Mark Ruffalo, Noam Chomsky and David Attenborough Join Forces for Climate Change Documentary | 1 Million Women

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Mark Ruffalo, Noam Chomsky and David Attenborough Join Forces for Climate Change Documentary | 1 Million Women: ​This has been a film 15 years in the making, but there has never been a more important time to release it. This world is a hotbed for denial (excuse the pun), the President of the free world believes anthropogenic climate change is a hoax, people out there don’t deviate from their single-minded media outlets and not nearly enough people changing their lifestyles, thus there has never been a greater need for poignant motivation. Video is a powerful course of action to raise awareness.

The film uses notable visionaries, thinkers, scientists and some of the most celebrated creative minds of our time in order to express the urgency of this issue. From David Attenborough, Noam Chomsky and Christiana Figuerez to Cher, Mark Ruffalo and Ian McEwan, the documentary is not short of ranging audiences.

Australian Government Bleeding The Citizens Dry!

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“She’ll Be Right Mate” Not any more she bloody won’t, wake up Australia!!!

Government giving money to UN & Indonesia whilst Australian citizens are homeless & living on the streets. Pensions cut, age of pension entitlement increased, Rates hike & more. 

Frustrated Man Pays DMV Bill With 300,000 Pennies

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Frustrated Man Pays DMV Bill With 300,000 Pennies

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LEBANON, Va. — It cost Nick Stafford $1,005 to pay a sales tax of around $3,000 on two new cars – but he says it was worth it.

That’s because Stafford paid the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) with 300,000 pennies that weighed a total of 1,600 pounds.

The pennies filled five wheelbarrows, which Stafford rolled into the DMV office in Lebanon, Va., this month. He also paid 11 people around $10 an hour to help him with his stunt by breaking open rolls of pennies. Stafford’s full costs of $1,005 included the wheelbarrows, the laborers, and three lawsuits he filed.

“If they were going to inconvenience me, then I was going to inconvenience them,” Stafford said.

Christian Heroes For Christian Kids: These Amazing Stories Are Putting God Back Into History!

Stafford was upset with the DMV because its employees would not give him the phone numbers to nine local offices. When he called with the request, Stafford’s call was repeatedly rerouted to a call center in Richmond.

Stafford simply wanted to know which of his four houses he should list when licensing his son’s new car, the Bristol Herald Courier reported. He called the Lebanon DMV but was routed to Richmond. After he filed a Freedom of Information Act to get the Lebanon DMV number and called it, he was told the number was not for public use. Frustrated, he kept calling the number until employees answered his question.

Stafford then decided he wanted the phone numbers of nine other DMV offices, and he filed suit to obtain them. The suit was dismissed by the judge when the state gave Stafford the phone numbers.

“The phone numbers are irrelevant to me,” Stafford said. “I don’t need them. I told the judge ‘I think I proved my point here.’”

“I think the backbone to our republic and our democracy is open government and transparency in government and it shocks me that a lot of people don’t know the power of FOIA,” he added.

Have you ever wanted to pay the government in pennies? Share your thoughts on his stunt in the section below:

Looking For Another Country? Read More Here.

Cold Steel Finn Wolf

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Here is my You Tube review of the Cold Steel Finn Wolf. I am very impressed with this excellent folder, which may well become my EDC folder.

On Amazon: Cold Steel Finn Wolf

Overall Length: 7.75 inches
Blade Length:  3.5 inches
Blade Thickness: 3 millimeters
Weight: 3.4  oz.
Steel Type: Japanese AUS 8A
Features: Scandi grind; Ambidextrous clip can be moved to opposite side for choice of right-hand or left-hand carry; Tri-Ad locking mechanism. 

White House Releases Summary of Trump’s First Week of Action

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I have to say, from a business perspective, we are getting a lot for our money.  Trump, to date, has proved to be the hardest working president in a generation…like

Lessons Learned from J20 Protests at Trump Inauguration

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Before the Inauguration of President Trump fades into memory, I wanted to capture some the important lessons learned.  Please feel free to post on chat boards and begin discussions because

Backwoods Home Magazine

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My favorite magazine of all time has to be Backwoods Home Magazine (BHM). I’ve never met the people who produce this magazine, but I can say for sure that they are of my tribe. We have the same mind set. The same aspirations.

Articles in BHM include writings on many diverse topics including:

  • Homesteading
  • Self-Reliance
  • Renewable Energy
  • Prepping
  • Gardening
  • Livestock
  • Firearms
  • Homeschooling
  • Arts and Crafts
  • Water Collection
  • Community
  • …and so much more

The current issue, at the time of this posting, is the January/February 2017 issue. It blew me away, and inspired my wife to strongly suggest that I write this post because there are so many articles relevant to our focus here on SurvivingPrepper.com, including pieces about:

Bugging out in place.
Prioritizing preparedness when money is tight.
10 foods to forage in winter.
Grid-down battery devices.
Build a stove pipe wood stove.
Build a wood-fired water heater.

 

Ask Jackie Clay
One of my favorite recurring features of Backwoods Home is the Ask Jackie Clay section where a woman (named Jackie Clay) answers a fairly large number of random questions sent in by readers each month. All questions are taken seriously, and answered with humor and expertise. This issue covers 18 questions, including: where to find parts for a 1948 Ford tractor, canning organ meats, and re-canning previously canned pears into pear butter. Jackie has been a homesteader for most of her life, and lives a lifestyle of self-reliance with family in Minnesota. In each issue of Backwoods Home, people ask Jackie random questions that are answered with humor and expertise. Sometimes the answers include fun stories added by Jackie too.

Irreverent Jokes
The Irreverent Jokes area is another monthly favorite. With every issue, I know I will have a good laugh while reading them. Here are a few jokes:

What’s the difference between a hippo and a Zippo? One is really heavy. The other is a little lighter.

It was raining hard and a big puddle had formed in front of the little Irish pub. An old man stood beside the puddle holding a stick with a string on the end and jiggled it up and down in the water.
A curious gentleman asked what he was doing.
“Fishing,” replied the old man.
“Poor old fool” thought the gentleman, so he invited the old man to have a drink in the pub.
Feeling he should start some conversation while they were sipping their whiskey, the gentleman asked, “And how many have you caught today?”
“You’re the eighth.”

My girlfriend thinks that I’m a stalker. Well, she’s not exactly my girlfriend yet…

A woman walked into the kitchen to find her husband stalking around with a fly swatter.
“What are you doing?” she asked.
“Hunting flies,” he responded.
“Oh! Killing any?” she asked.
“Yep, 3 males, 2 females,” he replied.
Intrigued, she asked, “How can you tell them apart?”
He responded, “3 were on a beer can, 2 were on the phone.”

 
Selective Advertising
Even the advertising in Backwoods Home is appealing because they are really selective about who advertises in their magazine, keeping products and services ads relevant to self-reliance. That means that I actually enjoy looking over the ads. And there aren’t so many of them that they interfere with the great articles.

Magazine Back Issues
After you finish reading your first issue of Backwoods Home magazine, you will likely want to see more. Fortunately there are plenty of back issues available. BHM has been around since 1989, and they’ve covered pretty much every self-reliance/homesteading topic imaginable. Every back issue of the magazine is available for purchase on Amazon, and there’s a complete list of articles, organized by issue, available on their website. You can browse each issue’s topics online and see what is interesting to you.

Article Anthologies
Another option when it comes to getting ahold of additional Backwoods Home articles are their anthologies. Each year BHM compiles the most popular articles from that year and publishes them together in a paperback book. Currently there are twenty four anthologies available on Amazon.

E-Magazines
If you don’t like the idea of having paper books taking up space in your home, you’ll be pleased to know that every issue of the magazine is also available as an ebook. Additionally you can get future issues in an electronic subscription.

Digital Products
Backwoods Home Magazine
Though not available on Amazon, Backwoods Home magazine has several CDs available on their web site, the best of which is their anthology DVD that has every article from BHM’s first twenty four years (in .pdf format) for a really great price. All of Backwoods Home’s digital resources are reasonably priced, and a great resource for homesteaders, preppers, gardeners, homeschoolers, and anyone else interested in a lifestyle of self-reliance.

The folks that produce and write for Backwoods Home magazine are real people, interested in helping their neighbors. Their tribe. Sure, they need to make a living, so they don’t publish and distribute the magazine for free, but they don’t overcharge for the great content that they provide. They really seem to be publishing this magazine to help, inspire, and educate their readers. I appreciate that, and I think you will, too.

If you found this article helpful/interesting, please Share it by clicking on the social media links. Thank you for helping us grow!

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Protect your head with a wool hat | WeatherWool Boonie Hat review

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If I’m outdoors, chances are I’m wearing wool. The WeatherWool Boonie™ is a hat to consider for cool, wet weather.

by Leon Pantenburg

I was sent this hat to review, and I will send it back after completing field testing. At the time of publication, WeatherWool™ has no sponsorship relationship with Survivalcommonsense.com.

Us follicle-challenged males who go outdoors become hat lovers. That’s my situation. I’m not completely bald – to my surprise – but with my DNA, a shiny head is inevitable.

The Boonie is based on a classic hat pattern.

The Boonie is based on a classic hat pattern.

So any time I go outside, I’m wearing some sort of head covering. In the fall and early winter that will probably mean a wool hat. I have a collection.

My most-used outdoor hat is a hunter orange Bailey. I got it in 1991 after starting hunting backcountry elk and deer in Idaho. That hat has been all over, and protected my head from rain, sleet, snow, hail and sun. It’s been folded, crumpled up in a tent, stepped on, wadded up and suffered serious use and abuse.

But I wore it in October on an Oregon deer hunt, and despite my wife’s persistent, ongoing campaign, have no plans to get rid of it.

A good wool hat is an investment for the outdoorsperson. My favorite style is a wide-brimmed hat, with a 2-1/2 to 4-inch brim. The 4-inch is best for rainy weather – it protects my glasses, and the back will drip off or hit the middle of my back on my rain gear. The shorter brim is great for urban settings, or when bow hunting in swampy, deciduous forests.

So the 100 percent wool Weatherwool Boonie Hat™ has potential.

Why Wool?

There are a lot of reasons for wearing wool clothing. (Here’s several.) But in a nutshell:

  • Wool is very fire resistant. Polypropylene and other synthetics will melt when a spark from the campfire hits them.
  • Wool is warm when wet, breathes well and insulates as well or better than just about anything.
  • Wool can be an organic, renewable and sustainable material with a tiny carbon footprint. Synthetics and plastics use petroleum.
  • Wool sweaters and pants can be cheap and they are easily available – check out your local surplus store for bargains. Look for wool sweaters at thrift stores and garage sales.
  • Wool garments seldom need cleaning, and when they do, a simple hand wash with mild soap will generally do the job.

Here’s the good stuff about the WeatherWool Boonie:

Design: The Boonie is made completely of  FullWeight Fabric.

I wore the Boonie to walk my dog one night when it was windy and in the low 20s. It kept my head warm  enough, but my ears got cold. Obviously, those conditions required a full-blown arctic quality head covering. The Boonie should be great in cool fall and spring weather.

Style: The Boonie hat has a shapeless, floppy brim, and many people, including some of our hardcore, elite military personnel, like it.

I don’t.

As my wife and daughter will verify, I don’t give a rip about what outdoor clothing looks like, as long as it does its job. (I have an ongoing struggle with my wife as she seeks to find and get rid of perfectly good outdoor clothing, just because it shows a little wear.)

Gilligan wore a Boonie style hat.

Gilligan wore a Boonie style hat.

Me wearing the Boonie.

But the floppy, Boonie style hat looks sloppy to me, and I look like a dork wearing one. After all, Gilligan wore a boonie with a 2-inch brim. I don’t like how the short, floppy brim can funnel water down my neck.

And Jed Clampett wore a floppy wide-brim hat, designed to make him look like a hillbilly.

Now, I’m OK with that hillbilly look.  (Actually, Jed is one of my role models, and I admire his survival skills, wisdom and business acumen. Great time for a “Deliverance” joke…)

Jed Clampett wore a wider floppy brim hat.

Jed Clampett wore a wider floppy brim hat.

But I want a stiffer brim on that outdoor hat that will shed moisture and protect my head from the sun and rain. If I were investing in a hat, I would make sure it had a stiff brim. If necessary, the Boonie brim can be starched to make it stiffer.

Tall crown: The Boonie has a taller crown, designed to help keep your ears warm. It is possible to wear the hat a high on your head. Then, if necessary, it can be pulled down to cover the tops of your ears to keep them warm. The idea is hat the brim can also be pulled down along the sides to provide more protection.

That technique will work in cooler temperatures, but the Boonie is not a winter hat for cold weather.

Color: The Boonie comes in four different colors to blend in with various scenarios. I like the cammo pattern. It isn’t too radical, and it fits in well in urban situations. Get a solid black color if you are anticipating blending into an urban setting.

Quality: This is evident from looking at the tightness of the cloth weave, quality stitching, and overall design. Weather Wool makes quality products.

Made in the U.S.A: All WeatherWool products are made in the United States of American wool. Everybody in the wool production, manufacturing, sales and distribution chain makes a living wage, pays local, state and federal taxes, and contributes to their community. Buy American!

My orange wool hunting hat has faded over the years, but still does the job.

My orange wool hunting hat has faded over the years, but still does the job.

Do you need a WeatherWool Boonie?

Everyone needs some sort of head covering outdoors. There is tremendous heat loss through the head, and some sort of insulation on the head is needed to keep a person from getting sunstroke or overheated in hot sun.

IMHO, the popular baseball cap style is a miserable choice for protection from the elements. The rain or snow will drip down your neck, the brim is generally inadequate to block the sun or rain, and in general, the design is ineffective for hard use.

In hot weather, a baseball cap doesn’t shade your neck and cheeks, and sunburn is a given.

To me, that rules out that style of hat.

Do you need a wool hat? Well, it is interesting that some companies famous for their synthetic outerwear that now recommend and sell wool base layers. And despite all the research and technology, many military forces in colder climates stick with wool winter wear.

Here’s my take: One size doesn’t fit all in anything outdoor-related.  A hat I don’t care for may please you. And the hat that doesn’t meet my requirements may be just what you’re looking for.

If you’re considering a quality wool hat, take a look at the WeatherWool Boonie. It retails for $115.00, postpaid. The Boonie may becomes your go-to cool weather hat.

Please click here to check out and subscribe to the SurvivalCommonSense.com YouTube channel, and here to subscribe to our weekly email update – thanks!

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Top 5 Creative Uses for Snow

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Top 5 Creative Uses for Snow Those of us who live in the North or in high altitudes are all too familiar with the abundance of snow that comes along during the winter months. Snow can prove to be a bit of an annoyance, especially for those of us who are generally isolated, or have …

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Best-Kept Secrets of Professional Painters

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Best-Kept Secrets of Professional Painters DIY projects can be fun and are definitely economical, not to mention the satisfaction that comes from being self-sufficient. Builds and repairs around the house are common DIY projects, but it is the seemingly simple tasks that prove to be the most challenging for a lot of us. For example, …

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DIY 5-Gallon Chicken Waterer

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DIY 5-Gallon Chicken Waterer For anyone who is homesteading or is just interested in having a chicken coop of their own, a convenient water supply can eliminate a lot of work. There is plenty to be done on a homestead, and one less thing to worry about can make a big difference. For a convenient, …

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10 Best Survival Shovels For Your Bug Out Bag

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survival shovels with a bunch of gearHave you ever dug a large hole or trench without a shovel? I hope not because it royally sucks.

Trust me; a stick is no substitute for a shovel.

It doesn’t matter what material you’re digging through – dirt, sand, mud, snow or ice. Plus, if you’re not wearing gloves you destroy your hands. With gashes, scrapes, cuts, blisters, and bruises.

Even worse, you end up wasting valuable hours and spending excess energy. Digging without a shovel is a difficult, tiresome, and even dangerous chore.

And that’s why Man invented shovels long (long) ago.

A Bit Of Shovel History

In fact, shovels may rank as one of mankinds oldest tools. Throughout most of the history of mankind, shovels were the only tool for serious excavation. They made it possible to build foundations, irrigation systems, sewage troughs, etc.

They allowed “ancient man” go from mud hut villages to planned cities. Right up to the second industrial revolution, shovels were the standard for excavation.

At one time, manual shoveling became so important that scientists began studying the “science of shoveling.” This field of study was to help make shoveling as efficient as possible. However, that was just before the invention of the steam engine.

Shovel Uses

But for some jobs, nothing can replace a good shovel, and they still play a significant role in:

– Military regimens
– Small projects in mining and construction
– Emergency rescue (i.e. firefighters, EMTs and SWAT teams)
– Backyard gardening and landscaping

The basic design of a shovel is simple. There’s nothing fancy about it. It’s made up of a thin, flat, sturdy spade-shaped hard material with a handle attached. It’s simple, but it’s effective.

But the shovel has come-a-long way over the course of human history. Today, shovels are not just shovels. They are specifically designed for specific jobs.

For example, there are shovels made specifically for avalanche rescue. There are military shovels for digging foxholes for war. Some shovels are ideal for digging deep narrow holes, while others are made for planting gardens.

In recent years, the survival community began developing what we call survival shovels. Tactical shovels made specifically by and for wilderness survival.

The bottom line is there’s a shovel for almost any type of circumstance. And while any shovel is better than no shovel, as you’ll soon see, not all shovels are created equal.

Today, grabbing “any old shovel” for survival is a terrible idea. The standard backyard shovel is too long, too heavy, too bulky to take with you. Especially by foot.

These run of the mill shovels won’t fit inside your bug out pack and will slow you down.

Yes, a regular shovel will fit in most cars or trucks, but it will take up valuable space. And as you’ll soon find out, they can’t hold a candle to a modern day tactical survival shovel.

10 Best Survival Shovels

Survival shovels are designed, top to bottom, for survival. They pack down tight, they’re light but sturdy and fit into a large bug out bag or survival pack.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our #104 Item Bug Out Bag Checklist. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

The best ones incorporate critical survival tools. Such as hatchets, saws, fire starters, flashlights, and weapons. The handle of the modern day survival shovel has become a storage location. For all sorts of essential gear.

These new shovels are the pinnacle of shovel tech and would make our ancestors proud.

FiveJoy Compact Military Folding Shovel – RS

fivejoyThis survival shovel is the Swiss Army Knife of shovels. The shovel breaks down into several unique survival tools. Which is great when you’re trying to consolidate your gear.

If you choose this shovel for your bug out bag, then you won’t have to pack as many separate tools. This shovel’s got you covered and includes:

• Sharp Axe Blade
• Serrated Saw Edge
• Hammer
• Paracord
• Fire Starter
• Ruler
• Emergency Whistle
• Bottle Opener

These extra tools help make this well-designed survival shovel extremely versatile.

Obviously, it can dig holes and trenches, but it can also saw logs, chop wood, cut, pick and pry to your heart’s content.

You have two options to choose from with the FiveJoy Compact MilitaryFolding shovel. A lighter compact version (C1) or the larger heavy duty version (RS). If you’re planning to hike, backpack or bug out with it then go with the lighter option. Otherwise, you’ll want to upgrade to the heavier duty version.

Either way, this shovel is a tough son-of-a-gun. It’s forged from heat-treated high-quality carbon steel (blade and knife) and aerospace grade aluminum (knife). These metals give the shovel maximum strength and lifetime durability. It’s also rust, water, and fracture resistant.

Unlike other survival shovels, you can adjust the shovel angle with its unique screw locking mechanism, allowing it function in alternate positions. It can be setup at 40°, 90° or 180° angles to operate as a shovel or a hoe.

Smart engineered handle design optimizes comfort and control. The slip proof foam cushion on the aluminum handle is water resistant, quick to dry.

It’s the real deal survival shovel and worthy of an investment in your survival arsenal.

Click here to check out today’s price.

Here are a few other multifunction survival shovels worth taking a look at as well:

2 BANG TI Super High Strength Military Folding Shovel
3 Rose Kuli Compact Folding Shovel Military Portable Shovel

Cold Steel 92SFS Special Forces Shovel

cold steel shovelSome survivalists prefer their survival shovel to function as a shovel, and that’s it. I totally get that. Perhaps you have more fire starters, knives and whistles you’ll ever need, so why get a survival shovel that includes more of these items.

Or perhaps you’d prefer your survival shovel be compact but not necessarily one that breaks down. Because we all know, the breakdown joints are where a shovel will fail first. So how about just eliminating the joint all together?

If these arguments sound like you, and you prefer a simple and sturdy over complex, then you should check out the Cold Steel 92SFS Special Forces Shovel.

It’s both lightweight and robust, with the shovel head made from medium carbon steel. The handle is made out of durable hardwood.

No bells, no whistles, just pure survival shovel goodness.

Click here to check out today’s price.

Gerber E-Tool Folding Spade

gerber e trench shovelLet’s imagine you want to keep things simple, but for your situation, you also want it to fit inside a backpack. Then look no further than the Gerber E-Tool Folding Spade.

It’s a proven, rugged and reliable design and can be used in various military, hunting, survival, tactical, industrial and outdoor situations.

The shovel power-coated boron carbon steel head also includes a serrated edge on one side to allow you to cut through those thick roots when trenching. The shape of the blade also promotes deep penetration into the ground with each strike.

This compact but mighty trencher comes in at an easy-on-the-back 2 lbs and breaks down to only 9.37 inches when in its closed position. When fully open, just use the safety locking design, and you won’t have to worry about it collapsing on you during use.

Lastly, the open handle design allows for maximum grip and power helping blast through your trenching chores quickly.

Click here to check out today’s price.

United Cutlery Kommando Shovel

united cutlery kommando tactical shovelThis shovel takes the simple idea of the wooden handle shovel in its overall simplicity and then upgrades it in both build and style. The United Cutlery Kommando Shovel features an bang near indestructible, injection-molded nylon handle. With 30 percent nylon & fiberglass reinforcement.

The shovel head is made from tempered 2Cr13 stainless steel coated with hard, black oxide.

The shovel’s leading edge is sharp. Plus, the shovel blade includes a partially serrated edge on one side and a concave chopping edge on the opposite.

The shovel also includes a reinforced nylon belt pouch for safe storage and portability.

The bottom line is this survival shovel has a few extra worthwhile features without trying to do it all. It’s a badass survival shovel that looks as good as it digs. It’s ideal for all camping and outdoors adventures and helps with digging, light chopping, or even a defensive weapon in an emergency.

Click here to check out today’s price.

7 Iunio Military Portable Folding Shovel and Pickax

military mulitool backpacking shovelWhat’s the one thing that all the previous shovels were missing? Length.

If you use any of the shovels we already covered, you’re doing to be digging from your knees. They are too short to stand and use your feet to dig like you would a standard backyard shovel.

But that’s where the Iunio Miltary Portable Folding Shovel makes its mark.

This shovel not only has many additional survival tools built in (saw, bottle opener, nail extractor, emergency whistle, fire starter, hammer, etc.) but when fully assembled is 35 inches in length (get the 35-inch version, skip the 31 inch). Yes, you get to stand and dig.

However, if you ever find your in a situation where a shorter survival shovel would work better, just remove the extension sections. You get to choose your shovel length but by adding or removing extensions.

It’s a favorite shovel among outdoor adventurists including Off-roaders, 4-Wheelers, Backpackers, Campers, RVers, Cadets, Scouts, Military Personnel, Hikers, Hunters, Fisherman, etc.

The shovel blade and handle are made from high-carbon steel which is both high-strength and wear-resistant. The grip on the handle is rubber. This military shovel passed all the manufacturer’s durability tests and field trials with flying colors.

The shovel also folds up and fits nicely in a provided high-quality tactical waist pack. The package comes with a belt loop to carry at your side and will work with MOLLE. So it’s easy for you to hang it on your belt or bag for transportation.

But the Iunio Miliary Portable Folding Shovel is not the only option with the extending length function.

Click here to check out today’s price.

Here are a few more survival shovels with extensions:

8 Chafon Compact Multifunctional Detachable Shovel Kit
9 Pagreberya Compact Outdoor Folding Shovel with Knife and Fire Starter

10 Schrade SCHSH1 Telescoping Folding Shovel

shrader telescoping folding shovelWhat I like most about the Schrade SCHSH1 Telescoping survival shovel is the telescoping features and the T-grip. These take your basic trenching shovel and add a couple of key features that help you get the digging job done.

It’s made out of 055 Carbon Steel and the head has is slightly sharpened. The overall blade length is 7.41 inches. The handle can telescope to different lengths as desired up to 19″ in length max.

The entire shovel only weighs 2 lbs. This is one tough shovel too, it won’t come apart under real use like some other shovels we’ve seen.

Click here to check out today’s price.

The Final Word

No matter what you’re digging, where you’re digging it, or why, there is a survival shovel out there designed for the job.

That is why it is so important to make sure that you have a survival shovel packed and ready with the rest of your bug out gear.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our #104 Item Bug Out Bag Checklist. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

You will thank yourself later – because a shovel is the kind of instrument you don’t need until you need it, and then it is necessary.

I can’t stress enough how bad it sucks to dig a hole with your bare hands or with a stick. In fact, it is downright dangerous. Those scrapes and cuts are prone to infection.

Having a shovel is a means of self-preservation – don’t waste any time. Make sure you’re prepared on this front by finding the perfect survival shovel that will best meet your needs and fit your survival plan.

Will Brendza

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How To Grow Food In One Container All Year Round

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How To Grow Food In One Container All Year Round Space is at a premium when you’re making preparations for harsher times, and if you don’t have such a roomy abode to begin with then the idea of growing your own fruit and vegetables can feel highly unviable. But eating plenty (and eating healthy) is …

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Jan 27, Survival Clothing

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One of the most vital pieces of life-saving outdoor gear is survival clothing – clothing that performs well in the wilderness. Learn about specific types and principles of effective outdoor clothing.

Post-election surplus

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Vendors expecting a Hillary buying panic cranked up production and….now have a lot of inventory they need to convert to cash. Thats why we see those sub-$400 AR’s and $30 stripped lowers. One of my vendors just dumped a bunch of Butler Creek 10/22 Hot Lips Clear-color 25-rd mags in my lap. If anyone wants some, theyre $104/12 ($8.66 Ea.), inc. shipping. Any interest or questions, hit me up in email, not comments…

The Single Biggest Problem Lurking In Most Survival Preps

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The Single Biggest Problem Lurking In Most Survival Preps

Image source: Pixabay.com

Prepping can easily become an all-encompassing activity, affecting every area of our lives. That’s why many preppers refer to it as a change in lifestyle, and not simply adding something to their already full plates. That actually makes sense, as the attitudes one needs to develop for prepping require looking at life in a different way and establishing a different set of priorities.

The basic concept of prepping is to make sure that you have everything you need to survive, no matter what comes your way. That’s a pretty broad concept, but one that is actually achievable. After all, our ancestors lived a prepping lifestyle as a matter of course, and they didn’t have as much available to them to work with as we do today.

But the problem with such a broad definition is that it’s easy to have blind spots — areas that we haven’t thought about which could affect our survival. Ultimately, we need to seek out and find solutions to those blind spots so that they don’t come up and bite us at the wrong moment.

One such blind spot is the area of debt. In our modern, materialistic society, we are accustomed to living in debt. In fact, I’d venture to say that there are many preppers who have built their prepping stockpile with credit cards. While that might be okay to get started, if someone doesn’t have the cash on hand, in the long run, it can be devastating.

Debt and Disasters

Here’s the problem, and it’s a problem which comes from a blind spot we all too easily have: The likelihood of a societal-ending event is much lower than is the likelihood of a regional natural disaster.

So, how is that a problem? Because many of us easily slip into the thought pattern of surviving such an event. As such, we don’t think of having to pay off that debt. After all, if an EMP attack were propagated against the United States, all the computers which house the records of our massive debt would be fried. Nobody could collect, because they wouldn’t be able to prove that we owe the money. And if the company is several states away, with no mail delivery, how could we pay anyway?

Emergency Seed Bank Provides THOUSANDS Of Pounds Of Food

The Single Biggest Problem Lurking In Most Survival Preps

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But a regional disaster isn’t going to do a thing to make those records disappear. So, in addition to trying to survive and rebuild our lives, we’ll have the problem of trying to pay for our homes, our cars and just about everything else we need, simply because we bought it on credit.

In such a situation, a family easily could lose their car or even their home if they didn’t have the cash reserves necessary to continue their monthly payments. Rather than helping them to survive, that would make their survival problem infinitely more difficult, as they would lose their shelter and probably a whole lot more.

A Potential Financial Collapse

But there’s another potential disaster that could prove even worse for those preppers who are in debt. That is, a financial collapse. The little hiccup we had in 2008 to 2009 caused millions of families to lose their homes. What would a nationwide depression do?

During the Great Depression, the unemployment rate hit a whopping 25 percent, meaning that one out of every four families had no income. Many of those families lost their homes, leaving them on the streets and searching for shelter. In the process of losing their homes, they lost many of their possessions, as well.

The same would happen again were we to be hit by another such depression. Considering that financial analysts have been predicting a collapse for years, we need to be ready for it. Perhaps the government and the financial community will be able to prevent such an event, but that’s not something that we can count on.

Your home is your single most important piece of survival equipment. It not only provides your family with shelter, but it is the place where you store your stockpile and other survival gear. When a disaster comes, it will be your home that will protect you. But as long as you owe money on it, there’s a chance you could lose it.

Getting Out of Debt

Granted, paying off a home – or even a car — is a difficult undertaking. This isn’t something that you can solve in a month or even a year. But it does need to be part of your survival planning. Until you own your home, free and clear, you will always have the risk of losing it. From a survival point of view, let alone any other, that’s unacceptable.

The Single Biggest Problem Lurking In Most Survival Preps

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Part of the problem is that most of us have more home and more everything than we can actually afford. The average American family lives off of 110 percent of their income, counting on credit to make up the difference. So, instead of getting out of debt, they’re actually getting more and more in debt.

The first step in getting out of debt is restructuring your finances. No, I’m not talking about restructuring your debt, but rather restructuring your budget. You’ve got to find a way to get to a positive monthly cash flow, rather than a negative one. That will probably mean cutting some things out of your life, and may even include downsizing to something that you can more easily afford.

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There are three major areas of debt that most of us have:

  • Credit card debt.
  • Vehicle debt.
  • Home mortgage debt.

Of the three, the credit card debt is the least important, although that’s the one that experts on debt reduction tell you to get out of first. Their reasoning is that it is smaller than the other two categories, and the interest rate is higher. But from a survival point of view, failing to pay off your credit card isn’t going to cost you anything, simply because there is no collateral for you to lose.

On the other hand, both vehicle debt and home mortgage debt do have collateral, the items you used the loan to buy. So, those are the ones you could lose the fastest. But even there, we can see a distinction between their relative importance, as you don’t necessarily need your car to live, but you do need your home.

So, the number one thing you need to come up with is a plan to pay off your mortgage. That may include paying off the other debt, as well, but the goal isn’t just paying off your cars or your credit cards; it’s paying off your home. Only then will you have the security of knowing it won’t be taken from you at your time of greatest need.

Do you agree? Share your thoughts in the section below:  

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The Wilderness Survival Skills Everyone Should Know

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The Wilderness Survival Skills Everyone Should Know No matter how much prepping and stockpiling we do, basic wilderness survival skills can be the determining factor of whether we make it through a SHTF situation. In the event that you are stuck in the wilderness with little or no provisions, knowledge is key. To help us …

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Article – Montana AG strikes Missoula’s expanded background check ordinance

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I pretty much predicted this would happen.

“Plainly interpreted, the Montana Legislature has prohibited all forms of local government from exercising any regulatory power over the purchase, sale or transfer of firearms,” wrote Fox, who more than a year before the ordinance was passed warned it “likely violates our constitutional right to keep and bear arms.”

The mandated expansion of background checks — to include virtually all gun transfers including private sales — was proposed in Montana’s second-largest city in 2015. It drew almost immediate fire from critics including gun rights groups and two out of three of Montana’s congressional delegates, but, with the support of gun control advocates, passed last September in an 8-4 vote.

Our morbidly obese, and terminally leftist, alcoholic mayor somehow decided that this was a ting that needed to be done. The biggest and oldest gun show in the state happens here every summer and it would have been a tremendous problem if this stupid thing to stand.

Experience is a harsh instructor, but some will learn at the hands of no other.

Poison in the Water? Trace Pharmaceuticals and Your Faucet

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pharmaceuticals

Vicodin5mgThe issue of pharmaceuticals showing up in public water systems is gaining more and more attention in the media, and for good reason—because it’s there! While it isn’t entirely clear what these drugs are doing to your endocrine system, it isn’t positive. Moreover, your exposure to trace pharmaceuticals is probably greater than you imagine. Consider these news articles:

I could go on citing more and more articles on the subject, but what’s the point? These are all legitimate news sources, not quack “fake news” and conspiracy theory sites. The issue is real. Do your own research and you will quickly see for yourself. Believe it or not, you are exposed to trace chemicals from the improper disposal of pharmaceuticals. 

By Danger Dave, a contributing author to SHTFBlog & SurvivalCache

But what exactly are “trace pharmaceuticals”? Denver Water states:

Trace pharmaceuticals are sometimes called microconstituents or emerging contaminants. They are products that enter the water supply through animal-based agricultural runoff or from human sources. A high percentage of pharmaceuticals in wastewater enter the water supply when people dispose of medicines in the sink or toilet. Most, if not all, pharmaceutical products — whether used in animals or in humans — are used in doses at which some amounts are passed through the user and back into water systems. 

New York Legislator Burke (from the first article) said, “I heard someone make sort of a glib joke the other day that they’re feeling depressed, so instead of going to the pharmacy they’re just going to drink a cup of tap water.” Funny, but no laughing matter.

From Prescription to Drinking Water

glass_of_waterHow is it that when we turn on the tap water we get a refreshing glass of… drug-tainted water? Well, what do people do with unused and expired drugs? Chances are they get dumped in the toilet and flushed. The water system is a circular system. It all comes back around. What is more, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) states that the flushing of drugs is only part of the problem.

“The main way drug residues enter water systems is by people taking medicines and then naturally passing them through their bodies,” says Raanan Bloom, Ph.D., an environmental assessment expert at FDA. “Many drugs are not completely absorbed or metabolized by the body and can enter the environment after passing through wastewater treatment plants.”

So drugs are getting into the water system simply by the fact people are taking drugs and then using the bathroom as they always do.

Drugs in our water is no easy problem to solve, and it’s the reason the FDA, in partnership with the DEA and community organizations, developed community-based drug “take-back” programs. (Click here to find a take-back program in your area.)

Dangerous?

doctor_medical_SWOT-2Everyone agrees that trace amounts of drugs are in the water. As we established, this is not “alternative facts” or theory. It is undeniable. What is not clear is to what extent it may cause harm to individuals consuming the water. According to WebMD, while scientists do not know the extent of the threat to our health, of particular concern is the presence of synthetic hormones, because “hormones work at very low concentrations in the human body.” They go on to say, “We know that kids, including babies and toddlers, as well as fetuses, are more susceptible to environmental exposures because their bodies are still developing and their exposure on a pound-per-pound basis is higher. And they lack the detoxification system adults have. So it is not unreasonable to expect they would be at a higher risk.”

Soooo… if it is of particular concern for kids, and the science is still out on the effects their presence in water has on adults, I am inclined to err on the side of safety.

Solutions

So there is no denying the research and concern. Drugs in drinking water is very real. While solutions for preventing the drugs from entering the water system prove somewhat elusive, there are concrete ways to get trace pharmaceuticals out of your water.

“Boil it,” you say? Nope. Boiling it does not solve the problem. “Then bottled water,” you argue. Not likely. Twenty-five percent of bottled water comes from the tap. Your best bet at addressing the problem? Filtering it between when it leaves the tap to when it reaches your mouth.

water_pitcher_epicPreppers are familiar with a few of the common water filtration available to them because they have purchased them as insurance against an environmental or man-made catastrophe to allow them access to safe drinking water. But why wait until catastrophe strikes to use them when those very filters could be used right now to clean your drinking water for safe(er) consumption? If you own the products already, why not use them on a daily basis now? If you don’t own the products, consider getting one, for the sake of your family’s health. A few that we recommend for prepping purposes also remove trace pharmaceuticals:

  • Black Berkey Filters
  • Epic’s Filtration Pitcher

From my view, any “prepper” product that can get used now is a must get. It makes far more sense to purchase these products before products that will sit on a shelf for a “just in case” situation that may not come.

Lastly, you can do your part to help combat drugs entering the water supply by following the drug disposal guidelines from the FDA found here.

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23 (Mostly Beginner) Preparedness Sewing Projects

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23 (Mostly Beginner) Preparedness Sewing Projects While establishing food stores and secure shelter might be on the forefront of prepping, there are plenty of other things we can do for readiness. Sewing is a skill that’s often overlooked during prepping, but becomes necessary when SHTF. Dropping by the store for clothes, curtains, or blankets won’t …

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Newborn Seized After ‘Off-Grid’ Parents Refuse Social Security Number

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Newborn Seized After Parents Refuse Social Security Number

HEFLIN, Ala. — A couple is charging that social workers took their newborn the day after he was born because of their alternative lifestyle and religious beliefs.

“They said our view was dangerous,” Christian Holm said of social workers for the Cleburne County, Ala., Department of Human Resources (DHR). “We were just trying to follow the Bible as close as we could and speak for Jesus.”

Holm and his wife, Danielle, have no house and live off the grid. They gave away their possessions and decided to enjoy life by hiking and camping out. When the two wanted to see the country, they put their car in storage and walked from Alabama to New Hampshire and back.

They were camping out at Cheaha State Park in northeastern Alabama in October when Danielle went into labor. She went to the Regional Medical Center in Anniston, Ala., to give birth, and DHR social workers came to her room and started quizzing the couple about their lifestyle and where they lived.

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Christian said state officials opposed their religious beliefs about “man’s creation destroying God’s creation” and also had concerns that the couple didn’t want to give the baby a Social Security number, according to The Anniston Star.

Police and social workers took the baby and did not tell the couple where they could find it, The Star reported.

“They took the baby, said, ‘He’s ours and this is the court date. Be there.’” Danielle told the newspaper.

Two months later the baby still had not been returned and the Holms were still waiting for their day in court. A hearing in the case had been scheduled for Dec. 20, but it was cancelled after Judge Melody Walker recused herself, The Star reported.

The Holms have attracted a group of supporters in Anniston who picketed the courthouse after the hearing was cancelled. Supporters have organized under the tagline “#freebabyholm.”

Newborn Seized After Parents Refuse Social Security Number“You can see when you talk to them directly that they are very loving and caring people,” Jonathan Payton, a friend and supporter of the Holms, told The Star. “That’s what really hit home.”

Christine Holm posted on Facebook Jan. 15 that the couple is getting a single two-hour visit a week with the baby.

“They say well you can have another ISP and arrange more visits,” he wrote. “What? Another organized coercion and conversion meeting just to have more visits? This is nothing but psychological control tactics to force submission at the expense of our little baby boy. Where is his so-called attorney to protect his rights?”

On social media, the public is divided.

“The Indians did it hundreds of years ago and had plenty more than we do now these days, why couldn’t they [also do it?],” one woman named Sherry wrote.

But others argued that modern society is different.

“The Indians lived in groups and took care of each other, food and shelter,” a man named Vince wrote. “The couple needs a plan to take care of this baby, it can’t live like they do, it needs special care, shots and meds. … Moving from place to place, out in the weather isn’t the best for anyone.”

Do you believe the baby should have been seized? Share your thoughts in the section below:

15 Natural Remedies For Pain

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Pain management. When people can’t get the pain medication they need through their normal distribution channels, there are other alternatives that may help remedy their pain. Here are a few to consider:   Weight loss It all starts with your body. A healthy weight, and losing weight if necessary is a good start to eliminate […]

Buy an Ex-Ambulance for an Awesome SHTF Vehicle

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Buy an Ex-Ambulance for an Awesome SHTF Vehicle While it may not be an obvious choice, a decommissioned ambulance can be a great option for mobile housing for when SHTF. Preppers and travelers alike could make use of an old ambulance, as the cargo area is spacious enough to accommodate a sleeping and living area. …

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The post Buy an Ex-Ambulance for an Awesome SHTF Vehicle appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Video: Surviving a Building Fire

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Joe Alton, MD’s latest video discusses some tragic building fires, especially in public venues. He examines what happens in a fire, how fire behaves, and what you can do to increase your chances of surviving the conflagration.

 

To watch, click below:

 

 

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

 

Joe Alton, MD

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Find out more about house fires, wildfires, burns, and much more in Joe and Amy Alton’s Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way, available at Amazon.

Baby It’s cold outside! Are you ready?

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A Few Ideas on How to Prep When it’s Cold Outside

If winter and its freezing temperatures are making you depressed, I want to give you a few ideas on how to prep and help pass the time. No, this is not one of those “how to prep for winter” types of articles.

Instead, I’m going to give you a few ideas that don’t require you to go hiking, to go outside and build a solar cooker and test it. These are things you can do in the comfort of your own home, most with little effort, but they will give you that feeling that you’re productive. And you will be.

#1. Try making a clay pot heater

…or any other indoor project for that matter. Now, don’t get your hopes up, these heaters won’t be able to heat up a whole room, however, they will help in an emergency. If, for some reason, none of your other heating options will work, you’ll be able to use this heater to at least keep your hands and feet warm.

Warning: candles are a fire hazard so be sure to supervise the thing every minute it’s running. There are lots of youtube videos about clay pot heaters you can watch. (Editors note: Please watch this warning video about clay pots. They can be very, very dangerous.)

#2. Watch a movie

There are plenty of survival movies you can watch with your family and learn a thing or two. While many of them are full of errors, I still enjoy them and I’m sure many other preppers do. If your family is not on board with you with regards to prepping, this could be a great way to open their eyes, if only just a little bit.

Recommendations: History Channel’s Alone series (not a movie, a TV show but really good), The Way Back (2010), Children of Men (2006), Volcano (1997).

#3. Make Plans

Don’t stop to making  survival plans. Winter is the perfect time to plan for the year ahead, set goals and think of ways of achieving them. Of course, making or refining your survival plans should be a top priority.

If you’ve already done your basic planning, consider improving them by:

  • figuring out how to make more room for your increasing stockpile
  • reviewing your gear to see if any of the items you have are low quality
  • printing better/more maps of your area and re-adding the points of interest with a marker
  • prepping for disasters and emergencies you haven’t yet considered
  • finding your blind spots and making plans to improve them (e.g. if you’re not prepping to bug out, you should definitely start planning for it)

#4. Perform a full inspection…

…of all your gear, your food, water and meds stockpile, your bug out bag, even of your EDC!

Check…:

  • that your electronics are still functional
  • for leaky or discharged batteries
  • your propane heater
  • your generator
  • that your hand-crank devices are still functional
  • that your fuel tank is full or almost full, and make a mental note to always keep it full
  • the gear inside your car
  • Your medical equipment (ever tested your newly bought thermometer, for instance?)

Check everything!

Pay particular attention to items that have never been used. You definitely want to put them to the test more than a few times, to ensure they’re going to hold up in a survival situation.

Inspecting your stockpile can save you money by not having to throw away food that would otherwise spoil. If a tuna can is close to its expiration date, you may want to take it out, eat it, and re-add to your shopping list.

#5. Learn how to use your gear

Come on, admit it: you have at least one piece of gear you don’t know how to use. Wouldn’t this be a great time to play with it a little bit and see how it works? Well, you won’t be able to test everything indoors (some items are fire hazards) but you can safely play around with:

  • Paracord (try to make some knots)
  • HAM radio
  • emergency radio
  • multi-tool
  • compass
  • …and so on.

#6. Read

Survival and preparedness are complex and, as a result, they have a lot of issues and controversies. The more you read, however, the closer to the truth you’ll get. The bugging in versus bugging out dilemma, what things are found in water that filters can and cannot purify, whether or not you should tell others about your preps, how to handle cashiers when they ask you why you buy too much of one thing – these are just some of the things that’ve caused heated debates (and still do).

Knowledge is power, so take advantage of all the free info out there, read it all and make up your own mind.

The post Baby It’s cold outside! Are you ready? appeared first on American Preppers Network.

The Survival Staff

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survival_staffs_standing

survival_staff_inhandIn this “back-to-basics” article, we will look at a basic building material, tool, and weapon- one that can be used for shelter, a tool handle, walking stick, and the most basic and primitive weapon.  As a weapon, the more-or-less six foot staff is one of the most universal among many martial arts traditions, and often the first taught.  Shaolin, Wing Chun, Kobudo and other schools of martial arts teach staff “forms”, or choreographed practice sequences that have been passed down through the ages.  For basic utility, the staff can be used to carry firewood and water (by hanging bundles or buckets at the ends and carrying over one’s shoulders), and for other forms of transport (such as game, strung up between two people; or to craft a sled or skid).  Sturdy poles can be used to build tripods, lean-tos, and other structures you might need around camp.  A staff can also be used to make a spear or whittled down for a tool handle.

By Nathaniel Whitmore a Contributing Author to SHTFBlog and SurvivalCache

There are many articles online regarding various types of survival staffs that are basically types of walking sticks, perhaps of lightweight material, that have chambers to hold objects for survival.  There are many clever designs.  I do like the idea of such staffs, but wonder how well they will hold up.  For this article, we are discussing the primitive staff.  It might seem a very simple subject, but there are many considerations worth becoming familiar with, including wood selection, crafting tools and handles, building possibilities, self defense, and weapon-crafting possibilities.

Gathering Resources

survival_staffs_hemlock_and_white_pineAt my campsite in the Catskills there were White Pines (Pinus strobus) and Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) saplings about 10 years or so in age and thick enough to block visibility and make walking difficult.  Besides other considerations regarding location, it seemed fitting for a campsite to clear the thick trees that were already shading each other out.  Small trees a few inches in diameter can be easily cut with a hatchet, camp saw, or machete.  They provide material for building structures and for other craft.  The unused material dries relatively quickly to provide future kindling and firewood.  Plus, depending on the species of trees being felled, food and medicine can also be gleaned.  In the case of White Pine and Hemlock the needles and bark can be used to make “tea” for medicinal use, pleasure, or as a nutritional supplement.  Many tree barks have medicinal uses and sometimes leaves or other parts are also useful as food or medicine.  

Related: Medicinal Uses of Pine Trees 

Once felled, the branches can be removed from the saplings with a machete or hatchet.  A small saw can be useful.  I also like to have pruners in my pocket and some loppers nearby.  Though more time consuming to use, such tools can more cleanly remove branches if desired.  I like to leave interesting branches and crotches in case they are useful for some project later.  But for the most part the idea is to work the sapling down to a relatively uniform building material.  After the branches are removed the poles can be organized by size.  This process gives you lots of material to work with for shelter building and the like.

survival_staffs_red_cedarYou might consider removing the bark while the saplings are still green.  For one thing it is easier to remove than when it dries to the trunk.  You also may want to use it for making rope, baskets, and the like.  It can be used as lashing for certain things right away.  You probably can’t get nice sheets of bark from small trees such as you would want for bark baskets, but the possibilities with even small strips of bark are many.  In some cases you will be able to find a stand of smaller trees that died from being shaded out.  The wood might still be good quality.  The Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) pictured is good quality even though it died as taller trees outgrew it.

Use as a Walking Stick  

survival_staffs_cabinA primary use of a staff is as a walking stick.  My first mentor in the world of wild edibles and survival skills, Taterbug Tyler, used to walk with a garden hoe that had been cut down to just a small triangle left of the blade.  He claimed that he once saved himself from falling over a ledge by grabbing onto a tree root with the hoe.  Mostly he used it as a walking stick in the rugged territory we hiked through looking for Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius).  The blade came in handy for unearthing roots and flipping over rocks.  It is a good tool and could be reproduced with the natural form of a hardwood staff.  

Another use for a staff as a walking stick is for crossing streams.  In certain territory you might have many streams weaving around, or you might need to repeatedly cross a stream that you are traveling along.  Even if you find logs and rocks to help you cross, a staff can help you maintain balance.  Without rocks to cross on a staff can be used like a pole vault to help you jump across what you otherwise could not.  For these reasons, it is useful to carry a staff.

As a Weapon

survival_staffs_cut_woodI am fascinated with the bo staff and like to go with just over six feet as a standard cutting length.  Particularly when Hickory (Carya spp.) or some other hard wood is found, it is an ideal size for a weapon as well as to begin making a bow or spear.  When cutting the trees down and into length, look for nice straight six-foot sections.  It is generally good to cut the trees where they bend in order to preserve straight sections and removed the crooks.

The staff has been a most basic striking implement since ancient times.  Needing to use a weapon against wildlife is an unlikely scenario, but not impossible.  Certainly, it could make you feel better to have some protection in hand.  There has been more than once when the sound of coyotes or something unknown has prompted me to pick up a stick.  Better yet is the feeling of knowing how to use it.  Most people should be able to wield a staff should an emergency arise and be able to perform basic strikes to protect themselves.  With training, the staff becomes an increasingly useful weapon, with several distinct benefits: there are reasons otherwise to keep it at hand, it is superb blocking instrument, any part can be used as the handle, and it can be used for a variety of strikes to virtually any part of the body.  It can be swung with great momentum.  It can strike low or high, as well as both in relatively rapid succession, and one can thrust with the end of the staff with the potential for damaging penetration.  For these reasons, the staff is a primary weapon of many styles of martial art.

Read Also: Low Profile Survival Weaponry

bruce_lee_bo_staffKobudo – the martial art of the Okinawan weapons (which is often integrated with Karate), Shaolin Kung Fu, Wing Chun Kung Fu, Ninjitsu and many others have their study of the staff.  Learning the forms, or kata, of these arts is a way to learn special combat moves.  Becoming proficient with these moves not only makes the weapon more effective, but provides a healthful exercise that improves balance, coordination, circulation, immunity, and awareness, all of which are important in a survival situation.  Plus, study of the forms could provide a pastime during life in the wilderness.

Shelter and Selecting Wood

survival_staff_witch_hazel_shrubWhen selecting a location to set up camp one should consider finding a nice stand of relatively young trees or saplings that can serve as a source of materials.  Your lean-to could be positioned centrally to reduce expenditure of time and energy.  Of course, you also want to consider exposure to sun and other elements.  In the part of the world where I live you generally want your lean-to opening toward the south to increase sun exposure in cold seasons.  If there is a strong prevailing wind you will want to put the back of the lean-to toward it.  You can also look for suitable trees to support a lean-to before you chop them down.  

Of course, when gathering trees for utility, one should consider the various types of wood and their pros and cons.  Generally, hardwoods are prefered.  “Hardwood” usually refers to deciduous trees, even the softer ones.  And “softwood” refers to conifers, which are usually softer than hardwoods (though soft hardwoods are softer than hard softwoods).  Hemlock and Pine are both softwoods.  Particularly White Pine is soft.  Although both softwoods, Hemlock is much harder than White Pine.  The White Pine saplings that are staff size (naturally or whittled down) are quite weak.  They have certain uses, but would break far too easily under any significant weight or force.

White Ash (Fraxinus americanus)  has a low moisture level, even when green.  My freshly cut staff looked stouter than it felt, compared to the heavier woods (Witch Hazel, Iron Wood, Hickory…) I had been working with.  Regarding bushcraft, one advantage of a lower moisture percentage wood is that building materials have less time to rot.  If you are planning to turn the bush into a campsite there is a good chance you’ll be using some green wood.  If you are building with green wood, there is a good chance for mold to develop as the wood dries out.  Thick, heavy, damp wood will dry out much slower than something light like Ash.  In fact, Ash has so little moisture that it can be burned green.  As we all know, the drier the better.  The survivalist, however, should be aware of the low moisture content of Ash in the event of finding no dead wood.  Perhaps green would might be a better choice than soggy logs from the ground.  Regarding a staff, Ash has the interesting benefit of being lighter.  So, the strength of a green stick with the weight more of a dry one.  Ash is the primary wood for baseball bats as it has strength but receives the vibration.  Although not nearly the strength of Hickory, Ash is used in much the same way for bows and tools handles.

The bushcrafter should be aware of the various kinds of woods, including their benefits and weak points.  Although the basic staff (or bo) seems simple, it’s uses are many.

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God & His Remnant: Unlocking The Prison Doors

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     I was struggling about what to write about today; no clear subject came to my mind or my spirit.  Then I heard the prompting Share what you’re seeing.  My first thought was, “Lord, I’m not sure what you mean.  Are you talking about specifics of what I’m seeing in the spiritual arena; or what I’m seeing in the people coming to us in ministry?”  After being convicted that it was the latter, I had to stop and really think … “What am I seeing? And how could that benefit the readers?”
     You see, our ministry has, for lack of a better word, exploded in the last month or so.  And our activities are diverging to the point that nearly every day is a new experience — God has expanded our duties and our manner of spiritual deliverance and interaction with people.  My husband and I have pretty much quit following an organized format for ministering to individuals and are operating under the full guidance of the Holy Spirit. By now, we have the foundation down for beginning the healing process from spiritual wounds, and getting the captives free.  Now God is showing us that the sphere of healing in which we operate is unique and distinctive to each individual.
     I tell you all this to show you that once you commit to partnering with Jesus to release people from the prisons they are bound up in, all rules are off, and Jesus will begin to show you deeper bondage that they are subjected to, and the supernatural ways you can help release them.  Needless to say, we are experiencing Jesus in more miraculous and extraordinary ways, and seeing His power manifested in methods that we could never have imagined without the help of the Holy Spirit.
     And the really cool thing is that we are seeing His power demonstrated in the lives of both faithful Christians and the decidedly Lost; in the most religious of people and in the most worldly.  And they are coming to us unbidden; without any effort on our part to invite them to be healed by Jesus.  And in some cases, we are being presented with people who aren’t even at the stage where we can begin the healing process.  They don’t even know Jesus and without that knowledge, real spiritual healing cannot take place.  At first, we considered what some who are being called to heal the spiritual wounds of satan’s captives do … they decline to work with anyone who does not have a saving knowledge of Jesus.  After all, it is He who does the healing, not us.  And if one doesn’t recognize His authority, then He can’t do the work in their lives — it’s a two-way street, and necessitates at least some level of relationship with Him.
     But we strongly believe the Word when it says that God doesn’t want anyone to perish, so it is our responsibility as members of His Kingdom on earth to do what we can to introduce each person to Jesus.  We know that He can take our efforts, and if the person is willing, He can begin a relationship where there was none.  We are seeing that in two separate and contrasting situations that God has brought to us.  In the first, we received a phone call from a dear friend who we’ve been praying over for years; a woman I will call Ashley.  Although she didn’t approach us with any obvious spiritual wounds, she sent me a text one day out of the blue … Should you read the Bible chronologically, or front to back (Genesis to Revelation)? In order for you to understand how shocked (and ecstatic) I was to receive this text, you need to know that I have known Ashley since she was in her early 20s, and she is now in her mid-40s.  My husband and I are Godparents to her daughter, and we have prayed countless prayers that we might plant a seed that would cause her and her husband to seek Jesus.  They have always politely declined to accept our offer and in recent years they have become quite successful financially.  The temptations of trips to Europe, second homes in the mountains, and all the trappings that money can buy have lessened any thoughts that they might one day need Jesus.

     But after nearly 20 years, God is showing me that we can never discount Him, and patience is truly a virtue.  We followed up that initial text with a phone call to find out why she was suddenly interested in the Bible, and found out that she has been attending some Bible study classes at the Christian school where her daughter attends (at least our encouragement to go that route with our Goddaughter bore some fruit).  While the primary reason for attending may have been to be included in that social circle, she soon realized how limited her knowledge of the Bible was, and she knew she could come to us.  So now, my husband and I alternate a weekly Bible study with her (by phone since she lives a few hours away) to introduce her to the Jesus of the Bible, with all the expanded knowledge we have been shown.  She is seeing and experiencing Jesus from the Truth of the Word, and He is fascinating to her! There is no external doctrine or manipulation; just the facts of the Bible.  While at this stage she is unaware of any deep spiritual wounds that need to be healed, the Holy Spirit is already convicting her of the manner in which she has lived her life, and we will be there if any of Satan’s lies surface that reveal any spiritual bondage.
     In the second situation, we were asked to speak to a woman I will call Martha, who lives several states away, and who has been gravely wounded by the Church — 25 years of an affair with a married Pastor, who subsequently dumped her and moved away when he was approached with accusations of inappropriate behavior with other women.  Of course, she thought he loved her; she was the only one; etc., etc.  But now she lives in a deep depression, realizing that she gave up her youth and any hopes of a husband or family, only to realize that she is in her mid-50s and alone.  And as Satan will do, he has convinced her that because no one in the Church reached out to help her, that they are all hypocrites; and sadly, she still professes to love the degenerate pastor, and longs for that relationship again.  She reached out to us through a connection from another person we were counseling, and asked us to help her get her life back together.  Not only was she depressed and angry, but she was hearing voices that told her she might be better off if she ended her life.
     After an initial consultation, and some encouragement to fill out a questionnaire regarding specific details about her life, her family, and her faith, we got her to admit that her free will choices had played the majority part in her circumstances.  When she revealed that she had been in Church all her life, but didn’t feel she knew Jesus (and the 25 years she sat in that immoral pastor’s church, it was to pursue her relationship with him, not Jesus), I asked her the pivotal question…. Do you believe that Jesus is real?  She said, “No, not really”.  So while she was hoping that we could somehow magically do some mind tricks to get her to stop thinking about her illicit affair, and to miraculously give her a new life, we had to tell her that we couldn’t proceed with the spiritual healing sessions at that point.  BUT, if she would be willing to let us introduce Jesus to her through a study of Him in the Word, and IF she could honestly seek Him and come to an authentic relationship with Him, He could begin to heal those spiritual wounds, and the counseling sessions could be back on the table.
     How will I know that God hears me? That He’s working on me? Am I too far away from Him? At least those are questions that show she has not dismissed seeking Him.  And these are questions that reveal an honest heart, and honest fears.  And after just two nights, she is able to talk to God, and finds herself sobbing, wondering how He could ever love her.  I explained that this is actually good news!  Her spirit is being touched by the Holy Spirit, and if she will keep on asking, she will get the answers she so sorely needs.  Keep her in your prayers; Jesus wants to heal her, and I want to see her life restored.

     I have to admit, she is one of the most skeptical and willful people I have ever met.  She admitted that all those years she sat in Church she never considered God’s will for her life; she just wanted what she wanted.  Isn’t that the sin we all share in the flesh?  My husband agreed to begin a Bible study with her, and asked her to get quiet and seek God each night for the next week… to ask Him to reveal Himself to her and show her He is real.  This is proving to be very difficult for her.  She is asking questions like,
     So these are just a couple of the different ways that God is bringing people with varying needs to our doorstep– people outside the circle of wounded Believers who are in spiritual bondage.  But, don’t get me wrong — we are still partnering with Jesus to help set His Body free!  And with each situation, we are encountering new spheres of spiritual warfare — Believers who are seeing [in the spirit] warring angels come to their defense; Believers who are approaching the Court of Heaven [with their Authority] to answer charges by Satan and to protect family members; Believers who are reconnecting to the wounded parts of themselves and bringing them into Jesus’s healing Light — each and every person is different, and the means by which Jesus is healing them is unique to each individual.  And, all I can say is that He is blowing our minds!
     When I stop to consider all the people in my small domain (both Followers of Jesus, and those of the world) who are fighting to get out of their spiritual prisons, my spirit cries out for the Church to recognize the need for us all to understand Jesus’s power and authority that is available to us!  As I now see with spiritual eyes, I cannot ignore the pain and fear I see in so many lives.  I am encouraged by those who are now willing to see and hear, as Jesus asked us to do, and who I know will join us in doing God’s work in His Kingdom.  God is starting a spiritual revolution and the Enemy is quite aware of it.  He will not sit idly by, allowing the Body of Christ to get up to speed, without intensifying his efforts to lock more people up in spiritual prisons.  It is my prayer that God will supernaturally download [to every Christian] our ability to fight spiritual oppression!  I pray that each successful deliverance from bondage will be magnified and multiplied! And I pray that the Glory of our Lord in healing the multitudes will be evident to all His creation on earth, thereby nullifying the lies, temptations, and deceit of the Enemy!  I pray all this in the Powerful and Mighty Name of Jesus!

Proverbs 1:5   “Let the wise hear and increase in learning, and the one who understands obtain guidance…”

   
     

6 Self-Defense Tactics For Weak And Small

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Self Defense

If you qualify as a small person, you may look as the perfect victim but when it comes to defending yourself, you have a couple of advantages that may make up for your stature.

First, the smaller you are, the more an attacker is going to underestimate you. They’re going to be more likely to assume that you’re an easy mark just because you’re smaller or perhaps physically challenged.

Second, they’re going to expect you to be afraid. If you don’t show fear, it’s possible that you can throw them off-kilter long enough to buy yourself a few extra, precious seconds. There are a few things that you can do to make this time count.

In this article, I am going to talk about some of those measures as well as share some other tips to help you defend yourself and your castle.

1. Take a Martial Arts Class

Martial arts are great both for self-defense and exercise. The health benefits of martial arts are out of this world. They help prevent muscle atrophy and bone loss and keep your connective tissues healthy. They also have the added benefit of giving you some extra skills that you can use to defend yourself if SHTF.

No matter what your fitness level is or what your physical abilities are, there are martial arts classes designed to meet your needs. The secret is to find a good trainer.

A huge advantage of martial arts or self-defense classes is that you’ll meet other individuals interested in learning to defend themselves. It’s likely that some of them will be doing it for the same reason that you are – prepping for SHTF.

Put out some feelers and you may just find some valuable allies that will be willing to join forces with you. That can be invaluable.

2. Learn to Use Your Brain as a Weapon

If your home is invaded in a survival situation, it may be more pertinent to use your head rather than your fists to defend yourself until you can gain the upper hand. For instance, trick the person into believing that you’re weaker than you really are.

Find non-traditional weapons that are handy such as your cane, a lamp, or even an ashtray. Make your first attempt count because you may not get another shot.

Offer to get your “money” from your purse and reach for you weapon instead. Don’t bother pulling it out; a gun will fire just fine though the bottom of your bag.

Click Here to Get Your Green Beret’s Guide To Combat Shooting Mastery & Active Shooter Defense!

3. Bring as Little Attention to Your Place as Possible

Wood cooking stove If your place is already boarded up and unattractive-looking, don’t bring any more attention to the fact that you’re there than necessary.

Make trips outside during times that nobody is likely to see you. If you can, build a path that’s blocked from public view in advance.

Using shrubbery or fencing will allow you a greater amount of privacy to come and go on your property undetected.

4. Take a Weapons Course or Join a Shooting Club

Knowing how to use you weapon is one thing but being comfortable with it is another. Taking a weapons course is a great way to safely learn how your gun works and how best to use it. You’ll also learn its shortcomings, which is just as important as knowing its strengths.

Joining a local shooting club has a few advantages. First, the more you load and fire your gun, the more comfortable you’ll be with it when it comes time to defend yourself. Gun clubs are also great places to meet like-minded people.

If you’re interested in being part of a community prepping network, chances are good that you’ll meet fellow preppers at a gun club. Just cautiously feel around. If nothing else, you might make some friends.

5. Plan Your Defense in Advance

The worst time to figure out how you’re going to respond in any given situation is when you’re actually in that situation.

Have an action plan based upon numerous scenarios and practice what to do in each situation. By doing this, you’ll identify possible holes in your plan and you’ll also be prepared to act instead of react when faced with the real-life problem.

Stockpiling ammo and guns is an important part of your survival plan. In order to determine your ammunition needs (or lack thereof), consider the following:

  • Are you planning on needing to defend yourself and your property aggressively?
  • Do you have plenty of excess storage space?
  • How long do you think the survival situation will last?
  • Are you planning on supplementing your food supply with game?
  • Is the disaster that you’re planning for a local event or a global one?
  • Do you have the funds to store enough ammo to get you through the disaster?
  • Do you plan on using ammo as barter?

Let’s take a look at these questions one a time.

First, are you healthy enough to operate a weapon? If you don’t have the physical or mental stamina to actually shoot another living being, then perhaps stockpiling weapons isn’t for you.

If you pull a gun on another person, especially in a desperate situation, you have to be prepared to use it and physically capable of doing so. Otherwise, you run the risk of your attacker disarming you and using your own weapon on you.

Next, if you don’t have enough space to store the amount of ammo that you think you’ll need, perhaps you should consider reloads instead.

If you’re only planning for a local disaster, remember that the rest of the world is going to continue to produce ammo so stockpiling it probably isn’t necessary and may even be a strain on your space and your finances.

Even if you’re planning on a global event, you may not need to stockpile more than a few boxes if the disaster is going to be a temporary situation that will be followed by a rapid recovery.

If, after you’ve considered all of these options, you still believe that you need to stockpile ammo, here are a few tips to help you do it.

  • Figure how long the disaster will last, then figure how many bullets you think you’ll use per day based upon what you’re going to be shooting at. Use those two figures to roughly estimate your ammo needs.
  • Make sure that your storage space is cool and dry, and likely to remain that way.
  • Store your ammo in containers that are airtight.
  • Rotate your ammo just like you do the rest of your stockpile. Make sure that you have the proper types of round for your weapon and for what you’re going to be shooting at.
  • If you still have kids in the house, store your ammo in a place that isn’t readily accessible to anybody who isn’t trained.

Sometimes the best self-defense is to back down and escape. It’s OK to run if you need to; if you’re faced with certain death or the need to leave your home, by all means, leave! If evacuation is part of your plan, you may want to hide a stockpile away from your home in a place such as a storage unit.

Try to protect yourself and your loved ones, as Brian M. Morris says in his “Spec Ops Shooting” guide to combat shooting mastery and active shooting defense.

Also, pack a bug-out bag with all of the necessary supplies that you’ll need to get you to your bug-out location.

6. Consider Buying Non-Traditional Weapons

In addition to your standard guns, there are common items that have now been weaponized. There are stun canes and that look like a regular cane but actually have stun-gun capabilities when engaged. There are cell phones like that, too.

Just about anything can be used as a weapon. Canned food, keys, a pen, lamps, rocks; really whatever you can get your hands on will be better than nothing but again, make your first move count by aiming for the throat, nose, head, groin or eyes if possible.

Carry your standard weapon, too. Pepper spray or your gun won’t do you any good if they’re in the upstairs drawer. It’s time to survive so be ready at all times.

There are many ways to learn how to defend yourself if you are weak and small, but the most important thing to remember is that you need to stick to the plan of attack (or escape) once you’ve committed to it.

This decorated former Green Beret shares a lot of lifesaving advice from his 25 years of service in this book. Click the banner below to grab your guide to gun mastery.

spec_ops_shooting_cover

This article has been written by John Gilmore for Survivopedia. 

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Prepping With Kids: Disaster Obstacle Course

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Prepping With Kids: Make a disaster obstacle course to teach kids about disasters | PreparednessMama

A preparedness challenge for all ages. The key to transferring the disaster obstacle course game into real preparedness is the conversation after you finish. Your family will love this game! January has been a month of surviving! Snowstorms, ice storms, winter break, snow days, sick days, the flu (2x), and an ear infection all visited […]

The post Prepping With Kids: Disaster Obstacle Course appeared first on PreparednessMama.

An Inexpensive Survival Cabin for Sale in the Northeast

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Yes, $68.000 and on seven beautiful acres.

  Periodically, someone tells me that they are looking for a secluded location for disaster emergencies, and that they can’t find anything for under three hundred thousand dollars. This is particularly true, they say, of the US Northeast.   I counter by saying that if you look hard enough, there are affordable full time rural homes, and there are affordable rural cabins for emergencies.

     This is one such instance.  I will leave this post up, even after the property is sold, as an inspiration to those who continue to look.

The information between the two sets of undulating lines is the work product of Survival Realty.com
ALWAYS DO ALL YOUR OWN CHECKING AND DUE DILIGENCE.

  The Callicoon of which they speak is in New York State.

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An on-site cabin is designed with the hunter and survivalist in mind. The ground floor has plenty of room for multiple beds, a table, and a wash area. A separate room has a composting toilet. Take the ladder to a loft where a new bamboo wood floor sleeps up to eight. All interior work designed with non-voc paints and sustainable materials. Heavily insulated, one wood stove keeps the space hot even when temperatures drop below 0 F. The 7 Acres of land is completely forested with plenty of dead and down wood waiting for a chainsaw.


Water comes from an on-site well drilled in 2011. There is no indoor running water (which is why I can’t sell it as a home and why the price is so much cheaper than a home), but you can install a septic system to remedy that (I got estimates at only $15,000). The electric is grid-supplied, but there is plenty of room to install solar or wind. The local utility is green, using wind power from nearby generators.
Friendly neighbors have adjacent plots of 10 acres or more.
This seven acres is enough to live off of. The land has abundant patches of wild raspberries and blueberries. Game is plentiful with deer and wild turkey crossing the property. I updated the driveway, shared with the neighbor, and cleared an area in front of the house. It’s ideal for a garden, chickens, and rabbits. I built a stone patio in front of the house, and there are amazing stone walls running through the property. It’s a great place for a barbecue.


If you want to get back to society, Callicoon is right across the Deleware with antique shops, a one-movie theater, and some great bars. There are many State game lands nearby and lost of fishing.
Supplied AS-IS, which is how I bought it. What does that mean? A liftetime supply of tools, including saws, maple syrup taps, antique stoves, game cookbooks, and all furniture. Ready to use at a moment’s notice! I bought it from an old man who used it as his hunting and fishing man-cave. Buy it and use it the same weekend!
I love this place, but I’m relocating and won’t be able to access it anymore. If you have the same dreams I did, getting away from it all to a self-sustainable place, this is perfect for you.

SurvivalRealty.com | Copyright 2015 | All Rights Reserved. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Winter Survival: Critical Training Techniques to Overcome the Elements

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 We’re deep into the winter, Readers out there in ReadyNutrition Land, as you well know.  Now, here’s a challenge for you: while the season is here, it’s time to put your skills to the test. Why?  Well, because you can practice doing a few things in a (semi) controlled environment.  This will enable you to gauge your weaknesses and strengths and iron out your problems, either for another “go” at it or for lessons learned to hone in the off season.

Essential Winter Gear

  1. Proper and effective dress: We have covered the importance of layering in previous articles. Everyone has their preferences; however, a good set of polypro thermals that wick off moisture and a good set of Gore-Tex upper and lower garments are a start.
  2. Backpack: I prefer the large Alice pack of the Army; however, what you need is to be comfortable with your gear, and for your gear to work. You need food, a source of heat, fire making equipment, a blanket/sleeping bag, a water supply that will not readily be frozen, extra clothing as needed, and the likes.  For a sleeping bag, I prefer the insulated issue bag with a Gore-Tex cover.  Don’t forget a ground pad of some type.
  3. Tools: A hatchet (preferably one with a hammer-head and a hatchet blade with one continuous piece incorporated into the handle; a good hunting knife, and a good utility knife (Swiss Army knife, or a multipurpose tool will fit the bill).
  4. Sheltering equipment: I prefer the Army issue poncho (that has grommets) and five (5) bungee cords for the four corners and the top (hood portion tied off) for an expedient shelter.  You can take a pup or dome tent, but be sure of how to put it up before you go out in the woods.
  5. Must-haves: these are things on your person when you venture forth – lighter, compass, thermometer (or device to compute temperature, such as wrist thermometer, etc.), flashlight, map of area for exercise. Use your judgement as to what other things you need.

Critical Tasks for Training in Winter

Let’s identify some critical tasks that you need to be able to perform in the wintertime.  These tasks pertain also to requirements you need to fulfill to be able to operate in the outdoors.

  1. For the first one, plan on just doing an “overnighter” or such, if you’ve never been outside overnight in a winter environment.  As with physical exercise: train, don’t strain.  Same principle here.  You want to see how well your skills work and what you need to improve upon.  It’s also a good way to test your equipment and yourself.  You are trying to learn by experience and not hurt yourself, so don’t push it beyond your limits this first time.
  2. For your water-carrying containers: use whatever you have that is insulated to a high degree, and if it is going to freeze?  You should leave about ¼ unfilled to keep your container from splitting.  Then, what do you do with it?  For wintertime, I have “special” one quart canteens, the older issue ones made from metal, with a screw on cap lined with cork.  The canteen carrier helps to insulate the canteens, but if they freeze…plop one on top of a small folding stove or at the edge of a fire and it’ll thaw that water out in no time.  In addition, the canteen nests in the canteen cup and you can thaw snow or ice to make water for yourself.
  3. Bivouac in an area that is close to home.  In an emergency, you can get home readily.  Now you can practice with that “safety net” if you need it.  Practice everything: making fires in the snow, making lean-to’s and igloos, and tree-pit shelters.  Practice your navigation with a compass.  This is where the military issue compass comes in handy, as it’s not liquid filled and not subject to freezing.  You should write down your experiences in some kind of a logbook or journal to use for improving later.
  4. Practice tracking your non-hibernating animals.  Learn the difference between a dog’s track in the morning, and in the afternoon when the sun melts the edges of the impression and expands the track, making it look bigger.  You’ve brought the ground covering mat and the poncho with you.  Alright.  Now, knowing you have that in reserve, practice clearing snow away from a patch of ground and using fallen pine boughs as ground cover.  Fashion a lean-to for yourself from the surrounding fallen timber.
  5. At night, practice building your fire and building a fire-reflecting wall.  Take constant notes on the things you observe: what you see, hear, feel, and smell.  Practice land navigation and orienteering in the daytime, and (until you’re comfortable) for short distances at night.  Learn to use the stars if they’re visible, as mentioned in previous articles.  If the S ever HTF, you’ll be way ahead of the power curve regarding living in the field and the boonies in a winter environment.

Mind you, these are all basics for you to try.  These basics will help you to inspire confidence in yourself and your skills.  Winter weather and a cold environment with snow and ice on the ground presents challenges, but they can be overcome and mastered with practice.  Stay warm, be safe, and keep up the good work!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Building a snow cave to survive the night

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Nomad shelters helped man survive in the wilderness for generations. As long as you had the proper knowledge and resources, you could build a shelter in a few hours. Making a snow cave to keep you warm at night is not complicated, but there are some tricks to it. During this time of year, a … Read more…

The post Building a snow cave to survive the night was written by David Andrew Brown and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Paracord Carabineer Spool

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This Paracord Carabineer Spool project that is very useful for outdoors-men of all types. It is just an way of carrying cordage in a way that is easily accessible. If you can get a section of PVC pipe around a carabiner (more on this latter) and zigzag spool 550 or tethering cord around it, you can […]

The post Paracord Carabineer Spool appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

7 Great Homesteading Magazine Recommendations

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Here are some of my favorite Homesteading Magazine Recommendations, These have a lot of great information (and are sometimes the sources of some of my project ideas). I like the term prepsteader as a way to merge the similarities of preppers and homesteaders Subscribing saves a lot of money over buying them at the newsstand. […]

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17 Natural Antibiotics Our Grandparents Used Instead Of Pills

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17 Natural Antibiotics Our Grandparents Used Instead Of Pills Our ancestors had a solution for treating infections, burns and other different illness, using what mother nature has offered to us. It would be good to remind ourselves what these antibiotics are and possibly think about using them in case of a SHTF scenario where pills are …

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2017 Suburban Steader Update – Week 04

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Week 4 of 2017 was a bit hectic for me but not so much around the Suburban Steader Homestead.  Curious why? Well, it started with a trip to the AFC Championship Game and then a snowboard trip to upper Vermont.  Come find out all about my adventures! This Week’s Milestones Last week was full of

Are you prepared to be unemployed?

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Are you prepared to be unemployed? Bob Howkins “APN Report” Audio in player below! You prep for disaster, stock up and fortify. Gain the tools & talent to handle catastrophe. But what if, instead of a bad storm, earthquake, tidal wave, forest fire or zombie attack, disaster comes visiting in a totally unexpected form. What … Continue reading Are you prepared to be unemployed?

The post Are you prepared to be unemployed? appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.