Jackie Trad MP Lying To The public to score points & make a name for herself.

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The Shooters Union has accused deputy Premier Jackie Trad of using the tragedy of the Lindt Café siege to score political points against the LNP and to target law-abiding firearm owners.

The Dutch Raise The World’s Happiest Kids – So What Can We Learn?

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The Dutch Raise The World’s Happiest Kids – So What Can We Learn?

Image source: Pixabay.com

What does it take to raise happy, well-adjusted kids? A UNICEF study broke this question down into five factors: housing and environment, behaviors and risk, education, health and safety and material well-being. They used these categories to determine which industrialized countries were getting it right.

A 2013 UNICEF report found that American kids ranked 26th – just above Lithuania, Latvia and Romania — out of 29 countries, and children in the United Kingdom ranked 16th. Kids in the Netherlands ranked first.

The report is a follow-up to a 2007 study that also showed the Netherlands in first place, with the U.S. and U.K. in the lowest two slots.

Those study results come as no surprise to Rina Mae Acosta and Michele Hutchison, the authors of the new book The Happiest Kids in the World. Acosta, who is American, and Hutchison, who is British, have first-hand experience in how differently the Dutch raise their children as compared with their native countries.

In their book, the two mothers, who are both married to Dutch men and are living in the Netherlands, identify several factors that are responsible for the sunny dispositions of Dutch children. The factors include more sleep for Dutch babies, less emphasis on academic achievement, more focus on family time and more involvement in childrearing by fathers.

More Sleep for Dutch Babies

Dutch parents guard the sleep time of their babies and are more careful not to overstimulate their babies than many American parents.

Awaken Your Child’s Love Of Learning And Put God Back Into History! Read More Here.

This extra sleep may help Dutch babies be well-adjusted. According to a study by Washington State University that was published in the European Journal of Developmental Psychology, Dutch babies appear to be more contented than American babies are.

In addition, Dutch parents use toys less frequently to play with their babies than do American parents.

Less Emphasis on Academic Achievement

In the Netherlands, academic education begins after children turn six. Grades are not emphasized, and children in primary school rarely have homework.

The Dutch Raise The World’s Happiest Kids – So What Can We Learn?

Image source: Pixabay.com

Dutch children play outdoors all year round in all weather, and they are usually unsupervised while they play. A popular parent saying is, “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing.”

Children are given a large amount of freedom as compared with American children, often riding their bikes to and from school and visiting friends on their own.

More Focus on Family Time

“The Netherlands have a reputation for being a liberal country with a tolerance of sex, drugs and alcohol, yet beneath this lies a closely guarded secret: the Dutch are actually fairly conservative people,” according to the authors in an article they wrote for the UK’s Telegraph.

“At the heart of Dutch culture is a society of home-loving people who place the child firmly at the center. Parents have a healthy attitude towards their kids, seeing them as individuals rather than as extensions of themselves. They understand that achievement doesn’t necessarily lead to happiness, but that happiness can cultivate achievement.

“The Dutch have reined in the anxiety, stress and expectations of modern-day parenting, redefining the meaning of success and wellbeing. For them, success starts with happiness – that of their children and themselves.”

The authors stress that Dutch families value togetherness and do not attempt to outdo their neighbors with lavish birthday parties or fancy gifts.

Dads Are Very Involved

Dutch families seem to be ahead of the international curve when it comes to work-life balance.  With the average Dutch worker spending an average of 29 hours a week on the job, Dutch parents have more time to spend with their kids.

The Dutch Raise The World’s Happiest Kids – So What Can We Learn?

Image source: Pixabay.com

The authors also report that competition between mothers – or “Mommy Wars” – occurs far less in the Netherlands than in the U.S.  and the U.K.

Dutch dads take an equal role in raising their children, and Acosta and Hutchison say it is as common to see a father wearing a baby-carrier or pushing a pram as a mother.

Dutch parents strive to give their children clear directions, not options. They say, “I want you to…” rather than something vague.

Two common Dutch expressions that reflect this clear sense of discipline are “parenting is practicing what you preach,” and, “what the old cock crows, the young cock learns.”

If you have seen photos of bright-eyed, rosy-cheeked Dutch kids, you now know a few reasons why those kids look so happy.

And there is one more thing that may contribute to those fresh-faced smiles. It’s “hagelslag.”

Dutch parents and children alike frequently eat chocolate sprinkles on toast for breakfast. Sprinkles have a way of putting anyone in a good mood.

What is your reaction? Share your thoughts in the section below:

The Happiest Kids in the World by Rina Mae Acosta and Michele Hutchison was released in January on the UK, and it is set for an April 4 release in the U.S.

Awaken Your Child’s Love Of History And Put God Back Into History! Read More Here.

How to Safely Spend a Night in Your Car

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 How to Safely Spend a Night in Your Car Anyone who drives faces the possibility of spending an unplanned night in a vehicle.  Bad weather, breakdowns, running out of fuel, getting stuck are some of the more common reasons why a driver might have to bed down for the night (or perhaps for several nights) …

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Boots That Incorporate Emergency Fire-Starting Kit

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Boots That Incorporate Emergency Fire-Starting Kit Built into the inside sole of each Substratum boot is a small storage cubby. Owners could theoretically store all kinds of small items inside this pouch, but Rocky S2V designed it specifically for fire-starting equipment. One boot holds an Ultimate Survival Technologies Sparkie flint firestarter and the other boot …

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What Is A Rocket Stove? Why Do I Need One?

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What Is A Rocket Stove? Why Do I Need One? Rocket stoves are fabulous! Easily built but capable of producing a hot flame that you can cook, I suppose, everything over. You can even bake bread with a little modification. Knowing how to build one from bricks or stones is practical knowledge, that if held …

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“Second Tier” List of Recommended Specialty Books

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I subscribe to a Good, Better, Best philosophy when it comes to preparedness resources. I would rather have a good piece of equipment RIGHT NOW, than have plans to buy the best most ultimate piece of gear someday. Then as I learn to use that good piece of equipment, it helps me know what too look for when I have the resources to upgrade. Once you start to understand the fundamental skills contained in the non-fiction must have list, you may want to learn more details. This next list is a little more in depth. It will be followed by a third list at a later date.

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6 Ways to Avoid Being Herded into a FEMA Camp

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6 Ways to Avoid Being Herded into a FEMA Camp Having everything you own reduced to a numbered cot in a FEMA camp is not how you want to find yourself in an emergency. It is not only a terrible position to find yourself in, but it could also be a dangerous one. The camps are meant …

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Brussels Grid Collapses – Solar Batteries No Help

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EU regs stop solar backup during brownouts

Large parts of Brussels are without power tonight after the City Grid ceased to function at about 10.45pm local time.

But buildings with solar panels on rooftops were not able to maintain their own power supply because the panels are all feeding into to the grid. Even solar panels with battery backup were unable to maintain a supply because EU regulations require a cutoff of the battery supply in the event of a grid outage.

Brussels is home to the HQ of the European Commission – the Berlaymont Building – which has its own petrol powered generators in the basement, so it is still functioning on skeleton power at time of writing.

The health and safety rules were introduced 10 years ago, even though a simple cutoff switch between the grid and the panels or batteries in individual buildings, would solve the problem by removing the threat to power workers as they tried to restore the supply. Lobbyists from the large power companies and grid management companies are responsible for the restrictive regulations.

It is believed the northern part of the EU capital has been affected the worst with the cause still to be identified.Residents have been forced to use candles and have posted pictures of their efforts to restore light on social media.

An earlier power cut is understood to have hit a smaller part of the city earlier in the evening but was ‘resolved by 8.30pm’.

Power firm Sibelga, which handles gas and electricity services in the city, and power network operator Elia have confirmed there is a fault in the grid, with repair teams on site.
Sirens have been heard across the city, which was the victim of a terrorist attack last March.

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Career weasels

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I made the mistake of watching the news tonight with another pearl-clutching “expose” about those…gasp!…’ghost guns’. Never mind that you’ve been able to build your own gun with no serial numbers for quite some time….you just can’t sell it. But what really bumps my blood pressure into the stratosphere is seeing career-weasel Chucky Schumer wringing his hands and talking about that evil NRA.

I dunno about you, but in my AO it’s not a difficult task to find someone selling an AR for cash in the newspaper, at a gun show, or through a friend. Happens all the time. So if I can buy a paperless AR, completely built on a real receiver not made by some hack at his kitchen table, why wouldn’t I? But…I suppose some folks don’t have those options.

I wonder if Schumer and his fellow travelers will try to get things like upper receivers, barrels, etc. regulated in some manner. That’d be quite the trick. Did you know that in some countries it’s the barrel that is the controlled part? Yup. Go look at your Glock sometime…notice the serial number is on the framer, slide and barrel? That’s because somewhere on this planet there is a place where thats the controlled part….so Glock stamps em all.

==============

I had a couple people tell me “Oh, I’ll take some magazines!” and then I never heard from them again. SO….still about seven sets of 12 left.

 

 

The Road to Self-Reliance

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Installing solar panels

Solar tied to the grid can be unreliable

American families have been going off-grid for more than forty years, but for most it’s a gradual process, involving a lot of learning by trial and error. In a recent article published in Reason, J.D Tuccille wrote about how his experience going “semi-off-grid” in 2008 led him to reconsider his attachment to the mains, and begin a journey towards self-reliance that is still ongoing today.

Dipping into off-grid waters

In 2008 a power failure lasted a week at J.D’s former home in remote Arizona. While he had his own well, it was controlled by a pump that required electricity, and the surface of the water was too low to dip some out by hand. Then there was the issue of modern plumbing without electricity, and the requirements of coffee pots to consider. However, outages were common – so J.D had come prepared. He and his wife Wendy Wendy had stored water, cut firewood, and fueled up the camping stove and lanterns. They remained hydrated, warm and fed through that and every other experience with the electric grid’s unreliability.
“All in all, it was a bit Little House on the Prairie for our tastes, though with a better wine selection – but ultimately more of an inconvenience than a disaster,” he wrote. “But tolerance for inconvenience can decline with the years.”

When they moved to a new house in the foothills, Wendy had a strict requirement – a climate-controlled environment in the house at all times. This required some research into the best off-grid power systems to use for the climate, so J.D had to get serious.
“This being Arizona, where everything bakes for much of the year under the fireball in the sky, my first thought was solar,” J.D writes. “But I quickly discovered that all of those panels adorning people’s roofs were nothing more than expensive shingles during a power outage. Most solar installations are designed to feed the grid, not keep you independent of it. I priced adding batteries to the mix to gain some autonomy, but they more than doubled the cost. And batteries couldn’t handle the power demands of an air conditioner anyway. So we settled, if that’s the right word, for a 22 kW standby generator, which can handle the well pump and keep the air conditioning running.”

He said they were “especially pleased” with the decision when the European Union completed a coordinated cyber-attack simulation and found it leading to a “very dark scenario,” including crashed power grids.
J.D also beefed up the water storage capabilities at the house with rain barrels hooked to the gutters, which are conveniently located near the garden where he now grows tomatoes, olive and fig trees.

“Wendy and I have stumbled down our path incrementally over the years out of a combination of necessity and curiosity,” he writes. “We also keep tweaking our set-up. In addition to the generator, I’m putting together a smaller-scale solar power system. That fireball in the sky isn’t going anywhere, and I want to get some use from the thing. I’m picking up a few panels, a few batteries. I doubt I’ll manage to put together a system that can handle the well pump, let alone the air conditioner, but maybe we’ll be able to power a refrigerator. We can always stick our heads in there to cool off in a pinch.”

DIY learning

In a similar long-term learning curve, Eartheasy founder and blogger Greg Seaman has been documenting his many “hits and misses” with off-grid issues such as lighting, electricity and solar panels since 2000. A seasoned off-gridder – he first moved to a rural island in the Pacific Northwest when he was 30 – he has spent more than 30 years learning the art of living off the grid, and writes that it’s a constantly changing and upgrading process. With the added necessity of internet connectivity to maintain his Eartheasy website, and provide access for his family as they grew, he had to develop alternative ways of powering his home.

“Bringing some of the benefits of electrical power to our off-grid home has been a hit-or-miss affair,” he wrote in 2012. “Over the years, we’ve tried some very simple approaches to lighting and small battery recharging for our flashlights, such as hauling a 12 volt car battery to a small rural school about a half mile away every time it needed to be topped up. This was time consuming and inefficient. But we didn’t want to lose the feel of our simple home by bringing in a large generator and the jugs of gas needed to run it, and the prospect of setting up a wind turbine or solar array seemed expensive and a technological eyesore in a natural setting.”

Greg said that for many years the family got along without electricity, but when wireless broadband was introduced into the area, the family decided to build its own “reliable, affordable and do-it-yourself alternative energy system.”
“Today, with the help of a local expert on off-grid home solar power and alternative energy systems, we have the best of both worlds,” he wrote.

Greg, who today runs a successful family business devoted to creating sustainable products for low-impact living, acknowledges that off-grid living isn’t for everyone – the reality of living through the winter, the isolation, physical work, school or community character doesn’t always fit for some people – but if you’re willing to keep learning and trying things yourself, independent homesteading can be a dream come true.

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DESPARATE to join an off-grid community

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Hello. My name is Harry. Im 21 years old and I live in Wales. Im an electronics technician and I build security systems for prisons. However, this does not resonate with who I am and my life purpose. I spend most  my free time in the forest studying the different plants and trying to teach myself basic survival skills. I am quite a spiritual and philisophical person and for a very long time I have had a burning desire to make the world a better place. I would be absolutely over the moon if anyone could offer me a place in an off-grid community where I could learn new skills and be provided with food and shelter in exchange for my hard work. If anyone can help me with this, please do, I would be so grateful! I don’t mind where in the world it is, I  will travel as far as I have to!

Thank You

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Be Our Guest: Food Preservation Part I

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Canning, off-grid, cooking, food preservation, water bath, pressure canner

With the “know-how,” food preservation isn’t so daunting

Charcutier Sean Cannon is opening his first restaurant, Nape, in London this month. Born and bred in Norfolk, Sean told the Guardian how growing up in a self-sustaining community influenced his cooking. His best kept secret – preserving.

“Whether it’s killing an animal and having lots of fresh meat, or early summer and everything is ripe, knowing what to do with a glut is key.” Cannon said.

If you live off-grid you’ll know that preserving food for future use is essential. Not only does it provide food security, but also allows you to taste sweet summer berries in the winter. By doing this age old tradition, it also stops more modern thoughts and concerns of “what is actually in my food?” If you do the preparing and the preservation, you know exactly what has gone into the food you will be eating.

There are many ways to preserve food including canning, freezing, dehydrating and smoking.

Canning is a valuable and low-tech way to preserve food. There are two main methods for this, either water bath canning or pressure canning. It is worth noting that water bath canning should only be done for acidic fruits, such as berries and apples. If canning other produce such as meats and vegetables, pressure canning should be used; otherwise there is a high risk of food poisoning.

The basic process is to heat water in your canner (or large pan if water bath canning). This should not be filled to the top; 3-5 inches should be left for your jars of food. Jars should have lids secured and be placed carefully into the canner, being careful not to knock other jars, as they could crack or break under the high temperatures. The jars should be immersed in the canner with the water just covering the lids. The canner lid should be locked in place if pressure canning and the jars left for as long as needed according to the recipe. After the required time, the canner should be allowed to depressurise if using a pressure canner, before the jars are removed. Heat protection and necessary precautions should be taken to ensure you do not burn yourself. The jars should then be left to cool and seal for a minimum of 12 but ideally 24 hours. The sound of popping and pinging will mark your canning success!

Canning is so popular because of the wide variety of foods that can be preserved this way and the length of time they will remain edible for. Plus there’s no worry of keeping food frozen or cool!

Canning does however come with an initial start-up cost. If you’re only looking to preserve fruits and jams, then water bath canning in a large pan is of course an economical way to go. However, if you’re looking to preserve a wider variety of foods which includes meat and vegetables, then it would be wise to invest in a pressure canner.

The Presto 23 Quart Pressure Canner and Cooker comes in at a reasonable $86.44 on Amazon. This can double as a water bath canner and a pressure cooker. Made out of aluminium, the canner allows for fast and even heating and with a liquid capacity of just under 22 litres, seven quart jars fit comfortably inside. The lid has a strong lock and an over-pressure plug can relieve any build-up of steam. With a 12 year warranty and excellent reviews, this canner will certainly suit the needs of most canners.

Canning, food preservation, jars, canning, water canning, pressure canning, off-grid, storage

Good jars & lids are a must – there’s nothing like hearing the “pop” of sealing success!

The Presto’s rival is the All American Canner. This is a pricier option at $225.37 on Amazon and has many similar features, being made of aluminium and also holding 7 quart (or 19 pint) jars. This is a heavier unit though, coming in at 20lbs to the Presto’s 12lbs. A reviewer having access to both canner makes did however point out another comparison between the two. She noted that the All American Canner has a weighted gauge which needs less “babysitting” than the Presto with its dial gauge, which required her to keep adjusting the heat of her stove. However, she pointed out that when compared side by side, both the Presto and All American took the same amount of time to get to pressure, to can the produce and to bring back down ready to remove the jars.

Once the initial canner investment is made, there are a couple of other bits and pieces which you will need. Jars are a must and are reusable. However, if using second hand jars to try and save on cost, it is important not to have any that are cracked or damaged in any way – this could lead to some nasty accidents later on!

In terms of lids, these can either be replaced for around $3 per pack or you could spend a little extra and invest in some reusable Tattler lids. These are marketed at $8.88 on Amazon for a pack of 12 and are “indefinitely reusable”.

Other kit you might want to buy (and are recommended to prevent nasty burns) are a jar lifter and canning funnel. These can be bought separately or in a set with other equipment such as kitchen tongs, a jar wrench and magnetic lid lifter advertised on Amazon at $8.79.

For more detailed information on canning basics for beginners, check out Starry Hilder’s video on YouTube!

Another popular preservation method, especially for meat and fish is smoking.
Smokin' Hot! Only if you want to eat your meat straight away. If you want to preserve your meat, cold smoking is the way to go!

Smokin’ Hot! But only if you want to eat your meat straight away. If you want to preserve your meat, cold smoking is the way to go!

This involves long exposure to wood smoke at low temperatures, which is different to grilling over an open fire. Smoking preserves meat and fish by drying the produce and the smoke creates an acidic coating on the meat surface, preventing bacterial growth. The addition of a rich mouth-watering smoky flavour only adds to the appeal of this preservation method.

 

There are two types of smoking method. The first is called hot smoking and cooks the meat so it can be eaten straight away. This involves getting the temperature above 150 degrees Fahrenheit. The meat will still need to be cooked over a long time, leaving it very tender.

The second is cold smoking which doesn’t cook the meat for consumption straight away. Instead temperatures between 75 and 100 degree Fahrenheit are used to seal the meat and flavour it. The time meat or fish is left to smoke depends on the cuts and type of produce. Adding salt to the meat can help to speed up the process as it is a natural preservative. After drying the meat should be placed in an air tight container and stored at a cool temperature until consumed.

There is a wide range of smokers from electric or gas to charcoal and wood. This propane smoker from Amazon comes with a built in temperature gauge and retails at $211.40. Alternatively, instead of trying to find a smoker that suits your needs, why not build your own? That’s what this family has done!

 

Part II of “Be Our Guest – Food Preservation” will cover refrigeration and dehydrating.

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Travel Preparedness: Airports and TTP’s

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Traveling is something that millions of people do every day and while not as frequent I too suck it up and play the airport / airline game.  Herded like cattle through various checkpoints, lines of people hustling to one location or another.  Stand here, sit there, and don’t move unless you are told to do so.  If you comply all is well, if you do not comply or even give the perception that you might not feel like complying well then…it could be a bad day.

Most of us carry a gun for our own personal protection and while traveling with a gun inside checked baggage is allowed outside of that firearms are a huge no-no inside airports and airplanes.  Combine that with the fact that parts of the airport (in my opinion) are extremely soft targets and the stakes rise when traveling to grandma’s house.  A quick threat assessment would reveal a most likely course of action:  Single shooter as we saw in Florida.  Most dangerous course of action:  Coordinated attack as we saw in Belgium and Turkey.

I believe there are two components/concepts which we can harness when traveling which would greatly increase chances of survival should a worst case scenario occur.

  • Situational Awareness. Should go without saying but it’s an important one.  Paying attention to one’s surroundings, avoiding grouping together in areas like baggage claim, understanding where the good guys with guns are and the exits nearest your location.  If you are with family or small ones, having a plan to get them out quickly if a stampede starts.
  • Trauma Kit / Training. How many lives could have been saved post event in the examples I listed above if a few survivors had an improved first aid kit (IFAK) and the ability to employ the equipment inside such kit?  Think CAT Tourniquet, Quikclot Combat Gauze, Israeli Bandages, Gauze, NAR Field Dressings, chest seals and more.  Hemorrhaging can kill quickly and the ability to stop it only in the short window between the event and when First Responders arrive could save others (or your own life).

Back in the day I never used to travel with an IFAK but thankfully I made the transition and it’s standard on the packing list these days.  I keep the components on our near my person in a carry on bag at all times.  I should stress once again that proper training on how to employ these items is crucial, otherwise you’ll have people attempting to TQ a neck or wipe blood away with combat gauze.  A good place to source many of these items is North American Rescue, check them out when you get a chance.

 

I’ll wrap it up with some final thoughts.  Many of us tend to be action oriented in that if there is a threat we feel as if we could / would do something about it to mitigate the threat or even eliminated it.  The reality is that some will slip through the cracks, some will get past the gates and into the village and maybe even get away.  It’s at that point where we have to remain action oriented but now it’s about saving lives until help arrives.  I strongly urge everyone to seek basic training with respect to utilizing the components in side of an IFAK and to stay aware and safe when traveling through airports.

Incremental Disaster Kit (Week 2)

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Last week’s list got you through one day of food, so this week we are focusing on the hardware store items to help with immediate shelter issues. Also, as I have learned from working in actual disasters, in many households, a pet is more than just an animal, it’s a member of the family. If this is the case, don’t forget to plan for their health and welfare also.

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Burt’s Bees Founder’s Cabin

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Burt's Bees founder next to his Cabin in the woods

Burt loved the land – and ithe Bees

Burt’s Bees founder Burt Shavitz was a modern day Thoreau. He loved nature and lived in a cabin much of his life.  For him, as he said before he died: “the old ways are the best ways” and “the land is everything”.

The company he founded unveiled Mr Shavitz’s  iconic, low-key cabin in January. Sadly, the company moved the rustic cabin from rural Maine to its headquarters on the American Tobacco Campus on in Durham, NC. The cabin displays Burt’s personal artefacts. The 300sq ft converted turkey coop originally had no electricity or running water.

“Burt was a living embodiment of our purpose to connect people to the wisdom, power and beauty of nature. A year after his passing, Burt’s life is a potent reminder for all of us that we can’t lose sight of our relationship with nature”, said Jim Geikie, General Manager of Burt’s Bees.

An observation bee hive was also installed to help educate the 1.5 million annual ATC visitors on bees and their importance to environment and humans. At its seasonal peak, the observation serves as a home to over 15,000 bees and is the largest of its kind in North Carolina.

Geikie spoke of his former boss’s habit of not using any electronics and instead choosing to embrace nature.”Burt used to say ‘I wake up when the sun comes in my window and go to bed when it’s too dark to read…Each day we come to work, we’ll be able to fondly remember the man who didn’t use an alarm clock and applaud his way of life as a beacon of inspiration in our hurried times”, said Geikie.

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Great Depression Soup: The Recipe You Better Save For Hard Times

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Great Depression Soup: The Recipe You Gotta Save For Hard Times

My parents were just toddlers when the Great Depression burst into their lives. It forever altered their view of the world, and not always in a good way.

My mother, in particular, would tell me horror stories about some of the things that went on during those years. Until the day she died, she always carried some sort of food in her purse, usually peanuts or crackers. She never forgot what it was to be truly hungry.

Perhaps the worst story she told me was that my paternal grandmother, who was in her early 20s at the time, woke up one January morning in a barn to find that her husband had just left her and their toddler in the night. She had no food, no money, no family, no place to live, and a baby to feed. She walked along the highway and offered her baby to anyone who would take her. She assumed that someone with enough money for a car had money to feed a baby.

These type of stories can give you nightmares and make you wonder how people survived! My mother told me many other amazing stories, about how they “just did without” or “made do” with what they had, but some of her stories were practical enough that we could still benefit from them if we should ever find ourselves in the same desperate circumstances.

Just 30 Grams Of This Survival Superfood Provides More Nutrition Than An Entire Meal!

Great Depression Soup: The Recipe You Gotta Save For Hard TimesOne of those was how women shared food-stretching recipes, such as macaroni and cheese or fish gravy. One recipe my mother remembered clearly was called “depression soup,” although she said her father called it “garbage soup,” a name that would make my grandmother angry.

My grandmother had a large pot with a lid that she kept in the ice box or outside in the snow. Cans (or jars) of fruit or vegetables were filled with a bit of water, and then scraped out and put in the pot. Everything, and I mean everything, went in that pot: bread crumbs, a tablespoon of rice, a shriveled-up carrot, a half-rotten potato (just cut off the bad part), fish heads and tails, bits of garlic, chicken skin, necks, livers, hearts, the hard skin of onions, broccoli ends, carrot and radish greens — you name it; unless it was rotten, it went into that pot.

Once it was about half full, my grandmother added water, perhaps a tablespoon or two of bacon grease, and cooked it for two hours or so. And that would be dinner. If you were fortunate, she baked bread.

My mother remembers that some soups were better than others. Once they began raising rabbits, the bones were used as a base. Soup made with bones and vegetables had to be tastier than soup made with carrot tops, radish tops and some bacon fat.

The point here is that while we would never dream of eating Depression Soup for lunch, remembering how people survived on scraps, literally, might come in handy for tomorrow’s world. We aren’t promised a land of fruit and honey in the future, so knowing how our ancestors survived during hard times might one day ensure our own survival.

Would you eat Great Depression Soup? Is there a better way to make it? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.

Book Review: Chainsaw Lumbermaking

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Once you’re familiar with Will Malloff’s method of chainsaw lumbermaking, you’ll be simply and economically turning trees into lumber on your own! Learn how to select the tree you want, fell it safely, and saw it into a fine pile of building or cabinet lumber. With detailed instructions and over 400 photographs, Will Malloff tells […]

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Grow Your Own: Winter Lettuce and Microgreens

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Grow Your Own: Winter Lettuce and Microgreens Winter is a tough time to grow food, we all know that. This article shows us how to grow winter lettuce and micro greens inside over the winter months. If SHTF this may be all we can gather, especially if you get a lot of snow and freezing …

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The post Grow Your Own: Winter Lettuce and Microgreens appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

The Island Where Electricity Is Banned & Everyone Has 10 Acres

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The Island Where Electricity Is Banned & Everyone Has 10 Acres

The off-grid life is growing in popularity across North America, but it certainly doesn’t always take the same form.

That’s what filmmaker and professor Phillip Vannini discovered when he spent two years travelling to every province and territory in Canada, interviewing dozens of people who have chosen to live off-grid – whether near the arctic circle in the Yukon or on a temperate island in British Columbia.

The result is a 90-minute documentary – Life Off Grid — where he learned the challenges and rewards of the off-grid life. He even visited an island that prohibits utility electricity and requires everyone to own 10 acres of land.

Vannini, the Canada research chair at Royal Roads University in Victoria, B.C., is this week’s guest on Off The Grid Radio.

Vannini tells us:

  • Why it’s actually more practical to live off-grid than on-grid in many parts of Canada.
  • How he found so many off-gridders – more than 200 — who were willing to share their stories.
  • Why people are choosing to throw away their “comfortable” lives and rough it off the grid.
  • Which couple lives in what he calls the “most remote home in all of North America.”

We also discuss a man who built an earth berm home for $1,000 and who constructed an air compressor out of a lawnmower motor.

Don’t miss this amazing show that will inspire you about the off-grid life!

Im going off grid in a few months

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Hi everyone I’m going off grid and it’s going to be a long hard Road I’m doing this with the relatively very little equipment and I’m not going to a homesteader I’m going out into the wilderness and building a shelter and staying there for as long as humanly possible I don’t like the term living off the land I prefer the term living with the land I’m giving up every single comfort that I’ve ever had in my entire life I just feel like Society has nothing left to offer me and I have nothing left to offer Society I don’t like the way the world is going we have all become our possessions it’s no longer who you are as a person but it’s what you own that makes you who you are successfulness is measured by what you have material possessions you’re not successful unless you have a big bank account a big house an expensive car that’s not what I want I don’t want to live my life living for the weekend I just want to live I’ve been reading a lot of Henry David Thoreau Alan Watts and Terence McKenna and I’ve come to the conclusion that I need to do this so I’m posting on here to see if there’s anyone else that feels the way I do things the way I do and would like to join me cuz it’s I don’t really want to have to buy a volleyball and paint a face on it haha my attempt at a joke also if anybody else out there has done this before what I’m about to do and has any advice or suggestions and gear or gear changing please by all means contact me my gear consists of Crossbow bolts both big and small game tips Sub-Zero sleeping bag Sub-Zero rated Thermo tent entrenchment tool skinning knife K Bar machete rain gear waterproof and insulated boots winter gear summer gear Flint fire starter kits a fairly advanced first aid kit lots of paracord fishing cord fishing hooks a couple traps and snares Hammerhead Hatchet tarp duct tape flare gun cast net a saw rope

 

 
 

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Non-Fiction Must Read Books

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Having “stuff” is cool, but too many people tend to rely on “stuff” in an emergency, when really, keeping your head and thinking your way through things works a lot better. (Ever watch MacGyver?) No preparedness plan is complete without knowledge, because somebody can take your stuff, but they cannot take your mind, (if YOU don’t lose it!).

The post Non-Fiction Must Read Books appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Survival Hacks! on I Am Liberty

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Survival Hacks Host: James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio in player below! All over the internet people are doing things that are truly noteworthy in the survival realm. Its very interesting to scroll through the numerous websites filled with survival hacks. In a capitalistic society like ours we often forget that there are options outside … Continue reading Survival Hacks! on I Am Liberty

The post Survival Hacks! on I Am Liberty appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Tactical Gear List & Considerations for SHTF

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Written by Orlando Wilson on The Prepper Journal.

The below personal tactical gear list is taken from a proposal I put together for counterinsurgency / tactical team in West Africa a few years ago, this should give you a few hints on kit etc.

The post Tactical Gear List & Considerations for SHTF appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Urban Altoids Survival Tin

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The Urban Prepper has a very cool urban survival tin. Most survival tins only have things you would need to survive a disaster: lighter, knife, fishing line, water purification tablets, and the like. But this is more of an “urban convenience” tin. It’s made up of things an urban dweller might find useful on a […]

The post Urban Altoids Survival Tin appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Domestic Terrorists Attack Free Speech & First Amendment Rights

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New York Times Headline – Anarchists Vow to use Violence to Stop Free Speech – 2/3/2017   Violent radical left-wing rioters are part of ‘the enemy within’ and are themselves domestic terrorists aimed towards destroying our Constitutional Republic.   “These people are calling for open violence against the President and anyone else that gets in […]

Gorsuch Once Sided With A Student Arrested For Making Fake Burps. His Dissent Was Epic.

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A Student Was Arrested For Fake Burp Sounds ... And Gorsuch Sided With Him

WASHINGTON — President Trump’s first U.S. Supreme Court nominee, federal appeals court judge Neil Gorsuch, has received high marks from conservatives and now is being applauded for demonstrating common sense in a 2016 ruling.

Gorsuch was the lone dissenter in a case that dealt with a 13-year-old boy who was arrested at a New Mexico school for making fake burb noises. Although two justices on the 10th Circuit ruled that the school was within its rights to do what it did, Gorsuch dissented and said the arrest never should have been made.

According to the court’s decision, the teacher reported that the student had “generated several fake burps, which made the other students laugh and hampered class proceedings.” She put him in the hallways, but he then “leaned into the classroom entranceway and continued to burp and laugh,” according to the teacher.

The teacher contacted a school police officer, who arrested the boy on interfering with the educational process.

Christian Heroes For Christian Kids: These Amazing Stories Are Putting God Back Into History!

The mother sued, arguing the police officer had used excessive force and had made an unlawful arrest. Gorsuch sided with the mom.

“If a seventh grader starts trading fake burps for laughs in gym class, what’s a teacher to do?” he asked in his dissent. “Order extra laps? Detention? A trip to the principal’s office? Maybe. But then again, maybe that’s too old school. Maybe today you call a police officer. And maybe today the officer decides that, instead of just escorting the now compliant thirteen year old to the principal’s office, an arrest would be a better idea. So out come the handcuffs and off goes the child to juvenile detention. My colleagues suggest the law permits exactly this option and they offer ninety-four pages explaining why they think that’s so. Respectfully, I remain unpersuaded.”

Other courts, Gorsuch wrote, also ruled that it takes more than childish antics to spark an arrest.

“The simple fact is the New Mexico Court of Appeals long ago alerted law enforcement that the statutory language on which the officer relied for the arrest in this case does not criminalize ‘noise[s] or diversion[s]’ that merely ‘disturb the peace or good order’ of individual classes. … Instead, the court explained, the law requires ‘a more substantial, more physical invasion’ of the school’s operations — proof that the student more ‘substantially interfered’ with the ‘actual functioning’ of the school. … What’s more, other state courts have interpreted similar statutes similarly. They’ve sustained criminal convictions for students who created substantial disorders across an entire school. But they’ve also refused to hold students criminally liable for classroom antics that ‘momentarily divert[ed] attention from the planned classroom activity” and ‘require[d] some intervention by a school official.’”

The case is A.M. v. Holmes.

What is your reaction to Gorsuch’s dissent? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Looking For Another Country? Read More Here.

Survival Seeds From Hometown Seeds

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Hometown SeedsHere at Surviving Prepper we prefer to minimize the number of affiliate ads that we allow on our site. Too many ads distract the reader from the content of the posts, and content is important to us. So, if you see an ad on our page it means that we believe the product is worthy of your time and your consideration. Hometown Seeds (and their survival seeds pack) is one of those companies/products that we think is worth talking about.

In a SHTF situation you’ll need a stockpile of ready to eat food. But, stockpiles run out. They’re only meant to get you through the aftermath of an emergency. For long term living, you need a garden. And Hometown Seeds sells all sorts of seeds to plant in your garden. Viable, fresh, non-hybrid heirloom seeds.

Heirloom Seeds vs. Hybridized Seeds

Heirloom plants are called “heirlooms” because they are the varieties that have been around for a long time. They are the plants that your great-grandparents probably grew. Heirloom plants are open-pollinated, and can be re-grown from seeds saved from generation to generation while retaining their flavor, appearance, and resistance to disease. The heirloom cucumbers and tomatoes and peppers that you grow and love will have seeds that will provide the same quality produce the next year, and the year after that, all the way down the line for as many years as you save their seeds. These are not plants that have been optimized for commercial planting, ease of corporate farming harvest, and efficient distribution packaging. This is real food. It looks different, and almost always tastes better.

Why non-hybrid seeds? Because hybridized seeds don’t “come true to seed,” which means that the veggie babies won’t likely look or taste much like their parents. If you want to minimize the potential for ugly surprises come harvest time, avoid store-bought, hybridized seeds. Seed Savers Exchange explains this better than I can in the following excerpt:

…commercially available hybridized seed, often labeled as F1, is deliberately created to breed a desired trait. The first generation of a hybridized plant cross also tends to grow better and produce higher yields than the parent varieties due to a phenomenon called ‘hybrid vigor’. However, any seed produced by F1 plants is genetically unstable and cannot be saved for use in following years. Not only will the plants not be true-to-type, but they will be considerably less vigorous. Gardeners who use hybrid plant varieties must purchase new seed every year.

So, when you plant seeds from hybridized plants, you never really know what you’ll get. There is a risk that you will end up with smaller plants that are less resistance to disease and have lesser yields; none of which is good when you’re trying to rebuild your world after societal and infrastructure collapse. Better to go with tried-and-true heirloom seeds instead.

 

 

Family Survival Seed Pack

The Family Survival Seed Pack – Non-Hybrid Heirloom Seeds

With around 20,000 seeds, this pack comes in a resealable triple-layered Mylar bag. Detailed instructions on how and when to grow the seeds. A small resealable plastic bag for each type of seed. Below is the list and amount of seeds in the pack.

  • Black Beauty Zucchini (appx. 110 seeds)
  • Bloomsdale Longstanding Spinach (appx. 890 seeds)
  • Champion Radish (appx. 895 seeds)
  • Detroit Dark Red Beets (appx. 535 seeds)
  • Golden Acre Cabbage (appx. 2,500 seeds)
  • Golden Bantam Sweet Corn (appx. 480 seeds)
  • Lincoln Peas (appx. 325 seeds)
  • Long Green Improved Cucumber (appx. 360 seeds)
  • Lucullus Swiss Chard (appx. 465 seeds)
  • Provider Bush Bean (appx.235 seeds)
  • Romaine Paris Island Cos Lettuce (appx. 2,500 seeds)
  • Rutgers Tomato (appx. 1,800 seeds)
  • Scarlet Nantes Carrots (appx. 6,800 seeds)
  • Waltham Butternut Winter Squash (appx. 70 seeds)
  • Yellow Sweet Spanish Onion (appx. 2,850 seeds)
  • Yolo Wonder Pepper (appx. 250 seeds)

Hometown Seeds Information

Hometown Seeds’ Family Survival Seed Pack includes enough seeds to cover 3/4 of an acre, and sells for $30. The seeds can be planted as soon as this year, or put away and stashed for as long as twenty-plus years before planting. Hometown seeds is a great company–a family own business–that provides the highest quality seeds at a fair price. They guarantee their product and have exceptional customer service. Take a few moments and check out Hometown Seeds’ Survival Seeds today.

If you found this article helpful/interesting, please Share it by clicking on the social media links. Thank you for helping us grow!

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6 ways to learn important first aid skills every mom needs

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I’m a stay at home (or I guess a work from home) mom. This means that I will likely be my kid’s first responder in any first aid emergency. So, having first aid skills is important to me. But getting those first aid skills can sometimes feel overwhelming. Am I right?  I mean us moms […]

The post 6 ways to learn important first aid skills every mom needs appeared first on Your Own Home Store.

Emergency Supply Checklist We All Need

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Sometimes an emergency supply checklist is a way to help us be prepared for the unexpected. If it seems overwhelming to know where to start, I get it. It’s almost like a house that needs to be cleaned and we don’t know which room to start on. Maybe we’re moving and we have a ton of boxes and packing paper staring us in the face. It’s okay, we clean one room, pack one or two boxes and keep going. You do the same thing with food storage and emergency supplies. You start with a few things you use every day and expand the amount. You write down what you eat every day and then buy a few extra things. I designed a food storage checklist a few years ago. If you missed it here it is: Where-Do-I-Start

I used to teach classes, and I still do sometimes, but my schedule is too busy to do much traveling to teach people, so I direct them to my website to learn what they need to do. I have a lot of printables that people can use to get them started. Here is what the document looks like:

Emergency Supply Checklist

I know for years the state, the federal government, the American Red Cross, and many churches suggested a 72-hour kit. I soon learned we need a whole lot more than any 72-hour kit could hold. Yes, I have a list for them too, but with all the chaos that’s going on in our country and around the world, we need more than what’s in that bag. I know, at least we can take it to the schools and churches after a disaster to help get us through the first few days. I’m not, and I repeat, not going to the hills like some preppers suggest with shotguns, etc. At my age, I couldn’t haul the stuff I need to feed my family of two and be able to carry the water too! Here’s the deal, if my house collapses from an earthquake, yep, I will evacuate. I’m not buying a second home up in the hills with a barricade built around it, nope it’s not going to happen. I’m prepared to stay where I am and I can survive most anything. Now, I didn’t get to this point overnight, it’s taken years of preparation, one step at a time. One #10 can, one case of this or that and one bucket of my hard white wheat at a time. You can do this too! One step at a time. Just start with a plan.

  1. Water, one gallon per person per day is suggested by most agencies. I suggest four gallons per person per day. I live in the desert and I will need lots of water.
  2. Food, fill in the blanks on my list above, you can start with one week, then two weeks, then three months. Buy at case lot sales and rotate the food. I always buy instant milk, ingredients that I can use to make pancake, bread, biscuits or crackers. I buy cases of vegetarian refried beans because I love them and I can make tortillas to help consume the beans. I buy rice, cans of cream of chicken soup, canned green chilies, canned diced tomatoes, and beans like kidney, pinto, navy, etc. I buy cases of canned fruits and vegetables. I used to “can” them myself, but now I just buy them.
  3. PRINTABLE first aid supplies: First Aid Kit Checklist by Food Storage Moms
  4. PRINTABLE 72-hour kits: FSM 72-Hour Kits For Adults and FSM 72-Hour Kits For Children and FSM 72-Hour Kits For Pets
  5. Be sure and get a stove that will boil water and cook a few meals when needed. This is the one I bought for all four of my daughters: Camp Chef Butane 1 Burner Stove with Camping Case and 12 Butane Fuel GasOne Canisters for Portable Camping Stoves
  6. Get a few good can openers.

Please start today with one can, one case or whatever your budget allows. Remember the government and your neighbors can’t take care of you. You must take care of yourself. PERIOD. It may take days or weeks for anyone else to have food and water available for you. Remember, please be cautious around our truckers on the highway, without them, we cannot survive. Please pray for our truckers who are the only ones that can deliver the food and water to our grocery stores. If you have a mini-farm that’s awesome, but most of us do not. May God bless our truckers.

Thanks for being prepared for the unexpected.

The post Emergency Supply Checklist We All Need appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Emergency Fire-starter: Start A Fire With Bare Hands

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Starting a fire

Starting a fire with your bare hands may sound like the manliest activity you can do, doesn’t it? Bear Grylls has a couple of episodes about how to start a fire without any gear available, for cooking some crunchy worms, right?

I am kidding, of course, but knowing how to start a fire in a survival situation is a pretty useful skill to have. Without fire you can’t cook your food, you can’t get warm, you can’t dry your clothes, you don’t have light, you can’t signal your presence, you can’t disinfect water for safe drinking, and so on and so forth.

We rely on technology to survive; even when it comes to wilderness survival. We are comfortable thinking that it will be OK because we have a cool survival knife, even better than Rambo’s, not to mention our top of the line survival/emergency kit, which contains all the things we’ll ever need if SHTF, including some cool BIC lighters, impermeable matches and what not.

However, life has the unpleasant habit of ignoring our plans, and emergencies don’t seem to care about our personal inconveniences.

The question to be asked and answered is — what are you going to do if SHTF and you don’t have your survival gear on your person?  Well, you’ll have to improvise or die trying, right?

This scenario is pretty far-fetched at first glance; I mean, finding yourself alone and close to butt-naked somewhere in the woods, without any type of gear and all that jazz.

Find out how this little survival stove that fits in your pocket can save your life!

Fire is what separated the humans from the animal reign, along with the invention of the wheel and Facebook. (I’m kidding again, of course!)

But I can bet that even the invention of the wheel was somewhat related to fire, i.e. there are “cultures” in remote parts of the world who didn’t invent the wheel, but they know how to make a fire without a Zippo lighter. The idea is that if some troglodyte who still lives in the Neolithic period, technologically speaking, can make a fire using what’s naturally available, so should we.

And obviously, making a fire with minimal gear that you can do yourself will require a paleo approach, i.e. we’ll have to see how primitive cultures mitigate this problem.

As far as primitive fire starting goes, most of the methods (all of them actually, if I come to think about it) involve the 2nd law of thermodynamics, and I am talking about mechanical energy — friction in our case — which is converted into heat, another form of energy which leads to fire and a happy ending.

So, as the Greek philosopher and inventor Heraclitus said back in the day, everything changes, and so does energy. But enough with philosophy and let’s get down to business.

How To Start a Fire Using Sticks

The simplest method for making a fire via friction in dry climates is the hand drill. The concept is pretty simple: you’ll have to cut a V shaped notch into a piece of wood, or fire-board if you like, then to use a rock/knife or whatever you have at your disposal for making a small depression adjacent to the notch, where you’ll place a piece of bark which will eventually catch the ember and burst into flames.

In the next step you’ll have to put the spindle (a stick basically) in the depression and roll it vigorously between the palms of your hands. You know what I am talking about. You’ve seen endless “Wild Survival” documentaries about it.

Some tried it in real life and failed miserably, but this guy seems to have got the hang of it.

Video first seen on Videojug

It’s worth mentioning that two persons can do it better, i.e. one person will apply downward pressure to the drill constantly, while the other will use a shoelace or a piece of string to rapidly rotate the spindle.

How to Start a Fire by Friction

If you’re alone, you can use this method , which is way better than rolling the spindle in the palms of your hands, especially if you’re not used to manual labor. This method involves using a little bow for rolling the spindle and it’s order of magnitude is more efficient than doing it with your hands only.

Video first seen on AZ Film Company

How to Start a Fire Using a Cord Drill and a Pump Drill

Check out this guy who makes it all look very easy. Watching this clip, you’ll learn how to make a cord drill first, then to upgrade it to a pump drill (this can be used for making holes in things, which may prove useful). The cord drill is a spindle featuring a flywheel attached basically and it works very well for making fires and more.

Video first seen on Primitive Technology.

How to Start a Fire With the Fire Plow Technique

Another primitive method for making fire is the fire plow technique. The concept is pretty straightforward, as you’ll cut a groove in a soft piece of wood, which will be the fire-board for all intents and purposes, and then you’ll rub/plough the tip of a harder shaft up/down the groove.

This technique produces its own tinder as the sticks rubbed together will push out tiny particles of wood ahead of the friction.

Video first seen on Survival Lilly

How to Start a Fire With a Fire Piston

Here’s a cool method called the Fire Piston and it works under the principle that air gets very hot when compressed at high pressure.

If you’ve ever used a bicycle pump, you might have noticed the heat that is created in the cylinder. When you compress air inside a fire piston, it happens so quickly and efficiently that it can instantly ignite a piece of tinder placed at the end of the piston.

Video first seen on Discovery

Ancient methods of making fire pistons involve hardwood for the tube or even a horn. The tube must be closed at one end, accurately bored and very smooth inside. The gasket can be improvised from fiber or leather for creating a seal for the piston in order to get the compression required.

How to Start a Fire With Flint and Steel

A classic in the field of ancient fire making is flint and steel. If you strike a softer steel against flint (which is harder), you’ll produce sparks to ignite your fire. But you can also make fire with just what’s available out there, i.e. flint, marcasite, pyrite, fungus, grass/leaf and quartzite.

Video first seen on freejutube

Remember that fire provides you with a cooking flame so knowing how to start one with your bare hands will make your survival cooking easy as 1, 2, 3!

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This article has been written by Chris Black for Survivopedia. 

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Tactical Pens

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by Ryan

The best items for your everyday carry kit are items that are hidden in plain sight.  Items that you can use in your everyday life allow you to expand your kit without having to keep that item concealed.  A tactical pen is simply a pen designed for uses other than writing.  It must be a functional writing tool, but tactical pens are typically designed for self-defense.  Even airlines will often let you carry your tactical pen.  They are great for stabbing at vulnerable points like the neck and eyes.  However, they also allow you to target pressure points for non-lethal force.

Why a Tactical Pen?

There are several reasons that a tactical pen could be a better option than other concealable weapons.

  • Multiple Functions – Unlike a handgun or knife, a pen can be used for several different every day and survival purposes. When building any survival kit, multifunction tools allow you to keep the kit as small as possible.
  • Non-threatening – If you are going to be attacked, it can often be beneficial to appear unarmed. Guns or knives must be hidden to accomplish this.  If a gun or knife is seen, an assailant will often disarm you immediately.  With a tactical pen, you are hiding your weapon in plain sight.  An attacker will rarely confiscate a tactical pen.
  • Cannot Be Used Against You – One of the most dangerous aspects of carrying a gun or knife is that your attacker can use it against you. It takes little skill or experience for an attacker to injure or kill you with conventional weapons.  However, an attacker will rarely have the skill to use a tactical pen against you.  In fact, in most cases they will be more inclined to use their bare hands.
  • Element of Surprise – Many would say that your greatest advantage in a physical confrontation is the element of surprise. A weapon that does not appear to be a weapon is an excellent way to gain this advantage.
  • Non-lethal – In most cases a strike from a tactical pen will disable an attacker without doing any permanent damage. This is preferable in most situations.
  • Easy to Conceal – A tactical pen is much easier to hide in your pocket than other weapons. Most knives and guns must have a sheath or holster specifically designed for concealment.
  • Inexpensive – Most tactical pens are much less expensive than a gun or knife.

How to Choose a Tactical Pen

When choosing a tactical pen, there are several variables to consider.  Most people only own one tactical pen, so it is important that you pick the right one.  Here are some points to think about when choosing your pen:

Material – Tactical pens are typically made of one solid piece of metal.  Unlike a normal pen, they are designed to take an impact without bending or breaking.  Most are made with aircraft grade aluminum, but some are even made from titanium.  The strength of your pen will be based on the material type and design.

Grip – With a pen being small and cylindrical, is could easily slip out of your hand after impact.  A good tactical pen will have design elements to prevent it from slipping.  Some have ridges designed to fall in between your fingers for a better grip, while others are tapered in the middle and fatter on the ends.  Ideally, you want some sort of design element to improve your grip.

Appearance – If a tactical pen looks too different from a normal pen, it defeats the purpose.  You want it to completely blend in.  If it is obviously a weapon or tool, other people are that much more likely to try to take it from you.

Function – Any tactical pen should have a sharp point for stabbing, but some are so much more.  These days you can buy tactical pens with glass breakers, fire starters, whistles, and styluses.  Some even have flashlights built in to the pen.  The newer models have DNA catchers to allow police to identify your attacker after the attack is over.  The more functions your tactical pen can cover, the fewer items you need in your EDC kit.

Here are a few quality models that you can consider purchasing:

How to Use a Tactical Pen

If you are attacked, there are specific points to target on the human body.  The tactical pen is not a knife or sword.  You cannot just swing it at an assailant and defend yourself.  You have to be surgical.  If you hit the right points, you will easily disable your attacker.

Remember that your goal is simply to get away from your attacker.  You do not want to use lethal force if you can avoid it, but you also do not want to give your attacker a chance to recover and hurt you.  The key to this strategy is multiple strikes.  When you find a point of impact, hit it several times before you back off and try to escape. This will ensure that your attacker stays down.

Here are some points to target on the human body:

Hands – Hitting an attacker in the palm, knuckles, or back of the hand is very painful.  Often an attacker will grab your arm or shoulder, so their hand is readily available to strike.  In many cases you can break the smaller bones in the hand with just one strike.

Feet – If you find yourself on the ground at the feet of your attacker, this is an opportune time to strike.  Attackers assume you are not a threat when you are on the ground, so this gives you the element of surprise.  Striking the feet of your attacker will likely not break the skin, but it might break bones.  In addition, the natural reaction to this type of injury is for the attacker to drop to the ground.  This gives you an ideal opportunity to flee.

Knees – The knees are another vulnerable part of the leg that will drop a man to the ground.  If you stab at the front or back of the knees, it will be very painful.  In addition, there are tendons and ligaments that can be damaged.  This would keep your attacker from following as you run.

Thighs – The thighs are meaty and make a good target for a tactical pen.  A strike to the inside or the outside of the thigh is normally very painful.  However, there are also pressure points on the inside of the thigh that intensify the pain.

Groin – Any strike to the groin is painful, but with a tactical pen that pain is amplified.  This is an easy way to drop a man to his knees.  You will likely have enough time to get away after just one good strike.

Ribs – The ribs are always a vulnerable spot on a person.  There is little flesh to protect the bones and internal organs.  A good strike with a tactical pen can break ribs or cause internal bleeding.  It is incredibly painful as well.

Sternum – The breast plate is a spot that can easily be injured, but it adds a psychological edge as well.  Any time you strike areas near vital organs, the injured person is likely to fall to the ground and curl into the fetal position.  Until they realize exactly what has happened, they think their life is in danger.  This is a great time to run for it.

Arm pits – You would not think this is a prime area to target, but the arm pits have little protection and lots of nerve endings.  If you can catch your attacker with their arm up, hold it in place with your left hand and strike with your right.  It is very painful and should drop him to his knees.

Neck – The neck is one of the few places on the body where you can actually kill somebody with a tactical pen.  A strike to the base of the neck on the jugular vein could render an attacker unconscious, while a strike to the throat could cause death. If you have no other choice, this is the spot for which to aim.

Eyes – The eyes are always a great non-lethal spot to target.  Not only is a strike to the eyes painful, but it makes it virtually impossible for your attacker to follow you.

Head – Any strike to the head is going to be painful.  In addition, it can cause a great deal of bleeding.  This can blind your opponent or just make them more concerned with their own well-being.

Once you have selected your tactical pen, take the time to practice with it.  It is important that you are comfortable targeting these specific areas when the pressure is on.  It is one thing to know the areas to target, but another thing to be able to act swiftly when attacked.  Practicing in low lighting or with the sun in your eyes is also a good idea.

In addition to practicing where to strike, it is also important that you practice how to strike.  Tactical pens can be held like a sword for thrusting forward, or they can be held backhanded for a downward stabbing motion.  In most cases, sword style will give you more accuracy with your strikes.  Your attacker is also less likely to block this type of movement.  However, each tactical pen has a different shape and grip.  You may decide that your pen works best by holding it a different way.  It is important that you can stab a solid, heavy object without the pen slipping or dislodging.

Also, while practicing, remember that your best move is to stab repeatedly at one particular spot.  This means that your grip has to allow you to keep making the same motion without it slipping. In most cases, you do not want to stop making contact until your attacker is on the ground or disabled in some other way.  However, at that point it is best to run for help.  Legally speaking, you can be charged with assault if you keep striking after your assailant is obviously disabled. Do what is needed to get away and then make a run for it.  If you have hit the right spots, you should have no problem getting to safety.

Your Ultimate Weapon Guide: What are Great Survival Guns?

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When you set out on any hunting adventure, the only thing that occupies your thoughts is to get the most out of this trip. But hunting is not just about killing the prey. Your own survival, from any possible threat (of an animal or straying in the woods) also matters. Straying in the wood or […]

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How to Prep Like the Rich

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com I recently came across such as Doomsday Prep for the Super Rich and a few others that say the elite are preparing for disaster.  Many are concerned about widespread unrest and other large scale catastrophes.   We’ve been writing about preparedness for some time now so I am not surprised.  Anyone who considers how dependent we are on technology, electricity, transportation and infrastructure quickly realizes our way of life can be interrupted by a […]

The post How to Prep Like the Rich appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

6 Rules You Need To Follow When Dehydrating Foods

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6 rules of dehydratingIn the book, The Prepper’s Cookbook, I emphasize how easy it is to bulk up your emergency food pantry by dehydrating food you have around you. With a meager $50 investment into a food dehydrator, you can:

  • dry vegetables for soup mixes
  • dry fruits for snacking
  • make jerky
  • fruit or vegetable leather
  • noodles
  • and even make crafts

Before you go crazy dehydrating, keep in mind that there are a few rules to follow to ensure food longevity, freshness and prevention of discoloration.

6 Rules You Need To Follow When Dehydrating Foods

  1. You can dehydrate any fruit or vegetable, regardless of quality or ripeness. If something is too ripe and soft, you can always puree it and dry the puree. Although using the best quality fruits and veggies will result in the best quality dried goods, remember that the goal here is preservation, not perfection. So don’t be afraid to dehydrate the bruised, overripe, and slightly damaged goods. Just make sure not to put mold in the dehydrator as it can spread and infect the rest of the foods.
  2. Some food items can be air-dried. Herbs and other green leafy food sources, in particular, do not necessarily need a dehydrator. They can be set out of the way and air-dried.
  3. Some foods need to be blanched. Blanching certain foods like onions, mushrooms and tomatoes ahead of time will limit discoloration and the risk of food-borne illnesses. This isn’t necessary, but it certainly helps in the longevity of your dried foods.
  4. Cook potatoes thoroughly for further enjoyment. Potatoes, beans and other root vegetables should be cooked thoroughly and then dehydrated. I’ve made a pot of beans and dehydrated them for soups. I have also made dehydrated potato flakes to use in my prepper pantry.
  5. Don’t dehydrate foods from different families at the same time. If you are dehydrating foods from different family groups, the flavors can cross over. For instance, if you are dehydrating tomatoes and peppers, note that the tomatoes will end up being spicy. As well, any Brassica should be dehydrated on its own, otherwise the sulfur taste will permeate into the other foods. The only exception is dehydrating fruits. Fruits can be mixed together, but mixing them with strong-tasting or smelling vegetables is not recommended.
  6. Be consistent with your cut size and spacing. Try to keep the slices of food the same thickness to encourage even drying times. As well, try not to allow the food to touch one another or overlap (green leafy vegetables are ok though). Otherwise, it can block the airflow and prevent drying.

Rehydrating Your Dried Food Sources

Rehydrating your dehydrated foods requires nothing more than the food to be introduced to a liquid. Get creative with the liquid that you use like juices, canning liquids, etc. Many preppers have found that rehydrating foods in liquids other than water gives the food a richer taste. For instance, soaking fruit in fruit juice makes rehydrated fruit taste sweeter or soaking textured vegetable protien (TVP) in meat stock helps give it a richer flavor.

Dehydrating foods is an excellent way to make use of food you have around you. Typically, at my home when the fruit bowl is overlooked, I will dehydrate fruits and create a healthy snack that the kids can’t resist. I also have made dried soups with the extra vegetables in the refrigerator.

 

For more information read, Drying Fruits and Vegetables by the University of Georgia

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Have Your Prepping Priority’s Changed?

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Have Your Prepping Priority’s ChangedIn early November I did a video about what to expect after the winner of the Clinton/Trump election was announced. In that video, I talked about how my preparedness plans would change depending on who won the election.

While I was right about how the people would react to a Trump election, I completely underestimated the lengths that the main stream media and the establishment would sink to discredit a fairly elected president of the United States of America.

Now that the dust has settled a bit, we are starting to get a clearer picture of how things might unfold over the next 4 years. All of this has caused me to reassess my prepping priorities. While my main concern remains an economic collapse, there are other issues that might need a little extra consideration at this point in time.

A Nation Divided

It seems that more than ever our nation is divided. Not divided by race or social class, but more by political affiliation. I think this is the result of not really having big issues to worry about. Life is good in America, and it’s been 75 years since WW2, so most people alive today have no idea what a real national crisis is.

Generally speaking, Americans are spoiled. Our small issues become big issues because we don’t have any big issues to be concerned about. I understand that something like a job loos can be a big issue, but it pales in comparison to WW3.

These days, the mainstream media can literally dictate American sentiment. From our education system, to what we watch on TV, everything is geared towards socialism. If you read Alt Right media, you are labeled a “white supremacists”, and because Donald Trump is so polarizing he gets labeled as “Hitleresque” by the MSM, and people who have no idea who Hitler really was.

Another problem is social media and all the keyboard warriors out there. Everyone can have a voice in the conversation, and their opinions become their facts. Public sentiment has become more important than facts, and everyone is guilty until proven innocent because of this.

SPP188 Have Your Prepping Priority’s Changed?

In this weeks show we talked about how our preparedness plans have changed, and some concerns I have in the short term, along with some that might be long term. We went into much more detail about these in the show, but here is a list of what we talked about.

5 Important Disaster Scenarios

For those of you that know me, an economic collapse has always been a top priority when it comes to prepping. While that remains a MAJOR concern of mine, there are a few disaster scenarios that have moved up on my threat assessment scale.

Civil Unrest

paid protestsWith everything going on these days, and everyone just waiting for something to protest, civil unrest has become one of my top prepping priorities. The protests themselves don’t concern me, the fact that 90% of these “peaceful protests” turn into riots does.

Free speech only applies if you agree with the main stream, and it is becoming increasingly obvious that there are people behind the scenes stirring the pot. Hopefully I’m wrong, but I can see this situation escalating and becoming a bigger danger.

Situational Awareness: Anything can happen at any time, and we need to be ready for it to happen. This article from BearingArms talks about avoiding riots, having everyday carry items and the OODA Loop Lisa mentioned in the show.

Martial Law: With all the protests riots going on, lead by the extreme left, Martial Law being enacted is a very real possibility. If this continues, it’s only a matter of time before the right stands up to have their voice heard. This could lead to major clashes, especially if you live in urban areas.

Civil War: I don’t think that a Civil War would necessarily look like “The Civil War” looked like, but over time it could become that. Some would argue that we are already in the early stages of a civil war, and I can’t say I totally disagree. This country was created with checks and balances, and needs both Democrats and Republicans to survive. If one side or the other gains too much power, our republic will cease to exist.

Armed Conflicts

armed conflictsLike it or not, President Trump is not one to sit back and let someone take advantage of this country. In the show I talked about how we cant just sit back and let a bully take our lunch money day in and day out, and that’s what we have been doing. Eventually we need to just punch the bully in the mouth, because if we don’t pretty soon it’s not just your lunch money they want.

Iran and North Korea:  No one in their right mind wants to escalate the situations in Iran and North Korea, and I am not advocating for that. At the same time, these countries are powder kegs, and just like the national debt, the more we ignore it, the bigger the problem gets.

Nuclear Conflicts: We all hope nothing like this never happens, but the reality is that some really bad people have access to nuclear weapons. On top of that, most of these countries don’t really like the United States and have these weapons pointed at us or our allies.

The Friend of My Enemy:  I’ve talked about Iran and North Korea quite a bit, but Russia will always be a wild card, and China is sitting back quietly, waiting to take our place at the top of the hill. My point is that just because someone is “on our side” right now doesn’t mean that can’t change very quickly. It seems that the lines are being drawn, and sides are being picked for the next world war.

Economic Collapse

Economic collapse dollar billAn economic collapse will always be high on my preparedness radar, at least until it finally collapses. I don’t know enough about the money manipulation and the games being played behind the scenes to know exactly when this will happen, but I do know it eventually will.

Even more concerning is that people seem to be more concerned about a refugee being inconvenienced at an airport, than the economic problems that will eventually directly affect everyone single of us.

Too Far Gone: The idea that a president can fix everything is ridiculous. The president can submit a budget, but it’s up to the house and senate to pass budget resolutions. These people are in the business of getting reelected, and telling people they can’t have something they can’t afford is a sure fire way of losing an election. Americans want their toys and lifestyle, whether they can afford it or not.

The Big Questions: We don’t know how Trumps economic policies are going to pan out. I think most of us are pretty hopeful, but even if he is the most successful US president in history, it will only be a drop in the bucket. The best we can hope for is to have a little extra money in our pockets, and use that to prepare for the inevitable.

Facing Reality: As I said earlier, if a politician were to say “we need to tighten our belts, and make some sacrifices” they would be run out of office. No one wants to face reality because they don’t need to. If you don’t pay for your home or your car, they take it. People think that the national debt is the politicians problem, even though most Americans would never elect someone that REALLY wanted to fix the problem.

The Power Grid

power grid failure banks closedThe US power grid has been and continues to be a huge problem, and the average American doesn’t even realize it. Most people think of a power outage as an inconvenience that denies them use of their phones and the internet. But the reality is, that would be the least of our problems.

In a large scale power outage the supply lines would be affects, our digital currency would be useless and even something as simple as no traffic lights could create massive problems. If we had to go without electricity for more than a month, the results would literally be catastrophic.

EMP/CME: In this article I talked about how probable an EMP is, and in this one I went over preparing for a CME. Both of these should be important to preppers because it would change our lives. There would be no flipping the breaker to get the lights back on, it could mean a lengthy rebuilding process of the power grid.

Cyber Attacks: There has been a major uproar lately about “Russian hacking”, but the reality is hacking someones Gmail account doesn’t take a tech genius. Could you imagine if Wall Street was hacked? Could you imagine if critical parts of our infrastructure were hacked and shut down? Cyber Warfare is no longer science fiction…it’s science fact.

Terrorism: The face of terrorism is always changing, and we need to be proactive about it, not reactive. Terrorists are always looking for the easiest way to do the most amount of damage, and I guarantee attacking our power grid is on their minds. I’m actually surprised this hasn’t happened in a European country yet because it’s so easy for terrorists to infiltrate their society.

Life Changing/Country Changing event

Expect-the-unexpectedThis list is how likely I feel some of these disaster scenarios are, and how my prepping priorities have changed. However, this does not mean I take any of these threats less serious than the others. We always need to expect the unexpected, and watch for the curve ball. If we focus too much on one area we are bound to get blindsided by something we should have seen coming.

There are also quite a few other disaster scenarios that I didn’t put on this list, like natural disasters, and disasters that hit closer to home like death, illness and job loss. If you have anything you would add to the list, let me know in the comments below…

 

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7 Instant And Natural Winter Survival Shelters

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7 Instant And Natural Winter Survival Shelters

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I’ve been in survival situations numerous times — usually because of bad luck or sheer stupidity. The two worst ones occurred in winter, and, thankfully, I survived.

Winter is unforgiving in a survival situation. The only advantage is that the snow and ice are delivering you a regular water source that’s typically safe to drink when melted.  After that, everything else is worse.

The critical first step is staying warm, building a fire and sustaining it. But there’s a second priority that’s equally important: shelter.

But before you exhaust yourself scrambling to find the branches, boughs and other materials to build a shelter, take the time to look for a natural shelter.

1. Low-growing pines

You may have seen a pine tree with its boughs overloaded with snow. It’s not an inviting sight, but if you spread the boughs and look at the base of the tree you may be surprised to see dry ground around the trunk. This is one of the ways that nature can provide you with an instant shelter that will protect you from the wind and snow.

7 Instant And Natural Winter Survival Shelters

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If you cut away a few low-hanging branches you can build a fire that will provide some heat. You also could build the Swedish “upside-down fire” even if you can’t clear all of the snow off the ground. We’ll cover that at the end of this article.

2. Large deadfalls

A large tree, whether it be a pine or deciduous, will often create a natural canopy over an area of ground if it has been toppled. Here again, you’re looking for that precious bare ground that says it may stay that way over a period of time. You could carefully clear some branches for a fire to provide some heat, but you’ll need to guard against snow melt.

3. Root cavity of large uprooted trees

We have a cabin in Michigan. One summer, a violent windstorm uprooted a monster oak not far from the cabin. It was a green tree, so I was going to wait until the next summer to cut it up. During the winter, I was walking and noticed the snow-covered and sand-encased roots forming a natural canopy over the hole left by the roots. It was dry and no snow had entered. I climbed down and was surprised that the sand was still soft and unfrozen. It was cozy but a bit claustrophobic. In an emergency, I would have gotten over that fairly quickly.  It was my first experience in a literal root cellar.

Learn The Secrets and Tricks Of The Word’s Top Survivalists!

Large uprooted trees are fairly common in heritage forests, so keep a look out and you might find your own natural root cellar as a winter shelter.

4. Caves

If you’re fortunate enough to find a cave, you’ve found nature’s natural penthouse.  However, advance cautiously. You’re not the only animal in the woods trying to survive the winter, and some of the other animals have bigger teeth.

Caves are also ideal for capturing the heat of a fire. Build the fire as large as you want.

5. Rock canyons

7 Instant And Natural Winter Survival Shelters

Image source: Pixabay.com

In some parts of North America there are natural rock canyons. They’re often narrow in parts and both the snow and wind have a hard time getting into them. That’s a good thing.  Here again, you can haul in your firewood and build a significant fire to stay warm. If you’re worried about animals using your canyon as a pathway at night, build fires on either side of you in the canyon. Just make sure they’re small enough so that you can jump over them.

6. Rock overhangs

There are occasions along a cliff face that a natural depression will occur, resulting in an overhang. It’s not as cozy as a cave, but it could protect you from precipitation and the wind, depending on the wind direction. It’s also a good environment to enjoy the heat of a fire; the rock at your back and around you should reflect the heat nicely. You just have to hope the wind doesn’t shift and fill your little enclosure with snow drifts.

7. Large boulders

It’s a bit odd to be walking through the woods and encounter a large boulder in the middle of nowhere. It’s so odd that geologists call them “erratics.” They’re erratic because they don’t geologically belong there. They were delivered by the glaciers as they advanced south during the Ice Age.

An erratic has some benefits. For one, the leeward side (the side opposite the wind) will often have less snow on the ground and will protect you from the prevailing wind. It also can serve as an excellent heat reflector. You can sit with your back against the wall of the boulder, and the fire will heat you and the rock face. Or you can build the fire at the base of the boulder to allow the rock to act as a huge reflector. This assumes you have a clear night without precipitation.

Do you know of other instant and natural winter survival shelters? Share your tips in the section below:

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.