Things To Make With 55 Gallon Plastic Barrels

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10 Awesome Things To Make With 55 Gallon Plastic Barrels With Spring just around the corner I wanted to go hunting for some fun upcycling projects for my self. I came across a lot of new and interesting projects, but non as awesome as this one I am sharing with you all today. Because I …

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How To Pitch A Tent Without Poles In An Emergency

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How To Pitch A Tent Without Poles In An Emergency Knowing how to pitch a tent with no poles may not sound like life saving knowledge.. but if you think about things for a second it actually is! Say you are camping and you forgot the poles, what happens if a bear ruins the poles …

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Why You May Need To Stockpile Supplements For SHTF

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Why You Need To Stockpile Supplements For SHTF I am not a doctor or a medical professional this is for information purposes only. Please consult with a medical professional if you have any questions or you start to take any supplements. Even in healthy people, multivitamins and other supplements may help to prevent vitamin and …

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Do It Yourself Sweet Cream Butter

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DIY Sweet Cream Butter Making butter is really easy, I make it all the time when I am home over the summer! I personally LOVE sweet cream butter over any other butters. I love the rich flavor it gives and again it’s so easy to make. Knowing how to make butter if SHTF is a …

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Does Chicken Soup REALLY Heal Colds? (And If So, What’s The Best Recipe?)

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Does Chicken Soup REALLY Heal Colds? (And If So, What’s The Best Recipe?)

Image source: Pixabay.com

When my kids don’t feel well, one of the only things they will eat is chicken soup – my homemade chicken soup.

But do they want the soup because it represents a strong comfort food they have known all of their lives, or is there something more?

The answer is yes, and the old wives’ tale is right. Chicken soup really is good for you.

Dr. Stephen Rennard and his team of researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha conducted a series of tests to study the health benefits of chicken soup.

“Everyone’s heard this from their mother and grandmother in many cultures,” Rennard said. “We found chicken soup might have some anti-inflammatory value.”

After examining blood samples from study volunteers, the researchers found that homemade chicken soup reduced the movement of a type of white blood cells, called neutrophils, which help defend against infection. By inhibiting movement of these cells in the body, chicken soup can help reduce upper respiratory cold symptoms, Rennard theorized.

“Researchers suspect the reduction in movement of neutrophils may reduce activity in the upper respiratory tract that can cause symptoms associated with a cold,” the University of Nebraska said in a press release.

Fast, All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effects!

The study used a soup made by Rennard’s wife, Barbara. (The recipe is below.) But is also compared results of the homemade soup with several commercial brands of chicken soup and found similar results. The brands tested included Progresso chicken noodle, Knorr chicken noodle, Campbell’s Home Cookin’ chicken vegetable, Lipton Cup-a-Soup chicken noodle and Campbell’s Healthy Request chicken noodle.

Although they were not able to pinpoint exactly what ingredients made the soup so effective against cold symptoms, the research suggested that it is the combination of chicken and vegetables that does the trick.

Does Chicken Soup REALLY Heal Colds? (And If So, What’s The Best Recipe?) An earlier study conducted by researchers at Mount Sinai in Miami found that consuming chicken soup helped sick study volunteers to breath better and to have less mucus. The 1978 report, which, like the 2000 Rennard study was published in the medical journal Chest, found that chicken soup boosts the function of cilia — the microscopic hair-like projections that help prevent germs from entering the body.

Given the nickname “Jewish penicillin,” chicken soup has been a mainstay for generations of mothers and grandmothers from many cultures who seek to comfort their families.

Some scientists theorize that chicken soup has anti-inflammatory properties and that the soup provides the fluids needed to flush out viral infections in the upper respiratory tract.

Staying well-hydrated is a key part of recovering from a cold or the flu. Research suggests then chicken soup may provide better hydration than either water or commercial electrolyte drinks. Here are other reasons chicken soup heals:

  • Chicken soup usually contains salt, which in a broth can help soothe your throat much in the same way that gargling with warm salt water can.
  • The soup’s warm liquid can help clear the sinuses with its steam.
  • Chicken provides lean protein to give your body strength when you are sick.
  • The vegetables in chicken soup can help heal the body. Carrots contain beta-carotene and celery contains vitamin C, both of which help boost the body’s immune system and help fight infection. Onions help reduce inflammation and can act as an anti-histamine.

Convinced? Here is the recipe for the soup used in the study:

Ingredients

  • 1 5- to 6-pound stewing hen or baking chicken
  • 1 package of chicken wings
  • 3 large onions
  • 1 large sweet potato
  • 3 parsnips
  • 2 turnips
  • 11 to 12 large carrots
  • 5 to 6 celery stems
  • 1 bunch of parsley
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Clean the chicken, put it in a large pot and cover it with cold water. Bring the water to boil.
  2. Add the chicken wings, onions, sweet potato, parsnips, turnips and carrots. Boil about 1 and a half hours. Remove fat from the surface as it accumulates.
  3. Add the parsley and celery. Cook the mixture about 45 min. longer.
  4. Remove the chicken. The chicken is not used further for the soup. (The meat makes excellent chicken parmesan.)
  5. Put the vegetables in a food processor until they are chopped fine or pass through a strainer. Both were performed in the present study.
  6. Add salt and pepper to taste.

(Note: This soup freezes well.)

Matzo balls were prepared according to the recipe on the back of the box of matzo meal (Manischewitz).

What is your favorite chicken soup recipe? Do you eat chicken soup when you are sick? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Every Year, Gardeners Make This Stupid Mistake — But You Don’t Have To. Read More Here.

Heizer’s Newest Pocket Pistol Is Super-Low-Recoil … And Semi-Auto, Too

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Heizer’s Newest Pocket Pistol Is Super-Low-Recoil … And Semi-Auto

Image source: Heizer

Heizer Defense, famed for its fashion-forward, rifle-caliber derringers, will break new ground in late April.

At the U.S. Concealed Carry Expo, the company will release its first semi-auto pocket pistol, called the PKO45. As the name implies, it is chambered in 45 ACP.

Heizer reps call this a concept gun in which every feature is the interpretation of an ideal. Company founder Charlie Heizer has aching wrists from his cycle racing days, so central to construction was recoil management. With that in mind, the bore axis is set extremely low, with the guide rod being on top of a fixed, stainless steel barrel.

Like other Heizer Defense firearms, the entire gun is made of aerospace-grade stainless steel. It should be an extremely durable shooter. It has a tidy profile, just 0.8 inches wide, with snag-resistant edges all around. It weighs 25 ounces unloaded. Heizer says the PKO45 is the thinnest of its caliber on the market.

Operation is single-action only, with an internal hammer. True to single-action design, it has a grip safety — but not where expected. It’s on the front of the grip, just under the trigger guard. The recoil spring and slide are built for easy racking, another accommodation to hand injuries.

Be Prepared. Learn The Best Ways To Hide Your Guns.

Magazines come in five- and seven-round capacity, both included with purchase. The mags are built on a Kimber body, with a Springfield XDS follower, and capped with what might be the industry’s first 3D-printed baseplate — a Heizer Defense invention.

Heizer’s Newest Pocket Pistol Is Super-Low-Recoil … And Semi-AutoThere’s an easy-to-operate safety lever on each side of the frame. I’m all for equality, but given the ease with which most manual safeties can be disengaged from the side of a handgun that’s exposed when the gun is holstered, a changeable lever would be preferable.

Hi-Viz sights are standard; TruGlo sights are an optional upgrade that I’d invest in were I purchasing a PKO.

Heizer Defense guns are known for standout finishes, and that tradition continues with the PKO45. Color choices are called copperhead, ghost grey, champagne and tactical black.

During the fall of 2016, I got to shoot a seven-round mag of ammo through a test model of the PKO45. It is indeed accurate; the trigger has a good feel and reset, akin to an off-the-shelf 1911. If I have to have a grip safety, this front-strap style would be my choice; my palms have hollow spots that sometimes disengage a backstrap grip safety just enough to cause an occasional malfunction.

Despite their abiding affection for big calibers, Heizer Defense is planning on meeting popular demand for a 9mm version in the near future. That one will be one to watch.

The PKO45 carries a $999 MSRP, with $849 predicted as the actual price. With its pricing and radically different styling, it won’t be for everyone. But those who choose a PKO45 will likely find it’s tough enough to last a lifetime. And there’s great peace of mind knowing it’s made in the USA by a family who understands that the United States of America is still the land of the free. The memory of political oppression in Hungary always will be fresh in the mind of Charlie Heizer, immigrant and Heizer Defense founder. His appreciation of the opportunities available in this great nation has been passed down to his children, who as adults now operate the business he established.

Would you consider buying a PKO45? Share your thoughts on this new gun in the section below:

If The Grid’s Down And You Don’t Have Ammo, What Would You Do? Read More Here.

The First 15 Foods You Should Stockpile For Disaster

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The First 15 Foods You Should Stockpile For Disaster

Image source: TheKrazyCouponLady.com

 

A good stockpile of food will go a long way toward helping you survive the aftermath of any disaster or life crisis, especially when grocery stores are emptied.

In fact, I’d go so far as to say that there are people who are not preppers who nevertheless instinctively know to stockpile food. This really isn’t surprising when you consider that through most of mankind’s history, stockpiling food was essential to survival — specifically surviving the winter months. During those months, wildlife is bedded down trying to stay warm and plants are dormant. If one didn’t have a good stockpile of food, their chances of survival were pretty darn slim.

But knowing to stockpile food and knowing what to stockpile are two different things. The vast majority of what the average American family eats is unsuitable for stockpiling, because it falls into one of three categories:

  • Junk food – Lots of carbs, lots of sugar, lots of salt and lots of chemicals, but not much nutrition.
  • Fresh food – Foods that won’t keep without refrigeration.
  • Frozen food – It will begin to spoil within two days of losing electrical power.

So we need to come up with other foods — foods that will give us a lot of nutrition and also have the ability to be stored for a prolonged period of time. Here are what we consider the 15 most important ones:

  1. Beans – This is one of the more common survival foods. Not only are beans plentiful and cheap, but they provide a lot of protein — something that’s hard to find without meat.
  2. White rice – The perfect companion to beans. An excellent source of carbohydrates, and it stores well. [Note: Don’t store brown rice, which contains oils and will spoil.]
  3. Canned vegetables – A good way of adding micro-nutrients to your survival diet. Canned goods keep well, long past the expiration date on the label.
  4. Canned fruit – For something sweet, adding canned fruit allows you a nice change of diet. Being canned, they keep as well as the vegetables do.
  5. Canned meats – Of all the ways of preserving meat, canning is the most secure in protecting the meat from decomposition. While it doesn’t typically have as good a flavor as fresh meat, it still provides animal protein at the most reasonable price you’ll find.
  6. Honey – As long as you can keep the ants out of it, honey keeps forever. Plus, it is beneficial during cold season.
  7. Salt – Nature’s preservative. Most means of preserving foods require the use of salt. In addition, our bodies need to consume salt for survival.
  8. Pasta products – Pasta is a great source of carbohydrates, allowing you a lot of variety in your cooing. Besides that, it’s a great comfort food for kids. Who doesn’t like spaghetti?
  9. Spaghetti sauce – Obviously, you need this to go with the pasta. But it is also great for hiding the flavor of things your family doesn’t like to eat. Pretty much anything, with spaghetti sauce on it, tastes like Italian food — whether you’re talking about some sort of unusual vegetable or a raccoon that you caught pilfering from your garden.
  10. Jerky – While expensive to buy, jerky is pure meat, with only the addition of spices. Its high salt content allows it to store well, making it a great survival food. It can be reconstituted by adding it to soups and allowing it to cook.
  11. Peanut butter – Another great source of protein and another great comfort food, especially for the kiddies. It might be a good idea to stockpile some jelly to go with it.
  12. Wheat flour – For baking, especially baking bread. Bread is an important source of carbohydrates for most Americans. Flour also allows you to shake up the diet with the occasional batch of cookies or a cake.
  13. Baking powder & baking soda – Also for making the bread, cookies or cakes.
  14. Bouillon – Otherwise known as “soup starter,” this allows you to make the broth without having to boil bones on the stove for hours. Soups will probably be an important part of anyone’s diet in a survival situation, as they allow you to eat almost anything. Just throw it together in a pot and you’ve got soup.
  15. Water – We don’t want to forget to stockpile a good supply of water. You’ll go through much more than you expect. Experts recommend a minimum of one gallon per person per day, but remember: That’s just for drinking.

While this doesn’t constitute a complete list of every type of food that you should stockpile, it’s a good starting point. You’ll want more variety than this, but in reality, your family can survive for quite a while with just the 15 things on this list.

As your stockpile grows, add variety to it. One way of doing that is to create a three-week menu, with the idea of repeating that menu over and over. If you have everything you need to cook everything on that menu, you’ll have a fair assortment of food, and enough so that your family shouldn’t grow tired of it.

What would you add to our list? Share your tips in the section below:

9 Clever Ways To Jump Start Your Garden During Winter

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9 Clever Ways To Jump Start Your Garden During Winter

Image source: Wikimedia

While garden season may seem a lifetime away when you’re hauling wood and shoveling snow mid-winter, there are many things you can be doing now to ensure a healthy, productive garden in the coming season.

1. Collect wood ash

Wood ash, used in moderate amounts, makes excellent garden fertilizer. The ash is comprised of non-combustible minerals that the tree took out of the soil to fuel its metabolism. Those concentrated nutrients can go back onto your garden soil or into your compost to give both a boost. Wood ash can impact soil pH, so use in moderation.

2. Browse seed catalogs

Real gardening starts with mid-winter dreaming. Browsing seed and nursery catalogs early can help ensure that you’re organized and prepared in the spring. It also can build a good bit of excitement to keep your mood up until the warm weather comes back. Try something new this year and consider planting varieties you’ve never even heard of.

3. Start a worm compost bin

Compost bins tend to stall in the winter as the cold temperatures slow down micro-organisms from decomposing your food scraps into nutrient-rich fertilizer. An indoor worm compost bin is an easy way to keep your compost going all year to ensure you have an ample supply to start seeds in the early spring.

4. Research new methods

Have you heard of permaculture? Back to Eden gardening? Hydroponics? Tomato grafting? Small scale mushroom farming?

Looking For Non-GMO Seeds? Get Them From A Company You Can Trust!

There are all sorts of innovative gardening and food production techniques that go well beyond just planting a few novelty tomatoes in a raised bed. Use the winter to research new methods to keep your mind sharp and your garden fresh and exciting.

5. Build cold frames

Winter is a great time to build a few cold frames either to get your garden started earlier in the spring, or to extend the season later into the fall. Cold frames are like mini-greenhouses that insulate a small area or growing bed from the mild conditions of the “shoulder seasons” or spring and fall. If you get started assembling a few now, they’ll be ready to be set out with greens by late winter, giving you a heads start on the gardening season.

6. Start long-season seeds

9 Clever Ways To Jump Start Your Garden During Winter

Image source: Pixabay.com

While most garden crops, such as tomatoes, need to be started just six weeks before the last expected frost date, there are others that will need to be started as early as mid-winter if you expect to have a full harvest. Leeks and onions need to be started from seed indoors as much as 10-12 weeks before the last spring frost. Early cold weather crops that you’ll want to plant and hope to harvest before the mid-summer heat, such as broccoli, also might need to be planted well before your other seeds.

7. Trim or cut shading trees

Most annual garden crops need full sun to produce full crops in a single summer season. Winter is a great time to prune back branches to ensure that your garden beds are getting as much sun as possible.  With the trees dormant, winter trimming will do the least damage to them in the long term. Winter also is a great time to cut down trees. With the soil frozen and leaves gone, cleanup will be much easier.

8. Plan a root cellar

If it’s mid-winter and you’re desperately missing your garden produce, perhaps take this time to plan ahead for next year to ensure that your garden provides for you a bit longer. Root cellars don’t need to be complicated affairs involving lots of land or heavy equipment for digging. Even a cold closet on the north side of your house can keep storage squash in prime condition all winter long. Evaluate the space you have and determine if you can convert part of your basement to cold storage, or in warmer areas, perhaps a buried cooler or refrigerator just outside the back door will be sufficient to keep things cool.

9. Force perennials indoors

Consider planning ahead to force perennials indoors. Rhubarb and asparagus roots are some of the simplest plants to dig in late fall or early winter and store in cool moist soil in a basement or back closet until you’re ready to give them an early start. Planted in buckets and brought into a warm room in the house, both rhubarb and asparagus can provide a dependable indoor harvest over a few weeks, even in January.

How do you jump start your garden? Share your tips in the section below:

Bust Inflation With A Low-Cost, High-Production Garden. Read More Here.

9 Tools the Practical Prepper Should Carry Every Day

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9 Tools the Practical Prepper Should Carry Every Day Everyday Carry is not a new concept. Whether you are a prepper or not, you carry items on your person each and every day. Adding useful tools to what you carry every day can make you more prepared for more situations. Focusing on what you happen …

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7 News Brisbane spreading misinformation, fear mongering. Is 7 News Brisbane anti-gun?

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7 News Brisbane spreading misinformation regarding the so called Ghost Gun. 7 News Brisbane report that these guns are being 3D printed in America & sold in Australia! Total Bullshit! The process they refer to is called “milling”, & these milling machines are well known in engineering workshops worldwide & nothing new. Further more these guns are illegal in Australia & will not be allowed through customs unless smuggled in.
This is 7 News Brisbane fear mongering to try & up their ratings, I also see it as backing the Liberals Terror Campaign. DO NOT pay any attention in future to news reports from 7 News Brisbane. They can’t be trusted.

Recovering a Trailer with a Stump Puller Pipe

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I really want to build a reciprocal roof pavilion at the land. I think that it will give me lots of usable space, shade, and a great place to give classes and hang out. My problem is that information on building a roof like this is hard to find on the internet. I get that […]

The post Recovering a Trailer with a Stump Puller Pipe appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

10/22 mag pouches

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I had posted about this a while back, but the post got lost in The Great Server Migration, so I figured I’d bring the subject back up. As you know, I came into a *ahem* ‘large’ quantity of Ruger 10/22 magazines last month. As I was putting ’em away for the Deep Sleep, I came across a couple things:

20170212_12215620170212_122222 20170212_122336-120170212_122343-1

Back around 2014 I came across this post over at Jerking The Trigger, mentioning Triple Stitch Tactical. Up to that point I hadn’t seen any sort of magazine pouches for 10/22 mags. Some back-n-forth emails with the folks at TST wound up with me getting the pouches shown above. Nowadays, it’s a slightly different story…there are other sources for this sort of thing. However, I really liked the TST pouch, admired their willingness to work on custom stuff (for example, the single pouch in the picture is the second one the sent. They sent me one, I gave some suggested feedback, and the second one totally nailed what I was looking for.)

The chest rig has MOLLE backing and some other attachment points, so I’m not wearing it as a chest rig (unless we are somehow threatened as a species from a sudden overabundance of ground squirrels and rabbits). But it’s an exceptionally handy way to mount several mags on your belt or pack for when you’re out knocking down ‘gophers’ in someones alfalfa field.

Speaking of…still a few 10/22 mag sets left. Get ’em while they’re get-able.

Making a Stump Puller Pipe

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In this article I will show making a stump puller pipe.  There isn’t much on the internet on doing this, but the technique is pretty old.  The problem with pulling stumps is that they are set to resist lateral pressure from pulling them sideways.  They (and those old cedar posts) come out much easier if […]

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How To Make The Ultimate Fishing Lure From A Spoon

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How To Make The Ultimate Fishing Lure From A Spoon Spoons are one of the most popular fishing lures on the market. They work to catch a wide variety of species in both salt and fresh water. Most spoons cost from $3-5, but watch the video below and see the guys at Real Outdoor Reviews explain how anyone can make one for less than a $1! Step 1: Clamp the spoon onto the scrap wood. Make sure the clamp is seated well on the spoon. Step 2: Using your metal drill bit, drill a hole in both ends of the

The post How To Make The Ultimate Fishing Lure From A Spoon appeared first on Mental Scoop.

Be Our Guest – Food Preserving Part 2

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Creek, Food Preservation, Off-grid, Refrigeration, Spring House,

Want a spring house but have no spring? Diverting water from a small creek is an option

In Part I, I covered canning and smoking as food preservation methods. This aricle take a look at refrigeration and dehydration.

Freezing and refrigeration is the easy way to preserve food compared to some other methods. The only problem is, once frozen or cooled it has to stay that way until consumption.

Before the wonders of electricity and modern technology, how did people do this?

On farms and in small villages it was common to have a spring house which would provide natural refrigeration. A stone building with troughs dug into the ground on which the house stood would be built over a natural spring. Water from the spring would flow through the troughs and jugs of milk or other produce could be placed in the channels. These would then be kept cool as the water flowed around them. Ledges and hooks would also be provided in the spring house, to hang meat and vegetables in a cooler environment.

If the house wasn’t built over a natural spring, water could be redirected from a nearby creek. Initially some spring houses were made of wood, however this was prone to rotting. Stone therefore is the better material, not only does it hold the cold better but it won’t decompose or decay with time.

Fancy building your own spring house? You can find out more at Bright Hub.

Another option which was used before electricity and still used today is root cellars.

These underground rooms stay cool in the summer but above freezing in the winter – perfect for fruits, vegetables and canned goods. The cool temperatures prevent bacterial growth and the humidity prevents withering. Ideally the cellar will have temperatures between 30 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit, have low levels of sunshine, good insulation from materials such as straw or soil and be easily accessible.

Root cellars come in a variety of forms from walk in rooms to putting trash cans in the ground to create a “mini” cellar. If you’re on a tight budget, take a look at this video by the Walden Effect, who made a root cellar out of an old refrigerator.

Speaking of refrigerators, if you want to be a bit more tech-centric, then there are various options for off-grid cold food storage.
Propane fridge, RV, off-grid, food preservation, chest freezer, solar freezer

RV owners have relied on propane fridges for many years – but are they worth the cost?

Propane fridges have been a staple for many RV owners and in off-grid homes. Some models can run off propane, DC or AC, making them more flexible. Although these appliances are good for keeping food cold and frozen with ample storage, they do require some maintenance and if they break down can be expensive to repair. Not only this, propane may be unavailable or very expensive to get hold of in certain areas and some propane fridge models can be extremely “fuel hungry” – not exactly the most economical option. There is also an initial investment of over $1,000. Take the Dometic DM2652 on Amazon at $1,119.99. This model measures 24 x 23 x 53.8 inches and so is perfect size for an RV, if you’re willing to spend the money.

Solar power refrigerators are also gaining ground.

Some of which can be hooked up directly to solar panels, running off direct current. The EcoSolarCool Solar Refrigerator on Amazon operates on 12 or 24 DC volts and is reported to be the most efficient solar refrigerator when tested against two other leading brands also advertised on Amazon. Coming in at 121lb, this stand-alone 25.3 x 23.6 x 57.1 inch model is a good size with just over 9 cubic feet capacity for storage. It comes with an upper freezer compartment and a lower refrigerator compartment. With prices starting at $1299.00 though, this is also an appliance that comes with a rather large price tag.

Another alternative is investing in a chest freezer.

These range in price but can be fairly inexpensive and have good storage space. Plus they can average under 2 amps when running. However, because of its shape (it’s a chest) rummaging around for the food you want can be a pain. Chest freezers can also develop condensation and it is best to buy a separate thermostat to monitor the temperature. Some chest freezers come ready to be run by solar power such as the Sundanzer Solar-Powered Refrigerator – 1.8 Cubic Ft., “>Sundanzer Refrigerator, specifically designed for off-grid use.

If you want a more DIY approach and temporary refrigeration then a zeer pot could be the answer.

Popular in Africa, zeer pots are essentially one terracotta pot inside another. One pot must be small enough to fit inside the other pot, but large enough to hold whatever you want to keep cool. The gap between the two pots is filled with sand and then water. The process of evaporative cooling keeps the inner pot much cooler than the outside environment. Although this is not cool enough for meat storage, it is still an option for other produce such as vegetables. If you fancy making your own zeer pot, have a read of this.

From keeping things cold to heating things up! Another food preservation technique is dehydration.

Efficient with zero energy input and little hands on time required, dehydration is perhaps one of the easiest ways to preserve food. The downsides to dehydration are that even though foods weigh less and so are easier to store, there is a longer time for food preparation later when making meals. Also dehydrated food can have a different taste (and texture obviously) to fresh produce. If using a solar dehydration method then you are limited to when the sun is out. This may not be such a problem at lower latitudes, but higher latitudes can be very restricted in their “sun time”.

Dehydrator, food preservation, solar, off-grid

Dehydrating foods can be done in a variety of ways from drying in the sun to using an electric dehydrator

Herbs and greens are the easiest foods to dehydrate; they dry quickly with no slicing required. Fruits and veggies are a little trickier; they need to be sliced thinly or diced into small pieces for drying. Smaller fruits like blueberries should be punctured to allow the moisture to escape during the process. Meat and fish are the most challenging to dry safely. The cuts need to be sliced as thinly as possible and be kept in a constant supply of warm air. Salting first will help with the preservation. Meat and fish especially should be stored in a cool place after drying to ensure they last for a few months.

So what can you use for dehydrating?

Firstly, you could invest in an electric dehydrator. These are probably the most convenient option for setting up (with no babysitting) but require a power source. The Excalibur Food Dehydrator being sold on Amazon at $244.95 is one such appliance. With nine large trays boasting 15 square feet of drying space, you can hardly complain for lack of room. But despite this the whole body is not overly large at 17 x 19 x 12.5 inches. An adjustable thermostat ensures you dry at the temperature you want and a 26 hour timer means you can walk away without the fear of forgetting about your food!

If you want to go down the solar dehydrator route, there are pre-assembled options. For instance the Hanging Food Pantrie Solar Food Dehydrator has five drying trays and protects food from insects and pests whilst using the suns energy to dry the food. No noisy fans and it’s collapsible for easy storage after use. Retailing on Amazon at $59.99, this is an option if you want something that stores well but also has good drying space.

Alternatively, you can go the whole hog and build your own solar dehydrator.

There are many variations and the beauty of this option is you can adapt the design to suit your needs. The basic components are a heat collector and a drying box. The heat collector has a clear plastic top which heats the air inside causing it to rise up and into the drying box. This is typically made of plywood with trays to rest the food on top of. Strategically placed vents help to control the air flow into and out of the dehydrator box to keep a constant circulation around the food.

If you want more detailed information on building your own solar dehydrator, take a look at this guide.

The post Be Our Guest – Food Preserving Part 2 appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

EDC Survival Flashlight Buyers Guide for 2017

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Any old flashlight lying around the house just won’t cut it when it comes to assembling the proper survival kit. Aside from being impractical in the wild, these flashlights won’t last long on the great outdoors. You would want to acquire the best survival flashlight around. But what’s the best EDC (everyday carry) flashlight for survival? We take a look at some important elements of what makes an excellent survival flashlight.

 

A. Situations Where A Survival Flashlight Comes In Handy

All people can certainly use a flashlight in almost all kinds of survival situations. The most obvious one is using the flashlight to illuminate a path or an object of interest. When the power goes out inside the house during a severe storm or natural disaster, or when your car breaks down out of nowhere in the middle of the night, you’d surely appreciate having a portable light you can carry with you.

Survival EDC flashlights can come in sporting different filters, which serve different purposes. Green filters are used for hunting game when it’s dark. Red filters strengthen your ability to see in the dark. Blue filters can help you read maps better during nighttime. Larger EDC flashlights can act as a self-defense tool in the form of billy clubs. Imagine being able to fend off animal and human attackers at night using what’s on your hand instead of fumbling around your pockets or being encumbered with a pepper spray or handgun.

Rounding out the best EDC flashlight features are built-in strobe patterns that can act as a signal in emergencies. These could be used to notify search parties about your presence and location, or call on your hiking party for a quick huddle. It sure beats having to expend your breath and shouting at the top of your lungs, right?

 

B. How To Choose The Best EDC Flashlight

1) Lumens

A lumen is a measure of how capable a source of light is for illumination purposes. In layman’s terms, it’s how bright your survival flashlight is. The unit of measure grows stronger as it goes up. So, the more lumens a flashlight has, the brighter the beam of light it can produce.

Most of the flashlights being advertised will list their lumen capacity on the features and on the package. Online, the company will include it on their product description section. Knowing how many lumens you’ll need is probably the single most important aspect in choosing a proper survival flashlight. After all, what’s a flashlight if it can’t shine a light and help you see more clearly in the dark?

The least amount of measured brightness is around 10 lumens. At the far end, some of the rescue lights being offered in the market reach a staggering 18k lumens! You’ll have to determine how you’d most likely use your flashlight to select the right amount of lumens. Here’s a basic chart:

35 to 100 lumens. EDC flashlights that range somewhere from 35 to a hundred lumens can be used for general purposes on the outdoors. They can be called upon to throw helpful light in a considerable distance. You can buy these flashlight types for camping, hiking, etc.

100 lumens or more. Flashlights that have 100 or more lumens are more towards tactical applications. They are typically carried and utilized by night watchmen, police, security guards and firemen. Flashing 150 lumens of light can cause temporary blindness, while a 300 lumen brightness can cause temporary blindness during daytime on enclosed areas.

1000 lumens or more. EDC lamps that tout anywhere from 100 to a thousand lumens are primarily used for search and rescue operations. The extra bright beams of light are handy when exploring caves and extreme outdoor applications. The throw of these flashlight types are typically at a hundred feet or more.

So, what this means is you’ll probably need a survival flashlight having 60 or more lumens to be able to disorient aggressors and get a clean escape. Should you wish to stop an attacker dead in their tracks, then 120 lumens should be sufficient to cause temporary blindness.

Overall, lumens aren’t only useful for illuminating, but they can be used in the self-defense aspect of survival as well. Having a handy weapon around, and the ability to see your immediate surrounding environment can put you at a great advantage. What’s more, a lengthy EDC flashlight can be used to strike a person or an animal, giving you precious time to safely escape unharmed.

 

2) Bulb Type

Incandescent bulbs have been part of our lives since its invention, but it’s time LEDs took over. A LED, or light emitting diode-based survival flashlight outperforms incandescent on all measures. They beat out incandescent in terms of efficiency, the output of luminiscent brightness, in toughness and battery consumption. They aren’t as fragile as incandescent and wouldn’t easily break when used on outdoor applications.



3) Battery Type

There’s a direct correlation between the size of an EDC survival flashlight and the type of battery it uses. In this case, the bigger the flashlight, the more power it needs. Micro survival flashlights use the kind of batteries used in watches. The larger ones make use of CR2, CR123A, triple A or AA batteries in order to function.

Standard AA-based flashlights have the advantage because of the nature of AA batteries. Because AA batteries have been around for a good number of years, they are common and can easily be procured. They have become reliable power sources for many electronic gadgets and lighting sources, including flashlights. Moreover, the reliability of these batteries are tried and tested.

Some of these flashlights make use of non-standard battery types. Some of the following include 18650s, CR123As and the Li-ion varieties. CR123 batteries are typically lighter than their counterparts, which can reduce the heft of your EDC flashlight. Lithium batteries are great performers against the colder temperatures.

Not all battery types are the same. Here’s how to determine the best battery type according to your needs:

Survivalists who prefer availability and reliability can pick out EDC flashlights that are powered by AA batteries. If you value efficiency and a powerful, yet lightweight performance, then you can browse amongst survival flashlights that are powered by CR123 batteries.

CR123 batteries pack quite the punch and are lightweight, but the disadvantage is that it comes with a more expensive price tag. They do provide a much more noticeable lumens output, but chances are you won’t be able to buy them at a convenience store. AA batteries can be bought easily in hardware, convenience and grocery stores.

 

4) Flashlight Size

Size is an important factor when making an excellent EDC gear. The general rule is that you should keep things small and compact. After all, not everyone wants to lug around a heavy bag full of bulky equipment as they travel outdoors. You might be surprised to find a variety of different-sized EDC flashlights. There are pen-shaped ones, ones that can be latched on a keychain, and ones that come with their very own pocket clips.

  • EDC survival flashlights are categorized into different sizes:
  • Micro survival flashlights are 2 inches and below
  • Mini survival flashlights are 3 inches and below
  • Small survival flashlights are 4 inches and below
  • Medium survival flashlights are between 4 to 6 inches

A good compromise between size and brightness is a medium EDC survival flashlight that offers around 100 lumens or more. The small-sized ones definitely have the advantage when it comes to portability, but they contain tiny batteries and provide less illumination. The rule is that a smaller EDC flashlight is more compact but it won’t be any good if attackers come your way. You will need to bring in another self-defense tool to fend off your aggressors.

 

5) Shock Resistance

Shock resistance is a must-have for any survival equipment, especially EDC flashlights. Check and see if the product has passed the ANSI FL1 standards. A seal would mean your EDC flashlight will be able to take a beating. Don’t be confused with the attached details- the numbers mean how high it can withstand a direct impact to a solid concrete platform. More often than not, a shock-resistant survival flashlight means it has an LED as its light emitter source.

 

6) Waterproof Rating

Being outside means you’ll experience a lot of constant environmental conditions in the course of a day. When it’s dark, raining or flooding, you will surely need a waterproof EDC flashlight to get through the dangers unscathed.

Most high-end quality EDC lights will have waterproof ratings. Most of the others should sport at least a water-resistant rating. Check the product description or the box for the IPX code rating, which is the standard testing for water resisting features and capabilities. Bottom line is to expect a waterproof rating on the product listing. If you don’t see one, then move on and find an EDC light that does.

 

7) Body Construction Material

The survival flashlight has to work whenever you push the on button. It has to be tough and made or durable material. If you plan on taking it with you each day, make sure that it can withstand the stress of everyday wear and tear. For this matter you should take a grain of salt when considering cheaper survival flashlights. Aside from the aspects mentioned above (waterproof, shock resistance, etc), your everyday flashlight should be made of quality materials, and its lens scratch and shatterproof.

Even if you don’t take it out of your bag or pocket, you can be sure that your EDC light will experience bruising, bumping and drops in a regular manner. With this in mind, it’s best to choose a product that is made of anodized aluminum, preferably hard anodized type III material. Stainless steel and titanium shells are acceptable, but they are typically more costly than one sporting an anodized aluminum construction. All 3 are perfectly fine and each have their own advantages. Aluminum is the jack of all trades in terms of heft, cost and durability. Stainless steel is tough but it’s also quite heavy. Titanium can be as durable as steel and twice as tough as aluminum while having only around 60 percent more heft than aluminum.

 

8) Weight

Survival experts will tell you to consider compact items as long as they provide enough utility value. Pocket-sized EDC flashlights are good. Medium sized survival lights are excellent if they are made of light materials such as titanium or aluminum. A flashlight that is powered by CR123 batteries is also an acceptable option. Keep the weight factor under 5 ounces if you plan on carrying them in your pockets all day.

 

9) Beam Features

An adjustable beam feature is much more useful than you’d think. It makes for a pretty versatile survival flashlight. Tune it to illuminate a wide area for search or travel applications, or tune it to a narrow beam in tactical and signaling situations. Hang it on top of your tent to make it act as a makeshift lamp. There are lots of creative ways to use this feature.

We talked about signaling capabilities earlier, and this time we’ll add some depth to it. You’ll often see multiple modes on the better survival flashlights aside from the usual concentrated beam. Signaling for help, or communicating in far-off distances? Then get an EDC flashlight with ample flash and signal features.

 

10) Attachment Options

This is a welcome feature for survivalists who want all the bells and whistles with their product. It means the survival flashlight should come with a keyring, carabiner clip, lanyard loop or a pocket clip. You will want the one that you intend to carry your EDC flashlight with, because nothing is more frustrating than having to carry it with the way you don’t want.

 

C. The Top 15 Best EDC Flashlights for Survival

1) Fenix E12- The Best EDC Entry-Level Survival Flashlight

Everything about the Fenix E12 is a marvel. You may wonder if this gem of an EDC flashlight was made specifically for survival scenarios. The 130 lumen brightness packed in a small shell can be fitted into a keychain for light carrying. This excellent flashlight runs on reliable AA batteries. Finally, the entry price point in the $30 range makes it the go-to light for beginner survivalists and outdoor warriors.

 

2) Olight S10- The Best Mid-Range Survival EDC Flashlight

Don’t be fooled by the Olight S10’s diminutive size- it has the perfect dimensions for a compact EDC survival kit. Would you believe that a 320 lumen brightness with options for high, low, medium, strobe and moonlight modes are packed inside a 2.7 by 1.9 inch flashlight weighing just 2.4 ounces? All that versatile feature inside a compact form makes it an easy choice.

 

3) Fenix PD35- The Best Overall Survival EDC Flashlight

The Fenix PD35 boasts an outstanding 1k lumens of light power that can handle everything you throw at it. Basic tasks and tactical operations are made easier and more efficient with this EDC flashlight around. Add to the fact that it has 6 lighting modes and weighs in at just 3 ounces, and you have yourself a winner. If you need extreme and reliable illumination, then the Fenix PD35 is for you.

 

4) Olight Javelot M23 – Best Main Survival EDC Flashlight

The M23 Javelot clocks in at just under 6 inches, which makes it small enough for everyday carry. The many modes and features also make it a very versatile survival equipment. The most notable achievement the M23 offers is the ability to crank up the lumens to 1020 and have the beam reach an oustanding 477 yards during nighttime. You get a strobe mode and 3 different lighting options- the highest is the aforementioned 1020 lumens brightness for 5 minutes, the second is a 350 lumens illumination for 2 hours and the last is a 20 lumens brightness that can last for up to 30 hours.

 

5) Elzetta Bravo – Another Great Main Survival EDC Flashlight

The Elzetta Bravo may very well be the most indestructible EDC flashlight you can find in the current market. The optical lens are of the 7/8 inch thick variety but it sports the most durable material on any survival flashlight. The electronic innards are protected by potting technology, which further cements the product’s overall toughness. That technology isn’t something that’s included in each and every flashlight. The solder joints and circuit boards are sealed and locked in place to prevent dislodging and disconnects.

6) Nitecore EA41 – The Best Standard Size Main Light

Military grade, hard anodized HAIII construction coupled with a scratch-proof mineral lens is pretty hard to beat. The Nitecore EA41 is powered by 4 standard AA batteries and has 5 brightness levels, including essential ones such as SOS and strobe options.

 

7) Eagletac A3D – Another Great Standard Size Main Light

The Eagletac GX30A3D is a two-in-one EDC flashlight. First, you get illumination that’s comparable to the best survival flashlights running on four AA batteries. The diffuser mode scatters the concentrated light into the surrounding environment, much like a lantern or a candle on demand.

 

8) Olight S1 – The Best Non Standard Backup EDC Flashlight

The S1 is the smallest one in Olight’s line of EDC flashlights. The small size keeps an unusually bright beam that might surprise you. Switch the lumens up to 500 for a good 1.5 minutes to stun and cause temporary blindness to an attacker. The Olight S1 offers a moonlight mode aside from the 3 standard illumination options. The .5 lumens brightness will shed enough light where you need it while keeping your night vision sharp.

 

9) Zebralight MK III SC600 – Another Great Non Standard Backup EDC Flashlight

The 3.8 inch wonder can stun potential attackers and provide enough illumination to light up a small room. You’ll only need a single 18650 battery to power it, which presents some advantages by its lonesome.

10) Thrunite 1A V3 Archer – The Best Standard Backup EDC Flashlight

Choose between 5 modes of illumination when you buy the Thrunite V3 Archer. There’s the standard low, medium and high options, and the Firefly and the Strobe modes. The 1A Archer keeps track of the last illumination mode you used, which comes in handy when you need the last used light mode in a hurry. The unique and intuitive U-shaped construction allows for faster on and off switching. Finally, the medium-sized EDC flashlight sports a strike bezel when things turn ugly and you need to defend yourself.

11) Sunwayman V11R – Another Great Standard Backup EDC Flashlight

Sunwayman’s V11R is versatile in a different way. Where other EDC lighting products offer different lighting modes, the V11R can be powered using 3 different battery types. You get the regular AA batteries, the 16340, the RCR123A and the CR123A. You can also get the exact lumens specification you want via the MCS (Magnetic Control System), ranging from a battery-saving 1 lumen to a maximum of 570 lumens instead of the usual preset modes.

 

12) Nitecore HC30 – The Best Non Standard Survival Headlamp

Slot the HC30 with either the CR123 or the 18650 and choose from 5 pre-set illumination levels- ultralow, low, mid, high and turbo. The highest lumens Nitecore’s offering can reach up to an ample 100, which is more than enough to light the path ahead and beyond. If longevity is what you want, then turn it down to a 1 lumen illumination which can last for more than 300 hours. The 3 concealed settings may be used for emergencies- strobe, SOS and location beacon mode.

 

13) Armytek Wizard Pro – Another Great Non Standard Survival Headlamp

Get a maximum of 2.3k lumens when you choose the Wizard Pro from Armytek to light up caves and mountain trails beyond. The bright power output boasts no fluctuations even as the battery loses charge. Check the remaining battery via the multicolored LED indicator. This product was probably made specifically for those who need ample lighting while they work with their hands.

 

14) Fenix HL23 – The Best Standard Headlamp

Fenix has made it clear that their LED lights can last up to 50,000 hours of usage. You can slot in Ni-MH or alkaline AA batteries to power it up. The Fenix HL23 can be submerged up to 6 feet in water with its IPX-8 rating. Furthermore, this sturdy EDC light can survive careless falls ranging from about 3 feet in height.

15) LRI Photon Freedom – The Best Multiple Carry EDC Survival Flashlight

Why take only one when you can take multiples? The LRI Photon Freedom allows you just that. Put up one in every area where you need ample lighting. This survival flashlight clocks in at just 1.5 inches, which makes it one of the smallest offerings in the current EDC market. The light is nothing to sneeze at- it can produce a steady 4.5 lumens lighting in the course of around 12 hours using just one battery. The 4 different modes include a helpful Morse Code option. Did we mention that it’s a keychain light-sized flashlight?

D. The Final Word on Choosing The Best EDC Flashlight For Your Needs

The 15 EDC Lighting options should give you an idea of how you would use a survival flashlight, and the specifications you’ll need to make it a worthy everyday carry equipment. An excellent EDC flashlight should be easy to carry around without hampering your movement and style. You shouldn’t just settle for cheap ones that could fall apart within one week of use. Rather, look for quality and the features you will need down the road. The best EDC survival flashlight is one you can rely on in times of emergencies.

We want to get free from the puppet strings of society

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We are a married couple in our early thirties that want to go off grid for several reasons

One being my disdain for corporate America and the reality TV wal Mart shopping zombies we have become 

But the biggest reason is to give back to the earth

We have a 27 foot 5th wheel which I am currently trying to convert to solar power and installing a compost toilet so we can be totally self sufficient

We are looking to join someone that already has land 

My skills include 

Welding

Metal fabrication

Carpentry 

Auto repair

Plumbing

Basic gunsmithing skills 

An all around general knowledge of construction 

Two calloused hands and a strong back 

My wife’s skills include

She’s a natural nurturer 

Great with animals 

We are looking to join someone just as soon as our camper is fully self sufficient (were shooting for next summer)

We do smoke so hopefully we can all agree on that (no we are not looking for somewhere to grow)

We are not looking for 

Wild parties

Militia’s

Drug addicts of any sort 

What we do want is to grow our own food , learn how to live as generations before,and to be free from the puppet strings of society 

If we seem to suit what you are looking for please respond to this post and thank you for reading

PS we do have two cats also

The post We want to get free from the puppet strings of society appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Book Review: Building the Low Impact Roundhouse

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I really want to build a reciprocal roof pavilion at the land.  I think that it will give me lots of usable space, shade, and a great place to give classes and hang out. My problem is that information on building a roof like this is hard to find on the internet. I get that […]

The post Book Review: Building the Low Impact Roundhouse appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Things You Can Do To Be More Self-Sufficient

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Things You Can Do To Be More Self-Sufficient

We are now three to five generations removed from the rural life that helped make America great. We have migrated to big cities and left our self-sustained lives behind. These mega-cities have caused our general well-being to decline, with suicide rates increasing across the world. Crowded conditions and economic problems have led to rampant crime, pollution, and a dog-eat-dog mentality.

You will find that most of these tips will save you money and some will even save you time.  The closer you get to true self-sufficiency you will save more and more money. Many find that the money saved alows them to cut down on overtime or even quit work altogether, allowing them to truely be free from the system and to become a homesteader. Saving money comes hand in hand with self-sufficiency and homesteading. Your labor is much cheaper than someone else’s and the money you save from gas and utility bills will go a long way towards paying down debts or buying more equipment for your homestead.

Here’s a list of 52 things you can do to become more self-sufficient. You would be one busy beaver, but you could even try doing one a week and in a year you will be closer to self-sufficiency than you ever thought possible. I recommend you learn the basics of your current project before moving on to the next.

  1. Plant your own vegetable garden.
  2. Change your own oil on your car or truck.
  3. Cut your own firewood.
  4. Collect and use rain water instead of municiple or well water.
  5. Supplement your house’s heating system with solar heating panels.
  6. Supplement your hot water needs with a solar water heater.
  7. Mulch your garden with local organic mulch instead of store bought products.
  8. Raise your own rabbits with worm beds underneath.
  9. Use home-made compost and free manure to enrich your garden’s soil.
  10. Grow non-hybrid vegetables and save the seeds for next year’s planting.
  11. Grow potatoes and save the fingerlings for next years planting.
  12. Use biointensive gardening techniques to grow lots of vegetables in small places.
  13. Build a greenhouse to extend your growing season.
  14. Build a root cellar (above or below ground) to store your harvest.
  15. Start a small orchard for a variety of fruits.
  16. Learn how to preserve food by canning.
  17. Raise bees to help pollination and for honey.
  18. Raise chickens for meat and eggs.
  19. Raise sheep for wool and meat.
  20. Raise goats or a dairy cow for dairy products.
  21. Preserve vegetables by sun drying them.
  22. Spin wool into yarn for making clothes.
  23. Make your own furniture out of tree branches.
  24. Preserve vegetables by freezing them.
  25. Grow herbs for cooking and medicinal purposes.
  26. Use edible wild plants to supplement one’s diet (Find a guide for your area first!).
  27. Use containers to grow vegetables in small places.
  28. Use chicken manure (composted) to help fertilize your garden.
  29. Use, use and reuse as much as possible before throwing away.
  30. Conserve electricity whenever possible.
  31. Tune-up your own car or truck.
  32. Sharpen your own tools.
  33. Build your own home or shed.
  34. Grow grapes for preserves or raisins or make your own wine.
  35. Build a pond and raise fish for food.
  36. Use solar and wind power to supplement your energy needs.
  37. Learn how to use a welder.
  38. Use clothes lines to dry clothes instead of a mechanical dryer.
  39. Grow grains to feed your own livestock.
  40. Grow alfalfa to return nitrogen to the soil.
  41. Use a generator for emergency and supplemental power.
  42. Dig or drive your own well.
  43. Bake your own bread.
  44. Do your own plumbing.
  45. Do your own electrical work.
  46. Run a small business from your home.
  47. Barter goods and services with your neighbors.
  48. Use a push mower instead of a gas or electric mower, or let the goats handle it.
  49. Use a bicycle (whenever possible) instead of a motorized vehicle.
  50. Make vegetables a large part of your diet.
  51. Make your own syrup from Maple trees as a sugar substitute.
  52. Supplement your diet by hunting game.

Source : besurvival.com

 

Make sure you like BackdoorPrepper on Facebook to be updated every time we find an article for innovative ways you can become a better prepper .

 

                         WHAT TO READ NEXT !!!

The post Things You Can Do To Be More Self-Sufficient appeared first on .

Things You Can Do To Be More Self-Sufficient

Things You Can Do To Be More Self-Sufficient

We are now three to five generations removed from the rural life that helped make America great. We have migrated to big cities and left our self-sustained lives behind. These mega-cities have caused our general well-being to decline, with suicide rates increasing across the world. Crowded conditions and economic problems have led to rampant crime, pollution, and a dog-eat-dog mentality.

You will find that most of these tips will save you money and some will even save you time.  The closer you get to true self-sufficiency you will save more and more money. Many find that the money saved alows them to cut down on overtime or even quit work altogether, allowing them to truely be free from the system and to become a homesteader. Saving money comes hand in hand with self-sufficiency and homesteading. Your labor is much cheaper than someone else’s and the money you save from gas and utility bills will go a long way towards paying down debts or buying more equipment for your homestead.

Here’s a list of 52 things you can do to become more self-sufficient. You would be one busy beaver, but you could even try doing one a week and in a year you will be closer to self-sufficiency than you ever thought possible. I recommend you learn the basics of your current project before moving on to the next.

  1. Plant your own vegetable garden.
  2. Change your own oil on your car or truck.
  3. Cut your own firewood.
  4. Collect and use rain water instead of municiple or well water.
  5. Supplement your house’s heating system with solar heating panels.
  6. Supplement your hot water needs with a solar water heater.
  7. Mulch your garden with local organic mulch instead of store bought products.
  8. Raise your own rabbits with worm beds underneath.
  9. Use home-made compost and free manure to enrich your garden’s soil.
  10. Grow non-hybrid vegetables and save the seeds for next year’s planting.
  11. Grow potatoes and save the fingerlings for next years planting.
  12. Use biointensive gardening techniques to grow lots of vegetables in small places.
  13. Build a greenhouse to extend your growing season.
  14. Build a root cellar (above or below ground) to store your harvest.
  15. Start a small orchard for a variety of fruits.
  16. Learn how to preserve food by canning.
  17. Raise bees to help pollination and for honey.
  18. Raise chickens for meat and eggs.
  19. Raise sheep for wool and meat.
  20. Raise goats or a dairy cow for dairy products.
  21. Preserve vegetables by sun drying them.
  22. Spin wool into yarn for making clothes.
  23. Make your own furniture out of tree branches.
  24. Preserve vegetables by freezing them.
  25. Grow herbs for cooking and medicinal purposes.
  26. Use edible wild plants to supplement one’s diet (Find a guide for your area first!).
  27. Use containers to grow vegetables in small places.
  28. Use chicken manure (composted) to help fertilize your garden.
  29. Use, use and reuse as much as possible before throwing away.
  30. Conserve electricity whenever possible.
  31. Tune-up your own car or truck.
  32. Sharpen your own tools.
  33. Build your own home or shed.
  34. Grow grapes for preserves or raisins or make your own wine.
  35. Build a pond and raise fish for food.
  36. Use solar and wind power to supplement your energy needs.
  37. Learn how to use a welder.
  38. Use clothes lines to dry clothes instead of a mechanical dryer.
  39. Grow grains to feed your own livestock.
  40. Grow alfalfa to return nitrogen to the soil.
  41. Use a generator for emergency and supplemental power.
  42. Dig or drive your own well.
  43. Bake your own bread.
  44. Do your own plumbing.
  45. Do your own electrical work.
  46. Run a small business from your home.
  47. Barter goods and services with your neighbors.
  48. Use a push mower instead of a gas or electric mower, or let the goats handle it.
  49. Use a bicycle (whenever possible) instead of a motorized vehicle.
  50. Make vegetables a large part of your diet.
  51. Make your own syrup from Maple trees as a sugar substitute.
  52. Supplement your diet by hunting game.

Source : besurvival.com

 

Make sure you like BackdoorPrepper on Facebook to be updated every time we find an article for innovative ways you can become a better prepper .

 

                         WHAT TO READ NEXT !!!

The post Things You Can Do To Be More Self-Sufficient appeared first on .

Concealed Carry Revolvers

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by Nicholas

Even in the 21st Century where concealed carry semi-automatics from .32 to .45 gauge have taken the market by storm, the traditional revolver holds strong. Revolvers continue to sell off the shelves in droves, and the likely reason is that people know that you can always depend on a revolver to save your life.

The semi-auto vs. revolver debate has been going for many years and will likely never end. Every individual has their preferences. But even though semi-automatics have become more modern and updated with each passing year, the basic design of the revolver still holds many advantages over a semi-automatic.

Let’s go over what these advantages are, and then talk about 5 of the best-concealed carry revolvers on the market.

WHY CHOOSE A REVOLVER OVER A SEMI-AUTO PISTOL FOR CONCEALED CARRY?

There’s no denying that there are many appealing reasons to own a semi-automatic rather than a revolver. Semi-autos typically hold more bullets, are easier and faster to reload, and today’s models are highly ergonomic.

Still, revolvers continue to hold their own against the semi-automatic when it comes to concealed carry. There are many advantages with a revolver that you won’t get with a semi-auto and that benefit you for concealed carry and self-defense. These advantages include:

It’s Simple

Revolvers are so simple that even those who have never even touched a gun before can figure out how to use one. Ease of use can prove to be immensely beneficial to you if you need to use your backup revolver to arm someone else in an emergency defense situation. There are no safeties to switch off or slides to manipulate, just point and shoot.

It’s Reliable

Yes, semi-automatics are reliable too, but all a revolver needs to do is turn the cylinder to fire the next round. For overall reliability, a revolver is hard to beat.

You Can Jam It into Someone in a Close-Range Fight

In a close fight where an opponent is physically attacking you, you would have to fire your weapon at point blank range. The problem with a semi-automatic in this situation is if you jam the muzzle into your attacker, the slide will be pushed out of battery and cause it to jam or not even fire. The barrel of the revolver has no effect on the cylinder, so you can jam it into an opponent up close and still fire all of your rounds if you had to.

It’s Safe

While revolvers don’t have manual safeties, they do have long trigger pulls (at least on double action). The long trigger pull makes them safe guns to carry.

These are just four of the biggest reasons to carry a revolver over a semi-auto. Semi-autos have their advantages as well, but the advantages to owning a revolver are undeniably compelling.

Now that we know the reasons to owning a revolver over a semi-auto, let’s find out about what some of the best-concealed carry revolvers are:

RUGER LCR

The Ruger LCR was revolutionary upon its first release in 2009. It was the first successful polymer-framed revolver available (although the inside of the frame is aluminum alloy). The polymer frame made it very lightweight in comparison to its main competitor, the Smith & Wesson J-Frame series or Ruger’s SP101. Lightweight and reliable, the LCR is an excellent choice for concealed carry in general.

Today the Ruger LCR is available in numerous calibers, including .22 LR, .22 Magnum, .38 Special, 9mm Luger, .357 Magnum, and .327 Federal Magnum. In other words, you have options!

Beyond calibers, the LCR is available in numerous configurations. While the standard model has a 2-inch barrel and covered hammer (called hammerless), it is also available with an exposed hammer and/or a 3-inch barrel instead.

As with all Ruger DA revolvers, the LCR features a push button cylinder release that will allow the cylinder to swing out when depressed.

RUGER SP101

The Ruger SP101 is built like a tank, and you’ll feel it when you hold it. While the SP101 is easily the heaviest revolver in this list, the trade off is enhanced durability and shoot ability. A major complaint about compact or snub nose revolvers, in general, is that they are difficult to shoot and have heavy recoil. Recoil is severely mitigated with the SP101.

The SP101 holds five rounds of .357 Magnum, which means it can also chamber and shoot .38 Special if you desire a lighter round. Also, Ruger also makes the SP101 in .327 Federal Magnum, which holds six rounds.

Standard SP101’s have exposed hammers, but so-called ‘hammerless’ variants are also available. You also have your choice between a 2-inch, 3-inch, or 4-inch barrel.

All in all, even if you find the SP101 a little heavier than you would like for concealed carry, you should at least find it to be one of the more easy-to-shoot compact revolvers on the market. Just like the LCR, it features a push button cylinder release on the side that will swing out the cylinder when depressed.

SMITH & WESSON J-FRAME

There are so many Smith & Wesson J-Frame designs in general that we cannot narrow it down to just one specific model for this article. The J-Frame, which has been around since 1950, is simply the smallest frame of the revolver in Smith & Wesson’s lineup and is designed exclusively for concealed carry.

J-Frame revolvers are small, light, steel framed, and reliable. They’ve served as CCW weapons for civilians and as backup guns for detectives and police officers for decades, including today.

While the J-Frame wasn’t the first snub nose revolver ever released (the Colt Detective Special had been out for over two decades beforehand), it was arguably the gun that made the snub nose revolver iconic and popular with civilians.

The success of the J-Frame has prompted Smith & Wesson to release several variants. All variants feature a standard capacity of five rounds either in .38 Special or .357 Magnum and feature a cylinder release on the side that must be pushed forward (rather than down on Ruger models), to release the cylinder.

Here are the basic types of Smith & Wesson J-Frame revolvers currently offered and the features of each one:

  • Model 36 – Original J-Frame, still in production
  • Model 642/442 – hammerless .38 Special J-frame; 642 is stainless, and 442 is black
  • Model 637 – hammered version of the 642
  • Model 60 – .357 Magnum version of the Model 36
  • Model 640 – hammerless version of the Model 60
  • M&P Bodyguard – polymer-framed, hammerless J-Frame with Crimson Trace laser sight

TAURUS 85

The Taurus 85 is essentially a cheaper clone of the Smith & Wesson J-Frame series, but that doesn’t make it poor quality. If you desire a concealed carry on a budget, you’ll want to give the Taurus 85 a hard look. On the outside, the Model 85 resembles a J-Frame clear and through. Like the J-Frame, it features a five-shot cylinder with a cylinder release that must be pressed forward.

But an interesting feature of the 85 is the option to remove the hammer to create a ‘hammerless model.’  Simply twist the hammer to the side, and you will then be able to remove it from the gun. It’s a neat feature for a revolver and one that gives you the option of having either a hammered or ‘hammerless’ revolver without having to buy one of each.

The Model 85 is offered as a blued model or in stainless steel. As with all Taurus guns, it comes equipped with Taurus’s Trademark Security System: insert a key that comes with the gun into a keyhole behind the hammer, twist it, and the gun will be rendered inoperable. The security system you some peace of mind if you store the 85 in your house and have small children running around.

TAURUS JUDGE PUBLIC DEFENDER POLYMER REVOLVER

Another interesting concealed carry revolver from Taurus is the Judge Public Defender Polymer Revolver. This is the famous (or infamous) Taurus Judge .410/.45 LC that has been shrunk down for concealed carry. As the name suggests, it has a polymer-frame to reduce the weight.

The Public Defender offers you devastating self-defense capabilities in either chambering. A .45 Long Colt round offers far more power than the standard .38 Special or even the .357 Magnum. A self-defense buckshot load of .410 Bore will be near the equivalent of shooting three 9mm FMJ rounds at once.

It should be noted that the Public Defender is designed for extremely close-range defensive use only. To this end, it may be more suited as an anti-carjacking gun rather than for concealed carry, but still, there’s something very comforting about having five shots of .410 buckshot on your person.

CONCLUSION

All in all, revolvers are old, but they’re not yet antiquated. They’ve been around for many years, and they will be around for many more years. While they have their pros and cons, it’s incredibly unlikely that a revolver will fail you in a self-defense situation. And that reliability is what matters the most for a concealed carry weapon. Any one of the five types of concealed carry revolvers we’ve gone over is a suitable choice for concealed carry and armed personal defense.

12 Rare Skills That Will Come In Handy When SHTF

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If you’re at all familiar with the world of prepping for natural disasters or other life-changing, cataclysmic events, you may have made some simple provisions of your own. You’ve decided that having a bug out bag is a good idea; you’ve stocked up on nonperishable items in your pantry; you have a plan for where […]

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How To Grow Pineberries: Strawberries That Taste Like Pineapple

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How To Grow Pineberries: White Strawberries That Taste Like Pineapple I bought my first pineberry plants in May 2015. They seemed to take ok and then die off in the summer heat. To my surprise they popped up the next year. No fruit but lots of runners. We gave them some space and crossed our fingers. Then 2nd day of June 2016. I have berries, lots and lots of berries. I’m thrilled to see little tiny white pineberries developing. We’ve picked two little bowls worth and they are delicious. So now having proof of the final product I am happy to

The post How To Grow Pineberries: Strawberries That Taste Like Pineapple appeared first on Mental Scoop.

Incremental Disaster Kit (Week 6)

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In an emergency situation you may not be able to rely on infrastructure. Hospitals may be full or even closed. Being able to take care of small injuries may keep them from becoming larger emergencies.

The post Incremental Disaster Kit (Week 6) appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Don’t Let Your Expectations Trump Reality

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Well, the United States has inaugurated it’s 45th President and undergone a peaceful transition of power. Just like in past elections, life goes on and people make necessary adjustments to the new reality. What’s important is not to put too much faith in a leader and his ability to “fix” things. After all, some people […]

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How To Make Hot Ice Using Homemade Sodium Acetate

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How To Make Hot Ice Using Homemade Sodium Acetate Before you attempt this please do it with safety glasses on and be careful, as with any chemicals. You do this at your own risk please take the time to read our disclaimer Sodium acetate or hot ice is an amazing chemical you can prepare yourself from …

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Self-Defense Skills You Need to Know

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If you want to be truly prepared for any emergency situation, self-defense is an essential skill set. Preppers, in particular, need to know how to defend themselves during major emergencies, as they will typically be in possession of scarce resources that others will go to great lengths to get. Here are the four fundamental self-defense and combat skills that every prepper needs to know.

Using a Firearm

In a true emergency situation, having to use a firearm—such as a rifle from DSGARMS—for self-defense is always a possibility. Though everyone hopes it never comes to that, it is better to be prepared than to be caught off guard. For preppers in areas with wildlife, being able to use a firearm can also help with procuring food. Pick a firearm out and train with it extensively at a gun range. Also be sure to learn proper gun maintenance, as you’ll want your firearm to be in top firing shape should your life ever depend on it.

Basic Martial Arts Proficiency

If you find yourself in an unarmed combat situation, basic martial arts training could very well save your life. For the best in combat preparedness, skip karate and learn a martial art like Israeli Krav Maga or Russian Systema. Both of these martial arts were developed specifically for use in life-or-death modern combat and teach students to survive a fight by any means necessary.

Making a Cell Phone Trip Wire

If you end up in an urban survival situation, there’s a good chance you’ll need to secure a building or space. Installing real alarms may not be an option, but a simple hack with a cheap cell phone, some tape and a piece of paper can produce a functional intruder warning device. Just be sure to keep a spare prepaid phone handy, as you may have trouble finding one once an emergency situation is underway.

Disarming an Armed Opponent

A specialized subset of martial arts skills is the ability to disarm someone with a weapon. Though it’s tricky, knowing how to properly disarm an opponent could save your life in a real combat situation. The best way to develop this skill is to learn the basic techniques and then practice them with a training partner using rubber weapon replicas. With enough repetition, you’ll be able to deploy these techniques under pressure, giving you a good chance at success if you ever have to use them in real life.

Whether or not you end of facing war or famine, these are some very important skills that will definitely come in handy. Choose one of the above skills and try to learn it within the next month or two and you’ll be all the more prepared for any situation that might come

The post Self-Defense Skills You Need to Know appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Book Review: Homes for Jubilee

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I got the book Homes for Jubilee because it was recommended by someone I trust in the arena of cement work and cement domes.  You may remember the mortar sprayer I got from mortarsprayer.com that I used to build the “Dome of Doom” aka the boulder looking dome I mashed up for the Doomsday Preppers […]

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Gear Review: Esi Hitch Portable Wireless Vehicle Backup Camera

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#WirelessTrailerCamera Esi Hitch Portable Wireless Vehicle Backup Camera Rear view camera Water Resistant IR Night Vision Camera System Trailer Hitch Rear View with 2.5″ LCD Monitor For RV Trailer Motorhome 5th Wheels Having a lot of trailers to move around and not a lot od space to do it meant I needed a backup camera.  […]

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Building With Shiplap – How To Use Shiplap To Build Anything!

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When it comes to building with shiplap, the sky really is the limit! This incredible wood can be used for so much more than just great looking walls. It is actually the perfect wood for DIY’ers looking to build nearly

The post Building With Shiplap – How To Use Shiplap To Build Anything! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

7 DIY Ways To Remove Odors From Your Pantry

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Ugh! You open the door to your pantry and your nose is assaulted with the vile smell of rotten produce, spoiled broth that spilled on the back of a shelf, or just plain mustiness. It smells as if it’s seeped into the walls, so how do you remove odors from your pantry without repainting the whole thing?

Surprisingly, you have several options. The first thing you need to do is clean up the mess. Thoroughly.

Until you do that, you’re not going to be able to get the smell out. If it ran down the walls behind the shelf, you may need to clean the wall clear down to the baseboard. Do whatever you need to do to clean it up completely.

Now, you’ve got the mess cleaned up, so how do you make it smell better?

Vinegar

You can always use a bit of vinegar to wipe down the walls and shelves. Just blurp a half-cup of white vinegar into a half-gallon of water and start wiping. This will likely make your pantry smell like vinegar for a bit, but it’s better than rotten potatoes.

Cleaning and wiping with vinegar is also good to get that musty smell out. Dust off the tops of your less-often used containers and just tidy up in general. Most of the time, it’s mildew or dust that gives your pantry that musty smell.

Vinegar can be used to get rid of cooking smells. Leave a small bowl of vinegar in the kitchen or in the pantry overnight to absorb the odors and you can enjoy cooking for your loved ones.

These lessons of yesterday will teach you the basic skills you need for survival cooking! 

Bleach

We all know that bleach kills almost anything, including bacteria that cause odors. Use 10 parts water to one part bleach to wipe down your entire pantry, shelves, floors, and walls, and you’ll soon notice that your pantry smells much cleaner.

If the mold and mildew have settled into rough wood, simply put your bleach solution in a spray bottle and spray it over the wood.

Baking Soda

OK, this one is actually best to use as a preventative measure, but placing a couple of boxes of open baking soda around your pantry will help prevent and eliminate most odors. You may want to use this in conjunction with other methods if you’re in a hurry or the odor is particularly offensive.

Change the boxes of baking soda out every few months to keep them working. This also works wonderfully in the fridge and freezer. Just pop the top and set it on a shelf. Baking soda is one of those must-have, multi-use survival items that you just have to have.

odor elim

Essential Oils

Many essential oils have antibacterial properties, and it’s not hard to find one that smells good. Mix several drops (how much depends on how strong you want it to smell. Use the sniff test til you find a ratio that works for you) into a half-gallon or so of water and wash down your entire pantry.

Some good suggestions are orange oil, rose oil, lavender oil, or even tea tree oil or eucalyptus if you like that piney, astringent smell. You can also add a few drops of essential oil to your vinegar to really get some bang for your buck and knock out nasty odors.

Charcoal

Charcoal is an excellent odor absorber and one that I particularly like because all you have to do is rip the bag open a bit and set it in your pantry. If you’re like me, you go through charcoal pretty regularly because you grill, so the bag doesn’t have time to lose its odor-absorbing qualities.

You can use charcoal in your cabinets, too. Just place a piece of two inside in the back and change it out every few months. Cool trick – if you have a plastic container that smells like onions or garlic, pop a piece of charcoal in it overnight with the lid on it and it will smell tremendously better by morning. The smell will likely be completely gone.

Mineral Oil and Alcohol

To remove stubborn odors from your pantry and condition and seal wood so that it won’t absorb more odors, mix 1 pint of mineral oil with a half-cup of rubbing alcohol and wipe all surfaces with it. Again, feel free to add a few drops of essential oil to make it smell good.

Lysol

Odors in pantries are typically caused by bacteria or fungi that are feeding of food or moisture and causing rot, mold, or mildew. Lysol, as well as bleach and vinegar, kills 99 percent of these pathogens and will therefore get rid of the odor. The distinct advantage that Lysol has is that it now comes in a variety of pleasant scents.

Lysol comes in mist and spray solution. Use the mist if your pantry just smells a bit musty (it’s handy to keep in the bathroom, too!). Use the cleaning solution if you’re cleaning up rotten produce or if the odor is so pervasive that you have to clean your shelves. Lysol cleaners are great to use when you’re spring cleaning.

Just a word of common sense caution: don’t spray Lysol on your food, especially produce that you’ll be ingesting directly.

Odors in your pantry can spread to your whole kitchen. If nothing else, they’ll assault your olfactory senses every time you open your door. Since the odor can be absorbed by boxed goods and even pastas and other foods, this is a case where an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Do you wonder what are the secrets that helped our grandparent survive during harsh times?

Click the banner bellow and uncover them!

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This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

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Disasters Are More Than Just Your Ordinary Day

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Obviously, disasters are more than just your ordinary day, but they typically start as one. I have been through more than my share of disasters in my lifetime. Some have been major and some not so devastating. Here’s the deal, we need to be prepared every day for whatever comes our way. The first disaster I was involved in was years ago when I was about 16 years old. I lived where snow was falling so beautifully all over the lawns, the sidewalks, and the streets. The trees and bushes in the yard looked just like a Christmas card. But then the temperatures dropped, and they dropped quickly. I had never seen an ice storm, literally, roads had become like ice skating rinks. Not really safe to ice skate in the extreme cold weather. The roads were closed for days, then two weeks.

My cousin and I had to walk to the store to get milk, and whatever else we needed at the grocery store. Keep in mind I was 16 and I had a pocket of cash walking in a snow covered sidewalk to the store. I had never lived where it snowed. It was cold, but it was fun because my cousin and I were together and laughing as we walked there. We laughed until we got to the store. There were lines and the food was rationed for families. WHAT? What is rationed? I soon learned we were allowed one gallon or one quart of milk a week, if they had it. I was back east helping my aunt for a few months who had a new baby.

Please keep in mind my mom always had a pantry filled with canned goods and bottled fruits. She made bread and taught her daughters to make bread and to be self-reliant without really knowing it at the time. Oh, how I wish my mom knew she inspired me to be prepared. She died before I was asked to write a book on food storage and emergency preparedness. If you haven’t purchased it, I highly recommend my book: Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation It’s a family friendly book where no weapons are discussed. I wanted the book to be a teaching tool for classes and family meetings. It’s available in stores online or in most every bookstore. I was honored to be asked to write it for people to be prepared for the unexpected.

Just An Ordinary Day:

Typically disasters start out as an ordinary day and can have some warning, or no warning at all. You would think where we live we all would have some way to be alerted as quickly as possible about the minor or major disasters listed below. Yes, we do hear in some cases beforehand, but other times we will not hear for several different reasons.

If you only have cell phones remember that these are not automatically on a Reverse 911 Emergency Notification System. If you are at work, at the park, the gym, driving somewhere and you have your cell phone AND we have a disaster or emergency, your CELL phone will alert you if you have registered your cell phone. You must register your cell phone with your local Reverse 911 Notification System if you want to be notified. You can “Google” Reverse 911 Emergency Notification in your city or county and you should be able to find it. Please do it today!

  • Floods
  • Overfilled rivers, canals and drain pipes gushing with water from excessive rain or snow melting
  • Fires
  • Ice Storms
  • Hurricanes
  • Tornadoes
  • Tsunamis
  • Riots
  • Mass evacuations
  • War
  • Pandemics
  • Railroad derailments
  • Transport accidents
  • Earthquakes
  • Sewer backups
  • Waterlines broken
  • Water contaminated in local water systems

Please be prepared for the unexpected, a disaster or unforeseen emergency could strike your neighborhood at any time. Are you prepared with water, food, cooking devices and fuel? Please start with one thing at a time. You do not need to go into debt to be prepared. We can’t think that the government will have supplies for our cities, nope it’s not going to happen for days, weeks or possibly months. Just picture grocery stores empty after a disaster because they will be empty in 24-48 hours at the most. Please remember to store bleach for cleaning up sewage, or whatever, and rotate it every 6-9 months. Trust me, we will need it. Please keep your gas tank 3/4 full and have cash on hand like fives and ones. If we lose power the ATM’s, the gas stations, the pharmacy and some stores will not be able to process your debit or credit card. Hard cash will work if you need it on any not so ordinary day.

My favorite things:

WaterBrick 1833-0001 Stackable Water and Food Storage Container, 3.5 gal of Liquid, 27 lb of Dry Food Products, Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

WaterBrick WB-0001 Ventless Spigot Assembly, Fits Both WaterBrick Water Container Sizes, Blue/White/Red

3M 1860 N95 RESPIRATOR AND SURGICAL MASK Box of 20

The post Disasters Are More Than Just Your Ordinary Day appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Tornadoes and Other Windstorms

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Tornadoes are Mother Nature’s most feared events because they are her most destructive force. Don’t wait for a warning! The more ready for emergency your home/business is, the safer you are; second, any thunderstorm can produce tornadoes. Tornado WATCH: conditions are right for tornadoes to form in the listed area. Pay close attention to the […]

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Please don’t eat the bunnies

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I’m really concerned about how people, especially young people will fare if/when TSHTF, I am right now, as I type, having a conversation with a young lady (23 years old she told me) on a Facebook group about frugal living. There have been some photos posted of people butchering their meat animals, chickens, roosters, rabbits and the such, though as I went through the page, honestly I saw only a couple of photos of someone with the dead animal in the photo that they intended to butcher.

This particular young lady posted a plea to the group to not post photos of animals being slaughtered (her words) for meat as these animals are cute and in her mind shouldn’t be considered for food, or at the very least not discussed on the FRUGAL living group as this “upsets her”. She posted a couple of pictures of cute baby chicks and baby bunnies to drive home her point.

I carefully penned a reply explaining why it’s frugal to raise and butcher your own meat animals, and that I’d prefer to see an animal raised on a home setting or small farm setting and butchered in a humane manner rather than animals being raised in commercial settings, never seeing the light of day, never touching the earth, being fed soy based feed, growth hormones, antibiotics, to have never felt the loving hand of a human and the such.

I wrote in the most polite and empathetic manner possible, but the conversation quickly degraded to her asking me why I don’t raise cute puppies for meat. You can see the full conversation below, I blurred out the names for privacy purposes. For the record, she also told me she does eat meat, just not red meat or rabbits. I am not interested in bashing or making fun of this young lady, I am sincerely concerned about the lack of knowledge as to where our food comes from, and the future of our society, especially if things go south.

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