Dental Floss In An Emergency Situation

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Dental Floss In An Emergency Situation  Preppers and survivalists love it when one item has a number of uses, and dental floss is such! Of course, dental floss and dental tape provide hygienic maintenance for healthy teeth and gums, but your dentist and your mom would be so proud that you have discovered these frugal …

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Sew Your Own Dog Pack

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Sew Your Own Dog Pack If none of the commercially available dog packs strikes your fancy (or if they’re too expensive), try putting together your own using the pattern and directions provided below click here to get all the info and the pattern you will need

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Insta-Fire Lights On Water, Works As Tinder, Kindling And Fuel

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InstaFire Lights On Water, Works As Tinder, Kindling, And Fuel Insta-Fire is a safe, simple, and versatile new Charcoal briquette lighting and fire starting product. It has water-repellent properties, 1/2 cup of Insta-Fire has a minimum of 10 minute burn time, and is super light weight – weighing 1.8 oz. Use it to light campfires …

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The Wavebox Portable Microwave Oven

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The Wavebox Portable Microwave Oven The impact of the microwave oven on human grazing habits has been extreme. It can reheat frozen food or cook raw food in a fraction of the time required of a conventional oven and has brought the convenience of preparing food to new levels. Now a portable microwave oven offers …

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How To Prepare Your Zippo For A Survival Kit

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How To Prepare Your Zippo For A Survival Kit If someone ask you if a Zippo is good to put in survival kit you would probably say – no it isn’t ,put a bic instead of zippo, a Zippo is good if you are about to use it in harsh weather ,but fuel evaporates. Read why having …

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7 Invasive Weeds You Can Turn Into Livestock Feed

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7 Invasive Weeds You Can Turn Into Livestock Feed

Stinging nettles. Image source: Pixabay.com

Most homesteaders have to deal with some kinds of invasive plants. On our farm in upstate New York, the main culprit is multiflora rose. People planted it as deer feed back in the 1960s and now, it’s everywhere, taking over hayfields and pastures with its sprawling big-thorned fast-growing stems. Multiflora rose removal was one of my least favorite chores: heavy, prickly and never-ending. Then we discovered that our goats enjoyed eating multiflora rose. And then we learned that it was actually good for them.

I still spend time every summer hacking down multiflora roses in the orchard and pasture, but my attitude has changed. Instead of endlessly beating back a useless nuisance, I’m harvesting a forage crop.

Deciding What’s Safe To Feed

I’ll discuss some specific nutritious invasives below. I likely won’t include all the invasives in your area, so you’ll need to do some of your own research. This may be complicated by the fact that there’s a lot of conflicting information out there. Some plants, for example, appear both on lists of safe food for rabbits and lists of plants toxic to rabbits. Here are a few factors to keep in mind as you decide what to feed your animals:

Many plants are safe when fed as a small portion of the overall diet, but become problematic in heavy concentrations. It’s generally not a good idea to offer only one or two types of forage to your animals, or to feed huge quantities the first time they’re introduced to a new food. Offered free choice, as part of a varied diet, many weeds can be safe and healthy. Some, like mountain laurel or locoweed, are truly poisonous and should be completely avoided. But if you find a lot of recommendations and some cautions around a particular plant, you might try offering your animals a small amount of it and seeing what happens.

Diatomaceous Earth: The All-Natural Livestock De-Wormer!

Toxicity and nutrition may vary depending on your location and soil type. Try asking local farmers and/or your local Cooperative Extension about the effects of plants grown in your area.

Some plants are healthy at one stage, problematic at another. For instance, we feed young leaves of burdock and curly dock to our rabbits, but after the plants have flowered we stop feeding; older plants may accumulate nitrates to the point of mild toxicity. If you keep cutting plants off before they go to seed, you can harvest young leaves over a long season.

Plants that are safe in themselves may be unpalatable or unsafe if they’re diseased. Clover is generally a safe and healthy feed, but in my region in wet summers it can develop white mold; we take care not to feed any of this to our rabbits, since rabbits are highly mold-sensitive.

Many different plants may share the same common name. Use Latin names in your research to be sure you have the right plant.

A Gallery Of Gourmet Weeds

1. Multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), the thorny invader previously described, contains 10-13 percent protein, and it can help ruminants to expel worms. Goats, sheep, cows and horses can eat it. Our goats don’t mind the thorns. After the rose has flowered, our goats may get diarrhea from eating too many of the hips at once. I’ve seen one report of a horse injuring its eye on the thorns.

2. Kudzu (Pueraria montana). Farmers south of us have reported great success with feeding kudzu to cows, goats, sheep, pigs, chickens and horses. It’s high in protein, and apparently highly appealing to many animals. Given its legendary growth rate, it’s a nearly inexhaustible food supply.

7 Invasive Weeds You Can Turn Into Livestock Feed

White Mulberry. Image source: Pixabay.com

3. White mulberry (Morus alba) is an invasive tree in many states. Its protein-rich leaves and stems are a valuable feed for cows, goats, sheep and rabbits; pigs and chickens will eat its fruit.

4. Burdock (Arctium spp.) is a nuisance in pastures. Its flat leaves spread widely, killing everything else; its burrs tangle in animals’ hair. But young burdock leaves, cut before the plant flowers, are rich in protein and minerals. We feed tender small burdock leaves to our rabbits, who tolerate them, and larger leaves to our goats, who relish them. Chickens and cows also will eat burdock leaves, up to a point. Older leaves may accumulate excessive nitrates, so don’t feed them heavily.

5. Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) does just what its name suggests. I was very displeased when it started taking over a corner of our pasture. Then I learned that it’s rich in protein, iron, calcium and vitamins. Once it’s dried, it no longer stings. We give our dried nettle to nursing mother rabbits in the early spring before other rich foods are readily available. Chickens, pigs, cows, horses, sheep and goats also can benefit from eating dried stinging nettle.

6. Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) self-seeds copiously and comes up in dense mats. Since it starts to grow earlier than many other annuals, its leaves can provide an early treat and a vitamin boost for chickens, rabbits, goats, cows and sheep. Later in the year it may be less palatable—and any way you’ll want to cut it or graze it before it goes to seed. Some sources say it shouldn’t be given to horses.

7. Redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus) takes over garden beds and farm fields. It’s widely agreed that young plants which haven’t yet set seed are safe and nutritious feed for chickens, rabbits, pigs, sheep, cows and goats. We’ve fed seeded redroot pigweed to our rabbits with no ill-effect.

What are a few of your favorite weeds to feed livestock? Share your tips in the section below:

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6 Lessons to Learn from the Oroville Dam Disaster

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image source: http://www.trbimg.com/

Have you ever pictured what it would be like to be ordered to immediately evacuate your home because of an impending emergency? Imagine only having enough time to grab your pets and your children and head for the hills. While many believe there is adequate advanced notice in evacuations, this isn’t always the case.

As many of you know, due to the higher than normal rain levels in California, water levels at Oroville Dam, the nation’s tallest dam, were so high that an emergency spillway was used for the first time. Initially, dam officials believed the measure worked, but were soon disappointed Sunday afternoon, as more water from record storms flowed into Lake Oroville. This is when officials detected a hole in the emergency spillway. Officials put out an evacuation order Sunday afternoon telling around 200,000 people the emergency spillway at Orville Dam could fail within an hour. With no time to lose, panicked residents quickly left the area scrambling to get out of harms way. As evacuees made the mass exodus, they sat for hours in gridlock hoping to get to their destinations in time.

While the dam break is slightly diminishing and the mandatory evacuation order has been lifted, many residents are thinking twice about going back due to another series of storms that will hit the Oroville area over the weekend and are threatening to dump 10 more inches in water. One resident states, “I don’t want to live in Oroville anymore,” said Shelly Clarke, 52, who fled her home with her husband and slept in her car overnight. “After this, I’m afraid of the dam.” Source

When I wrote The Prepper’s Blueprint: The Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Through Any Disaster, I emphasized that every disaster teaches us another lesson in how to be better prepared and this one is no different. This essential survival guide stresses how important is to have plans and supplies in place in order to be better prepared for the disasters that are on the horizon.

6 Lessons to Learn from the Oroville Dam Disaster

Keep the following in mind the next time you think you don’t need to prepare or evacuate.

1. Evacuations can come at the very last minute and many may not be prepared in time.

image source: http://www.sacbee.com/

The mandatory evacuation order came Sunday afternoon and 200,000 residents were given one hour to leave. Even if you are given short notice to evacuate, it is very difficult to get your belongings in order under the stress of a mandatory evacuation. One Oroville resident recollects how most people barely had time to grab their kids and pets before leaving in all directions. Some fled on foot. Some fled without shoes. Deyan Baker, 19, Anthony Rhoads, 21, and their 2-year-old daughter, Rylee, of Oroville, had no car, so they ran into the street hoping someone would give them a lift. Source


“We were running. No one was stopping,” Baker said. “I started having a panic attack. I felt helpless.”


Preparedness experts suggest having an evacuation bag or bug out bag prepped for items for the entire family. Make sure these are easily accessible and ready to go for emergencies such as this. While a dam break may not be a disaster your area would encounter, what about a gas leak, or a refinery spill? What about a wild-fire? There are many reasons to have evacuation supplies. Here is an evacuation checklist to ensure you have everything covered. As well, consider preparing your evacuation vehicle.

2. Evacuations are dangerous.

image source: http://www.mercurynews.com/

Not only is a mass exodus arduous, but dangerous as well. During evacuations there is always some risk to danger. For instance, many are in a state of panic and do not always make the wisest of choices. One Oroville evacuee brings up the point of just how dangerous the roads are when evacuating.


“Cars were speeding by so fast, some careening on the shoulders to pass the traffic, “you could smell the engines burning,” Rhoads said. “You could smell the burnt oil, burned clutches, tires squealing.” Source


There are those who are in a mental state of its ‘every man for himself’. There are also others who are opportunists and take advantage of the situation and can cause injury as a result. One Oroville evacuee knows this lesson all too well. Cameron Asbury, 33, was packing up the truck with his family’s belongings after receiving the evacuation order Sunday afternoon when an unidentified man hijacked the vehicle, ran him over and sped away. You can read more about that here. The point here is during evacuations, it can be dangerous due to heightened emotions, desperation and opportunists taking advantage of the situation. Make sure that you have a way to protect yourself. While many do not believe in firearms, having one during these times would be advantageous.

3. No one knows when evacuation orders will be lifted. 

image source: http://www.gannett-cdn.com/

While the mandatory evac order has been lifted for Oroville, there is still an evacuation order in place and many are not sure when they will come back with the threat of the dam still fresh in their minds. When an evacuation is ordered the residents are left to the mercy of the local government in deciding when it is safe to come back. Having a short-term disaster plan in place before a disaster strikes will relieve some of the stress associated with evacuating. As well, with a solid plan (conceived while you were calm and rational) this will ensure that you won’t skip any important planning steps. Living out a disaster in an emergency shelter is not always the best choice, especially if you have pets or special health care needs. Consider how important having an emergency fund would be in a situation such as this. Having money set aside in advance to pay for hotel stays, food, etc. would prevent you from going into further debt.

4. Information is limited, imprecise and emotionally driven.

image source: http://cdn.abclocal.go.com/

Sunday’s evacuations in Oroville came after several days of state officials saying the dam itself was not in danger and that there was no serious threat to nearby communities. Authorities continued to maintain Sunday night that the dam itself was safe. But their assessment of danger to downstream communities from the spillway’s damage changed dramatically Sunday at 4:42 p.m., when DWR issued this tweet: “EMERGENCY EVACUATION: Auxiliary spillway at Oroville Dam predicted to fail within the next hour. Oroville residents evacuate northward.” Source As the mandatory evacuation was ordered, news stories were quickly published about this situation and no one really knew all the facts. Many believed the dam was under the threat of imminent failure, thus causing more panic and heightened emotions.

5. Limited resources.

image source: http://www.mercurynews.com/

During any type of emergency breakdown, there is strain on resources due to the demand of the same types of items needed: gas, water, food, for example. This causes a demand that many stores cannot keep up with and a breakdown inevitably follows. There are some stores who will take advantage of this and price gouge. Limited resources does not only occur during the evacuation route, but afterwards where the evacuees locate to. With 200,000 individuals scattered around the Northern California area, local grocery stores could find their supplies quickly exhausted.

6. The state, county and city officials were unprepared.

image source: http://www.mercurynews.com/

Although the local and state government are closely monitoring the situation, many state residents have raised questions on why the erosion of the dam wasn’t fixed 5 years ago when state officials were warned. According to one article, “Countless proposals have been floated over the past two decades to fund infrastructure out of the general fund, and prioritize critically needed upgrades to dams, roads and bridges. But Sacramento spends a pittance out of it’s $180 billion budget on infrastructure, and most of that is earmarked for the abysmal roads and a crumbling intrastate highway system.” Simply put, government officials were not prepared for encountering a damaged dam. Due to their negligence in planning and funds, a town’s livelihood is threatened – children are absent from schools, flooding of multiple communities could occur and an even more disastrous situation becomes more catastrophic.

Each time a disaster presents itself, it is important to recognize ways to better prepare so that history does not repeat itself. The Oroville dam disaster is a reminder of how important it is to be prepared and to be able to react at a moment’s notice. While many believe local and state governments have everything planned out, there are slip ups and those mistakes can be disastrous for the residents involved. The six points listed above frequently occur with disasters and it is important to recognize this. If you walk away with anything from this article, understand how important it is to plan accordingly. Emergencies happen at the drop of a hat and if you aren’t ready, if you waste precious time gathering emergency items at the last minute or have to come up with an emergency plan at the last minute, vital details will be left out.

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

From Storage to Stovetop

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We’re excited to introduce our new From Storage to Stovetop series where we will be highlighting one item from our storage and showing you exactly how we use it in our kitchens. We will be updating this post with an index of each item as we highlight it. So bookmark this page and check back often to see the features as they are posted.

From Storage to Stovetop Introduction

Facebook Group

We’d love to have you join our Storage to Stovetop facebook group to share your own experiences as you use the products we are highlighting each week. It will be a fun place for us all to learn and practice using our food storage together! Click here to join the Facebook Group

From Storage to Stovetop Index

Instant Pot (newsletter introduction)


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When Inflation Causes Mortgage Rates To Spike…

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I couldn’t help but correlate what I recently read over on ZeroHedge to the reality that many people are ‘on the edge’ (paycheck to paycheck) with being able to pay their mortgage (“Mortgage Delinquencies Rise Most In 7 Years As Rates Spike”), indicative of the fragility that exists within the structure of our debt burgeoned […]

After The SHTF What’s Next

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We have always emphasized that preparing for the days after is as important or even more so than the preparations leading up to a crisis, providing you have advanced warning, of course. Imagine being told that a dam near your community may collapse at any time and you have to evacuate immediately, are you ready to do that.

The Oroville dam in California is close to collapse and roughly, 200,000 residents in the water’s path were told to leave immediately. The evacuation order has been lifted for now, but more rain is coming.

Would you leave? Some residents of the area who would be in the path of the water choose to stay instead of fleeing the possible catastrophe. Looting was apparently the main concern, and so people stayed back to try and prevent it.

Trying to protect your home and property from such an onslaught of water would be impossible however, but a few choose to stay and some may have had little chance of surviving if the dam did collapse.

You may be faced with the same dilemma someday. A train carrying toxic chemicals may derail in your town, a levee may fail, there could be an earthquake, and then a tsunami as a result, or any disaster that strikes without much warning where you must decide quickly whether to stay or evacuate.

To survive the days after you need to have your ducks in a row. You need all of your important paperwork in one place, preferably vacuumed sealed so your documents are protected from moisture damage. You do not have to seal the paperwork as if it were food, but just enough so it can be heat-sealed to make it waterproof. Vacuum sealing paperwork to tightly may damage some documents so be careful.

Passports, insurance documents, birth certificates, marriage certificates, deeds and so on will be needed during the days after. You may not be able to get back to your home without the proper identification so make sure you have some form of ID on you at all times. Proving you live in the community is needed to help reduce looting and vandalism.

You will need a shelter whether they are emergency shelters set up by your local, state, or federal government because everyone needs a dry and warm place to regroup, get meals, shower/bathe, and sleep. You may also seek out friends and relatives homes that are out of the disaster area. Hotels/motels are another option as well, if you can get ahead of the mass exodus because rooms would go fast. Rooms may be rented days before as people gather information on any possible disaster scenario.

Regardless of where you end up, you will need clothing, personal hygiene items, possibly blankets, emergency food, water, specific items for children and babies, pet supplies if applicable, and any medicines needed for daily maintenance and over the counter medications for pain, nausea, allergies, and so forth.

FEMA and the Red Cross in some cases, do provide some emergency supplies, but you should not count on it, and it may take several days for them to get operational in your area, so be prepared to survive on your own in the meantime.

If given advance warning, you can leave by vehicle but expect the roads to be clogged, so it is important that you decide quickly and move to evacuate even quicker to avoid the gridlock. The better prepared you are, the faster you can evacuate.

It is important that you know what is in your area that could cause a mass evacuation. In California, for example, the authorities knew about the dam for years and yet repairs went undone. You cannot count on your local, state, or federal government to always take care of you or to keep you informed of dangers literally in your own backyard.

You need to know about dams, levees, fault lines, flooding issues, hurricane probabilities as well as, the possibility of tidal waves, tornadoes, wildfires and any winter weather events that could cause devastation in your community.

You need to research and stay informed because no one will do it for you. You need a plan for evacuation and for sheltering in place, and once you decide one way or another you may not be able to change your plans after a specific point. If you decide to stay, you may not be able to evacuate if you change your mind a few days into it, because the roads and bridges could be damaged, washed out or simply not safe, so consider this as well when planning. Once committed you may have to go all the way with it, so you need to be prepared to do just that.

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Feeling Hot Hot Hot: Solar Cooking in Action

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Solar cooking, parabolic, box cooker, panel cooker, solar, off-grid, self-reliance, cooking, food, technology

Despite looking futuristic – solar cooking has been used for many years

Cooking can be challenging in itself. Following recipes, getting the right ingredients and hoping it comes out tasting delicious – unless you’re a top class chef, everyone has had a fair few burnt dinners in their time. When you’re off-grid however it’s not just worrying about what it tastes like, but how to cook the food in the first place!

Harvesting the power of the sun for cooking has been a practice conducted for many years.

Solar cookers have been on the market since the mid-80s and have become a popular option for safe and easy cooking with no fires or fuel involved. There are obvious benefits to solar cooking, after the initial investment it is a free renewable source of energy. Not only this, but it is seen as a healthier way of cooking without smoke from fires etc.

Solar cookers convert the sun’s rays to infra-red radiation producing heat. Therefore, it is not the sun’s heat itself or the ambient air temperature outside the cooker that causes the food to cook.

There are three main types of solar cooker which can vary in their design and build.

The solar box cooker is derived from a box with reflectors that funnel the sun’s rays into the chamber which contains the food to be cooked. These models can reach very high temperatures, on average between 200-350°F, which is ideal for most baking needs. With a good heat retention and little need for supervision it is perfectly safe to leave food for long periods without fear of burning. Being a box shape these cookers are less likely to tip over and when constructed will have high levels of insulation.

The solar panel cooker on the other hand doesn’t reach temperatures quite as high; between 200-250°F. Essentially the design is a pot or pan within a plastic enclosure, with a 3-5 side reflective panel surrounding it to channel the sun’s rays. This type of design is best for slower longer cooking periods, leaving food very succulent. With no adjustments needed to track the sun, little supervision is needed.

Solar Cooking, food, cooking, solar, off-grid, technology

No need to worry about the risk of fire or burning food with solar cooking

Finally, the solar parabolic cooker can maintain the highest temperatures of the three main types and so can be used for grilling or even frying food. It can cook food much quicker, however usually smaller amounts than what can be held in the box or panel solar cookers. Also more attention is needed when cooking using this model, as the angle and direction of the cooker will need to be changed more frequently to track the sun.

There are many plans and designs for you to try if you want to have a go at a DIY solar cooker. Many designs include using materials commonly found around the home or are easily obtainable. For example, cardboard boxes, aluminium foil, black paint, some form of adhesive and even umbrellas!

If you don’t want the hassle of DIY or want a larger cooker with a guarantee, then there are several options on the market.

The All American Sun Oven is a box cooker design which can cook, bake, dehydrate and boil. Reaching temperatures of up to 400°F with even heating across the entire cooking chamber, the Sun Oven can do almost anything except frying. The built in thermometer also allows you to monitor the temperature. Weighing in at 23lbs the Sun Oven folds up like a suitcase, with its reflectors easily collapsing, making it easily portable. An adjustable leg prevents toppling and a levelling tray inside the cooking chamber ensures there’s no spillage when adjusting the Sun Oven.

Manufactured in Illinois, cooking times are similar to a standard electric cooker or oven after preheating. Factors that will affect the cooking time include the quality of sunlight at the time of cooking; the type and amount of food being cooked and how often the oven is refocused or the door opened. A typical rule of thumb stated on the Sun Oven website is to add between 10 to 15 minutes on to the cooking time, every time the oven door is opened. The model has an estimated life span of 15 years and can last a lifetime if cared for and maintained properly. The Sun Oven is available on Amazon at $298.00.

If you want something a little closer to the $200 mark, then the GoSun Sport is worth checking out.
Solar cooking, solar, food, cooking, off-grid, technology,

Small and compact the GoSun Sport and GoSun Dogger are perfect for fitting comfortably in an RV

This slightly futuristic looking design features parabolic reflectors and a solar vacuum cooking tube, which absorbs light and acts as an insulator. The tube converts approximately 80% of all the sunlight captured by the reflectors into useable heat for cooking – pretty impressive. With the parabolic shape of the reflectors, the GoSun Sport rarely needs readjusting as it captures light from a variety of angles. Not only this, but this model can cook in the cold and snow due to the high levels of insulation. Although, you will have to add up to 15 minutes onto the cooking time to allow the oven to heat fully.

With the cooking tube shape, food cooks evenly and in as little as 20 minutes, with temperatures of up to 550°F being reached! Despite this, the GoSun Sport is cool to the touch, easy and low maintenance and weighing only 7.5lbs is perfect for an RV or boat.

GoSun Ambassador Patrick Sweeney lives off-grid in his tiny trailer called Patcave. He told GoSun, “I love to cook and I love to be self-reliant. I also can’t afford to eat at restaurants. Living on the road in the Patcave, the GoSun stove allows me to cook great food anywhere the sun shines.”

The GoSun Sport retails at $229.00 on Amazon.

A smaller version of the GoSun Sport, the GoSun Solar Dogger, retails at $59.00 on the GoSun website. It is lightweight at only 2.5lbs and is perfect for hotdogs. Reviews on the Solar Dogger have shown that this model can be used for a wide variety of foods from oatmeal to fish.

The post Feeling Hot Hot Hot: Solar Cooking in Action appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Warren Buffett Just Sold $900 Million In Walmart Stock – What Does He Know That We Don’t?

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Warren Buffett Just Sold $900 Million In Walmart Stock – What Does He Know That We Don't?

NEW YORK — America’s most successful investor is among those who think the nation is on the verge of a “retail apocalypse” that might devastate hundreds of communities.

Warren Buffett has sold almost all of his Walmart stock, which was worth $900 million, Business Insider reported. Buffett had been a major investor in the world’s largest retailer.

Buffett seems to be among those who believe that traditional brick and mortar retailers cannot compete with Amazon. He started selling his Walmart shares last year after calling the ecommerce giant “a big, big force” that “has already disrupted plenty of people, and it will disrupt more.”

Get Out Of The Rat-Race And Make Money Off-Grid!

Buffett has been investing in Amazon since 2003, when he bought $98.3 million worth of that company’s junk bonds.

Traders tend to watch Buffett’s financial moves. Twelve years ago he predicted the problems Sears and Kmart are now having. Sears, the owner of Kmart, is in the process of closing 196 stores because of massive losses. In 2005, Buffett told University of Kansas students that Sears’ acquisition of Kmart would fail.

He also predicted the problems that many department store operators are having. Macy’s is planning to close 68 stores, and retail analysts expect J.C. Penney to start closing stores soon because of poor sales.

Walmart eliminated 7,000 accounting and invoicing positions in its stores last year and will lay off around 1,000 people at its headquarters in Bentonville, Ark., this year.

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Oroville Residents Brace for Disaster: But it’s not Just Oroville; California’s entire Water System is at Risk

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Experts warn areas throughout northern California are in danger of flooding and many of the area’s dams and levees face disasters similar to what’s going on at Oroville Dam. […]

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“THANKS, OBAMA!” THE 44TH PRESIDENT’S EXECUTIVE ORDER ON SPACE WEATHER

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You’ve probably heard of something called a coronal mass ejection (CME), otherwise known as a massive solar flare, and you probably know it could be very bad for the United States if the we happened to be facing the sun when it impacts earth. A large CME has the potential to have devastating impacts on everything from our global positioning systems (GPS), satellite operations, space operations, aviation and even our power grids, knocking them offline in an instant and destroying critical power grid infrastructure. A CME is one of several extra-terrestrial events that could possibly impact earth that are collectively referred to as space weather. Although much less likely, an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) can produce the same impacts, most commonly seen as a result of a nuclear explosion. In a world where international terrorism is a real threat, the possibility of an EMP weapon being used against the United States is a real concern. Experts agree that a direct impact from a large CME or a successful EMP attack is an existential threat to the United States that could instantly bring an end to our modern civilization.

 

A silhouette of the New Jersey.

 

On October 13, 2016, President Barack Obama signed an Executive Order — Coordinating Efforts to Prepare the Nation for Space Weather Events that outlined the country’s contingency plan in the event such weather events lead to significant disruption to systems like the electrical power grid, satellite operations or aviation, stating “It is the policy of the United States to prepare for space weather events to minimize the extent of economic loss and human hardship.”

 

 

With this EO, President Obama ordered that the federal government takes steps insure that the national infrastructure is secure in the event of a space weather event. The National Space Weather Strategy and Action Plan ( PDF ) was announced a few days later in conjunction with President Obama’s executive order, along with a PDF of The Implementation of the National Space Weather Action plan, complete with a White House official summary. The official pages aren’t up on WhiteHouse.gov, but here is the latest information I could find on those too.

 

 

After years of Congress knowing about the problem and failing to take action, I was pleased to learn that the President did what he could through the executive office to try and protect the critical infrastructure of our nation.  However it is still up to Congress to set aside the funds to follow through and take action in support of the specifics laid out in this order.

 

So what does this mean for me and every one of you concerned about national security and the protection of our extremely fragile power grid infrastructure? The phrase “Within 120 days of the date of this order…” is used repeatedly in this executive order. If you take a look at the calendar, we are at that point right now. I’ve read for years about how everyone knows this is a threat, yet no one is willing to take action. Well, the former President did what he could do in response to a lack of action by Congress and now it’s our turn. Call your United States Representatives and your United States Senators and ask them to take action on President Obama’s executive order to coordinate a national response and strengthen our national power grids against the possible catastrophic impacts of a massive CME or electromagnetic pulse attack. Find your US Representatives and your US Senators and urge them to take action on this very important initiative today.

 

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Why Homesteaders SHOULDN’T Own Livestock

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steven gregerson pic for emailAs homesteading continues growing in popularity, many wannabe homesteaders face sticker shock – surprised by the costs of a self-sufficient life.

But this week’s guest on Off The Grid Radio says that homesteading doesn’t have to be expensive. Homesteader Steven Gregersen, who lives on 20 acres in Montana, says too many homesteaders begin with the wrong outlook and goals, thus dooming their endeavor.

Gregersen wrote a book, Creating the Low-Budget Homestead, that explains how he homesteads on the cheap.

Gregersen explains to us why he urges first-time homesteaders not to buy livestock – and how they still can get free meat. He also tells us:

  • How to find inexpensive land that, with a little work, can be perfect for homesteading.
  • How the proper view of budgeting can place a homesteader on the path to success.
  • How he “gets by” without having a lot of things Americans take for granted.
  • How he earns money off-grid, and how you can, too.

If you’ve ever wanted to homestead but didn’t think you could afford it, or if you simply want to learn new ways to save money, then this week’s show is for you!

After the Fall: Jason’s Tale – Book Review

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After the Fall Jason's TaleI listen to a lot of audio books during my work day and during my commute. The ones that I like are added to the Prepper Fiction page on this site. There are a lot of books that don’t make the cut. But I added one this week written by David Nees, titled After the Fall: Jason’s Tale.

As you can guess from the title, the main character is a man named Jason. After an EMP attack he is suddenly alone in life. His wife was on a commercial airline, that most likely dropped out of the sky when the EMP hit. Living in a decent size city, things get kind of dangerous quickly. Jason helps the neighbors he can, then decides to get out of Dodge.

Being better prepared and smart about his actions, Jason is able to get out of the city and into the mountains. Everything was going well until he literally fell down the mountain. Battered up pretty badly Jason has to find help and trust strangers. Luckily he finds an older couple that have farmed on their land forever. He is able to recover while helping the couple with odd jobs around the farm. Jason strikes out on his own again, but just as he starts making progress away from the farm, there are gunshots from where he just came. Suspecting the worse, Jason returns to the farm as fast as he can run. What he finds is both bloody and brutal. Life changes for him forever.

I don’t want to give away the whole story. So I’ll stop there.

After the Fall: Jason’s Tale

This was the first book that David Nees has written. But the way he slowly builds his characters and the story are like a seasoned writer. I enjoyed After the Fall: Jason’s Tale and look forward to the second one.

The post After the Fall: Jason’s Tale – Book Review appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

Winter Camping and Our Internal Clock

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This interesting news article was in a local paper on February 15.

Article by Brett French, The Billings (Montana) Gazette.

“Camping in winter can be miserable. The nights seem painfully long. I toss, turn and check my watch frequently, wondering how it is that only an hour has passed since I last checked the clock.
New research may give winter campers like me some hope that those cold outings may be of benefit in an unusual way.
According to a study published in “Current Biology” by the Sleep and Chronobiology Lab at the University of Colorado Boulder, sleeping outside is a good way to reset your restless winter internal clock.”

Brett French’s complete article


Book Review: Harvesting Urban Timber

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Harvesting Urban Timber explains the importance of harvesting urban trees and how to do so. Three to four billion board feet of potential lumber is being fed either directly or indirectly into landfills throughout the United States each year. Case studies illustrate how some cities and counties have reduced waste through the use of urban timber […]

The post Book Review: Harvesting Urban Timber appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Prepping Lifestyle? 3 Unique Degrees That Fit The Survivalist Lifestyle

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If you’re the type who wants to live out in the wilderness on your own, or want to be well prepared to survive the apocalypse should it come to pass, you might be interested in degrees you can earn that would be best suited for someone who wants to live your lifestyle. Fortunately, there are plenty of different types of degrees that offer practical survival skills, but these three are by far some of the most helpful.

  1. Agriculture Sciences

    To survive on your own, knowing how to grow your own food is essential. You will need to have an extensive knowledge of different kinds of crops, how to properly care for the soil so it is not stripped of nutrients, how to properly irrigate the fields, recognize and fend off plant diseases and more. You will also need knowledge of how to sustain your food supply and stockpile food, as well as maintain healthy plant genetics, all of which an agriculture sciences degree teaches.

  2. Gunsmithing

    Very few schools around the country offer this degree, but a select few do. Being able to make your own firearms is an invaluable skill if you wish to live out in the wilderness. Currently existing programs not only teach how to manufacture guns, but also to repair them – another critical skill for survivalists. You will need guns to hunt for food, defend yourself against animal attacks, and possibly against people. Most gunsmithing programs also have knife making elements as well, which is an added bonus for an aspiring survivalist. Knives are just as important as guns when you’re on your own, and can be used to defend yourself, create tools and prepare food.

  3. Nursing

    Nursing, or any medical knowledge like an msn degree, is very useful when you must fend for yourself. If you or a loved one is injured or sick, having intimate knowledge of the human body, various conditions, and how to treat them are invaluable. As an added bonus, treating patients in combat zones will prepare you even better, as you might not have access to modern technology. Any number of accidents or conditions could befall you when you’re out in nature, relying on yourself for survival, and so getting a nursing degree is a great choice.

So if you wish to live a survivalist lifestyle, and want a formal education to supplement it, these three degrees are some of the best choices. They are not the only options – among the others include engineering degrees, animal husbandry and culinary arts. Pick the subject you think you’d benefit most from a formal education, and then learn the other skills through other sources or on your own. You’ll be prepared to live a survivalist lifestyle in no time.

Emma is a freelance writer living in Boston. When she manages to tear herself away from the computer, she enjoys baking, rock climbing, and film noir.

The Forgotten Handloading Cartridge You’ll Want When Society Collapses

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The Forgotten Handloading Cartridge You’ll Want When Society Collapses

Image source: Wikimedia

Born in the early 1960s as the brainchild of Bill Jordan, Elmer Keith and Skeeter Skelton, there is a uniquely viable magnum cartridge that has stayed under the radar.

I’m talking about the venerable .41 Remington Magnum, which was designed with the idea of making a police service cartridge that was neatly balanced between .357 and .44 magnum, and also could be loaded hotter for hunting use.

What should have been the ultimate police revolver soon became a somewhat obscure hunting revolver, though, due to a poorly chosen introduction of heavy hunting guns paired with hot hunting ammo, while mostly ignoring the police and armed private citizen market. The end-result has been a cartridge that over the last 50 some-odd years has developed a cult-like following of skilled handgunners and knowledgeable handloaders.

While lacking the extreme high end of heavy bullets that the .44 magnum has, the .41 can be loaded anywhere from mild to wild, with heavy loads equal to most upper-end .44 magnum loads. But why should you want an obscure cartridge like the .41? The simple answer is ballistics and ease of shooting. The flat-shooting characteristics of the .41 make it a joy to shoot, and many gun owners find comparable .41 loads to be more pleasant to shoot than .44 loads.

The market has recognized this ongoing fascination with the .41 and, as of this writing, there are several single- and double-action revolvers from Ruger and Smith and Wesson being built, along with a lever-action rifle by Henry.  There certainly is no shortage of guns in which to shoot this round!

Learn How To Make Your Own Ammo! Read More Here.

If you are living off-grid or preparing for an uncertain future, you’ve probably got or are considering at least one big bore revolver. You also are hopefully wise enough to secure your ammo supply with sufficient supplies to load your own ammo for a long period of time. Much can be said for choosing a very common cartridge like the .44 magnum, but unless you are expecting a world where you are reduced to scrounging for production ammo (and at that point I’d say you’ve got greater problems than what revolver cartridge you chose), the prudent survivalist is not limited by common market demands, but rather his or her own personal stockpile of bullets, powder and primer.

The Forgotten Handloading Cartridge You’ll Want When Society Collapses

Image source: Wikimedia

Revolver brass has a long lifespan if you don’t abuse it, and a few hundred pieces of brass and a couple thousand primers and bullets (and the powder to load with) should keep your revolver shooting for a lifetime during social collapse.

But that doesn’t really tell you why you should consider the .41. Remember: This is a round designed by three of the greatest combat handgunners of the 20th century, and certainly three of the last who understood in great detail the revolver as a hunting and fighting tool. The .41 isn’t just some sort of compromise cartridge; it is built from the ground up to provide exceptional performance. It shoots flatter and straighter than a similar .44, and a comparison of ballistic tables shows an uneasy superiority over the .44 in many similar loadings. Having been used to take everything from elephants and polar bears to deer-sized game, the .41 has proven its worth time and time again.

Be Prepared. Learn The Best Ways To Hide Your Guns.

Because it does not have the market penetration of the .44, the .41 has become something of a handloader’s cartridge, and also the mark of a sophisticated, or at least well-informed, shooter. As with any cartridge, handloading lets you develop highly effective cartridges for your own personal use, and the .41 is no exception. Revolvers such as those sold by Ruger with their long cylinders all but beg for heavier-than-factory bullets, and if you are handloading, you gain far more authority over the whims of markets and law than if you rely strictly on factory ammo.

In short, the .41 magnum is a hard-hitting, straight-shooting magnum that can kill almost anything walking on the face of the earth, and certainly in North America if you do your part. It is a pleasant-shooting round, a fantastic companion in the forest, and if you are concerned about a really grim future, it is possible obscure ammo stocks will be less of a target for theft than more popular rounds. However, no matter how you cut it, the .41 magnum does everything the .44 does, but with greater accuracy and without the irritating cultural connotations of a “Dirty Harry gun.” Check one out, and you might be hooked, too.

Have you ever shot or owned a .41 magnum? What did you think? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Learn How To Make Your Own Ammo! Read More Here.

25 Things NOT To Do If You Bug In

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There are countless articles and videos with lists of tips, hacks, and things to do if you bug in during a disaster. However, there aren’t many lists of things NOT to do. That is the subject of this video by Reality Survival. If you’ve never bugged in for an extended period of time without power, […]

The post 25 Things NOT To Do If You Bug In appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Winter Gardening: 13+ Tips and To-Do’s

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The post Winter Gardening: 13+ Tips and To-Do’s is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

For a gardening enthusiast, there’s nothing worse than not getting out into your green space. If you’ve got a green-fingered calling, the winter can put the brakes on your passion and bring down your mood. Luckily, there are many ways to stay busy in the garden during the winter. How to Keep Gardening in Winter Prepare […]

The post Winter Gardening: 13+ Tips and To-Do’s is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Affordable, Accessible, & Discreet: Best Neck Knives You Can EDC

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Affordable, Accessible, & Discreet: Best Neck Knives You Can EDC

Carrying your knife around your neck is not a new phenomenon, nor is it a fad. It’s a concept that’s been around forever. Whilst the practice of wearing a neck knife has garnered traction for situations, sad to say, neck knives have never enjoyed mainstream success. Survivalists like Cody Lundin famously wore their knives around… Read More

This is just the start of the post Affordable, Accessible, & Discreet: Best Neck Knives You Can EDC. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


Affordable, Accessible, & Discreet: Best Neck Knives You Can EDC, written by Thomas Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

Affordable, Accessable, & Discreet: Best Neck Knives You Can EDC

Click here to view the original post.
Affordable, Accessable, & Discreet: Best Neck Knives You Can EDC

Carrying your knife around your neck is not a new phenomenon, nor is it a fad. It’s a concept that’s been around forever. Whilst the practice of wearing a neck knife has garnered traction for situations, sad to say, neck knives have never enjoyed mainstream success. Survivalists like Cody Lundin famously wore their knives around… Read More

This is just the start of the post Affordable, Accessable, & Discreet: Best Neck Knives You Can EDC. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


Affordable, Accessable, & Discreet: Best Neck Knives You Can EDC, written by Thomas Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

Is The Economic Melt-Up About To Melt-Down?

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“STOCKS AROUND THE WORLD CONTINUE TO ADVANCE. The trend remains upward and although nearly ever method we know of for measuring market sentiment is preposterously over-extended to the upside, and although nearly every method we know of to measure relative value is equally over-extended to the upside, the great game of investment musical chairs continues.” […]

Prepper Training: This is How to Prepare Your Body to Escape the Big City on Foot

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bugging out on footReadyNutrition Readers, this piece covers some of the basic fundamentals on road marching.  Yes, this is a typical military exercise, but it has several applications for you in terms of preparations and in training.  Road marches can be both physically demanding and challenging.  They should not be attempted without proper preparation, and if you have any underlying health conditions, consult with your doctor prior to doing them.

As I have mentioned in previous articles, I prefer the large-frame Alice Pack of the US Army, the one I have been using for many decades, now.  It is both sturdy and affordable, and can meet a person’s needs from a training and a survival perspective.  That mentioned, it is up to you to find one that feels both comfortable and offers you the support you need to be able to move on the road or cross-country with weight on your back.

Don’t road march cold: you need to take the time to do some light calisthenics to warm your muscles up prior to the physical exertion.  The weight you will tote with you will vary according to your abilities and physical condition, as well as the needs of the exercise.  It is a training event: you need to keep it as such and hold it in that regard.  You need proper footgear and comfortable clothing, as well as a water supply.  You need to prepare for it the night before, with a good meal and plenty of rest and fluids prior to your start.

Your stretches can include (but not be limited to) the side-straddle hop (referred to as “jumping jacks,”) as well as half-squats, squats, hamstring and calf stretches, and so forth.  I prefer boots to support my ankles, although I have seen many people using tennis shoes and hiking shoes.  Whatever your preference, as long as it gives your arch the support it needs.

Start out small, with a lighter amount of weight.  That will be on you to gauge.  Start by doing a mile, and then work your way up.  A good conservative plan for a road marching “schedule” can be one per week with lighter weights and shorter distances.  As you “work your way up” you’ll want to make the road marches less frequent.  The reason being is you don’t want to damage yourself with a potential stress fracture or a hairline fracture from continuously pounding the pavement with your feet and heavy weight on the shoulders.  Shin splints are a common occurrence over time, as well.

Medically, they’re referred to as MTSS (medial tibial stress syndrome), and are pains within the connective muscle and tissue surrounding your knee and the outside of your tibia.  It is a chronic “dull” aching feeling that arises in about 15 to 20% of people who run, walk, or (in this case) march long distances.  Ice packs and rest can enable you to recover in a short period of time.  For any question of it, consult with your physician if the problem persists.

The road marches will strengthen your legs and back, and also develop your cardiovascular capabilities.  You should time every one of them, and attempt gains each time you undertake a march.  Gains would take the form of quicker times, or more weight carried.  You have to do it gradually.  Eventually, your end goal is to carry what you normally would in a rucksack if the SHTF and you were out in the woods.  Cross-country is markedly different from doing it on the side of the road due to the uneven terrain as well as other factors, such as water, thick vegetation, an abundance of rocks, etc.

Weather is also a factor, and in the warmer months great care must be taken to ensure you don’t dehydrate yourself.  Remember: thirst is a late sign of dehydration, and means you’re already depleted when you feel thirsty.  It would also be good to undertake these marches with a partner, so that if an emergency arises you have someone with you to rely upon for first aid or to go for help.

Your endurance will improve with time, and it also takes adjustment for your feet to become accustomed to both your pace and the work.  It is an excellent lower-body exercise that still manages to work your upper body.  It requires discipline, determination, and preparation to accomplish.  Eventually you will see results, and can road march 2 to 4 times per month successfully as part of your physical regimen.

Remember to take account of the water you will carry when you initially weigh your rucksack.  You can pick up a good fishing and game scale that will enable you to find out exactly how much you tote.  Try it out.  It is cost effective and will give you some good results.  Happy rucking!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Fight Colds and Flu At Home

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natural cold remedies

As I type this I have three kiddos sick with a winter cold, and one just getting over it. I blame it on our recent trip to the local children’s museum. It never fails. No matter how much you sanitize their little hands, inevitably they’re going to get sick. When that little girl playing with the Legos hacked and snotted all over her hands, I knew we were done for.

Parents, for heaven’s sake keep your sick kids at home!

That was my short rant. This is one of my biggest pet peeves.

So now that my crew is dealing with stuffy noses, sore throats, and a hacking cough, I’m in doctor mom mode. I’ve pulled out all of the natural cold remedies in my cabinet and have been doing my best to help their little bodies fight off the bug as quickly as possible. My oldest son was the first to come down with the virus, and was miserable for two days but bounced back pretty quickly by day three, so I’m hopeful it won’t last too long for the rest of my guys.

I’ll share with you what my natural cold remedies protocol is when we get sick with a cold or flu. Since I’ve been using these natural cold remedies, we have not had to see a doctor for colds or flu in over eight years. We’ve been able to manage it at home – naturally.

The main idea behind these natural cold remedies is not to mask symptoms, but to give your body’s immune system the boost it needs to fight the bacteria or virus naturally. The more you enable your body to do what it was designed to do, the stronger your immune system will be and the faster you’ll get over future colds.

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Want To Know How To Treat Infections Without Antibiotics?

Check out this 2 hour video from an expert herbalist that reveals how to treat dozens of types of infections with your own homemade remedies.

Click here For The 2 Hour Video On
Treating Infections Without Antibiotics

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Four Foods To Avoid When Sick

Food plays a big part in how strong your immune function will be and how quickly you get well again. If you sit around eating junk food and you deprive your body of the essential nourishment it needs to be strong and healthy, you can be sure that you will suffer longer. Your body will be trying to fight a battle without any ammo.

Here are the four foods you need to be avoiding as soon as you feel the symptoms of a cold coming on:

  1. Processed “Foods”. If it doesn’t grow out of the ground and you can’t pronounce the ingredients, don’t eat it. It isn’t really food and it won’t give your body the vitamins, minerals, and nutrients it needs.
  2. Gluten. Sometimes wheat and other glutens can trigger inflammation in the body and can slow down your immune response.
  3. Dairy. Milk products can cause more mucus to develop, which is the last thing you want when you’re sick.
  4. Sugar. Sugar is an immune suppressant, and bacteria thrives on it. You don’t want to feed the germs you’re trying to kill. Avoid all sugars, except a little honey when used in other remedies.

natural cold remedies

Garlic is Great for Coughs

Garlic has strong antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. It’s probably the best natural remedy I know for treating many infections.

Here’s my go-to garlic salve recipe for treating deep coughs and upper respiratory infections. It’s from the book, “Be Your Own Doctor” by Rachel Weaver, M.H.

Garlic Salve

  • 1/3 c. coconut oil
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 8 cloves peeled garlic
  • 5 or so drops of lavender essential oil

Pour everything into a blender and mix until smooth. Strain off the bits of garlic, and store the liquid in a wide-mouth glass jar in the fridge. It will solidify as it cools. If your child has super sensitive skin, you might try adding more coconut oil and olive oil.

Apply liberally to the chest, back, and bottoms of feet (covered with socks) at least four times a day, and as often as every couple of hours, as needed. This isn’t something that you can overdose on, so don’t be afraid to use too much. If it doesn’t seem to be working, use more!

natural cold remedies

Honeysuckle Tea for Sore Throats

In spring I collect buckets full of honeysuckle blossoms to make a tea concentrate. I know I’ll need it during the cold and flu months to soothe sore throats. You can make the tea by steeping 2 cups of honeysuckle blossoms in 1 quart of boiling hot water for 10 minutes, then straining it off. Add 1 cup of honey to the tea, bring it back up to a boil for 1 minute, then remove from heat and allow to cool. I like to pour the tea into ice cube trays to freeze. Store them in a labeled ziploc bag. You can suck on the cold ice cubes, or heat them up and drink as a hot tea.

natural cold remedies

Steam for Severe Congestion

For unbearable sinus congestion, steam with essential oils added can bring much needed relief. Boil some hot water and pour it into a glass bowl. Add a few drops of eucalyptus essential oil. Put a towel over your head and lean over the bowl to trap the steam. Close your eyes (to prevent the oil from burning them) and breathe deeply through your nose to help break up congestion. Blow your nose as much as you can while the mucus is loose. Do this treatment several times a day, as needed for relief.

 

natural cold remedies

Hot Herbal Tea

Hot herbal teas are wonderful for helping to clear congestion, for soothing sore throats, and for relaxing body aches and pains. Peppermint tea is a good decongestant, and will help loosen up thick mucus. Licorice tea is great for sore throats (as is the aforementioned honeysuckle tea). Chamomile tea helps to promote relaxation and rest. Rose hip tea has a ton of vitamin C in it and is a great immune booster. Many herbal teas are also great for relieving stubborn, dry coughs. There are plenty of herbal tea blends that are specifically designed for fighting colds and flu; check out what’s available at your local health food store or online.

 

natural cold remedies

Herbs and Vitamin Supplements

Certain herbs and supplements can help boost your immune system and help your body fight more effectively. The next time you get sick, make sure you have the following items in your medicine cabinet:

  • Echinacea & Goldenseal Complex
  • vitamin D
  • vitamin C with rose hips
  • Olive Leaf
  • probiotics

I also highly recommend taking elderberry syrup (Sambucus) for even more immune support. I’m all about doing everything you can to give your body the edge it needs to heal!

 

natural cold remedies

Diffuse Essential Oils

I absolutely love diffusing essential oils on a daily basis. Not only do they make your home smell amazing, they also put healing oils into the air for you to inhale and benefit from.

When we’re sick I diffuse peppermint for congestion, lavender for relaxation, eucalyptus for coughs, or a combination of oils.

Water diffusers are better at getting the oils into the air than the kind that use candles or reeds, so that’s what I’d recommend using.

 

Drink Lots of Good Stuff!

If you’re dealing with congestion, the best thing you can do to clear it out is to drink lots and lots of fresh, filtered water and hot herbal teas. Doing so will break up the mucus and phlegm and will help your body clear up quickly.

If you have a juicer, making fresh juice from organically grown fruits and vegetables will give your body an amazing amount of vitamins and minerals.

Definitely avoid soft drinks, sweet tea, prepared juices (yes, even store bought orange juice), and alcoholic beverages until you are completely well again.

 

When implementing these natural cold remedies at the first sign of a cold or flu coming on, you’ll be able to fight off infections in record time. By boosting your body’s own healing mechanism instead of suppressing and masking symptoms, you’ll find that your colds will be much less severe and will last for a much shorter duration of time.

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Survival Life Article – SIG P320

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I’ve started writing over at Survival Life and they published my first post. It’s a review of the SIG P320 so hop on over there and give it a read. More articles and reviews are on the way so stay tuned. Go ahead and bookmark that site too, lots of good articles written by thoughtful […]

The post Survival Life Article – SIG P320 appeared first on Smart Suburban Survival.

Four Things That Are Not Safe To Can At Home

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There are four things that are not safe to can at home. Period. Lately, I have been concerned with articles on Facebook or blogs with posts stating you can preserve certain foods at home that I knew were not safe to can. Then I started getting emails and Facebook PM’s asking me if this post or that post was accurate. In my gut, I knew some of the foods weren’t safe to can. So I went to the experts to confirm my thoughts. I am not a newbie to canning. I have been safely canning my foods per Utah State Extension service guidelines for over 50 years. I also have my Master Preserver Canning Certificate via the USU through the USDA training courses. This is an updated article whereas I added milk to my list. I am seeing a lot of people canning milk and cream. These are unsafe to can at home because of the fat in them.

Now, you might say, “I learned how to can them from my friend (or whoever) and my jars look great”. They may even taste okay. But here’s the clincher, you don’t know what bacteria is lurking inside those jars. Please, please, please do not risk the health of your family by canning these higher risk food items. Carolyn mentioned the reason certain foods are not listed on your local state canning extension lists is because they have not been proven safe to preserve via our home canning process.

Four Foods Not Safe To Can At Home:

1. Never Can Eggs

I want to bring this issue to everyone’s attention because eggs are not safe to can at home. Bacteria will grow and you may not even see it in the jars when eggs are canned at home. Now, I am not talking about pickled eggs (which are safe for the refrigerator for a short period of time only).  Please do not can eggs. Call your local extension service if you still think you can can your own eggs. If the food item you have a question about canning yourself isn’t listed on your local extension service it is more than likely unsafe to process at home.

Yes, you can freeze eggs but personally, I don’t want to fill my freezer with eggs. The texture will not be the same with frozen eggs but they would work for baking. I get nervous about the electricity going out. I can only imagine trying to get rid of those thawed eggs in a power outage.

I love reading about people having chickens and gathering eggs from their chicken coops. I have heard good stories from people who are learning to raise chickens who have the land and families working together as a team. I have also heard they have excess eggs and want to know what to do with all those eggs.

Let’s get real here, please save money and buy some professionally processed eggs in #10 cans for longer term storage needs. Or in packages from a reputable company. I only buy Ova Easy Eggs. They are real eggs, you can scramble them, make a frittata, quiche or bake with them. I have a few #10 cans of powdered eggs, but I must say, they do not taste like eggs when cooked in a frying pan, even with butter. They will be fine for baking muffins, cakes, pancakes or bread. These are the only ones I like to buy because they taste just like eggs out of a carton: OvaEasy Powdered Whole Eggs – Case (12 x 4.5 oz Bags)

2. Never Can Bacon

There is too much fat in bacon to make it safe for canning at home. I am not a scientist or microbiologist to be able to explain correctly the significance of the bacteria that grows in bacon if you try canning it at home. I realize some people have canned bacon for years and swear by its safety. Here again, we don’t know what’s lurking in our home canned bacon. I highly recommend you do not can bacon at home. Here’s the deal, I love bacon. Doesn’t everything taste better with bacon in it? My husband and I have been eating BLT’s for weeks now with the tomatoes out of our garden.

The only bacon that’s on my food storage shelves is four cans of professionally processed cooked Yoder’s Bacon. They will be used for a treat if we are without power for weeks. It’s way too expensive per pound to store much more. I bought six cans of the canned bacon from Yoder’s. I taught a class with one can and did a post with the other can. I compared the price of precooked bacon from Costco and one can of Yoder’s: Yoder’s Bacon & Ova Easy Eggs by Food Storage Moms.

Yes, I freeze a few packages of bacon when it goes on sale. I thaw it in the refrigerator and bake it in the oven the next day. I line a cookie sheet with foil and spread the bacon out in single layers as well as I can. I bake the bacon at 400 degrees for 45-60 minutes depending on how crispy it gets in that time period. I love that my stovetop stays clean by baking the bacon in the oven. I learned this from my daughter and her husband. It’s so much easier.Please note *I buy very thick bacon from a meat butcher so if your bacon is thinner, cut the time in half.  Yoder’s bacon: Yoders Canned Fully Cooked Bacon

3. Never Can Butter

Now let’s talk about butter. It is not safe to can at home either. Maybe you had a friend show you how to can it. Like bacon, butter has way too much fat in it to safely can it at home. Here again, we don’t know what bacteria may be growing in those jars.

I watch for butter to go on sale and fill my freezer with as many as my budget will allow. I also bought some powdered butter that tastes awful. I get the dry heaves just thinking about the smell of it. One website states their powdered butter “tastes like Land O’Lakes butter.” No, it doesn’t, I have tried them all. They are fine for baking.

This is a statement I was given from the USU Extension Service on a sheet of paper listing food to NOT store:

“Home Canned Butter, especially unsalted butter has NO protection from botulism, salted home canned butter has no science-based process to can safely. Heating the jars does sterilize it, but it will NOT kill any botulism spores. When you remove the oxygen from the jar, it allows for the potential growth of botulism spores”.

I highly recommend this brand of canned butter for your food storage: Red Feather PURE CANNED BUTTER – 6 cans of 12oz each – great for survival earthquake kit

4. Never Can Milk or Cream:

Here’s the deal with canning milk or cream, it is unsafe to preserve by water bath or pressure canning. The milk and cream have too much fat in them. This is what I found on the USDA website: “Caution: Do not add noodles or other pasta, rice, flour, cream, milk or other thickening agents to home canned soups. If dried beans or peas are used, they must be fully rehydrated first”. End of quote. In the classes, I took to pass my Master Preserver Canning Certificate we were reminded of these four products I have listed above that they are unsafe to can because we cannot get our pressure canner up to the temperature required to kill off the bacteria. This is why I buy these products from commercial companies that have the equipment to can them safely.

Comments from Readers:

Thanks to Lauralee H. explains how butter was stored in pioneer days:

The pioneers only made small batches of butter at a time from milking their cow. Then they stored it at room temperature in a butter bell. A ceramic type of dish where they spooned the butter into the top bell part and over the butter poured a small amount of boiled salted water that was cooled over the butter. Then a plate type bottom was placed on it, and it was turned over quickly and sat down on the counter. That way the salted water was on the bottom of the butter sealing out the air. Each time they needed the butter they poured the water off and used the butter. Most of them did salt their butter back then when churning it. They tried not to make too much butter at a time, only what they could use up in maybe three days. If they made big batches they were going to do baking that would use it up. I think you can still purchase butter bells.

Thanks to Shelley for this great comment:

The National Center for Home Food Preservation is the go-to resource for safe. approved methods and recipes. If I ever have a question this is where I go. I am also a Master Food Preserver through Washington State University and I also rely on the Extension Services to provide information. Please don’t trust the online resources you see as safe. Research first!

http://nchfp.uga.edu/index.html

Another Linda telling me what her mom did years ago: hello, great post. My mom was born in 1910. She told me stories of how things were done in Ky for generations. They had cold dairies (called various things) but what it came down to was watch where the river level was at the highest point in the year and go a few feet above this. You dig out the river bank, shore it up, just like they do in the mines, caves, etc. Milk, eggs, butter was stored. mom said it was very cold even in the summer. Winter temps allowed longer storage thus greater amounts stored. For pitted fruits, a fruit cellar dug into a mountain or wood building covered to be a small hill, etc.

JoEllen: Actually you might have included anything “dairy” as something unsafe to can as well. There’s a crowd out there who advocate water bath canning of extra milk. Hopefully, they will survive their ICU stay…

Please be careful when canning ANY foods at home, but these three we should never can at home. Here’s to safe canning.

Utah State Extension Service: Utah State Extension Service.

My favorite things:

Ball Mason Wide Mouth Quart Jars with Lids and Bands, Set of 12

All American 921 21 Quart Pressure Cooker Canner

Norpro Canning Essentials Boxed Set, 6 Piece Set

Ball Enamel Water Bath Canner, Including Chrome-Plated Rack and 4-Piece Utensil Set

Ball FreshTech Electric Water Bath Canner, Silver

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What you NEED to know about EMPs

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When it comes to possible serious SHTF (Sh*t Hit The Fan) or TEOTWAWKI (The End Of The World As We Know It) events, the one that seems to be most “popular” with preppers is a EMP (Electro Magnetic Pulse) attack. Many popular “prepper fiction” books, such as One Second After, have been written based upon […]

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What We Can Learn From The California Evacuation

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california evacuation

Imagine waking up one morning, to find that your home, which you thought was safe, was in fact, is in danger. Not just a little danger, either; but one which could destroy your home, wiping it off the face of the Earth. What do you do?

That’s the situation which has faced almost 200,000 people in Northern California, as the risk of flooding from the Oroville Dam and Reservoir is increasing. An unusually wet winter has led to the reservoir reaching dangerously high levels.

Erosion damaged the primary spillway, as a 200 foot long, 35 foot wide hole formed in the bottom. Closing this spillway merely caused the water to rise even higher, overflowing the emergency spillway.

However, the emergency spillway only had a concrete lip, with the rest of the spillway being nothing more than an open hillside, leading down to the river below. Not capped with concrete, it was subject to erosion, which the water flowing over it quickly caused, raising concerns about the emergency spillway collapsing and releasing a 30 foot tall wall of water on the towns below.

This prompted an emergency evacuation that touched on four counties, with all the confusion and problems of any mass exodus. People had an hour to get out of their homes and on the road, where they found traffic moving at a snail’s pace and gas stations overwhelmed by people who needed to fill their tanks. As gas stations and then cars ran out of gas, people were forced to abandon them and take out on foot.

What’s Wrong With Conventional Prepper Wisdom

This is where the average prepper says it’s time to grab the bug out bag and put Plan B (for bug out) into effect. While that is a logical conclusion from a near-term survival viewpoint, it may not be the best possible solution from a long-term survival viewpoint. Even if your home is destroyed in such a disaster, there are many things within that home, which you will need as you rebuild your life.

“The clear answer is to bug out to some other urban area, which is far enough removed from the epicenter of the danger your home is facing, to make it a safe haven from the pending disaster.”

The problem is, most of us think of bugging out as something to be done in an emergency, with the intent of living in the wild. But that’s not necessarily the best solution. Living in the wild is infinitely harder than living amongst our fellow humans, where we have the entire infrastructure of modern society to support us. It really only makes sense to bug out into the wild when we need to escape from our fellow man, such as in the case of a breakdown of society.

In those cases, we’re usually referring to a nationwide catastrophe which has led to the breakdown of society. There is no safe populated place to go, leaving us with heading into the wilderness as our only viable option.

On the other end of the scale, we have bugging out to a refugee relocation center, often referred to as a FEMA camp. That option works for those sheeple who expect the government to care for them from cradle to grave, but it doesn’t work for us. Most of us don’t trust the government all that much and definitely don’t want to put ourselves and our families into their hands.

So if prudence dictates that we bug out, but it doesn’t make sense to either bug out to the wild or bug out to a FEMA camp, what are we to do?

It is easier to find the things you need to have in order to survive, if you’re in an urban area, than if you’re in the wilderness. Not only that, but if you have to rebuild your life somewhere, it’s also easier to do that in the company of others, than out in the middle of nowhere.

We have to understand that not all bug-outs are equal. There’s a huge difference between bugging out due to a natural disaster, than bugging out due to a breakdown in society. Because of this difference, we need to adjust our plans accordingly and not use a “one size fits all” style of prepping. The bug out bag might be the only thing we can take with us so make sure you have your bug out bag ready to go.

Planning for an Evacuation

9343130 - tsunami roadsign near pescadero, california

While mandatory evacuations are by no means common, they aren’t unprecedented either.

There was a mandatory evacuation ordered before Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. A similar order went out for Hurricane Sandy.

If a tsunami was ever to head for any of our shores, you can be sure that a general evacuation order would go out.

But the most common evacuation orders are those that happen for floods and forest fires. This evacuation in California falls into that category.

If we accept that such an evacuation is different than bugging out due to social unrest or a breakdown in society, then we need to determine what we should do differently. More than anything, this affects the things we should being with us.

Since we would not be heading off into the wild, we wouldn’t need a massive amount of wilderness survival gear. Oh, we’d need some, as there would always be the possibility of being forced to abandon our cars and take out on foot. In such a case, it would probably be wise to avoid the roads and head cross-country, especially if a lot of other people were caught in the same predicament.

The simple fact of being prepared makes you and I too good a target for mooching and stealing, for us to stick around others who have had to abandon their cars as well.

In that case, the bug out bag might be the only thing we can take with us. But if we work things right, we won’t have to abandon our cars. In that case, we can take a whole lot more with us. Specifically, we can take the things we’ll need to have in order to rebuild our lives.

So, what are those things?

  • Clothing: both rough clothing for the wilderness and professional clothing for seeking a new job.
  • Valuables: there’s no sense leaving valuable jewelry behind to be looted or buried in the mud. Better to take it with you, so that you can use it. If nothing else, it can be sold to provide you with food.
  • Cash: whatever cash you have on hand will be needed to keep your family going, wherever you are going to end up.
  • Photos and other important memories.
  • Professional tools that you would need to have so that you could continue working or working a new job.
  • Important documents: birth certificates, professional degrees, marriage license, certifications, car titles, property deeds, medical records, kids school records.
  • Computer: today, so much of our lives and our work is on our computers, that we will need them to help us rebuild our lives, if our homes are destroyed.

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The thing is, with only a few hours to pack up and leave, or even less, chances are that you won’t be able to pack those things up, or even that you’ll think of them all. That’s why you need to have a checklist of things that you should take with you, besides your bug out bag.

In fact, you probably need several different checklists, based upon different scenarios. That way, you’ll be able to choose the checklist that’s most appropriate to the situation.

It’s much easier to think through what you need to do, when there is time, and things are calm. In the moment of crisis, the mind tends to go blank; so don’t wait for that moment to come. Prepare your lists and note where those items are kept. That way, you won’t need to waste precious time looking for it.

Lessons to Be Learned

As with any such disaster, there are lessons for us to learn. Professionals who deal with disasters and crisis situations always do an after-action-review, to see what they can learn. It doesn’t even have to be a situation that they were involved in; they’ll review other actions, so as to find what lessons they can learn.

We can do the same thing, simply by looking at what happened and putting ourselves in the place of the families who became victims of this potential disaster. In doing so, we can see what went wrong and what remedial action needs to be taken, to make sure that it doesn’t happen to us, as it did to them.

Know Your Area

The people living downstream of the Oroville Dam should have known that they were living in an area with a high risk of flooding. It doesn’t matter that there has never been any problem with that dam before, the very fact of its existence creates risk, especially in earthquake-prone California. Knowing that, they should have planned what they would do if anything ever happened to the dam.

Granted, their problem isn’t yours or mine, but we need to ask ourselves what risks we have overlooked. It’s easy to look around us and totally miss the most dangerous things in our area. As preppers, we need a good handle on every risk that exists in our area and we need to know if something happens to increase the risk from any of them.

Keep Your Ear to the Ground

One of the most important elements of an effective bug out is knowing when to bug out. Most survival instructors teach that it’s best to shelter in place as long as you can; but there are always cases that go against that advice. The situation in Northern California clearly fits that description. In that case, getting out sooner is clearly better than getting out later. If nothing else, it helps you to avoid the traffic.

But that requires knowing what’s coming, before it becomes public knowledge. In other words, you need good, solid information about each and every one of the risk elements that can affect you. That way, you can take action before it is too late.

Don’t just depend on traditional sources of information. The news media has proven that we can’t trust them; so why should we trust them for this? They could easily avoid telling of a pending disaster, just to further some political point that they feel is more important. To the left, we are nothing more than pawns in their power game, so they don’t really care what happens to us.

In the case in point, the knowledge that they had just passed through an extremely wet winter should have been a warning to anyone who recognized that dam as a threat. That would then lead to further investigation, finding how high the water was. From there, they would want to keep an eye on the water level, seeing it continue to rise and the mounting risk that it was creating.

Don’t Trust “Expert” Analysis

While experts have their place, we shouldn’t put all our trust in what they say. In this case, experts had said that the emergency spillway was safe for much more water than what was pouring over it. Yet they quickly found that their analysis was incorrect. Hey, they’re human, they can make mistakes too.

Those experts were even faced with complaints, filed by various organizations, which stated that the design of the emergency spillway was inadequate and not up to government mandated standards. Yet, bowing to the pressure of their own senior management, who didn’t want to pay the expense of capping the emergency spillway with concrete, they stood their ground, saying that it was safe.

So listen to what the experts say, but don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Make your own analysis, based upon the knowledge you have and logic. If something doesn’t look right to you, there’s a good chance that it isn’t.

Trust Your Gut, Don’t Wait

While the people weren’t given much notice, I’m sure there were one or two who had developed their own idea of what was happening. Knowing that, I would be surprised if they didn’t have thoughts of bugging out early. Had they followed their instincts, they would have been the safest and most comfortable people out there.

I understand that we don’t want to disturb our lives for nothing. That makes sense. At the same time, there are situations where we need to disturb our lives. This is such a situation. Maybe nothing will happen; but maybe it will. With that being the case, it’s better to be safe than sorry. You can always call it a practice drill.

Have Gasoline on Hand

fuel Unsurprisingly, one of the problems the evacuees faced was that the gas stations ran out of fuel, leaving them without enough gas to get their cars to where they were going.

Gas stations don’t stock fuel for an emergency, but rather to meet their daily sales. There is no way that they can meet the needs of a mass evacuation.

In this evacuation, as in any other, a large number of vehicles ended up parked on the side of the road, when they ran out of gas.

When you consider that most people run their cars on the bottom half of the tank, that’s not at all surprising. I’ve got a shocking message for those people, it doesn’t cost any more to keep the top half of the tank filled, than it does to keep the bottom half filled.

More than that, you should have a stock of gasoline on hand, all the time. That’s a bit tricky, because gasoline doesn’t store well. But if you rotate that gas supply, putting it in your vehicle’s tank and replacing it with fresh gasoline every six months, you’ll always have a good supply of gasoline for bugging out with, should the need arise.

Have Alternate Escape Routes

Not only are the gas stations inadequate for a mass evacuation, the highways are too. Highways are expensive to build, so they build them based upon actual and projected traffic. Adding enough extra lanes to handle a mass evacuation is impractical.

This means that the highways are going to be overcrowded and that traffic will slow to a snail’s pace in any evacuation. But in most cases, the side streets and back ways will be totally devoid of traffic. There will be ways that will be open, especially country and farm roads that aren’t used a whole lot. Learn those routes and make sure that you have maps to use in figuring out alternate ways to get out of Dodge.

Have a Destination

Finally, make sure you have somewhere to go. I don’t know about you, but the last place I’d want to go is some overfilled school gymnasium, which had been turned into a refugee center. I’d much rather pitch a tent outside and have a modicum of privacy.

Most people will only go as far as they have to, in order to avoid the disaster. So, you can easily get away from the crowd by going a little farther. Don’t stop in the first town you get to, go on through and stop in another, on down the road. There will be less people there competing for hotel rooms and other necessities.

Better yet, scout out some good locations to go to in the case of an emergency. Take a few weekends off and do some traveling, visiting other cities and finding the resources that you’d need to have, if you have to abandon your home. That way, you have some idea of where to go.

Be Prepared

Emergencies can happen at any time. I’m sure that the majority of the people living downstream of that dam had no idea that they were in danger. Their first indication that there was a serious problem was when they were told to evacuate. Since most of them were unprepared, they ended up leaving with whatever they could grab.

The truly sad thing is that they could have received adequate notice, if the authorities were willing to share information about what was happening. But they didn’t.

While they gave a flash flood warning to Sacramento, miles downstream, they didn’t say a thing to the people who lived closer. Those were the people who ended up having to evacuate with a one hour notice.

That’s the way we can expect things to happen. That’s why it’s a good idea to be prepared. We never know when an emergency will happen, how much information will be withheld from us or how much time we’ll have to evacuate, but we can prepare to deal with a disaster.

Having a good knife makes part of your preparations. Here’s a great offer for you, click the banner below to grab it at once!

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This article has been written by Bill White for Survivopedia.

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8 Simple Tips To Grow Your Best Tomato Crop Ever. Period!

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If you are like most avid vegetable gardeners, you are always searching for new ways to grow your best tomato crop ever. And with good reason! Ripe, juicy, tomatoes are amazing to eat, especially fresh from the vine. But a great

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6 Solid Reasons to Invest in a Survival Bow and Arrow

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6 Solid Reasons to Invest in a Survival Bow and Arrow

Modern day survival enthusiasts are never without a trusty rifle or handgun. These weapons are often used for hunting game and for self-defense, which may become a very real necessity when you’re trying to survive in the wild. Of course, guns are easy, convenient, and powerful. But if you’re a survival specialist that’s looking for a real challenge, it’s probably better that you invest in a survival bow and arrow instead. In fact, a survival bow and arrow isn’t really something you should ever be without.

If you’re thinking you can get by without a bow and arrow, and you’re questioning whether you should really get one or not, this list of solid reasons should swing you towards the right decision.

  1. Lightweight and Portable – It’s any survivalist’s priority to maintain the lightest possible weight when in the wild. That’s because a heavy pack will make you feel more tired much faster, and can restrict the movements you can comfortably make. With too many guns and ammo in your bag, you might find yourself panting heavily before midday.

A survival bow and arrow can be very lightweight, collapsing into just three pieces or less, depending on the model you choose. This means you can easily fit it into a standard backpack or carry it around without working up a sweat.

  1. Versatile – The different parts of a survival bow and arrow can be easily adapted to perform several other functions. For instance, the bow can be used as a makeshift fishing rod, arrows themselves can be used as part of your shelter, and you can even utilize your bow to start a fire much easier. All that said, it’s easy to see that when you take a survival bow and arrow with you, you’ve got more than just a weapon.

 

  1. Silent – The best way to hunt down as much game as possible would be to take each one down without scaring off the others. When you shoot a rifle or a handgun, the reverberating noise can startle any other game in the area, meaning you’d have to go through the entire luring and calling process all over again. With a bow and arrow, you can take down your game without causing too much of a commotion, so you’d have more chances to hunt more down in the same proximity. Throw in the shooting rest you can find, and you can spend hours in the same spot, shooting down game without getting noticed.

 

  1. Endless Ammunition – When your rifle or handgun runs out of ammo, you become nothing more than a sitting duck. That’s why it’s any shooter’s priority to make sure they make the most of each bullet they have. With a survival bow and arrow however, you can have access to an endless supply of ammunition. Even so, if you don’t bother to retrieve your arrows, you can make your own from twigs, sticks, and wood you find around you. So you can be sure there’s always something you can use to make the most of your bow.

 

  1. Less Limited – Depending on where you live, there could be a plethora of different gun rules that you’d have to follow unless you want the cops at your doorstep. What’s more, buying a gun isn’t all that simple. There are lots of paperwork, documents, and requirements you need to submit just to register a gun to your name, and it could take weeks before you get your hands on your purchase.

With survival bow and arrows however, you won’t have to worry about the same issue. You can literally walk into a store and purchase one without any questions, and you can even have it shipped straight to your home when you buy it online.

  1. Adaptable – When using a gun for your hunt, you’d have to consider the size of your chosen game and select a corresponding gun caliber. If you’ve only got a few firearms in your possession, you may not be able to hunt down other sizes of animals because of the inappropriate caliber of your available gun.

With a survival bow and arrow however, you can screw on different arrow heads to allow you to take down literally any size animal you want to. Simply interchange the attachments to adapt your arrow to your chosen target and you’re good to go.

Another plus when it comes to adaptability is the endless number of attachments you can purchase for your bow. For instance, if you feel that your bow isn’t accurate enough or if you struggle to aim with a bow, you can purchase other attachments to make it easier to use. Often, the best bow sight can be bought for a very reasonable price, making the bow itself an economic choice compared to guns.

A survival bow and arrow can be a major investment, especially if you take your time to learn the ropes and master this uncommon survival weapon.

So, what are you waiting for? Up your hunting game and become a true blue survival expert by purchasing your own survival bow and arrow today.

 

About the author : 

Kevin Steffey is an avid hunter and freelance writer, the founder of Deer Hunting Field. He loves spending time in the field with his rifle more than almost anything else. He also occupies his off-time discussing deer and their habits online. But more than anything, he wants to teach and educate about hunting …
 

                    WHAT TO READ NEXT !!

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Is it a Cold or the Flu?

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com Our local news announced that statistics for the number of flu cases has spiked this week.  I’m not surprised.  I’ve noticed a lot of co-workers coming to work while sick.  The most common comment when asked about their condition is, “I’m so miserable, I don’t even know what I have.” How can you tell whether you have a cold or the flu?   (I am not a doctor; so this is not medical […]

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3VGear Bug Out Bag’s Interview and Giveaway

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3VGear Bug Out Bag’s Interview and GiveawayThis week in the Survivalist Prepper Podcast I had the pleasure of talking with Dan from 3VGear.com about their product line of bug out bags. When you think about bug out bags or everyday carry bags, there are probably a few names that come to mind before you think about 3V Gear. This might even be the first time some of you have heard about them.

3V Gear gets its name from the phrase “Veni, Vidi Vici,” which is Latin for “I came, I saw, I conquered”. As you continue reading you will find out why them being a smaller company is a good thing. With some of the bigger companies you are paying for the name, and to them you’re just a credit card number. At 3VGear you can get a high quality bag at around half the price… and get treated like a real life human being.

When it comes to prepping supplies, bug out bags are right at the top of everyone’s list. With so many different types to choose from, it can be a tough choice to make. You have hiking backpacks, Military style backpacks, low cost back packs and cheap backpacks. Along with that, other things that need to be considered are: price, space, compartments, comfort and durability. These all play a big role when picking your bug out bag.

Anyone who has put together a bug out bag knows that it can get pretty expensive when you start putting together all the pieces. While the quality of a bug out bag should be a huge consideration, if you can’t afford all the supplies you need in it, you’re not really prepared at all.

SPP190 3VGear Bug Out Bag’s Interview and Giveaway

Here are a few of the topics I talked about with Dan this week. To get a real understanding about what a good product these bug out bags are, make sure and listen. We are also going to be giving away 2 of these bug out bags. Dan is sending me the Paratus 3 Operators Pack (Latin for prepared) to review and give away to our YouTube subscribers.

And along with the other prizes we are giving away in this month’s Survivalist Prepper Contest, Dan is donating one of his Velox II Tactical Assault Packs.

Like I said, the folks at 3V Gear value their customers, and will treat you like a real person. If you have any questions that weren’t answered in the show just send them an email, or give them a call by using the phone number at the top of their website.

From the Show…

  • With all the other companies out there selling bug out bags, Dan explained what sets 3V Gear apart from them, and what has kept them in business for over 5 years.
  • We talked about how these bags are for people just getting into prepping, as well as people who have been doing this for a while.
  • Space, comfort, and durability all play a big role when picking a bug out bag. We talked about some of the features of the different bags and how they apply to bugging out.
  • Which is better, a smaller bag (so I can’t pack it with 100lbs) or a larger bag where I have more options? We went over the features of each bag, and which bag would be good for which situation.
  • I asked Dan what type and size of bag would you recommend for an EDC, and what bag was his favorite.
  • Physical fitness plays a big role when you are thinking about a bug out scenario. We talked about how to increase your fitness level, and determining the type of bag that works for you.
  • I also asked Dan what he carries. At one point or another he has used all these bags for different reasons.
  • We talked about the Paratus 3 Day Operators Pack (which I think might be your most popular with preppers) and the giveaway I will be doing on YouTube.

The Survivalist Prepper Giveaway

Along with the Velox II Dan is giving away, we are also going to add a few more items to this month’s giveaway. Here is a list of the other prizes, and you can enter the contest here.

  •  3VGear Velox II
  • 2 Blaze Charcoal Brick Packs
  • 2 MicroFire SOG
  • 2 AquaTabs
  • 2 BOB FAK
  • Sara’s New Book

The post 3VGear Bug Out Bag’s Interview and Giveaway appeared first on Survivalist Prepper.

The Threats We Face!

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The Threats We Face! Host: James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio in player below! The threats that face the average American family are many. They are part of a list that seems to be ever growing. Outside of the very real social and environmental risks there are true physical threats to our family. These threats … Continue reading The Threats We Face!

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