Travel trailer living with 3 boys?

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Travel trailer living with 3 boys?

…and 2 dogs. Wow, that is amazing, I’ll first give my un-requested opinion about it… honestly I don’t know how they do it, living in an RV with one or two consenting adults is one thing, even with a young (read YOUNG) child, but once you have more than one kiddo, especially when they start getting near the teen years, I just can’t imagine. That being said, apparently this family is doing this and doing it well.

I think this must be some good experience for the 3 boys, being home schooled on the road, they are getting an education they would never get in public school, and I suspect it’s a much safer environment since they can choose where to stay at any particular time.

I did enjoy getting the tour of the trailer, there are many really interesting and handy features of this trailer, I especially love the large pull out drawers. The square nesting pans really caught my eye as well, I cook on a stove that came out of an RV so I have the same issues with round pans bumping into each other if I use more than one pan at a time, will have to look into that.

Another thing I enjoyed about this video is it’s real, this is how they live, it’s clear they didn’t do any major tidying up before the camera came in, I’m sure there was some tidying up, but I noticed the washcloth hanging in the shower and the stuff laying around, so this speaks real to me.

I don’t know how long they will continue living this way, I’d love to know what the 3 boys think of this lifestyle. I do believe this will be a positive life experience for them. Enjoy the video and let me know what you think below.

https://youtu.be/C9suPtfAWSk

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Former CIA Director Warns Of Attack That ‘Would Blackout North America And Kill Millions’

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Former CIA Director Warns Of Attack That ‘Would Blackout North America And Kill Millions’

WASHINGTON — A former CIA director is warning that it would be “profoundly dangerous” to underestimate North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, who he calls a “sociopath” who doesn’t follow the standard protocol on nuclear weapons.

James Woolsey, CIA director under President Clinton, and Peter Vincent Pry, chief of staff of the congressional EMP Commission, co-wrote a column for The Washington Times asserting that the U.S. isn’t prepared for North Korea’s threat.

“Kim Jong-un is a sociopath who inherited absolute power from his father and grandfather,” Woolsey and Pry wrote. “Like them, Kim is mentally and spiritually absolutely corrupted. Kim is so suspicious of his own followers that he is purging his political and military elites, inventing sadistically ingenious ways of killing even close relatives.”

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They called him “Caligula in the third generation, armed with nuclear weapons.”

“His paranoid personality is exactly the type to start a nuclear war,” they wrote in the March 26 column.

Western analysists, they wrote, “wrongly assume” that North Korea will follow a testing regime “similar to that for U.S. missiles,” with multiple flight tests. Instead, North Korea is rushing untested weapons into deployment.

“North Korea sees itself in a long nuclear crisis with the United States, always on the verge of nuclear war, necessitating that missiles get rushed out the door based on component testing and maybe some minimal flight testing,” they wrote. “Pyongyang is in a panic, like Moscow during World War II rushing not properly tested tanks to the front from the factory floor — except Pyongyang’s panic is over nuclear war.”

That explains why North Korea deployed 30 intermediate-range ballistic missiles (IRBMs) for nine years without flight testing them until recently, they wrote. The country also has deployed mobile intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) without flight testing.

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“Pyongyang’s panic explains why we should be a lot more worried about their KMS-3 and KMS-4 satellites orbiting over the U.S. If nuclear-armed, these satellites could make an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack that would blackout North America and kill millions,” Woolsey and Pry wrote. “Surprise EMP attack by satellite is such an unconventional gambit it is still not on the mental radar screens of most analysts — exactly as Pyongyang hopes.”

The two men asserted that the U.S. must do four things to protect itself:

  • “Harden the national electric grid against EMP and cyberattack, starting by appointing new commissioners to the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission who care more about national security than essentially representing the electric utilities.
  • “Redeploy Aegis guided missile cruisers to plug holes in the National Missile Defense, especially in the southern Gulf coastal states — Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas.
  • “Modernize the U.S. nuclear deterrent, including development of EMP and cyber weapons capable of neutralizing nuclear missile threats preemptively.
  • “Launch a new Manhattan Project to resurrect President Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative and deploy space-based missile defenses to make preemptive warfare unnecessary.”

What is your reaction? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

Solar Generator vs Fuel Generator

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Solar Generator vs Fuel Generator One of the first purchases I made when getting into serious preparedness was a gas generator. Not only the necessity for electrify drove me but also the importance of creature comforts. My power goes out and then it comes back on. I am happy with my gas generator. That said …

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Vital Considerations About Shelf Life of Food

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By Denis Korn           60102_Forever Young Mac & Cheese_MD_RGB

When I consult with preparedness planners about the various food options for long term storage, the foremost question is, “What is the shelf life?”  Shelf life considerations for preparedness foods is an essential factor in effective preparedness and survival provisioning.

HISTORY

When I began in the natural foods/outdoor recreation/preparedness industry in the mid 70’s, shelf life concerns of dried food products was confined to the military, backpackers and the few folks who were preparing for the unforeseen and the impending tribulations.  For the average person – who needs foods that will be palatable 10 – 20 – 30 years in the future?  Packaging for longer shelf life dried foods was limited 40 years ago, and there were few companies at that time in the industry.  Pouch foods for backpackers and campers had at best a few years shelf life.  The companies that packed in #10 cans usually didn’t do anything effectively to ensure long shelf, which meant reducing residual oxygen levels.  It was hit and miss depending on the specific food that was being canned.  There were two exceptions that I knew of at the time – Arrowhead Mills in Texas and Oregon Freeze Dry in Oregon.  Both companies would have the cans in a vacuum chamber and introduce nitrogen to displace oxygen.  This is what my company at that time – AlpineAire Foods – did in the late 80’s with our can products called Gourmet Reserves.

In about 1990/91 things changed dramatically for effective shelf live packaging.  I was introduced to Mitsubishi Gas Chemical America and their Ageless Oxygen Absorber.  We had our cans and pouches tested by them and the results were extraordinary.  Where military specs required a 2% residual oxygen level, the Ageless Absorber could reduce the levels to 0.1% or less!  This significantly increased shelf life by reducing oxidation of foods.  I was the first person in the industry to embrace this technology, and my company immediately began using these absorbers in our cans and pouches – and the rest is history.  Currently it is an industry standard to use oxygen absorbers in foil pouches and #10 cans of dried foods.  Companies that are still only using nitrogen flushing to reduce residual oxygen are utilizing an ineffective method and outdated technology.

WHY OXYGEN FREE?

Basically there are 2 reasons for wanting to store food in an oxygen free environment – (1) eliminate the possibility for infestation and spoilage from insects and microorganisms, and (2) control oxidation, which leads to the rancidity of fats and oils, foul taste, off color, and nutritional deterioration.  The lower the oxygen levels – the more effective in preserving the integrity of the foods stored.  Some foods are more susceptible to oxidation deterioration than others.  It is important to know how susceptible the foods you are storing are to oxidation, because as you will see the type of container you store your foods in may at some point no longer be an adequate oxygen barrier.  Research by Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Company, the inventors of oxygen absorbers and manufacturer of the Ageless® brand absorber, indicates that in an oxygen free atmosphere (their absorbers can reduce the residual oxygen level in the proper container to 0.1% or less) all adults, larvae, pupae, and eggs of the most prevalent dry food insects are killed within 14 days.  Freezing a product – grains, beans, cereals, etc. – will not kill all microscopic eggs.

While oxidation has a distinct effect on most foods, there are some dried foods that are not as susceptible.  Whole grains and beans being the most obvious, however there are some dried vegetables and processed cereals that seem to have an inherent long shelf life.  That is why when opening containers of very old dried foods, some are spoiled and others may still be edible.  The old adage still is applicable – If it looks OK, if it smells OK, and it tastes OK it is OK.  Over long periods of time some nutritional value can be lost, however in an emergency situation you will have food to eat.  It is still recommended that all long term storage foods be packed in a very low residual oxygen atmosphere.

BOGUS CLAIMS

I need to once again alert all those reading this article to be discerning, cautious and on your guard when buying so-called long term pouched emergency foods!  I have written extensively about the deception and misinformation being delivered by businesses that call themselves emergency and/or survival food companies.  I have over 40 years in the natural foods, emergency preparedness and outdoor recreation industries – I know deceitfulness when I see it.

The #1 red flag that indicates a deceptive claim and is used by the newer and untrustworthy companies is the fabricated 20 – 25 – 30 year shelf life claim of pouched foods in plastic buckets.  It is interesting that some of these companies are now adding in small print the term “up to” on their packing and literature.  I suppose if you stored your foods in Arctic conditions it might last that long, however most people do not store foods for 20-25-30 years in ideal conditions, and when you evaluate the packaging material and process, they are also less than adequate or ideal for these very extended shelf life claims.  Also keep in mind that these companies are so new that there is NO anecdotal evidence of their misleading claims.

MATERIALS

The material in which a dried food product is packed is essential in insuring an optimal shelf life.

Plastic buckets (HDPE – high density polyethylene) – 5 and 6 gallon round and square sizes with handles are very popular for packing grains, beans, and other commodities in bulk

Pro:

  • A convenient container to store larger quantities of dry foods – stores and stacks well, is compact, and can be carried easily.
  • Inexpensive new and can be obtained used from a number of sources.
  • A thick walled (90 mil) container with the proper gasket can be used effectively to control the atmosphere within for up to 2 to 4+ years.
  • Can be used in conjunction with foil pouches for convenience of storage.
  • You can use multiple foil pouches stored in the bucket for convenience of use.
  • Insects don’t easily penetrate the thick walls.
  • Can withstand some rough handling.
  • Because insects at all stages are destroyed within about 14 days, the short term effectiveness of using an oxygen absorber to create an oxygen free environment is useful.

Con:

  • HDPE is a permeable (porous – albeit microscopic) material and gas transmission rates (the length of time gases such as oxygen will travel through a given material) indicate that it will take 2 to 4 years for the atmosphere within the bucket to match the atmosphere outside (our normal atmosphere is normally about 21% oxygen and 79% nitrogen with a very small amount of other gases such as carbon dioxide).  This means that if you started with an oxygen free or low level to begin with, that over time the oxygen level in the bucket will continue to increase until it reaches parity or equality with the normal atmosphere.  Some foods will still be fine after the atmosphere has been equalized.
  • If you want the atmosphere to remain constant inside your container, or be oxygen free for extended periods of time, HDPE plastic buckets are not appropriate – check with the manufacturers (as I have done) and find out their specifications and recommendations for your needs and the specific container you want to use.
  • The ability to maintain whatever atmosphere you desire within the container will depend not only on the quality of the HDPE walls, but also the integrity of the gasket seal.
  • HDPE will absorb odors and they will eventually permeate into the contents of the bucket.  Direct packed foods will also absorb the odor.  Do not store plastic buckets in areas that have a strong smell. (NOTE: Foil pouches within a bucket will prolong the odor absorption)
  • Rodents and other animals can easily break into plastic buckets if left unattended for extended periods.
  • Not recommended for long term storage (4+ years) of directly packed oxidation susceptible foods, although should be OK for whole grains and beans.

Pouches – There are literally hundreds of possible combinations of materials and sizes available to create a pouch that will contain food.  Normally a food manufacturer or packer goes to a company that specializes in manufacturing pouches and gives the company their specifications and requirements for the specific foods to be packed.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  It is common these days among those who sell empty pouches for food storage, or food already in pouches, to use the term “Mylar® pouch.”  This is very misleading.  By itself the term can mean anything and it tells you nothing of importance so that you can make the appropriate decisions on what pouch to use.  The “Mylar®” brand is the registered trademark name of a PET polyester film manufactured by DuPont® Teijin Films.  They produce hundreds of variations of this polyester resin material.  It is a component used in the production of many variations of packaging material.  It can be clear or opaque such as in wrappers for food bars or Mylar balloons – that look “metalized” yet contain no foil.  Mylar® by itself is not an appropriate material for long term pouched food.  Ask you supplier what they mean when they say “Mylar®.”  A reliable pouch must have an appropriate layer of foil to be effective.

For those reading this article the requirements needed are to pack dry foods for the long term.  If you buy stock pouches from a distributor you need to tell them what you plan to put in it and what your expectations are for the long term.  You should insist on knowing the specifications (especially the gas and vapor transmission rates) of the pouch and whether they suit your needs.

If you want a pouch that gives you the longest possible shelf life for your foods, you will need a laminated pouch consisting of multiple components and layers.  As far as pouches are concerned, one of those layers must be foil (NOTE: All plastics are gas and vapor permeable – some rates are very high – meaning that gases transmit through them very quickly – and some plastics both individually and in combination have slower rates).  Only quality foil is a beneficial gas and moisture barrier – that is foil without microscopic holes).  TRICK:  Take an empty pouch into a dark room and put a small flashlight inside.  No light should escape from the solid portion of the pouch.  often you will see “pinholes” of light indicating a poor foil layer and/or rough handling, or significant light indicating no foil at all.

Ask the distributor the specifications of the pouch, the different components used – not only for barrier properties but also for durability, the transmission rates if not foil, if foil – its thickness, and the reliability and reputation of the manufacturer.

Pro:

  • The variety of available sizes offers flexibility in choices of quantities to store.
  • Costs are reasonable.
  • Can be effective as a short term oxygen free container.
  • Small pouches of food can be very useful for bartering and distributing among those in need during in an emergency.

Con:

  • Not recommended for very long term packaging of products for an oxygen free environment.  Shelf life of pouched foods is recommended for 5 to 15 years depending on type of food product, storage conditions, handling, and composition packaging materials.
  • Excessive or rough handling, loss of seal integrity, and pressure of sharp edges on the pouch from the products within can create “pin-holes” (microscopic holes in the pouch material) that eventually will cause gases to be transmitted through the pouch (NOTE: I am concerned when I see and hear some folks instructing people to cram and squeeze foil pouches into plastic buckets).
  • Rodents and other creatures can easily penetrate pouch material.

Metal cans – For food storage purposes #10 size (about 7/8 gal) and #2 ½ size (about 7/8 qt) are the most popular used with the proper can sealers.  It is possible, if you keep searching, to find 5 gallon square metal cans with a large pressure lid on the top side.  These are ideal for bulk food storage, although they may be hard to find (NOTE: I sold these cans packed with foods at AlpineAire Foods about 20 years ago).  You also may want to consider clean or new metal garbage cans as a means to store smaller size foil pouched foods.

Pro:

  • Ideal for long term food storage.  The atmosphere within the cans, with the proper sealing, can remain oxygen free indefinitely.
  • Metal is non-permeable for gas and water vapor – a zero transmission rate.
  • Difficult for rodents or animals to penetrate.
  • Can withstand some rough handling.

Con:

  • Costs can be higher than other materials.
  • Extra attention must be given to proper sealing.
  • Metal containers may be difficult to obtain.
  • Sealing equipment can be costly
  • Some non enameled cans may rust if exposed to moisture.

Glass

Pro:

  • Excellent for long term food storage.  The atmosphere within the jars, with the proper sealing, can remain oxygen free indefinitely.
  • Glass is non-permeable for gas and water vapor – a zero transmission rate.
  • Difficult for rodents or animals to penetrate.
  • Easily obtainable and relatively inexpensive.

Con:

  • Very fragile – must be stored and handled with care.
  • Practical only in smaller size containers.

ABOUT GAS TRANSMISSION RATES FOR POUCHES

A gas transmission rate is the rate that atmospheric gases such as oxygen, nitrogen and water vapor will penetrate a pouch.  Most pouches referred to as “mylar” have three layers known as PAL pouches.  Plastic – usually a type of polyester film known as mylar®;  Aluminum – a foil layer that should be at least .35 mil;  Polyethylene – the material that seals the the pouch.  All “mylar” pouches have transmission rates depending on the thickness and composition of the layers, and there are hundreds of different pouch sizes and compositions.

Basically a transmission rate is designated as the volume of gas (or weight in grams of water vapor) in cubic centimeters per a given area transmitted in a period of time.  When looking at a typical good quality “mylar” pouch spec the O2 transmission rate is: 0.0006/cc/100 sq. in. in 24 hours.  This means that 6 ten thousand’s of a cubic centimeter will transmit through a single side of a 10″ x 10″ pouch in one day.  This is pouch material in an ideal condition and not the seams.  While the transmission rates are slow in a quality pouch, over time the residual oxygen levels increase.  Rough handling, poor seam sealing, puncturing from foods within and the side seams themselves can also cause additional “pin-holing” and leakage that will effect transmission rates.

Try this experiment yourself at home:  Take an empty “mylar” pouch that is new or one from the pouched foods you are storing – have a small and powerful flashlight and insert it into the pouch – move it around the inner surface and seams.  You will see light coming through at the seams, and depending on the thickness of the foil and pin-holing, you will see dots of light.  These are the visible (there are still invisible and microscopic) areas in which gas transmission will occur.

The reason I have included this section in this article is to give some basis to appropriate shelf life claims.  If shelf life is equated with very low residual oxygen levels – (and hopefully proper storage conditions) – then claims of a very long shelf life of pouched dried food products is compromised by ever increasing levels of oxygen over time within the pouch itself.  Beware of long shelf life claims of pouched foods.

STORAGE CONDITIONS

There are six conditions (plus Time) to be aware of when storing food for emergency preparedness food storage, or outdoor recreation.  The foods being referred to in this post are shelf-stable freeze-dried, dehydrated, dried commodities.  Optimal storage conditions can also be applied to wet pack:  retort, MRE’s, canned goods, and other specialty longer term wet pack foods.

NOTE:  The six conditions listed are chosen because these are factors in which we have the control to optimize for the longest reliable shelf life.  TIME is the one factor that we can not control – and it does have a significant effect on the shelf life of various foods.  Nutritional value is lost with many foods over time.  To know with certainty the viable nutritional value of all food reserve items at any given time after a lengthy period of storage – is at best complex or most likely mere conjecture and guesswork.  What we can do is to apply proper planning procedures – do your research with trusted resources, rotate and consume your storage foods, and be realistic about how long you will really need the foods you choose to store.

  • Temperature– This is the primary factor affecting the storage life of foods.  The cooler the better. 40 degrees-50 degrees would be great. Room temperature (65 degrees-72 degrees) or below is generally fine.  Avoid above 90 degrees for extended periods of time. The longer food is exposed to very high temperatures the shorter the edible life and the faster the degeneration of nutritional value.  Note:  There are some “foods” available for emergency preparedness that are known as “emergency food or ration bars.”  These products are generally referred to as “life raft bars” because they were originally designed for life rafts and can withstand high heat for extended periods of time.  They primarily consist of white sugar and white flour, and were not meant to be the sole source of nutrition for a long period of time.
  • Moisture– The lower the better.  Moisture can deteriorate food value rapidly and create conditions that promote the growth of harmful organisms.  The moisture level contained in foods varies depending on the type of product it is.  Have foods in moisture barrier containers (metal, glass) in high humidity areas. NOTE:  “Mylar” bags or plastic buckets are not a long term (over 3 years for buckets and 10 +/- years for bags) moisture or oxygen barrier. The moisture and gas transmission rates through these materials vary depending upon the specifications of the manufacturers.  Plastic absorbs gases, moisture, and odors.  NOTE:  Be careful where you store dry foods in cans.  Very cold flooring or any condition where there is a dramatic temperature differential may cause a build up of condensation inside the container.
  • Oxygen – A high oxygen environment causes oxidation, which leads to discoloration, flavor loss, odors, rancidity and the breakdown of nutritional value in foods. It also allows insects to feed on dried food reserves. Without oxygen, insects cannot live, nor can aerobic (oxygen dependent) organisms. Whole grain and beans have natural oxygen barriers and can store for long periods of time in low humidity and if free from infestation. All other processed grains, vegetables, fruits, etc. must be in a very reduced (2% or less) oxygen environment for long term storage.  NOTE:  Mylar® bags or plastic buckets are not a long term moisture or oxygen barrier. The moisture and gas transmission rates through these materials vary depending upon the specifications of the manufacturers.  Plastic absorbs gases, moisture, and odors.  The best long term storage containers are glass and metal.
  • Infestation – Examples include rodents, insects in all their stages of growth, mold, microorganisms, and any other creatures that get hungry – large or small.  The proper packaging and storage conditions are required to control infestation and not allow critters to both get into the food, or have the necessary environment for them to flourish if they are sealed into a container – such as in the form of eggs or spores.
  • Handling – Rough handling can not only damage the food itself, but it can also adversely effect and compromise the integrity of the container in which the food is stored.  Glass of course can break; any pouched item can develop pin-holes, tears, or cracks.  The seams on buckets and cans can be tweaked, twisted, or damaged to allow oxygen to enter the container.
  • Light – Food should not be stored in direct sunlight.  Both for the potential of high temperature, and its affect on food value.  Sunlight directly on stored foods can destroy nutritional value and hasten the degeneration of food quality, taste, and appearance.  Foods packed in light barrier containers do not pose a problem with the affects of light.

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Another Home Invasion. No Legal Right to Defence in Australia.

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The Australian government doesn’t give a damn about the safety of the public. Gun control has nothing to do with public safety. We are not allowed to own, carry or use anything specifically meant for use in self defence or in the defence of others. Now the government has banned the use of firearms for defence. Australians are left defenceless unless we break the law. We should have the right to defend ourselves and our families in whatever way we consider necessary. Surely this is a human right?! The Australian government is denying us this right!

Sooner or later I think Australian citizens will have to ask themselves this question: Would you rather be judged by 12 or carried by 6 ?!

How to Hunt Deer with a Bow Effectively

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

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Editor’s Note: This post has been contributed by Joseph. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter the Prepper Writing Contest today.


Deer hunting can be done in two ways; either by using rifles or using bows. If you are one of the many hunters who prefer the latter option, this is the perfect article for you to know the practice tips to hunt deer with a bow. Dedicated hunters will know that practice sharpens your skill on shooting a bow with precise and accurate shots. Thus, here are a few tips to pave your way to become a skilled bow hunter.

Practice during unfavorable conditions

Obviously, a good hunt is scheduled during the peak seasons when the weather is favorable for hunting and trekking. However, weather can be a greatly unpredictable thing, and while out on a hunt, it’s better to be prepared for anything.

Practicing in windy conditions where the direction and force of the wind can greatly affect your accuracy can improve your bow skills. Think of this way; if you can shoot well in crappy weather, then you can do so better in normal conditions. More importantly, you are prepared for any kind of situation when you’re out hunting.

Take it slow

If you’re planning to shoot your first buck from a tree stand, you cannot do so successfully without learning how to shoot from a higher position.

 

It’s not wise to push your limits while at the beginner stage of bow hunting. The best strategy to gauge your skills is to start slow. Start shooting at small distances until you can perfect your shot at that distance. Only then should you further increase the increments.

This strategy can also minimize frustration because it will let you know the farthest distance where you can shoot most accurately. On the field, it will help you gauge your Effective Kill Range (EKR), or the distance range wherein you are most likely to take down a deer without messing up the shot.

Learn how to use a bow sight

A bow sight is an essential tool when shooting long distance. The best bow sight can greatly enhance your long-distance shooting by a tenfold. Basically, it has pins set at different distances which can help you shoot long-distance targets from stagnant position, such as a tree stand.

Other than a bow sight, you should also use other essential bow accessories such as a bow stabilizer. A bow stabilizer, on the other hand, is an accessory that helps minimize torque, stabilize shots, and increase the accuracy of your shots.

Know how to shoot from a higher position

If you’re planning to shoot your first buck from a tree stand, you cannot do so successfully without learning how to shoot from a higher position. Because the trajectory will change once you shoot from an elevated place.

So one of my tips is to practice shooting dummy targets from a tree stand. Once you get a hold of this skill, you’ll find tree stand hunting an easy task.

Target for easy-kill areas

The most humane way to kill a deer is to shoot it in the chest area, where the arrow can pierce through the lungs or heart and deliver almost instant and painless death. To practice this skill, you can use target print-outs of a deer in order to enhance your ability to kill instantly.

Moreover, this will also minimize the possibility of the deer running away because of a shot in the belly, hind, or legs. With accurate shots to the chest area, you can harvest your kill easily.

Don’t hesitate to ask questions

If you’re not sure about something, ask a more experienced bow hunter than you. Remember that it’s not a competition of who is best. Every great bow hunter starts somewhere, and while you’re a beginner, it’s best to take advice from experts and use it to work on your weak points.

Other than constructive criticism, you can also form bonds with other bow hunters and potentially join them on their next bow hunt. This will be a big plus for you: because not only do you have new hunting buddies, you also have a lot of people to help you work on your skills.

Practice with your bow in low-light conditions

You can also master shooting with it during near sunset or near dawn conditions.

Most often, whitetail deer make an appearance before sunset when the light is dimming and your bow sight is getting difficult to use. Although most bow sights come with a glow-in-the-dark pin feature, it will be much wiser and a skill-builder to practice shooting in low light.

If you have a bow sight with a low-light feature, you can also master shooting with it during near sunset or near dawn conditions. In this way, you won’t need to fumble with your bow sight while on the field.

Adjust your bow according to the wind

The wind plays a big role in the accuracy of your shot because, as said before in this article, it can affect the direction and/or trajectory of your shot. When hunting deer with a bow, you’re also most likely confined to shooting from far distances. Therefore, it’s better if you learn to adjust your aim with the wind.

Most importantly, with this skill you can reap rewards when a supposed to be sunny day turns into a windy one. Remember: the weather is completely unpredictable, and as a hunter, don’t expect it to always be in your favor.

Work on your form

As a beginner, the best form for archery is one of the most difficult aspects to master. It’s imperative that you work on your form every time you practice shooting. Moreover, you can also ask an experienced bow hunter to evaluate your form and tell you the mistakes that you’re making.

Why does this need to be done? Well, a great form will directly affect the accuracy of your shot and help you shoot better. Otherwise, a bad form can lead to inaccurate and imprecise shots that will just leave you discouraged. Thus, remember to work on this aspect along with everything else.

Learn how to wait for the perfect shot

In deer hunting, timing is everything, whether you shoot with a bow or a rifle. The proper timing of your shot will decrease the chances of a botched kill. Since deer are highly receptive of sound, you can scare away a bunch of them if you have off timing with your shots and they end up on a nearby tree or the ground.

Unfortunately, the only way to practice your timing is to do it on an actual deer. Because automated practice targets have predictable movements, they aren’t great options for practicing timing. Unlike with deer, you can learn how to assess their movements and make it predictable to you.

Conclusion

Here, we’ve highlighted the best practice tips to hunt deer with a bow. It’s not the actual camping and hunting that’s the most difficult part, but the practice on shooting a bow. Thus, the best option you have in order to be the most prepared hunter in the world is to practice at every chance you get.

Did you like this article? If you did, leave us a comment below and tell us what you think. You can also share this with your friends. Thanks for reading!

 

About the author: Joseph Gleason is the founder of Captain Hunter. CaptainHunter.com is a site dedicated to the sport of hunting. We have a deep respect for nature and for the environment, and we therefore take the sport of hunting very seriously.

Never think that you are alone in the woods again. Our goal is to share what we know with who needs it most.

If you liked this article, please rate it.

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Experimental Tech in Desert Village

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An off-grid village in the dry desert has become the place to develop solutions for off-grid living in undeveloped communities.

An off-grid desert village in Kibbutz Ketura, Israel is being used as a platform for tech companies and entrepreneurs to develop innovative off-grid technologies. The village was set up in 2014 via a collaboration between the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies and Eilat-Eilot Renewable Energy Initiative. The project is aimed at developing off-grid solutions for undeveloped areas, encouraging experimentation. It is the key step between development and implementation in areas where whole communities have no grid access.

There are four key areas for off-grid living which are currently being developed and worked on in the village.

Desert Village Building:

There are three types of structure in the village, based on existing building types within in off-grid communities. The rural structure is based on a traditional design and has a thatched roof to help with ventilation, but lacks natural light. Therefore, to adapt it, the village has added windows to the buildings to provide natural light for reading and other activities, as well as providing more ventilation.

The urban structure is based on a design most commonly seen in urban slums. The modifications to this design are the double roof structure and wall insulation. The first roof layer is made of palm leaves for ventilation purposes and the second consists of metal for protection against the rain. Plywood walls have insulator material like sheep wool within the wall to keep thermal balance in the building. The structure is mainly based on plywood which is low priced and the design is simple to construct.

Finally, the earthbag dome design was first developed in the 1980s, using soil sacks to construct huts. The bags of soil provide a rigid, stable structure with a balance of temperature. There is no need for deep foundations or a separate roof structure, due to the dome shape. These buildings are rapid to construct, simple and cheap.

Energy:

The desert village has some different energy technologies within its boundaries. The Kalipack solar suitcase can produce energy from three sources – electricity, a vehicle or solar power. Storage takes the form of a lithium ion battery and can power a small refrigerator, laptop or lighting, amongst other things. The village also has a small domestic biogas system which has efficient waste disposal whilst producing methane gas for cooking, water heating and home lighting.

LuminAID have introduced some chargeable and easy to use solar lighting. But GravityLights have also been developed at the village. These work by combining kinetic energy with potential energy. A weight of some sort is elevated and connected to a pulley system which powers a generator. The result is a light which is five times brighter than a kerosene lamp. Surveys with families using the lights have been very positive so far.

Water:

Clearly something that is very important in every community is clean water. The desert village has a solar water distillation system developed by SunDwater. This technology converts contaminated water to drinkable clean water through a process of concentrated radiation, requiring no external energy source. Plus, it’s completely green and eco-friendly. NUFiltration have also developed a water purifier unit in the desert village which provides waste water treatment. Once again, easy to use, requires no electricity and produces 500 litres of clean water per hour. There’s also no maintenance or spare parts required as it’s all done using man power! The village also has a solar powered water pumping system for agriculture and farming.

Food:

We all need fuel and that means food! The village has a hydroponics system developed called the LivingBox. These modular units are like Lego, therefore they can be fitted together and remodelled to suit different needs. They can grow a wide variety of fruit and veg and save up to 80% of water that would be used in other techniques. Solar ovens and cookers are used for cooking food. Plus, an energy generating pot has been developed which produces electricity from a heat source. The pot can then be used as a charging point for phones and other devices.

These are just some of the developed technologies that are in the village. Check out this video below to find out more about renewable energy in the Off-grid demonstration village!

The post Experimental Tech in Desert Village appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Two Amazing 100 Year Old Mead Recipes

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Two Amazing 100 Year Old Mead Recipes Mead or honey wine is the oldest alcoholic drinks known to man. It is made from honey and water via fermentation with yeast. It may be still, carbonated, or sparkling; it may be dry, semi-sweet, or sweet. These recipes are for educational purposes only. We do not take responsibility if you make these recipes wrong and become sick! Do your homework and research making your own alcohol, it can be very dangerous and even deadly! Old School Mead Recipe This old but very delicious mead recipe makes around 1 gallon of mead. That is

The post Two Amazing 100 Year Old Mead Recipes appeared first on Mental Scoop.

A Beginner’s Guide to Survival Shelter: A Prepper’s Primer

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Shelter is a prepper’s most valuable asset. Food, water, and security mean nothing if you are constantly exposed to the elements. Whether you’re preparing for a natural disaster, a strike on the electrical grid, or worse, your first question should be: do I have access to sufficient shelter or the means to build my own? …

The post A Beginner’s Guide to Survival Shelter: A Prepper’s Primer appeared first on Know Prepare Survive.

6 Reasons Archery Features in your Dystopian Future

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You’re preparing for the end of the world right? Or at least some sort of cataclysmic event that changes the game completely. Maybe a horde of blood-thirsty, bone-crunching zombies surrounds you. You’ll have to fight your way out. Luckily, you have your trusty handgun with you. You take it out, aim, and click. No ammo. No headshot. No you.

You should have chosen a bow and arrow instead.

You laugh now, but you won’t be laughing when your precious shotgun fails you, jamming up in the humid air caused by hyper global warming, failing to protect you and your store of canned goods and bottled water as you are besieged by your crazed neighbors, all signs of decency gone since the complete collapse of American society, probably caused by a particularly nasty Presidential Tweet, or PNPT, as it shall come to be known.

No Infrastructure Means No More Guns

Look, I’m not saying I don’t like guns. Of course I do! I’m not against firearms of any sort, just strongly against their misuse in the wrong hands. What I’m saying here though is once we go through armageddon or some sort of radiation-based apocalypse, guns are going to be hard to find. They’re already hard to find in some parts of the world like the UK. Unless you own a manufacturing plant or live in a foundry, you probably don’t have the means of producing a gun on your own. Once society breaks down and all the WalMarts and Cabellas have been raided and their contents stashed by the greedy, what happens? Sure, the ones you already have will still be there, until they get taken from you or need replacement parts or become damaged, without a solid government and clear social structure I doubt anybody is going to be making and supplying you with any more.

You Can Make Your Own Bow (and Ammunition)

There are lots of different bow types available today, but it is completely possible to make your own bow. How do I know? My 8-year-old nephew made a long-bow in an after-school class called “Crafts for Boys.” It used a length of PVC pipe for the bow and paracord for the string. Shot pretty decently, too. If you don’t have PVC pipe, and you find that all hardware stores have been commandeered by a soviet regime and will no longer sell you supplies, you can also fashion a bow from oak, lemon tree, hickory, yew, teak and many more hardwoods and you’ll need nothing more than a sharp knife to help you. For the string you’d be able to use rawhide, thin rope, hemp cord, fishing line or just ordinary twine.

Arrows are nothing more than sharpened sticks sometimes hardened in fire and the art of fletching them (adding the feathers) is entirely optional depending on how far and accurately you’re trying to shoot. Making your own arrows is also a pretty simple job.

You can find instructional videos to take you through the process. If you’re smart, you’ll watch a YouTube video about how to do it right now. I’m pretty sure the internet won’t be working when most of our infrastructure has been disabled or destroyed.

Hunting!

Hungry? Can’t go to Chili’s; it’s been overrun by mutants with a taste for Southwestern food and your blood. Guess you’ll have to strike out on your own. A bow would be perfect for this situation! You can hunt all sorts of game with a bow, birds, deer, your neighbor’s dog (hey, it’s the end of the world, remember?), all of which will cook nicely on a spit over an open flame. Modern bows with broadhead arrows (lethal looking things, look them up) have been used to takedown elephants, and that is no easy feat, but it shows you the versatility of the bow and why it shouldn’t be discounted.

Ever heard of Bow Fishing?

Live near a stream? If you’ve done your target practice, you’ll be able to spear a fish on the end of an arrow. You can just shoot the thing right out of the water, and the arrow may even stick into the river bed, allowing you to easily retrieve your dinner (Let’s see you do that with a .22). If it doesn’t, no bother really, the arrow will be easy enough to find and if you’re lucky to have the kit handy modern bows like the Sabercome with all the necessary fittings for bowfishing reels which allow you to reel in a freshly speared fish, just like a fishing rod. But with bowfishing not only fish are on the menu, if you can find them in the shallows or some clear water you can hunt eels, alligator, ray even small barracuda and shark all with the same bow and arrow.

Let’s get this out of the way, it’s an armour piercing weapon!

Personally I like to think that due to the fact that archaeologists discovered what they believe to be the first signs of actual bow use somewhere in a well preserved encampment in northern Europe (Stellmoor), and that the signs pointed to those bows being used to hunt reindeer, that bows were developed primarily as a tool to aid in hunting. However, should you need to defend yourself from a swarm of undead, a bow will help you out in that department as well. Just don’t eat your kill in that case. Ew.

A decent broadhead is a lethal and dangerous thing, with modern technology they are surgically sharp, but even a slimmer bullet or field point will pierce soft shell armour, and well…. just who knows exactly what you’ll be up against. I remember once reading a sci-fi book where the protagonists were protected by force fields that no metal or energy based weapon could penetrate and the only thing that would get through was a good old fashioned wooden arrow. That was a long time ago back in school, but the image never left me! I just wish I could remember the name of the book!

The Noise!

When you go to a shooting range, you wear ear protection. (And if you don’t, you really should. You’re damaging your hearing when you don’t.) But let’s say you don’t care about your ears right now because you’re fighting for your life. You’re up against one of them and they’re after you and yours… you shoot it with a firearm. Maybe it goes down, maybe not. But guess what? You’ve attracted the attention of everything within a pretty sizeable radius out there, and they’re now headed your way! In end-of-days scenarios, you always want the most silent weapon. Don’t mess with a gun and a separate silencer. A bow is naturally quiet, the truly silent-but-deadly choice. You can even silence a bow using special string silencers that help to calm the vibration, making you even more undetectable.

In The End

If you agree or disagree feel free to let me know! If you’ve any sense you’ll at least entertain the idea of learning the skill of shooting a bow, and possibly take a look at some of the best beginner recurve bows available in the market today. Who knows where you’re going to be living and just what you’re going to be up against!

The post 6 Reasons Archery Features in your Dystopian Future appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Where to drop out in the USA

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Nipton Hotel

You may never leave

Does your life ever get you to the point where you want to just drop out and leave the system behind? Here are four options for starters. There are many more – you can hook up with others using our free classified ads service or posting on our searchable map – landbuddy.com

NIPTON
In the Mojave desert town of Nipton, the spirit of the western frontier has transformed a forgotten outpost into a self-sustaining ecotopia where the dream lives on.
A former long-haul trucker with a bowie knife strapped to his hip, Jim Eslinger serves as caretaker and hotelier of Hotel Nipton, its existence marked by a wagon-mounted sandwichboard that reads:
WELCOME TO NIPTON, CA B&B HOTEL & ECO-CABIN STORE, RV PARK & CAMPING RESTAURANT
Eslinger added a cluster of tented eco-cabins, outfitted with platform beds and wood-burning stoves.
A faded settlement of about 20 permanent residents, the town consisted of an assortment of structures, some solid and occupied, some as vacant and splintered as an Old West movie set. Computer Gamers might know Nipton for its cameo in Xbox 360’s Fallout: New Vegas, where it played a post-apocalyptic wasteland infested by giant mantises. But otherwise it was your typical drive-through desert community, fixed at the crossroads of Nowhere Special and Wherever You Were Going when Eslinger arrived. There was one notable exception: Nipton, and everything in it, was for sale.
There a cluster of tented eco-cabins, outfitted with platform beds and wood-burning stoves. Popular with today’s 30-something crowd, the cabins were based on a design by Frank Lloyd Wright. There is a solar plant, which produces 40 percent of the town’s power. It sits on the outskirts behind a barbed wire fence, its rows of reflecting harvesters mirroring the sun as it moves across the sky.
There is a hydrogen system in order to store clean energy.
The town of Nipton is for sale.

KALANI HONUA
A solar-powered village tucked away on 120 acres of lush Hawaiian rain forest sounds a lot like Lost: Season 3, but it’s actually an eco-minded retreat center in one of the best areas in the state to drop out. Here in the heart of the Big Island’s Puna District, residents and volunteers are busy harvesting papaya and avocado, cooking farm-to-table meals, and taking classes in hula and tauhala weaving. Book a night in one of their cottages, pop in for a gong bath, or grab some honey produced from the on-site apiary. From $95; kalani.com.

SYNCHRONICITY
There’s no rule that says you must drop out in a rural location with hippies running nude through the woods. Case in point: Synchronicity, a creative community set in L.A.’s bustling Koreatown. Though a small group of artists calls it home, the door is always open to guests, who can stop by for weeknight dinners and a monthly art salon. There’s even a private room on hand for passersby to crash, free of charge up to a week, though payment in the form of a cooked meal, live performance, or carpentry is accepted. synchronicityla.com.

ARCOSANTI
Set on 860 acres overlooking central Arizona’s Agua Fría River valley, Arcosanti tweaks modern means to live greener. The late founder Paolo Soleri encouraged his town to live leaner-efficiently making use of labor, space, and design to create a place that’s elegant and resourceful. Drawing some 50,000 tourists each year, the sleek mini city amid the prickly pear and cottonwood trees offers guided tours, workshops, live music performances, and a gallery of intricate wind bells that are built by residents and serve as a perfect souvenir. Not so much a home for dropouts as a place to drop in. arcosanti.org.

The post Where to drop out in the USA appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Finding Remains in the Field

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At a recent Search and Rescue (SAR) conference I sat through an excellent presentation by the state of Oregon’s medical examiner.

She offered her suggestions regarding the discovery of human remains in the field.

First, don’t move the remains or other items such as clothing, shoes and other personal effects.  You may have found a crime scene.


Second, take a picture of the bone that is found.  A cell phone camera is fine.  Put a reference to determine size for the examiner.  For example, a ruler works best but the sole of your boot or a knife would help too. 

Use your GPS to  record the geographic coordinates of the scene.

Consider marking the location with flagging tape.

Contact and forward the image to the local law enforcement authorities.

The image below says it well.





Go Home And Stay Home

  A friend and I were talking the other night, and during the conversation, I mentioned that I’ve usually only met two types of people in the moolisha. The first is the guy who wants to hear or read something that makes him think he has a chance. The second is the guy who wants […]

5 Old-Fashioned Toothache Remedies That Really Do Work!

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5 Old-Fashioned Toothache Remedies That Really Do Work!

I don’t know about you, but I really (really) hate going to the dentist. Unfortunately, this means that I often wait until I’ve made the problem worse with my procrastination. I know I should go regularly, but I always seem to find a reason to put it off.

You have to admire our ancestors, though. Imagine having a toothache with no dentist (or money for a dentist) in sight. How did they live with it?

Most times, people used herbs to relieve toothache pain until they could find a dentist or until they could find someone to pull the tooth! Other types of mouth pain, such as sores from ill-fitting dentures or canker sores, were made bearable through pain-relieving and healing herbs.

Although most of these remedies have been forgotten due to over-the-counter pain relievers and better dental care, there might come a time when we wish we knew what these herbs were.

Let’s take a look at the top 5 herbs that work to relieve mouth pain or a toothache.

1. Cloves

This is perhaps the oldest and best-known remedy for relieving toothache pain and helping gums to heal. My dentist actually has a little homemade concoction that his grandfather used to make to help with these problems. He won’t tell me everything that’s in it, but I can taste cloves and I must say that this stuff really worked to heal a stubborn sore on my gum!

Need All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effect?

The active ingredient, eugenol, is in the oil of the clove. In fact, many dental items you buy today contain oil of cloves. Cloves have antimicrobial compounds, as well as a numbing effect, which makes them perfect for tooth or gum pain. Crush a couple of cloves and place it where the pain is for 10 or 15 minutes.

2. Cabbage

This common food once had an uncommon use — as a dental pain reliever! When applied topically, it is said to help heal mouth sores quickly, as well as numb the pain. Cabbage leaves were softened with a rolling pin, and then rolled up like a tortilla and placed where the pain was. This very old-fashioned remedy calls for using 4 to 6 leaves a day.

3. The toothache plant (Acmella oleracea)

5 Old-Fashioned Toothache Remedies That Really Do Work!

Toothache Plant. Image source: Wikipedia

This little plant works so well, its medicinal use has become its name! Other names include buzz buttons or sechuan buttons. The flowers of this plant have a super-numbing effect in the mouth, even more so than cloves. If you look at the flowers, they do remind you of a tooth with a red “sore” spot in the middle! The remedy calls for using just the fresh flower and holding it on the painful area.

4. Onions

Onions seem to appear on every medicinal herb list, don’t they? Some people claim that onion juice is so effective at relieving pain that it’s better than ibuprofen. I don’t know if that is true or not, but the remedy is that you cut a large piece of onion (apparently yellow onions are best for this, as they are the strongest) and place it between the teeth, as close to the painful area as you can.

Beet Powder: The Ancient Secret To Renewed Energy And Stamina

Now slowly bite the onion, but only until you feel the juice come out. The idea is to get as much of the juice from the onion as possible. So bite slowly, turn the onion piece a bit, and then repeat until the pain is gone.

5. Sage and vodka

This old remedy came to America via German immigrants. Since sage has antibiotic and anti-inflammatory compounds, this remedy makes sense. Two teaspoons of dried crushed sage leaves were put in a small glass container, along with one teaspoon of salt and about one-fourth cup of vodka. This mixture should sit for five minutes before using. Mix this solution gently, and then take a sip and swish it around, biting the mushy sage leaves. Then spit. Don’t drink this or you will most likely end up vomiting. Repeat two or three times, and then throw out any leftover. This needs to be repeated three times a day with a fresh mixture, as it supposedly goes “stale” after just 15 to 20 minutes.

What all-natural methods do you use to relieve mouth and tooth pain? Share your tips in the section below:

Solar Cooker Types Compared

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Solar cookers come in all shapes and sizes – from portable units to permanently mounted units. While they come in different designs, they all work the same way. They concentrate the sun’s energy into a small space at temperatures sufficiently hot to cook food. You can literally cook anything you want in one of these…

The post Solar Cooker Types Compared appeared first on The Weekend Prepper.

Prayer Plant Care – Growing The Maranta Plant

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The post Prayer Plant Care – Growing The Maranta Plant is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Prayer plants are some of the most beautiful houseplants you can find. They’re great in hanging baskets as they spread low and wide.Whether you’re just starting out with houseplants or an an expert grower, the prayer plant is an excellent choice. Quick Navigation Prayer Plant OverviewTypes of Prayer PlantPrayer Plant CareLightWaterSoilFertilizerRepottingPruning​PropagationProblemsGrowing ProblemsPestsDiseasesFAQs​ Prayer Plant Overview […]

The post Prayer Plant Care – Growing The Maranta Plant is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

One Shotgun Fires 10 Different Rounds (video)

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I must really be into conversion kits lately but this one has to take the cake, it’s the Chiappa M6 Combination Folding Shotgun With X-Caliber 12-Gauge Adapter Set which can be found for between $600-700 online. About the only problem I see with it is that it’s a single shot, but apparently this guy’s review … Continue reading “One Shotgun Fires 10 Different Rounds (video)”

Why Everyone Should Use Coupons To Get Prepared Quicker

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Couponing has always received a lot of negative attention. For far too long people have felt embarrassed to use coupons, in order not to have their friends ridicule them or have sales clerks look down on them. But as you’ll see in the infographic below, coupon users had the right idea all along. Why shouldn’t … Read more…

The post Why Everyone Should Use Coupons To Get Prepared Quicker was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Grandma’s Forgotten ‘Everyday Survival Skills’

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skills grandmother

Our grandparents didn’t spend their spare time watching TV or playing video games. The truth is they didn’t have spare time. Keeping the family fed, fields tended, livestock healthy and a roof over their heads kept them busy from dawn to dusk. They did whatever it took to survive and thrive.

While grandma and grandpa each had everyday skills that all homesteaders and survivalists should learn, today we’ll focus on Grandma’s day.

Grandma was a dynamo. She rose before dawn with a mile-long to-do list in her head. Feeding the family a hearty breakfast and sending them on their way was first priority. She then could get to her own busy day. Housework, fixing a fence with grandpa, helping the cow give birth, making pies to trade, fixing lunch, canning peaches and pulling weeds were checked off the list. Then it was time to make dinner and send everyone off to bed.

“The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets” — Every Homesteader Needs A Copy!

Parking or storage for trailers, ATVs, snowmobile

Here are some of the skills that helped her succeed at all of these tasks.

Feeding the Family

Grandma didn’t just run to a drive-thru to grab dinner after work. She planned ahead and made meals from scratch. She knew the night before what she would make for dinner. To accomplish this, she knew how to do these things:

1. Cooking from scratch – When grandma made dinner, she created masterpieces with no help from any cardboard box mix. Her meals were nutritious, tasty and far less expensive than any of the quick foods today. Love and care for her family were the special ingredients in every meal.

2. Cast iron cooking – It is amazing how many different dishes grandma made in her cast iron cookware. An entire meal, from soup to dessert, can be made with just one cast iron pot or skillet.

3. Preserving foods – Many of us remember coming home with jars of jelly, apple butter and pickles from grandma’s. Her cellar or pantry was always lined with shelves full of preserved goodness. Learning to preserve food via canning, pressure cooking or other methods is a wise investment in your own future.

Growing or Raising Food

Running to the grocery store each day was not an option to grandma. She essentially could shop every day in her own pantry or backyard.

4. The kitchen garden – No matter what grandpa grew in the fields, grandma always had a kitchen garden. She could walk out back and pick fresh dinner fixings. She often had fruit and nut trees, as well as her herbs and vegetables.

5. Animal husbandry – Grandma tended to be the one who cared for the livestock — a cow or goat for milk, a steer or pig for meat and then, the chickens. It was hard to find a homestead that didn’t have at least a few chickens – if not more. Aside from eggs, many times an old hen or rooster ended up as Sunday dinner. Which leads us to the next set of skills …

Want Out Of The Rat-Race But Need A Steady Stream Of Income?

6. Butchering livestock – Although it was more often grandpa who killed the large animals, grandma was the one who usually cut up or butchered them. Her skills with the butcher knife were admirable. She also could efficiently wring the neck of that old hen for the stew pot.

‘Jill of All Trades’

Our ancestors did as much as they could for themselves. Things were made to last, and those that didn’t were repurposed. Here are just a few more things that grandma did in caring for her family and home:

7. Crafty creations – Grandma needed basic sewing skills to keep her family clothed. She might even be talented enough to make clothing in addition to repairs. Quilting and weaving were other abilities which could provide additional income, as well as add to her family’s warmth and comfort.

8. Stretching a dollar – Being thrifty came naturally to grandma, as nothing went to waste. She reused, repurposed and recycled everything. She often was a skilled negotiator and bartered goods or her skills for things she needed or wanted.

9. Medical care – Doctors and hospitals weren’t readily available. Grandma was required to have basic medical skills and more. She even might doctor animals as well as people. Her familiarity with medicinal herbs and plants came in very handy.

So, how did your day compare to grandma’s? Did it seem a bit lacking? It’s not too late to start learning some of these skills that she used on an almost daily basis. So put down the remote and game controller and invest your time in useful endeavors. These skills could even save your life and those of your loved ones.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Julie Dees is a freelance writer from Central California who also happens to be a real, lifelong cowgirl. She enjoys writing about her animals, her interest in homesteading and anything related to the outdoor life. Visit her website, TheCowgirlWrites.com.

9 Forgotten ‘Everyday Survival Skills’ From Grandma

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Grandma's 'Everyday Survival Skills’

Our grandparents didn’t spend their spare time watching TV or playing video games. The truth is they didn’t have spare time. Keeping the family fed, fields tended, livestock healthy and a roof over their heads kept them busy from dawn to dusk. They did whatever it took to survive and thrive.

While grandma and grandpa each had everyday skills that all homesteaders and survivalists should learn, today we’ll focus on Grandma’s day.

Grandma was a dynamo. She rose before dawn with a mile-long to-do list in her head. Feeding the family a hearty breakfast and sending them on their way was first priority. She then could get to her own busy day. Housework, fixing a fence with grandpa, helping the cow give birth, making pies to trade, fixing lunch, canning peaches and pulling weeds were checked off the list. Then it was time to make dinner and send everyone off to bed.

“The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets” — Every Homesteader Needs A Copy!

Parking or storage for trailers, ATVs, snowmobile

Here are some of the skills that helped her succeed at all of these tasks.

Feeding the Family

Grandma didn’t just run to a drive-thru to grab dinner after work. She planned ahead and made meals from scratch. She knew the night before what she would make for dinner. To accomplish this, she knew how to do these things:

1. Cooking from scratch – When grandma made dinner, she created masterpieces with no help from any cardboard box mix. Her meals were nutritious, tasty and far less expensive than any of the quick foods today. Love and care for her family were the special ingredients in every meal.

2. Cast iron cooking – It is amazing how many different dishes grandma made in her cast iron cookware. An entire meal, from soup to dessert, can be made with just one cast iron pot or skillet.

3. Preserving foods – Many of us remember coming home with jars of jelly, apple butter and pickles from grandma’s. Her cellar or pantry was always lined with shelves full of preserved goodness. Learning to preserve food via canning, pressure cooking or other methods is a wise investment in your own future.

Growing or Raising Food

Running to the grocery store each day was not an option to grandma. She essentially could shop every day in her own pantry or backyard.

skills grandmother4. The kitchen garden – No matter what grandpa grew in the fields, grandma always had a kitchen garden. She could walk out back and pick fresh dinner fixings. She often had fruit and nut trees, as well as her herbs and vegetables.

5. Animal husbandry – Grandma tended to be the one who cared for the livestock — a cow or goat for milk, a steer or pig for meat and then, the chickens. It was hard to find a homestead that didn’t have at least a few chickens – if not more. Aside from eggs, many times an old hen or rooster ended up as Sunday dinner. Which leads us to the next set of skills …

Want Out Of The Rat-Race But Need A Steady Stream Of Income?

6. Butchering livestock – Although it was more often grandpa who killed the large animals, grandma was the one who usually cut up or butchered them. Her skills with the butcher knife were admirable. She also could efficiently wring the neck of that old hen for the stew pot.

‘Jill of All Trades’

Our ancestors did as much as they could for themselves. Things were made to last, and those that didn’t were repurposed. Here are just a few more things that grandma did in caring for her family and home:

7. Crafty creations – Grandma needed basic sewing skills to keep her family clothed. She might even be talented enough to make clothing in addition to repairs. Quilting and weaving were other abilities which could provide additional income, as well as add to her family’s warmth and comfort.

8. Stretching a dollar – Being thrifty came naturally to grandma, as nothing went to waste. She reused, repurposed and recycled everything. She often was a skilled negotiator and bartered goods or her skills for things she needed or wanted.

9. Medical care – Doctors and hospitals weren’t readily available. Grandma was required to have basic medical skills and more. She even might doctor animals as well as people. Her familiarity with medicinal herbs and plants came in very handy.

So, how did your day compare to grandma’s? Did it seem a bit lacking? It’s not too late to start learning some of these skills that she used on an almost daily basis. So put down the remote and game controller and invest your time in useful endeavors. These skills could even save your life and those of your loved ones.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Julie Dees is a freelance writer from Central California who also happens to be a real, lifelong cowgirl. She enjoys writing about her animals, her interest in homesteading and anything related to the outdoor life. Visit her website, TheCowgirlWrites.com.

Stacy Lyn Harris’ new book HARVEST

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My mouth has been watering for Stacy’s new book ever since she told me she was writing it a few months ago.  HARVEST is finally out and I think it’s her best title yet.  With a freezer packed with wild meats from this year’s hunting season, HARVEST couldn’t have been released at a better time of year.

Harvest has heart. The very nature of the book is coordinated around food that has families working together in order to bring them together. For Stacy Lyn, food is much more than sustenance, it is the medium through which familial ties are strengthened. The time and effort Stacy Lyn has put into cultivating and crafting recipes that will draw you back to the fond memories regarding your own family’s table is evident throughout. The masterfully shot photographs of the dishes alone will have your senses in a delicious uproar!

Harvest includes Stacy Lyn’s cherished family recipes, free-range meat dishes derived from her husband’s hunting obsession, and lighter takes on decidedly southern classics—all prepared simply, in the freshest way possible. The book covers food from the garden, pasture, woods, and water in four sections:

  • “The Garden” features Fried Green Tomatoes, Jalapeño Poppers, Corn Chowder, Fried Squash with Tomatoes and Pesto, and other recipes to make you wish it was summer all year long.

  • “Beyond the Garden” delves into beekeeping and raising chickens for an amazing Honey Butter to pour over Cinnamon Pear Buns and your favorite Egg Salad Sandwiches with Refrigerator Pickles.

  • “From the Pasture” focuses on free-range, pasture-fed game recipes like Braised Short Ribs, Black-Eyed Pea Gumbo, and Juicy Pork Chops, plus a how-to on sausage-making.

  • “Seafood and Fish” includes Stacy Lyn’s favorite entertaining recipes, Best Ever Clam Bake and Perfect Fish Tacos.

  • For city dwellers or anyone who feels Stacy Lyn’s way of life is out of reach, 15 “how to” articles, peppered throughout the book, offer steps for cooking and eating sustainably in any setting—including container gardening, saving seeds, preserving, foraging, composting and more.

For more information about Stacy Lyn, subscribe to her websites, stacylynharris.com and gameandgarden.com and follow her on your favorite social networks @stacylynharris on Facebook and Instagram.

Find HARVEST on Amazon here:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0983879931/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wwwwillowhave-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=0983879931&linkId=cec183912fdf97032f811fe6568e8a23

Stacy Lyn Harris’ new book HARVEST

My mouth has been watering for Stacy’s new book ever since she told me she was writing it a few months ago.  HARVEST is finally out and I think it’s her best title yet.  With a freezer packed with wild meats from this year’s hunting season, HARVEST couldn’t have been released at a better time of year.

Harvest has heart. The very nature of the book is coordinated around food that has families working together in order to bring them together. For Stacy Lyn, food is much more than sustenance, it is the medium through which familial ties are strengthened. The time and effort Stacy Lyn has put into cultivating and crafting recipes that will draw you back to the fond memories regarding your own family’s table is evident throughout. The masterfully shot photographs of the dishes alone will have your senses in a delicious uproar!

Harvest includes Stacy Lyn’s cherished family recipes, free-range meat dishes derived from her husband’s hunting obsession, and lighter takes on decidedly southern classics—all prepared simply, in the freshest way possible. The book covers food from the garden, pasture, woods, and water in four sections:

  • “The Garden” features Fried Green Tomatoes, Jalapeño Poppers, Corn Chowder, Fried Squash with Tomatoes and Pesto, and other recipes to make you wish it was summer all year long.

  • “Beyond the Garden” delves into beekeeping and raising chickens for an amazing Honey Butter to pour over Cinnamon Pear Buns and your favorite Egg Salad Sandwiches with Refrigerator Pickles.

  • “From the Pasture” focuses on free-range, pasture-fed game recipes like Braised Short Ribs, Black-Eyed Pea Gumbo, and Juicy Pork Chops, plus a how-to on sausage-making.

  • “Seafood and Fish” includes Stacy Lyn’s favorite entertaining recipes, Best Ever Clam Bake and Perfect Fish Tacos.

  • For city dwellers or anyone who feels Stacy Lyn’s way of life is out of reach, 15 “how to” articles, peppered throughout the book, offer steps for cooking and eating sustainably in any setting—including container gardening, saving seeds, preserving, foraging, composting and more.

For more information about Stacy Lyn, subscribe to her websites, stacylynharris.com and gameandgarden.com and follow her on your favorite social networks @stacylynharris on Facebook and Instagram.

Find HARVEST on Amazon here:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0983879931/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wwwwillowhave-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=0983879931&linkId=cec183912fdf97032f811fe6568e8a23

Companion Plants In The Garden – What You Plant Where Matters!

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When it comes to companion plants, what you plant where in your vegetable garden can have a big impact on its overall success! As you plan out your garden layout, it’s important to take into consideration the relationships that plants

The post Companion Plants In The Garden – What You Plant Where Matters! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Is Your Labor In Vain?

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     This is a touchy question when it comes to the Body of Christ.  The word “Labor” conjures up one of the Church’s “sacred cows” … Labor = Works, and All works are invalidated because Ephesians 2:8-9 says, For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that [salvation is] not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; not as a result of works, so that no one may boast. Satan has twisted this Scripture and convinced much of the Church that we are not to do works at all. Therefore, much of the Modern Church’s teachings deplore the idea of works, and we are left with an ineffective Body which has abandoned the mandate and directives of Jesus.  Let me explain…
     There are two different aspects of this doctrinal position.  The first is the issue of inheritance and rewards.  Colossians 3:23-24 says it pretty plainly: Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the inheritance as your reward. You are serving the Lord Christ. That word “work” signifies “labor”, and obviously, when we work hard for the Lord, we can expect rewards from Him.  But that is not the aspect I want to address today.

     I want us to think about Jesus’s heart in this matter.  In Matthew, Chapter 9, we get a very good picture of His heart when it came to healing people.  In this short chapter, we see Him healing a paralytic; the daughter of a synagogue official; a woman who had been hemorrhaging for twelve years; two blind men; and a mute, demon-possessed man.  At the end of the chapter, it says He went “through all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues and proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom, and healing every kind of disease and every kind of sickness”.  And then, in the last verse, it tells us why He healed them all … He had compassion on them.
     That word compassion, in the Greek, literally means to have the bowels yearn. The bowels were considered by the Hebrews to be the seat of tender affections, so the fact that Christ felt “compassion” means He was so moved with tender mercy for the multitudes [who needed healing] that He physically felt it. But it is the last two verses of Chapter 9 that I hope will dispel the Church’s sacred cow regarding “works”.
     In verses 37 and 38, after seeing the multitudes who cried out for healing, and feeling mercy to His very core, Jesus turns to His disciples and says, “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few. Therefore beseech the Lord of the harvest to send out workers into His harvest.” Can you grasp the immensity of this situation?  The Greek word for “send out” is ekballo, and it means “to throw out”, “to cast out”, “to drive”… all with force and effort.  It is the same word used when referring to casting out demons, and denotes the intensity and the need for the action.  Here, in Matthew 9, Jesus is saying, “There is such a multitude [or plentiful harvest] that need healing and delivering and saving, that I can’t get to them all.  Please ask the Lord to send out [with intense force and effort] workers and laborers to gather His Harvest [of lost and hurting souls].”
     At this point, it is evident that Jesus is not concerned about how skilled the laborers are — it is about how much time we have to save the harvest.  If we don’t gather the harvest, the harvest will die! How true is that today??? How many people need to hear us preaching and teaching the Gospel of the Kingdom so that they can receive God’s grace and avoid the fires of hell?  How many people need to hear the message of the Gospel and God’s Kingdom on earth so they can be healed from the Enemy’s  spiritual oppression?  How many need to feel the power of Jesus in our hands as we heal their physical illnesses? Are we, as Jesus’s Church, doing what He asked those disciples to go and do in Matthew, Chapter 9?  Do we think the need is any less today than it was 2,000 years ago?
      You see, the Modern Church puts the emphasis on the readiness of the Laborer [if they even consider that work needs to be done, in the first place]. They will say, “We can’t get out ahead of God!” “We better be careful — we might make a mistake, and make it worse!” “We just need to Wait!!!”
     But Jesus’s emphasis was on the readiness of the Harvest.  There are people who DESPERATELY NEED the Message of the Kingdom, and healing, and casting out of their demons. As the Church, we don’t need to wait any longer for a special sign from Heaven!  If you believe it is truly Jesus doing the work in and through us, then you’re ready to wade into His Harvest. The Church is still waiting for a door to be opened for them.  But Jesus said, The gates of hell will not prevail [against My Church]. So, what does that tell us?  Hell has gates! And Satan is not going to willingly open the door or gate for us!  Sometimes we have to kick some doors open!
     Sometimes I get the impression that the Church is waiting for Heaven to open up and give us permission to delve into the spiritual aspects of the Kingdom.  But Heaven opened up the minute Jesus returned to His Father and the veil was torn away! Heaven opened and received Him — and it has never closed!
     It is very clear by Jesus’s instructions to us as His disciples that we are the conduit between Heaven and earth. He has given us a commission to bring in the harvest before it withers away and dies. We are to engage with those who are hurting and need healing, and that means we will have to engage with the darkness in this world [because it is the darkness that is oppressing both believer and unbeliever, alike].  But the Church only wants to take The Light where it’s already light. We’re afraid of the dark!
     But our examples are Jesus and those disciples who went forth to preach and teach the Gospel of the Kingdom.  [NOTE: Jesus didn’t preach about His death, burial, and resurrection — i.e., the Salvation Message — and neither did He tell these early disciples to teach the Gospel of Salvation. He didn’t reveal that until right at the end of His life and ministry]. But Jesus and these disciples taught the multitudes about the Kingdom of God; about the reign, rule, and superiority of God.  And then they demonstrated what they preached … they healed, and cast out demons, and proved that YHWH is superior to any demon or power of Satan.
     Isn’t that the same message that needs to be heard today? And don’t you think that those same lost multitudes exist today?  That the Harvest is plentiful? And can you see the need for Laborers in this massive Harvest? So, are you willing to work heartily for the Lord of the Harvest?  Or are you content with containing His Light in your comfortable surroundings?  Jesus said the Harvest is plentiful … God is waiting for us to move into the fields and begin sharing the Gospel of His Kingdom and doing the works as His ambassadors.  His Word says that by our fruits He will know us.
     The harvest is ripe and there are multitudes waiting for us — all manner of illnesses and diseases need to be healed; demons need to be cast out; and the power and authority of Heaven [through the Holy Spirit] is waiting to permeate every new disciple of Jesus Christ — all in His mighty and compassionate Name.
     It’s almost Harvest Time — Are you practicing your faith by laboring for the Kingdom of God — or is your faith absent of useful aim or effect; void of results for the Kingdom? We will all have to account for our works when we stand before Him. I beseech you — Do not labor in vain!

1 Corinthians 15:58   “Therefore, my beloved brothers, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that in the Lord your labor is not in vain”.

         

How To Make A 5 Gallon Bucket Survival Kit

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If you love buckets and survival, you’ve landed in the right place, as today’s article is about 5-gallon buckets and survival, or how to use an already-legendary item in the prepper community for building a survival kit.

And yes, I am talking about the famous 5-gallon bucket, which seems to be at the top of the list when it comes to survival and sustainable development.

Besides gardening, building pyramids, and putting a man on the moon, this inconspicuous item can be used for improvising an emergency/survival kit as it’s large enough to hold quite a few items of survival gear, it’s tough and water resistant, and it’s pretty easy to carry around depending on what’s in it.

These DIY emergency kits are easy and cheap to made, and in a crisis situation they’ll prove to be highly valuable.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

The idea is to have as many as possible placed in strategic places, i.e. one in your car, one in your basement, one in your vacation home, one in your office – you know what I’m talking about.

To begin with, let’s concentrate a bit on the bucket itself. Not all buckets are created equal; you need to get a good one that hasn’t been used to store toxic chemicals.

How to Choose a High-quality Bucket

Here are a few places where you can get a high-quality (as in solid) 5-gallon bucket for free:

  • Wendy’s
  • Tim Hortons
  • Dunkin Donuts
  • Sam’s Club
  • Chick Fill A.

You can also try Mc Donald’s, Walmart and Subway but these guys are so environmentally conscious that they usually recycle their plastic buckets. It’s worth a try anyway.

Also, you should go for food grade buckets at all times, because you never know what you’ll be storing inside after all, besides your emergency survival kit, alright?

Another important factor to consider is that your bucket is strong enough to withstand pressure and comes with a plastic lid – that’s quite important.

If cruising the multinational corporations proves to be unsuccessful in terms of acquiring free 5-gallon buckets, you can always go for the unthinkable option and buy some from Home Depot, Foodland, McHappy’s, Lowes or FireHouse Subs. A brand new bucket from these guys will cost you anywhere from 2 to 5 bucks, lid included (the lid may cost extra).

These are just a few ideas, so don’t start throwing rocks; I’m only a messenger. If you’re not happy with my tips and tricks, just use your imagination.

If you end up with free but stinky plastic buckets (the ones which were used for storing pickles are the smelliest) don’t worry, they can be cleansed in a jiffy with a solution made of 1 gallon of hot water and 1/3 cup of bleach. The same stuff can be used for cleaning your bathroom by the way, but don’t tell anybody.

Another interesting factoid to consider: the best food-grade buckets are marked with a 2 on the bottom. The number represents the type of plastic used in its construction and 2 is the least toxic variety. However, if you put Mylar bags inside, you can forget about the food grade status of your bucket.

If you’re definitely never going to store food inside the bucket, it doesn’t really matter what you use.

With the “how to choose the ideal-5 gallon bucket for my prepping endeavor”  science taken care of, let’s move on to the most important part of the story.

What to Put in Your 5 Gallon Bucket Survival Kit?

Well, there are various schools of taught about the actual content of a proper emergency kit, but let’s play it safe and follow the golden rule of survival, or the holy trinity.

The trinity of survival goes something like this: regardless of what you’re thinking about, whether it’s an alien invasion or a natural disaster, you’ll have to take care of 3 main things if you want to stay alive and tell the story to your kids, friends, or favorite pets: food, water and shelter, that about sums it up.

With all these simple things considered, your survival emergency kit must be able to provide you with the necessary items/gear/stuff or whatchamacallits for allowing you to eat, drink and stay safe for at least 3 days (the more the better).

Video first seen on Robert Martin

With water being a crucial survival item, you should pack 3-4 water bottles in your survival bucket, along with a quality water filter. The problem with water is that it’s voluminous and heavy to carry around, so you’ll have to figure that out for yourself (I am talking about how many bottles of water to store in your emergency kit depending on your geo-location).

Freeze dried meals are also must-have items in a survival emergency kit, together with a few protein bars, chocolate, and other long shelve life, easy to carry, light, compact, and high-calories foods. A rip stop tarp is essential, as it can be used for a number of purposes, including as a makeshift shelter (a 6×8 would be enough, and grommet holes are a must).

Tip: disguise your 5-gallon bucket survival kit into an Ottoman and hide it in plain view (think along the lines of easy to grab if SHTF).

Video first seen on Emma Catherine

These are the most basic items to store inside your 5 gallon bucket survival kit, i.e. food, water and shelter. But there’s plenty of room left, so let’s go a little bit more high tech: a gun would be nice, also a quality survival knife, which is essentially a multi-tool. Being able to protect yourself and your family, especially in a crisis, is crucial. A few extra rounds of ammo wouldn’t hurt either. 

A fire starter kit/BIC lighters, some weatherproof matches, duct tape, a mini multi tool (I’d go for a Leatherman), a whistle, and some wet wipes would be nice to have in any emergency situation I can think of, so keep those in mind too. A compass, an LED lighter with some spare batteries, a couple of N 95 dust masks and a small sliding saw would be also advisable to add to your survival stash.

A shortwave radio is essential in a catastrophe as it gives you the possibility to gather essential intel from local authorities, so throw one in just in case – the smaller the better.

Paracord! Need I say more? Check out my articles about paracord if you have any doubts. 25’x2 would do.

A cool addition for your survival kit would be several 30-gallon trash bags, as they can be used for various purposes, including as a makeshift rain poncho.

A first aid kit is a must, together with some over the counter/prescribed medicine, depending on one’s health condition.

A couple of Mylar thermal blankets would be nice as they’ re awesome if you have to camp outdoors and they take up so little room it really doesn’t matter.

If you still have room left, you can consider split leather gloves, extra batteries (for your radio/flashlight, remember?), glow sticks, safety goggles, a can opener, a sewing kit, a bar of soap and even some toothpaste/toothbrushes.

Another handy item to have in your emergency survival kit provided you have enough room for it would be a solar charger for your cellphone (I’d go for an old-school feature phone with long-lasting battery and all that). You can find those on the Internet (Amazon etc).

A 5 gallon bucket survival kit is a life saving equipment to grab in a crisis situation when panic is the greatest killer.

How long will you survive in a SHTF situation?

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This article has been written by Chris Black for Survivopedia. 

Teaching Situational Awareness to Kids

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We can be blissfully unaware of our surroundings and distracted much more than we realize. Teaching situational awareness to kids can be lifesaving | PreparednessMama

We can be blissfully unaware of our surroundings and distracted much more than we realize. Teaching situational awareness to kids can be lifesaving. Being married to a soldier changes how you view the world. Especially if you have a spouse who has served overseas and in combat. They struggle with crowded or confusing places and […]

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How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

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Today, I’m following up with my ideas on how to store emergency preparedness items. I have a small home, as I have mentioned before. It’s 1900 square feet, and you may remember, I have a three car garage. The third stall, which could hardly fit any size car, is where Mark and I organized all our emergency preparedness items. All my food storage remains inside the house. I only store emergency preparedness stuff that can withstand the heat here in Southern Utah in the summer. Outside temperatures have gotten as high as 120 degrees, making the temperature in the garage, even with all the insulation we have added, higher than food storage items can stand for any length of time. Yep, it’s hot here in the summer! We have a lot of dust here, so you see that I all of my stuff has been put in protective plastic zippered bags.

I hope this post shows the world several different options to store emergency preparedness items. I apologize for the different size pictures, but I wanted you to see as much as possible on each rack.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I have hanging shelves from my garage ceilings (I have seen the shelves at Costco). They are 4 feet by 8 feet and about 18-24 inches hanging from the ceiling. The portable washing machines are two 6-gallon buckets (one has drilled holes in it), a green Gamma lid and a mobile washer like this one: Breathing Mobile Washer Classic – Portable Clothes Washing Machine – Handheld – Manual – Mobile Hand Powered Laundry Solution – Superior Materials and Construction The large wash buckets can be found at most stores, these are made by Behrens. Behrens 2, 15-Gallon Round Steel Tub I went to an antique store to get a washboard. Bwbg7 Galvanized Washboard (Wbg7)

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I bought some heavy duty racks from Costco online and they deliver them to your house. They are 72 inches tall by 48 inches wide and 18 inches deep. They have some heavy duty rolling wheels which are nice when I need to move them.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I label everything with cardstock and place the 1/2 sheets in the buckets so I know what I have in each one. My 72-hour kits below are in plastic bags with a list of items that are in each one.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I have a very small kitchen, so I store my pressure canner and water bath canner outside in those bags as well. These are the bags that I buy, depending on the size of the item I’m storing: Richards Homewares – Set of 4 Md Chests 12 Guage Vinyl 12x16x8 each, Kitchen You can buy these at Bed Bath and Beyond as well. All of my Lodge Dutch ovens and cast iron pieces have Lodge bags, if available, and then they are stored in the appropriate size bags to keep them dust free. Set of 2 Clear Zippered Sweater Storage Bags

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

The buckets below are color coded for a reason. I can see at a glance how much FUEL I have. I have the regular propane tanks out on the back patio stored away from the house. I buy these colored buckets and Gamma lids from Pleasant Hill Grain: Gamma Lids (all different colors) and the 5-gallon colored buckets. Any bucket with a lid will work, I’m just an organized chick, it’s who I am.

  1. Green-clean scrap wood
  2. Red-oak lump charcoal
  3. Black-clean pine cones
  4. Blue-Kingsford’s charcoal briquettes without the starter fluid

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

Now, that I have shared some of my ideas on how to store emergency preparedness items, please share yours with me. I will add them to my post. May God bless us all when an unforeseen disaster strikes our community. We will be ready, that’s for sure.

The post How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (3/25/17)

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Here are the top 7 articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks.  But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

I’ve also included one honorable mention that I think you should read.

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 3/19/17 – 3/25/17

Peace,
Todd

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These Aren’t Considered SHTF Survival Skills, But They Really Should Be

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MCan you grow your own food and raise your own livestock? Can you fix your own car? Are you a competent marksman? Can you hunt and fish? Do you know your way around a first-aid kit? Can you make your own biofuel? How about bartering?

Everyone who’s interested in prepping has heard about or considered learning some of those skills (among many others) countless times already. There are certain skills that seem essential for surviving a catastrophic event, and they are repeatedly mentioned and discussed ad nauseam in the prepper community. Of course they’re vitally important and sophisticated subjects that warrant lots of discussion, but there are a few skills that are often totally overlooked; probably because they seem mundane and unexciting.

That however, doesn’t mean they should be ignored. If you’re looking to tack a few more skills under your belt, or at least confirm that you don’t have any of these gaps in your prepper education, consider the following:

Learning Another Language

If society collapsed, then nation-state borders would temporarily lose their meaning. People living in immigrant enclaves, gated communities, and small towns across the country would be uprooted from their lives. Everyone would be wrenched away from their social bubbles. In other words, you would be running into all kinds of people who you would normally never meet, and a lot of those folks will speak a different language. The more languages you know, the less misunderstandings you’ll face after the collapse.

Driving Stick

As time goes on there are fewer and fewer vehicles with manual transmissions being built and sold, and the number of people who actually know how to drive a stick shift is declining. But this could become a vital skill after the collapse. Stick shifts tend to be older, and older cars tend to be easier to fix and maintain. Older vehicles are also a lot easier to hotwire (I’m not suggesting that you steal. There would be many abandoned cars if society collapsed). So if you don’t know already, now is a good time to learn how to drive a stick.

Investing

Investing sounds like a skill that is exactly the opposite of what you need to know to survive. When we think of investors, we imagine people who are reliant on the grid; people who work for investment firms and sit behind computers all day. In reality, investing is still an important skill to have when civilization crumbles. Being a good investor requires you to have a solid understanding of how the world works, so you can use that understanding to figure out what is going to be more valuable in the future. At a base level, there isn’t much difference between investing money in a promising company, and trading a can of soup for a pack of cigarettes that will be worth more in the future as supplies dwindle.

Negotiation, Persuasion, and Conflict Resolution

Preppers spend a lot of time preparing to survive violent situations. However, violence is messy and destructive. And more times than not it’s preventable with a little bit of tact and understanding. Don’t buy a dozen guns and thousands of rounds of ammunition without working on your own ability communicate with others, and find common interests with people who oppose you. If society collapsed, the only people you should have to physically protect yourself from, are the ones who refuse to talk to you.

Stress Management

In the modern world, most people deal with stress by consuming addictive substances and engaging themselves in an endless stream of entertainment. After the collapse, there will be no TV or internet, and the substances people use to take the edge off will be hard to come by. And this will happen as everyone is dealing with the most stressful event anyone has seen in generations. If you can’t handle hard times without the aid of a stiff drink and a cigarette, then you’re not ready to cope with an event that could destroy our civilization.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Gratitude Can Help You Forgive

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My life is full of things for which I’m grateful. From my family to my wonderful new (and at the same time very old) house, a church fellowship where I am loved and accepted and of course the fact that I have a loyal and wonderful readership, there are many great people and things in my life. Welcome to Day Eighteen of 30 Days to Forgiveness.

As a brain cancer survivor, I can even include my life and the fact that I’m (relatively) healthy and well. All surgery has risks, and doctors are careful to inform you ahead of time, but before surgery I was warned that any outcome in which I was breathing would be considered a success. Nine years later I am doing far more than “just breathing”!

When we spend time taking note of everything for which we are grateful, and we consciously express that gratitude, our entire manner of thinking starts to shift.

If you take the time to think about it and make a list, I am sure that you will come up with many wonderful things for which you are grateful. One of the most popular Question of the Day topics on my Facebook page is when I ask people to name three things or people for which they are grateful.

And I will ask you – if you’re willing – to take a moment and tell us some of your gratitude list in the comments.

Too often we take these blessings for granted.

In our world today, gratitude sometimes seems to have become a lost art. People are focused on the negative, fixated on what’s happening next and very, very busy.

Too busy, as the old saying goes, to stop and smell the flowers.

There is much to be said for actively appreciating the positive and living in the present.

Here my readers nod and raise an eyebrow in confusion, wondering what in the world this has to do with forgiveness.

It all comes down to your frame of mind. You see, if you’re focused on negativity, busy-ness and complaining, fretting about what’s next and worrying about what you need or want or … any of that, really, you are not at all in the right mindset to practice forgiveness.

When we spend time taking note of everything for which we are grateful, and we consciously express that gratitude, our entire manner of thinking starts to shift.

It becomes much easier to appreciate what we have and focus on the positive in our lives. As a result, we find it easier to let go of negativity, and that includes the pain, anger and need for revenge that we may be feeling.

Have you ever noticed this in your life?

It’s one reason we confuse sadness, caused by events in our lives, with clinical depression.

What I mean is that, in the normal course of our days, good and bad things happen. When something good happens, it is normal to react with happiness. (And the flip side is true – it’s completely normal to feel sad when bad things happen. It’s just not normal to dwell on it forever.)

When we are happy and grateful, it’s harder to become down and depressed. It’s harder to be angry and we’re more likely to forgive and move on.

Of course if your brain patterns and chemistry have shifted and you are suffering from clinical depression, it will take more than happy thoughts to get you healthy again. Clinical depression is a serious thing and needs proper medical care.

Think of it this way – healthy eating and exercise may help prevent the onset of diabetes, but once you have developed it, more serious intervention is required. The same with depression.

But for the rest of us, those who are experiencing the normal range of emotions, responding with sad feelings when things go poorly and feeling happy when they go well, why not look at gratitude as another great tool in your forgiveness toolbox? Start using it in an intentional way.

One of the very simplest ways to get started is to count your blessings. When you wake in the morning and as you go to sleep at night, give thanks. Be specific! One of the things that I have taught my children is that, when they can think of no other words to pray, “Thank you, Father God” is always sufficient.

When we give thanks with a grateful heart, our mood improves and forgiving becomes easier. If we look at the grace and mercy that we have experienced in our lives, while still acknowledging that we, too, have caused pain and harm, it becomes much easier to extend that same grace and mercy to others.

It really doesn’t matter what your life looks like right now. If you stop and look for it, you will find a lot to be grateful for.

One moment in seared into my mind forever.

Remember how the surgeon told me that success would be any outcome in which I came out alive? That was a pretty low bar to meet – brain surgery is dangerous. In fact, since the tumour was sitting right between my parietal and occipital lobes, she said it would be a success if I came out alive but with no vision and an inability to communicate properly or remember things.

Cheery thoughts when going into surgery.

Anyway, what you might not know is that our life was very rough at the time. We rented a geared-to-income apartment and accessed the food bank about once a month. Not only that, we were struggling with some major legal – and obviously, health – issues. To say our life was rough is actually an understatement. It was during this time that Psalm 27 became my go to affirmation and I memorized it. “Though war should rise against me, in this will I be confident …”

And so, in the middle of all of this difficulty, I was diagnosed with a large astrocytoma (brain tumour) that was just starting to turn aggressive.

When I opened my eyes after the surgery, sleepy and sedated, my first thought was “I’m alive!” and then I drifted back to semi-consciousness. My next clear thought, which brought me very much awake, was

I’m alive and I can SEE!

That’s when I started bullying my poor nurse to let me get out of bed because there was a life to be lived.

With that said, my memory is terrible now and I’m very grateful for notes and lists and digital calendars! And if I ever tell you to put something down on “that … um … that flat thing where we eat”, or if I suggest that you put the leftovers in the dishwasher and take the laundry out of the freezer, please don’t laugh too hard. Yes, I sometimes forget every day words. And people I see often. And names. The list goes on.

I have become used to hearing ‘Oh, don’t you remember …?” because usually, no, I don’t.

Maybe your list is going to start with that. I am grateful to be alive. I am grateful for my vision. I am grateful for lists because my memory is awful! I’m grateful for people who love me even when I forget what a table is called. I am grateful for universal health care. I am so very grateful for Dr. Schneider and her team.

Dig down and have fun with it. Make a list as long as you can possibly make it. Write it out and stick on a wall where you can see it every day.

Give thanks with a grateful heart.

When we spend time taking note of everything for which we are grateful, and we consciously express that gratitude, our entire manner of thinking starts to shift.

Sugar and Soured Health

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Sugar and Soured Health Bob Hawkins “The APN Report“ Audio in player below! The last APN Report was all about lowering the amount of salt in a diet as a good way to lose weight. Not so much of a diet but more of a lifestyle choice & awareness of what is in the foods we … Continue reading Sugar and Soured Health

The post Sugar and Soured Health appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

News: Chaos in QLD as 80,000 without electricity & Floods in NSW.

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7 News Image.

Can we expect more of this and worse in the future? Is this a part of climate change? Trump and Turnbull are putting the world in danger!

This Federal Agency Has Seized $3.2 Billion From People – Without Charging Them With A Crime

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This Federal Agency Has Seized $3.2 Billion From People – Without Charging Them With A Crime

Image source: Flickr / Creative Commons / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictures-of-money/

WASHINGTON — One single branch of the U.S. government, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), has collected more than $4 billion through civil forfeiture since 2007.

Disturbingly, most of that money — $3.2 billion — was seized in cash without criminal charges or convictions, a report from the Inspector General at the U.S. Department of Justice found this week. The $3.2 billion figure does not include the value of cars, homes and other items the DEA took.

The report – dubbed “The Review of the Department’s Oversight of Cash Seizure and Forfeiture”found that reasons for the seizures included “traveling to or from a known source city for drug trafficking, purchasing a ticket within 24 hours of travel, purchasing a ticket for a long flight with an immediate return, purchasing a one-way ticket, and traveling without checked luggage.”

Discover How To Become Invisible In Today’s Surveillance State!

Darpana Sheth, senior attorney at the Institute for Justice, told The Washington Post that the report “raises serious concerns that maybe the real purpose here is not to fight crime, but to seize and forfeit property.”

Civil forfeiture is the controversial method whereby law enforcement officials can seize property they believe to be tied to drug trafficking, without going to trial or even pressing charges. (Listen to Off The Grid Radio’s in-depth report on it here.)

Sheth said a criminal conviction should be required to seize money.

“Nobody in America should lose their property without being convicted of a crime,” Sheth said. “If our goal is to curb crime, we should simply abolish civil forfeiture.”

Do you support or oppose civil forfeiture? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Bugging Out on Foot is a Risky Proposition

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Bugging Out on Foot is a Risky Proposition This is a nice short reality check. The bug out is one heck of a commitment. I am always happy to see someone inject some reality into the fantasy of the bug out. It should really be the last possible option. In this article there are several …

Continue reading »

The post Bugging Out on Foot is a Risky Proposition appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Video – Target practice

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Found this elsewhere in the blogosphere and it really was too good to not share:

Reminds me…at some point I need to go shooting. The weather is getting nice and it might not be a bad idea to get in some range time.

As an aside, theres a gun show here in town this weekend so that’ll be interesting.

Start Prepping Without Feeling Overwhelmed

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post is another entry in the Prepper Writing Contest from Kena K. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.


Everyone has different reasons for prepping. For us it was the combination of hearing about the increasing devastation of more natural disasters in the U.S. and abroad, and seeing how many people lost their jobs and homes during the economic recession. Initially, our thought was just to have some extra food in the cupboards in case I lost my job. We started by emptying out the closet in our extra bedroom, which allowed us to get rid of some of the extra “stuff ”we all seem to accumulate. Next, we purchased a few shelving units on sale, and secured them to the wall inside the closet. From there, we researched food items with longer storage lives like beans, instant rice, oatmeal, pasta, instant potatoes, honey and sugar and then started buying a little extra food each time we went to the store, focusing on sales to keep things cheaper. Once home with the the food, I wrote the “use by” date on the labels of the food before storing them in the closet so the items that expire soonest would be used first and those with the later expiration dates would be placed behind those to be used later.

As time went on our food storage grew and became more diverse. We began to compare our closet to a savings vault and the more food we put in it, the richer we felt. Coincidentally, the more we collected, the more interested we got in the whole prepping concept. I organized the food according to categories like beans, rice, oatmeal, canned fruit, canned vegetables, canned fish and meats, boxed meals, spices, baking items, drink mixes (coffee, tea, hot cocoa, hot cider, instant milk, Gatorade, Tang, Kool-Aid, etc.) and so on. We not only thought of ourselves, we also planned for the possibility that other members of our family might have to leave their homes, so we downsized more of our “junk” to create more space, and collected more food.

The biggest challenge for me was storing water. I didn’t want anything to be so heavy it would fall on our heads, collapse the shelves, or worse to leak and ruin our food, so I boiled water and stored it in glass quart jars that I had saved from empty juice containers, and then dated the jars and placed them upright, underneath the shelving units where lucky for me, they fit perfectly. I also purchased and stored some plastic drinking water bottles. Since the minimum recommendation is to save one gallon of water per day, per person and pets, and since water is life, I found it difficult to determine how many days we should save for and where to find enough space to store it all. Eventually, I got creative and found other places throughout the house to store more water and we kept empty 5 gallon water containers with our camping gear so we could use them to gather more water, as needed.

Prepping isn’t a new idea – What is new is the idea that you don’t need to prepare.

At some point, we began to expand our storage items from just food into thoughts of our pets needs, first aid, extra indoor and outdoor clothes and shoes, towels and blankets, soap, shampoo, lotion, toothbrushes, toothpaste and the like, again purchasing items on sale. We started going to garage sales to look for things like oil lamps and camping items. We made Bug Out Bags for ourselves should we need to evacuate at a moments notice and I even stored a few emergency items in my purse and in our vehicles. We have a camp trailer so we also got it ready with extra sleeping bags, food, hygiene items, books, puzzles, cards, and toys for the grandkids. It became a game to us, always thinking of things we might need and how to purchase them without spending tons of money. We bought things like tools, personal protection items, backpacks, cooking and camping gear for each other for our birthday and Christmas presents. During the winter when the weather was too bad to go outside, I used my time to copy our important papers, put family pictures in a small photo album, and wrote down their addresses, phone numbers and birthdays and anything else of importance I could think of (scars, blood types, etc). We stored some state and Forest Service maps in the glove box and our backpacks in case we had to travel or use the back roads. I also started collecting recipes for ways to use the freeze-dried foods we’d purchased.

In the spring we expanded our garden area and mostly planted food that we could freeze, dry or can. We felt really good growing our own food because we kept it organic and knew it would taste so much better in the winter than grocery canned foods. We read articles on sprouting and bought seeds so we could try it. Since we owned an acre of land outside the city limits we figured we should utilize our property to help us survive, so instead of a yard full of grass and ornamental trees, we opted for edible landscaping by planting a few fruit trees, berry plants, rhubarb and herbs. We even raised our own chickens for eggs and meat, and had rabbits and turkeys for awhile.

Keep in mind that none of this happened over night by any means. It was something that we started that grew over time. It grew because we saw the importance of it, turned it into a game and then had fun doing it.

What could possibly go wrong?

As our adult children came to visit they began to notice all the food we were collecting and they laughed saying if the Cascadia Fault line acted up, they would just bring their friends and come to our house since we were already so stocked up. I had read an article about someone who opened his property to a few friends who ended up bringing other friend after the Katrina hurricane in 2005 but no one brought anything to contribute towards the cause and soon the years worth of food that he had saved for himself was gone because he had to share it with everyone else. Remembering this, I told the kids that they were more than welcome to come and to think about what they could bring to contribute (food, bedding, towels, etc), and that we had indeed planned for them to stay with us if need be, but then I had to let them know that we did not have enough for their friends, so they would have to prepare for themselves or plan on going someplace else. I felt like I was being a bit mean, but when the SHTF, we all have to decide who can enter our domain and who can’t…and what we are willing to do in order to back that up.

Major cities affected by a disturbance in this subduction zone include Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia; Seattle, Washington; and Portland, Oregon.

That year for Christmas, I gave the kids a mini survival bag for the glove box of their cars that included things like a metal cup with a bit of food, a pocket knife, flashlight, fire starter, and hand warmers and a tiny address book that I wrote our address and phone number in, thinking that in an emergency they may not have cell service so it would be helpful to have important numbers written down with the hope they might be able to use a land line. I told them it was just a starter kit, and encouraged them to add to it.

After some time, I noticed it seems the kids have been paying attention. They have started to collect extra food in case the power goes out or they get sick and can’t go to work or get to the store. My 80 year old mother recently had to rely on the water and food she had stored for just such an occasion when she was unable to leave home due to a heavy snow storm. Fortunately she didn’t lose power, but if she had, she would have been OK because she had candles, a flashlight and an indoor propane heater on hand that we had given her. She had extra blankets and winter clothes too, all things we had given her or that she had gotten for herself. It was a big relief to know she was prepared as we do not live in the same town and are in fact divided by a mountain pass that may have been impossible for us to go over during the storm. Fortunately, she also has a kind neighbor who helped keep her walkway shoveled and some folks from her church who stopped by to check on her. I would prefer that we lived closer so we could help her more, but for now at least, that is not the case.

Whatever your reason, I hope this article inspires you to begin your prepping adventure. Keep it simple, make a game of it, and don’t spend a ton of money upfront if you don’t have it. Second-hand stores, Dollar stores, garage and estate sales, all have great deals. Online stores and military supply stores are great places to look for backpacks, camping supplies, military clothing and a whole host of other items without paying an arm and a leg for it like you might at a specialty-type store. There are numerous prepping articles full of great advice and helpful lists of whatever you might be interested in, like what to put in your first aid kit or your bug-out bag for example. There are also plenty of prepper-type stores online to buy freeze-dried and dehydrated food if you choose to go that way, and they tend to have different items on sale every month, which is how I am building up our freeze-dried and dehydrated items. You can even find a limited supply at some stores like Walmart. So, there are lots of options, and the more you get into it, the more you will want to do. Perhaps you can get others to join you – encourage your family, friends and neighbors to have extra supplies on hand “just-in-case” explaining you never know when you might get sick or when the power will go out. Let them know they don’t want to be the one stuck without gas, food or water. They wouldn’t want the power to go out and be sitting in the dark without some sort of light, heat, or a way to cook and clean. Invite your friends to go to a garage sale with you as a fun way to get started.

There is still so much I want learn like emergency first aid, tying knots, identifying edible mushrooms and wild foods. Reading books and watching survival-type shows is a fun way to be introduced to different ways to build shelter, make fires, use weapons and just live off the land, but of course nothing prepares you for this type of survival like taking a class and practicing your skills and I look forward to it all. I hope you do, too.

If you liked this article, please rate it.

The post Start Prepping Without Feeling Overwhelmed appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Layers of Security for Your Rural Home or Compound

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This article will focus on security in a mostly rural area “Mostly rural” can mean that you do have neighbors, but they are not what most would consider within shouting distance, so in other words, if you have a security breach, then you are likely on your own. They say that prevention is the best […]

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34 Primitive Survival Skills All Survivalists Should Know

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This article was shared with us by Colin, freelance writer and editor at Basis Gear Maybe you’ve got a few tricks up your sleeve when it comes to outdoor survival, or perhaps you are searching for some? In any case, it goes without saying that as an earth-dweller, surviving outdoors is a matter of extreme importance. When it comes down to this, preparation is everything. How should you prepare? By taking into account the variety of skills and information essential […]

The post 34 Primitive Survival Skills All Survivalists Should Know appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

A Survivalist’s Top Prepping Tips

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Prepping, prepper, survivalist, surviving, expo, community, people

Fire is one of survivalist Fischer’s top prepping priorities

Last month hordes of prepping enthusiasts and survivalists turned out for the Survival Expo in Richmond, Virginia. Vendors like Preparedness Essentials were present selling prepping  products from long term food storage solutions to solar power to tactical gear. One of the vendors was Joe Fischer, a firefighter and air force veteran turned business owner who promotes survivalist training. His business USURVIVEALL also sells survival equipment like the Firestarter which retails at $25.00.

“Preparedness is a way of life.”

Joe is a strong advocate of versatile items in a grid down situation. The essentials in the trunk of his car include pouches of tuna, rice and beans and tea lights. But two key pieces are his bandana and some black tape. Why? They are versatile! A bandana can protect your face from bugs, act as a water filter and be used as a bag to carry berries or other food. Whereas, black tape can be used as a bandage, for repairs or lashing things together to make a shelter or some other construction.

Fischer doesn’t prep for civil unrest, economic collapse or the end of the world, he simply wants to be ready for a particularly bad storm, tornado or power outage. Versatility he believes is the key to surviving.

His top prepping priorities are:

  • Fire – not only for heat and cooking, fire is an important resource for purifying water. It also has soothing abilities; anyone who’s sat by a crackling fire knows how calming it is. Therefore, it helps put you at ease, as Fischer points out, “every animal on earth is afraid of fire”.
  • Knife – common sense prevails, this is an extremely important tool for any survival situation and can get you out of some sticky situations.
  • Shelter and water – a product like a mylar blanket not only keeps you warm but can be set up as a shelter. It can also be used to collect water. Plus, it’s cheap and easy to pack, folding down into a small square for transport.
  • Cordage – something that doesn’t cross everyone’s mind, but is just as important urges Fischer. Cord can help you string up a shelter or a rain tarp. Not to mention if you need to do some climbing (up or down) this can be the difference between life and death.
Prepping, prepper, survivalist, survival, off-grid, self-sufficiency, versatile

A bandana is a versatile piece of kit that could be game-changing in a survival situation

The next Expo coordinated by RK Prepper Shows is being held in Springfield, Montana on June 24th and June 25th. Tickets are priced between $12 – $14.50 for adults and $5 – $7.50 and can be purchased online.

Surviving societal collapse

Even though Fischer doesn’t believe in prepping for end-of-the-world scenarios, two South Carolina law makers have a different view. Josiah Magnuson and Jonathon Hill have set up the “Virtue Solution Project”, a group which aims to save America… or survive societal collapse. Based on a mix of religion, political organizing and disaster prepping, the group advocates their followers to form communities that do not rely on corporate America. Community preparedness centres will enable followers to learn about spiritual leadership, first aid, farming, renewable energy and tactical defence.

Magnuson is setting up the first prepping centre in a barn on an acre of land outside Campabello. Although it will start life as a coffee shop, it is hoped it will be developed further for the group. Apparently, other groups are planned for Pickens, Simpsonville, Charleston and over the border in Georgia.

Magnuson states, “there will come a point where there is a major disaster in our country…we need to be ready for that, and (prepping) will give us an opportunity to have a fresh beginning.”

The group is heavily based on religion, with a focus to reshape community ideas towards those of the Founding Fathers. However, Hill points out that the group is in its infancy and development of ideas is still taking place. “We’re not saying that everybody should go and pick up guns and go have a revolution.” Instead, he says prepping is about self-sufficiency and providing for your neighbours and community.

For a more in depth analysis of the group’s ideology, take a look at this article.

The post A Survivalist’s Top Prepping Tips appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

3 Things To Do: Protecting Your Online Communications

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I tend to hide in the background of the American Preppers Network. I’m the web-master, the guy that makes the guts of the place work. It’s a thankless job, but somebody has to do it. Well, actually it’s not thankless, both Tom and Gman at Prepper Broadcast have thanked me for countless little and big things that have happened over the years. What most people may not know is how I got the job in the first place. You see, I sorta hacked one of Tom’s sites….

I actually don’t remember how long ago this was, it’s been literally years. It was way back in the beginning when River Walker first coined the term “Preppers” before anyone else, yes even Doomsday Preppers didn’t exists back then. Tom was trying to create a nation wide network of like minded people who wanted to connect and share information on preparedness. He set about setting up each and every state blog and worked hard at getting people involved. I was busy doing my own thing, hosting sites, and working on side projects for mostly my own amusement when I noticed that one of his sites had an error.

Getting a hold Tom back then was like trying to pull teeth from a bull in heat.

After several emails with no reply, I just fixed it myself. Being the honest guy I am, I sent him a final email on the subject telling him what I had done. That last email actually got a response from him, he asked “You want a job?”

Hacking for the most part is rather easy. Most people are unaware that all your on-line communications are out there for the whole world to see. Finding out how to access your personal bank account, your browser history, and guessing your passwords can be done with just a few keystrokes. Tracing you to your door is even easier. This so called set of “private” information is very public.

And now the Nanny.gov wants help to spy on you, from your own ISP.1 2 3

Yes, in the Republican controlled Congress, rules made by the FCC to protect consumers’ right to privacy were over tuned4. Well so much for Trump being the hero of the common man in the White House. What this means to you is basically this. Before you didn’t have any real privacy on-line from hackers, trolls, and various scum on the net. Now, you can add your own Internet Service Provider and any branch of the government to the list.

There are three things you need to do now.

  • You need to use the privacy features of your browser.

When you use incognito mode, Chrome doesn’t record any history or cookies, and it disables browser extensions. This means that third party services like Facebook, Google, etc that use cookies to track your movement across the internet to serve you better ads won’t follow you to the incognito tab.” guidingtech.com 5

Most browsers that are available, even if you use alternative operating systems other then windows, leak. They leak your history, tracking cookies, saved login settings to your bank and social networks. And that’s not to mention other information about you that goes out on the net from your ISP, or the data that is literally mined from advertiser software and places you go to. The privacy tab option helps prevent most of those leaks, but not all.

The most important thing to remember about the privacy tab is that it mostly helps with preventing unwanted snoops from checking out what you are doing with your browser who have physical access to that browser, your house guest for example. Some private modes are better then others. It all depends on how much effort is put into making it secure by the developer and how much you trust those developers. Firefox’s private mode automatically blocking web trackers, where as Chrome’s doesn’t 6, But that being said, Firefox has been known to still record the SSL certificates from sites7.

Private browsing prevents people from snooping on your web browsing after it’s occurred, but they can still snoop while it’s occurring … ” – howtogeek.com 8

  • You need to be able to turn off Java.

Java is a favorite target of cybercriminals because it is so easy to exploit, and also because users are frequently using outdated versions of it.” – tomsguide.com9

The easiest way to do this is to install an extension that allows you to toggle Java. on and off at will. Sometimes you still need to use Java due to login options on sites your active in, or simply because you trust the site in question. If you want to remain anonymous, to hide your IP, and prevent maleware, you are going to need to turn it off, and know if it is off.

Fortunately, Java is heading the way of the dinosaur10, sites are now using HTML5 which simply doesn’t need it anymore. The number one issue with Java that I have is that it does not self update, if there is a future security risk involving Java your system will not automatically update. A lot of things use Java, not just the personal computer or laptop, this is the main source of DDOS attacks on the internet.

  • You need to anonymize your connection to the internet.

Tor aims to conceal its users’ identities and their online activity from surveillance and traffic analysis by separating identification and routing. It is an implementation of onion routing, which encrypts and then randomly bounces communications through a network of relays run by volunteers around the globe.” – wikipedia 11

This is where it gets hard. Even if you set up a VPN on your laptop, the browser on your other devices is not configured. And not only that, how can you be sure to trust your VPN? You need something between you and the router that you connect too. Not everyone is a tech geek like me, a simple solution is needed for the average Joe to protect himself from big brother, and the nosy neighborhood. You need to either use a simple solution, or jump on a huge learning curve about proxies, virtual private networking, and the peer-to-peer system, to name a few.

I found such a device. It’s called Anonabox. The original Anonabox is perfect for using as a simple way to securely connect to the internet in a way that I don’t have to worry about being traced back to my ISP. It uses the TOR Onion networking system which is constantly evolving to to be better. This isn’t the total geek version AnonaboxPro, which I also got for myself, it’s the one I use so I don’t have to worry about the other devices, and the kids.

It’s real simple to use. It’s pre-configured, locked up, and plug in-play. You just plug it into your router, power it up and connect to it via WIFI. That simple.

There are a lot of reasons to use TOR. But it is not user friendly. Even the most basic set up12 can be a real headache for the average user, even experts have fallen prey to the FBI because of simple mistakes13. Having a simple always on, hardware connected to the TOR network like Anonabox reduces the risks of stupid mistakes. You do still have limitations, you can’t use Skype over TOR, and most people will fine it hard to stream movies over TOR unless they use a Kodi with a high cache amount.

Some geeks might suggest to just use the TOR Browser bundle, but that isn’t always the best option, Freedom Hosting was taken out by the FBI due to the bundle having vulnerabilities14. Using a standalone plug in-play helps avoid problems from others on your network.

The Anonabox Original is a small light weight device that works right our of the box. I have very fast internet, my main worry for using the Anonabox was whether it would slow the net down to the point where I couldn’t use it with Kodi. But it turned out that it worked fairly well, not as good as a direct VPN connection, but still good enough to use CCLOUD VOD on Kodi, which is what I am currently using to watch classic movies. Using a TOR Browser to watch streaming movies from other sources just doesn’t work unless you can cache the whole film, or via a torrent.

I also got an AnonaboxPro, which I plan to use with the darkspider project. For a more technical article on it visit my blog.

– wolfe

1https://epic.org/privacy/netneutrality/ What does that have to do with privacy?

The post 3 Things To Do: Protecting Your Online Communications appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Dealing with Bureaucracy

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Feds attack Rancher

Not only in Nevada

Off-Grid living and Government Bureaucracy are totally opposed to each other. Many people go off the grid just to get away from the Bureaucrats. but you can never escape them altogether. An anonymous rancher from the mid-west tells his story:

I’m sure most everyone would agree that public service is a noble calling. We are indebted to all those since our founding fathers who have stepped up to serve the greater good. Unfortunately, serving the good of the public and that of the bureaucracy seems to be almost diametrically opposed.

I know many ranchers who have considered just moving out of the system entirely versus dealing with bureaucrats and bureaucracies. But the reality is there is no way to avoid them, no matter how frustrating, impersonal, complex, incompetent, and arrogant they may be. In fact, the reach of bureaucracies into our daily lives seems to be growing exponentially, almost at the pace of their incompetence.

In business, we have to innovate, we have to do things more efficiently (reduce overhead), we have to improve the quality and timeliness of our decision-making and we have to become more customer centric and deliver more value. It is a never-ending, daily struggle for survival that ensures that businesses have this type of focus.

The great irony is that bureaucracies, because of their nature, often perversely have the opposite incentives. They must spend all their money, grow their sphere of influence and gobble up more and more resources while often doing less and less.

Thus, innovative, cost-effective, efficient, customer focused, responsive to change, or even user-friendly are not words that one usually associates with bureaucracies, and for good reason.

For example, I recently had to go to a local social security office—local when you are a rancher includes traveling 180 miles to the nearest government office—to get a replacement social security card for my son. I won’t go through the month of wasted time attempting the process through the mail that his mother suffered through.

I knew I was in trouble when the alert security guard sent me back to my car as he spotted my pocket knife. When I returned, I had the privilege of standing in line to answer several questions on a touch screen computer so that I could be issued a number that would allow me to speak to a human.

There was not enough seating so we had to stand. The only thing to do was to watch the Social Security TV network that was playing on several big screens around the room. The weather was the focal point, along with admittedly well-conceived marketing messages that would make you inclined to be supportive of the Social Security Administration (SSA) and the job it does.

The other tidbits were kind of shocking as they were highly reflective of a political agenda, which ironically was mostly focused on global warming. While I hope I never have to return to that office, I almost want to go back in a year or so and see if the new administration has changed the agenda of the SSA television network.

What struck me is that the Trump administration probably wouldn’t be able to effect that change. There are just so many layers, so many agencies, that it is almost impossible to believe that they could ever get that far down their priority list.

Sitting there waiting for my number to be called, I couldn’t help but overhear the conversations between desperate people who were needing problems resolved and the absolute indifference to their situations by the people working there and their rigid adherence to a set of rules.

7 hour wait – thank you Bureaucracy

My problem was solved instantly. Why it required a 7-hour drive and 2 hours of waiting, when it should have taken a 30 second phone call, is something I never will understand. But it did make me understand something I had never taken the time to contemplate before.

My state is unique as far as ranching goes. One side of the state operates in relative freedom from government, land is almost universally privately held and we do not have much pressure from urban governments. The other side operates largely on public lands and deals constantly with a myriad of competing interests for those lands, as well as urban and development encroachment.

Those of who us who live without having to deal with government bureaucracy tend to be a little less concerned about government; those who are forced to deal with them realize the importance of being engaged at so many levels.

Ranchers and bureaucrats are destined to not get along. Ranchers aren’t tied to rules and power grabs when it comes to Bureaucracy problems, they are geared to fixing them proactively and as quickly as possible. Ranchers live by a code that respects others; bureaucracies by their nature are almost inclined to disdain the individual. Ranchers are inclined to action; bureaucracies to discussion.

In case you are wondering, I didn’t walk out with the card even after having to provide what seemed like 25 different proofs of our identity. Instead, the new card will be mailed in 10-14 days. If it doesn’t show up, I’m sure I’d be welcome to return to get another number next week.

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Save Money with Increased Self-Sufficiency

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Becoming more self-sufficient can help you save money in so many different ways. Perhaps the original driving force behind becoming more self-reliant wasn’t money, but once you start developing skills and independence, it just might become a pleasant side effect.

Of course there are so many different ways to increase your self-sufficiency, and most of these aren’t going to happen overnight. But let’s take at five things that your great-grandparents probably did, and that you can do, too, in order to save money.

Grow it, keep it, use it and don't forget about the sun. Five tips for increasing self-sufficiency while saving money. Try the free solar calculator to find out what you need.

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Grow It Yourself

This is DIY, except with food! You can grow your own fruits, vegetables, spices, and herbs. There are a variety of different ways that you can grow your own food, including planting your own vegetable garden, growing non-hybrid vegetables and harvesting your own seeds, and using square foot gardening techniques in order to grow a lot of food in very small spaces. You don’t need a hundred acres and a team of horses to grow your family’s food.

Want to get even more self-reliant and frugal? Homemade compost and composted manure are fabulously frugal, even if you need to get them from someone else. Just be sure to source your compost and manure locally.

Potatoes and winter squash, in my experience, grow with almost no attention, and a 10 pound bag of seed potatoes can easily become a hundred pounds or more of storage potatoes in your root cellar! The frugal way is to plant the potatoes that sprout over the winter.

Did you know that you can get varieties of many fruit trees that can grow in a large planter pot? What’s more frugal and self-reliant than an apple tree? Well, an orchard, to be honest. The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago. The second best time is always ‘today’.

Frugal gardeners don’t like being bound to short growing seasons. Build a greenhouse, or pick up a kit that lets you put one together quickly.

Go Au Naturel

No, no, no – leave your clothes on. That’s not what I meant.

There are SO many ways that you can use renewable, natural resources in order to be more self-sufficient AND save a boatload of money.

Do you heat with wood? (If you can, you should.) Instead of buying split wood, buy it in chunks or even logs and split it yourself. As a comparison, we can buy 8′ lengths of hardwood logs for about $100 per cord. Split wood that is ready to age, though, is well over $300 per cord, and aged firewood – I don’t even want to ask anyone.

How about water? I realize that there are some areas where rainwater harvesting is restricted for a variety of reasons. (Just as not everyone is about to burn firewood) But if you CAN harvest your own rainwater, do it! Rainwater is great for watering your garden. That’s a common bit of advice. What you might not know, though, is that rainwater is soft water and therefore fabulous for washing your hair and for cooking dried beans! Just make sure you filter the water well if you’re using it for beans.

And then there is … the sun! It’s funny how often we ignore it because the sun is one of the best ways to increase your self-sufficiency in so many different ways. The most obvious, in my opinion, are solar panels.

I despise paying electricity bills. If you find yourself sending hundreds of dollars every month to the power company, and especially if you then deal with power outages throughout the year, you might be wondering if there’s a better way.

There is. Install solar panels and get a solar array set up for your home, and say goodbye to power bills. If it works for us, here in dark and cloudy Nova Scotia, where we average something like two hours of sunlight a day in December … it can work for you.

Try this fun, simple to use solar calculator!

The power of solar goes beyond solar electricity, though. Some people heat their homes entirely with solar heating panels, and solar water heaters do away with the cost of your electric or gas hot water tank. And don’t forget that retro-progessive, solar-power method of clothes drying – hanging them out on the line.

Grow it, keep it, use it and don't forget about the sun. Five tips for increasing self-sufficiency while saving money. Try the free solar calculator to find out what you need.

Be Like Old MacDonald

No matter where you live, you can probably figure out a way to raise some livestock. Even apartment dwellers can raise a few bunnies or rent a field and barn to raise some pigs.  Some of the most common small livestock are chicken and ducks, sheep, goats … and even bees. Chickens and ducks provide eggs, meat and manure. Goats or small cows give milk, pigs essentially turn compost into bacon, and bees make honey.

It goes farther, though. Goats and sheep (provided you have the right breeds) can provide you with materials for spinning, knitting and crochet. If you learn to spin wool into yarn, you can make some of your own blankets and clothing. Snuggle under a warm wool blanket on a cold winter’s night and you might think that you’ve discovered how to spin straw into gold!

Store It

There’s no sense going to the work of growing all of that food unless you know how to store it. If it’s possible, consider building a root cellar. Learning to can foods means that you can preserve a lot of what you grow or cook and enjoy it all year.

Use and Reuse

You’ve probably heard that slogan from World War II – Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without. When you use and reuse whatever you can as much as possible, you reduce waste and find new and creative ways to do things. Not only does this increase your self-sufficiency, but it will save you a lot of money.

There are many ways that you can become more self-sufficient. Be conscious of alternative techniques to improve your health and well being, your impact on the environment, and your wallet, and you may find other ways to increase your self-reliance as well.

5.11 tactical RUSH 72 backpack review

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Recently, I purchased the RUSH 12 as a trekking bag, but I have really wanted the 5.11 tactical RUSH 72 backpack for a long time for being my ultimate bug out bag. I finally purchased it and I am so glad that I did. This is the one pack that I keep loaded down with all my needed items that I can just grab and go when I am in a hurry, and the RUSH 72 literally does it all. There is too much room in this bag, and I love the fact that it can be laid flat and that the main compartment is able to be unzipped all the way around so it become a front loaded bag. That is beyond awesome in my book.

This is what makes it so simple to stock in its place within this pack without having to dig through all the stuff in your bag just to get one single item. It is really roomy, but it is quite comfortable because of the MOLLE equipped middle belt, it takes the force of your stuff from your shoulders and into your waist it really belongs. That makes it great for those who often get stiff trekking long distances with a bag on your back.

This is one bag that is really durable. That is what sold me on it, and it is a real testament to the 5.11 items quality. The bag is super tough and flawless. Although, it is a bit heavier than the other bug out bags that I have owned, simply because it is made from the greatest nylon that I have ever seen on any other type of equipment. There are no missed stitches, or frays. It is tough enough that I would be comfortable to throw it off a cliff and not have any major damage done to it.

The compartments

There is one large major compartment, one big front compartment, and 2 side chambers, a hydration compartment, and some smaller pockets. These all have firm inner zippered and non-zippered pockets. It has straps that hold it to the main compartment which was made for expanding the bag. The front compartment has a gap between this pocket and the large pocket, but the nylon straps are normally loose and allow you to put in whatever you need such as small camping items.

I managed to fit a small camping tent, inflatable camp out pad, cook set, 3-liter bladder, first aid kit, water filter, dried foods, some paracord, multi tool, and a machete as well as a few other odds and ends.

I won’t lie, I have carried a whole lot of civilian backpacks but I have also carried a few military rucksacks. This bag is actually really great for its size. It is perfect to make a 72-hour bug out bag that has a bunch of alternative pockets and MOLLE webbing all over the bag.

The 5.11 tactical RUSH 72 backpack was one that I was quite surprised to find that it worked perfectly for many of my treks, hunting trips, and even my man in the wild hikes up in the wilderness. This bag can hold my food, clothing, and shelter. I don’t think that there is going to be any other type of bag out there that can really do that.

What is better is that it also has a tier strap system that will let you connect your RUSH bags into one large carry on for luggage when you are traveling on planes.

Being able to pick out the right type of bug out bag and getting to be the right size was a bit challenging. If it is too large then you will be dragging out a lot of luggage, if it is too small then you are stuck tying your gear to the outside of the bag and end up snagging everything. Having a good quality bag was really important and the 5.11 has a great reputation among civilians, dooms day preppers and even survivalists. To be honest this is the best bug out bag that there is.

The quality of this bag is great. I love that it was literally made to be able to withstand years and years of abuse. I am constantly on the go, and this has literally become my go to bag and when I am ready, it is right there, ready with all my gear. Another thing that I loved was that there was so many pockets. There are so many of them and they are all useable and easy to arrange. It helps me to stay organized, which is a plus. It is customizable and expandable. The MOLLE webbing allows for there to be some pretty awesome MOLLE attachments. It was built to be compatible with the Camelback. Plus, it is the right size to work for a 3 or 4 day wilderness trip in cold weather. There is just one issue; it is a bit expensive for some people. No it is not cheap, and you are getting what you pay for.

Conclusion

Overall, this is a great bag that is of excellent quality, perfect size, and a lot of organization that I really need for my gear. I have managed to get the chance to carry mine all over as a carry on when I flew, as a laptop bag, and some major hiking. There is a lot of room in this bag and it literally lives up to that 72-hour concept. I honestly prefer the storm gray color, as many people do not really give it a second glance, so you are less likely to be robbed. This is one of the best bags that I have ever owned and I will continue to use it until it finally gives out and becomes something that I can keep because I have had so many awesome adventures in it. You certainly cannot go wrong with the 5.11 tactical RUSH 72 backpack.

 

A 5-Year-Old Girl Guarded A Pretend Castle With A ‘Stick Gun.’ She Got Suspended From School.

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A 5-Year-Old Girl Guarded A Pretend Castle With A ‘Stick Gun.’ She Got Suspended From School.

Image source: Reuters screen capture.

RAEFORD, N.C. — Make-believe is now a forbidden activity on the playground at some schools – but only if it involves a pretend gun.

Five-year-old Caitlin Miller discovered this the hard way when she was taken to the principal’s office during recess and suspended.

Her misdeed: “turning a stick into a gun and threatening to shoot and kill other students,” a note from the assistant principal said. Or, at least, that’s how the school saw it.

Caitlin and her friends were playing “king and queen” during recess on the Raeford, N.C., school playground when she noticed a stick shaped like a Star Trek phaser pistol on the ground.

She picked up the stick and used it to guard the castle’s king and queen against an intruder – at least until teachers noticed and took her to the principal’s office. There, Caitlin was given a note to take home to her mom. It included a picture of the stick. Caitlin was suspended from school for one day.

Heirloom Audio: Christian Heroes For Christian Kids

A 5-Year-Old Girl Guarded A Pretend Castle With A ‘Stick Gun.’ She Got Suspended From School.“One minute she’s playing with her friends and the next her teachers are dragging her to the principal’s office,” her mother, Brandy Miller, told WTVD TV. “She’s confused. Nobody explained anything to her.”

The school stood by its action against the kindergartener.

“Any student engaging in such behavior will be removed from the classroom or school environment for as long as is necessary to provide a safe and orderly environment for learning,” a press release from the Hoke County School District reads.

Caitlin has grown up around guns, as her father serves in the Army. Her mother did not know what to tell the girl, not wanting to bring up the subject of school shootings.

Now, the girl feels uncomfortable at school.

“She feels like all the teachers hate her,” Miller wrote on Facebook. “I can’t imagine being five and feeling that way.”

Do you think the girl should have been suspended? Share your thoughts in the section below:

16 Remedies for Radiation Exposure (link)

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I didn’t realize there were so many potential helpful “remedies” for exposure to radiation. That said, they shouldn’t be considered equals either and, of course, it depends on what radioisotope you’ve been exposed to. Regardless, radiation safety seems to boil down to (1) NOT being deficient in vitamins and minerals in order to avoid unwanted … Continue reading “16 Remedies for Radiation Exposure (link)”

Survival Mom DIY: Bone Broth For Nourishment During Hard Times

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how to make bone broth

Bone broth has been enjoying a resurgence in popularity in the last little while, but it’s actually been around for a while. Some people refer to it as stock, but according to culinary experts, while stock and broth are related, they are distinct liquids with different characteristics. Functionally, though, they are so similar that I’ll be treating them as though they are the same thing in this article.

One of my favorite meals growing up was my mom’s turkey noodle soup, made from the little bits of meat and bones of our leftover Thanksgiving turkey. My mom would make a huge pot of it every year, which we would then keep in the fridge until someone felt a little peckish. The broth would set up like Jell-O, so if we wanted some we’d have to gouge out a portion with a measuring cup; it would melt into a liquid in the microwave.

Her secret? Boiling the turkey bones the way she did, created bone broth. She didn’t know it at the time, but she was a trend-setter before bone broth was a trend! They say that if the broth becomes a solid upon refrigeration, you’re doing it right. And she created perfect bone broth every time. Objectively, I can see how perhaps this description would seem unappetizing to some, and that is unfortunate because soup broth had a rich, delicious flavor that could not be rivaled by lowly bullion cubes.

Bone broth has been part of global culinary culture of millennia (these recipes from Ancient Mesopotamia call for chicken stock), and it continues to pop up in our wider culture, even apart from the fact that it has suddenly become trendy. Remember that scene from the film Nanny McPhee where the slightly crazed military cook exclaims with glee, “There’s a lot of goodness in a turkey neck!” and the audience collectively goes, “Ugh,” at the unappetizing sight? Ta da! Bone broth!

From a survival or prepper’s point of view, bone broth is one way to stave off nutritional deficiencies or even starvation in an extreme scenario. It’s important to know how to make bone broth for that reason alone, although if the power grid has failed and you’re making this over an open fire, just know it will need to be consumed quickly, since refrigeration might not be an option.

3 Steps for making bone broth

Bone broth is economical, flavorful, nutritious, and on top of all that is a good way to use the little tiny scraps and bits of protein that can be found on bones. Bone broth at its most basic can be made in three steps:

Step one: Obtain soup bones

Soup bones are extremely inexpensive and can be found at any regular grocery store. Usually these will be labeled “soup bones” and can be found in large quantities for as little as one dollar. Oxtails and sections of beef shank are slightly more expensive but also make excellent bone broth. Bones from fish or poultry are equally effective.

Alternately, just keep any bones from your everday cooking. I keep bones in a zip-loc bag in the freezer until I’m ready to make a large batch of broth.

Step two: Boil the bones

Boil and boil. Boil those things into oblivion. This can take up to several hours. The process can be expedited by using a pressure cooker instead of a regular stock pot (more on that later). This process gets all the nutrition that can be had out of the bone (bits of fat, protein, collagen, etc.) and into the broth.

There is some debate as to how long you should boil your bones. Some say 2-3 hours is sufficient, while others claim that you should leave it to simmer overnight or as long as a full 24 hours. Many suggest roasting beef bones first for optimal flavor, but I have been known to skip this step and still be pleased with the result. You can also add vegetables to your bones during the cooking process, and this does improve the flavor. Aromatic vegetables like celery and onions and herbs are popular additions, as are carrots.

Step three: Strain out the solids

Because, you know, you couldn’t actually want to eat the bone. (While crunchy, the bones would most likely do a number on your teeth, apart from being a possible choking hazard.)  If you used the carcass of your Thanksgiving turkey or the leftovers of a roast chicken, you’ll find lots of teeny little bones and bits of gristle that you’d rather not find in your soup. Any solids remaining from vegetables can be discarded, as after an intense boil all of the nutrients have gone out of them and into the broth.

A note on economy

In times and places where rationing has been in place, getting good cuts of meat became extremely difficult, if not impossible. If meat was being sold by the pound, it was in the butcher’s best interest to sell you a cut that mostly contained bone. Using the bone for broth meant the money spent on the meat could be used to the fullest extent possible. Before the 20th century when the vast majority of humans lived in conditions that we moderns would consider abject poverty, using bones in this way became a matter of course. All the more reason to know how to make bone broth in order to maintain a high level of nutrition for your family. During the Great Depression, surely many utilized bone broth, or stock, in their meals, along with the foods on this list.

On nutrition and bone broth

In health food circles, bone broth has been tied to a number of health benefits, including better joint health, improved digestive function, and improved immune response. Bone broth is high in minerals such as manganese, calcium, and iron. It has enjoyed some popularity as an alternative to sports drinks – the sodium content replaces electrolytes, but without all the sugar that sports drinks are known for. Nutrition experts warn that while very healthy, bone broth shouldn’t be viewed as a cure-all.

Cooking options for making bone broth

If you don’t already have a pressure cooker, go ahead and get one. Cooking foods under pressure means they are done in less time than if you were to use a conventional pot or pan. From a preparedness standpoint, cooking things more quickly means not only less time, but also less fuel. A regular, run-of-the-mill one with no bells or whistles can be found on amazon for about $45. As with all things, you can also get a super-fancy one for over $100 if you felt so inclined. More on using pressure cookers can be found here.

An electronic pressure cooker can be powered up by a smaller generator, in a worst case scenario, although, admittedly, it would be worthless in a long-term power failure. A standard pressure cooker can be used on something like a campstove, but the tricky part would be maintaining the level of heat and pressure throughout the cooking time. This isn’t impossible by any means, but just know that it would be a factor, since the heat from altnerative cooking stoves can fluctuate.

Otherwise, a large stock pot filled with water and bones and brought to a boil and then kept at a low simmer for several hours will produce bone broth just fine.

Recipes

Alton Brown, as with so very many things, has the best bone broth recipe. Technically this is a stock, not bone broth, because it’s cooked for less than 24 hours, but it can be used the same. Please note that his method calls for the use of a pressure cooker.

Another recipe for bone broth can be found here, courtesy of the Paleohacks blog.

If you aren’t already a fan of bone broth, I hope you will be inspired to become one! And if you are, what is your favorite use for it?

 

how to make bone broth

6 Intimidating (And Quiet) Alternatives To Guns

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6 Intimidating (And Quiet) Alternatives To Guns

A firearm is a critical defensive tool to have in your survival kit, but there are a wide variety of non-firearm alternatives available on the market.

While a gun might be your first and best defensive option, it has some drawbacks, too. One of the biggest is noise – guns are loud, and even suppressed firearms are fairly noisy. Shooting an unsuppressed firearm can cause severe hearing damage, give away your location to an imminent threat, or scare away wild game that you are trying to hunt.

Another downside is that firearms need ammunition to function – without it, your expensive new gun is just a menacing-looking paperweight. Your supply of ammunition is limited by its cost, the amount of space you have to store it, and (in survival situations that require you to leave your home) the weight you can carry. Consequently, you may only have a limited amount of ammunition on hand when your survival plan needs to be put into play. You should consider purchasing one or more non-firearm defensive tools if:

  1. You want a backup to your firearm in case you run out of ammunition.
  2. You want a quiet defensive tool.
  3. You cannot carry a gun in some locations.
  4. You have moral, philosophical or ideological objections to the use of firearms.

This article will discuss your options for purchasing alternative defensive tools to add to your bug-out bag or emergency stash. Remember: You will need to practice and become proficient with any defensive tool to ensure that you can operate it effectively when a disaster strikes.

Projectile Weapons

1. A crossbow or compound bow.

While crossbows and compound bows are traditionally used for hunting, they also can be used as a defensive tool. While not as effective as a firearm, a good crossbow or compound bow will provide lethal accuracy out to 60 yards without the loud report of a gunshot. A well-constructed entry level crossbow (firing at 300fps or greater) will typically cost around $500, though lower-powered variants can be purchased for much less. Entry level compound bows firing at 300fps or greater will typically start at $200, and go up from there. You will want to purchase a case, spare bolts or arrows, replacement arrowheads, spare bow strings, and bow wax.

2. A survival bow.

As with the crossbow or compound bow, a survival bow is a hunting tool that can double as a defensive weapon. Unlike compound bows, a survival bow can be disassembled easily, and stored in a small pouch or carrying case. Aside from its ability to be disassembled for compact storage, the main benefit of the survival bow is its simple design when compared to a compound bow. However, survival bows are not as easy to shoot as compound bows because they have a much heavier draw. Your bow should have a minimum of a 40-pound draw – if the manufacturer doesn’t provide you with draw information, it is likely under the 40-pound mark. A decent survival bow can be purchased for as little as $90.

3. A slingshot.

They can use virtually any small object as ammunition, are compact enough to store virtually anywhere, and are very quiet. Steel ball bearings are the best ammunition for this type of weapon, but marbles, rocks and even steel nuts from a hardware store will function adequately.

The Self-Defense Weapon That Doesn’t Require A Firearms License!

While a slingshot may not kill an attacker, it can certainly break bones and cause substantial bodily trauma. The best part is the price – a decent slingshot can be purchased for under $100.

Handheld Weapons

4. A machete.

A machete is a great tool to have in your prep kit, regardless of whether or not you are looking for an alternative to firearms for defending yourself. You can find a high-quality machete for less than $50 at any hardware or sporting goods store. Just remember that machetes are designed to slash, not stab.

5. An expandable baton.

6 Intimidating (And Quiet) Alternatives To Guns This compact, concealable defensive tool is an excellent choice for close-range defense. The expandable baton is composed of a handle that contains telescoping metal shafts, and a weighted tip.

It’s The Low-Cost Way To Defend Yourself Against Criminal Scum!

With the flick of your wrist, the baton expands to its full size, and makes a formidable impact weapon. An entry-level expandable baton can be purchased for around $25, and high-end versions for under $100.

6. A knife.

A fixed-blade knife is an ideal defensive tool because it is designed to withstand a lot of abuse. However, they are harder to store because of their length. Folding knives may not be as durable or reliable as fixed blades, but are good to have because they are easy to store or carry unobtrusively. When looking for a high-quality knife, expect to spend at least $50, maybe more. Some can be purchased for under $20, but their quality and durability may be questionable.

What weapons would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Pulled Over By Police While Carrying (How to Handle It)

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I know a lot of people who complain about how paranoid the police are. It seems like police officers always assume the worst about the people they pull over, and many officers are apparently very trigger happy. For example, an officer shot this man because he exited his vehicle while holding his wallet, which the […]

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Always Prepared: 5 Items You Absolutely Must Have in Your 72-Hour Kit

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Disaster preparedness has become much more mainstream in recent years, with hundreds of thousands of people getting interested in what items they should have to provide for themselves and their families in the event of an emergency. If you are getting started in disaster preparedness, the first thing you should be putting together is a 72-hour kit, sometimes also called a bug out bag. This is a light, portable pack that can easily be carried with you and which will give you the supplies you need to survive for at least three days. Here are five of the top items that should be in everyone’s 72-hour bag.

Personal Water Purifier

Getting fresh water is one of the most difficult parts of dealing with a disaster situation. The amount of bottled water you would need to survive for 72 hours would weigh you down and severely inhibit your mobility. A better option is a personal water purifier. These filter-based devices are small, straw-like systems that will remove dirt, debris and even bacteria from water. Be aware that some toxins, such as heavy metals, and viruses will not be caught by these filters, so it is still important to choose your water source carefully.

LED Flashlight

If you’re on the move in a disaster situation, it may be necessary for you to remain mobile at night. If this is the case, a good LED flashlight is absolutely essential. LEDs are both brighter and more energy efficient than normal bulbs, making them a more reliable option in a real emergency. Even though they are energy efficient, it’s also a good idea to keep at least one set of spare batteries for your flashlight in your pack.

High-Calorie Food

In a disaster scenario, you may have to move several miles a day or otherwise exert yourself physically, meaning you will need calories to fuel your activity. There are survival food bars that are specifically intended to serve this purpose, but other options are also available. High-protein snack bars make a decent alternative, as do canned tuna, peanut butter and instant pastas that can be prepared using only boiling water. Remember, in a life-or-death situation, the more calories that are in a given food, the better it is. You can also bring along a small pack of multivitamins to round out your nutritional needs.

A Good Jacket

You never know in advance what the weather may be like when you need to use your 72-hour kit, which is why it’s important to put a good jacket in your pack. Because it may be bitterly cold, it’s best to have a heated jacket that can keep you warmer than your body heat alone can. As with your flashlight, be sure to bring along a spare battery for your heated jacket, as it could mean the difference between life and death in extreme temperature conditions.

First-Aid Kit

In an emergency situation, the possibility of injury is always a risk. One of the key components of your 72-hour kit should be a basic first-aid kit that will allow you to clean and treat any injuries that may come up. This kit should also have common over-the-counter medicines in it to relieve symptoms of illness.

A disaster scenario is never something to look forward to, but with a little basic planning you can get through one without too much difficulty. Put your 72-hour kit together well in advance, and you will have everything you need to deal with an emergency. If you have a family, also be sure to put together a similar kit for each family member, as carrying all of the necessary supplies for everyone will be too much for any one person.

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12 Long Blooming Plants You’ll Love

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12 Long Blooming Plants You’ll Love What’s the point of planting if your plants die within weeks or months? If you’re going through all the trouble of digging up your garden you might as well plant something with a little endurance, something that’s willing to sprout all over again once the bitter winter frost has passed. These twelve plants could very well be your next long-lasting perennial. 1. Moonbeam (Coreopsis) If we’re being honest, this one’s first because I love its name. Moonbeam grows in clumps around one to two feet tall, they are known for their density and feature yellow

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Lucky Bamboo Care – Growing Dracaena Sanderiana

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The post Lucky Bamboo Care – Growing Dracaena Sanderiana is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

In Asian cultures, lucky bamboo has been a symbol of good fortune for over 4,000 years. Recently it’s also become popular house plant that is widely available outside of Asia.Aside from being a pretty plant, one of the main reasons for its popularity is how easy it is to grow. Quick Navigation Lucky Bamboo OverviewLucky Bamboo […]

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Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

22 Ways for Growing a Successful Vegetable Garden

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Spring is fast approaching, so are you planning to grow a healthy and beautiful vegetable garden that will help beautify your home’s outdoor and be a place of relaxation? Growing your own fruits and vegetables in the yard lets you spend more time outside, at the same time saves your money for buying organic food. So if you have the space to grow your own vegetables, you should definitely take advantage of that. Even if you only have a small space, it isn’t an obstacle anymore in your effort to vegetable garden. In the following projects you will find a lot of vegetable garden designs to help you start your neat and tidy veggie garden that produces fresh and tasty food for you. Take a look and get started!

1. Use metal trough as container for vegetable garden and install a path between your veggies:

Tutorial of above project ====> houseandbloom.com

2. If you are planning to plant cucumbers, melons, and beans in your garden, you can build a trellis and raised garden box combo to let them get support at some point:

Tutorial of above project ====> weedemandreap.com

3. Spiral garden has very cool looking and works great for people with limited space:

Source: recycledawblog.blogspot.com

4. Use landscaping rocks to build a series of raised garden beds and put a galvanized water trough in the center of garden for easy watering:

Source: recycledawblog.blogspot.com

4. Use landscaping rocks to build a series of raised garden beds and put a galvanized water trough in the center of garden for easy watering:

Source: bhg.com

5. U-shaped raised garden makes efficient use of limited space:

Source: brittanystager.com

6. Build pea tepees structure to make the harvesting and maintenance more easier:

Source: lillbutton2.blogspot.com    Source: grit.com

7. Use landscape stones to build a stunning carved garden in your backyard:

Source: paintspeckledpawprints.net

8. Wire trellis is a great option to build a vertical growing garden in a tiny backyard:

Source: gardenoholic.com

9. Lay the ground with red bricks or pebble and place cedar and pine planks garden boxes on it to plant your veggies:

Source Unknown.

10. Build a mini vegetable garden along a foundation wall:

Source: flickr.com

11. Concrete blocks are the perfect materials to organize an easy and cheap vegetable growing place:

Source: vintagekidsmodernworld.com

12. Build a bean tunnel for your climbing beans:

Source: wahsegavalleyfarm.typepad.com

Source Unknown.

Source: houzz.com

Source: palletwoodprojects.com

Above image source: raisedurbangardens.com    Bottom image source: gardensall.com

Source: bengreenfieldfitness.com

Source: flickr.com    Source: landscapingcapetown.co.za

Source Unknown.

Source: commmunitygardening.blogspot.com

Source: youtube.com

Source: homegardenseedsorganic.com

 

 

Source : www.woohome.com

 

 

 

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The post 22 Ways for Growing a Successful Vegetable Garden appeared first on .

How To Get Rid Of Any Burrowing Animals With This Dawn Soap Solution

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How To Get Rid Of Any Burrowing Animals With This Dawn Soap Solution I have enough trouble walking on my own two feet without holes under them. Seriously, gravity is a cruel mistress, but divots and holes in my yard definitely do not help. Ankles are sensitive! And even if you’ve figured out how to avoid mole holes and hills, your kids sure haven’t. Have you ever heard the phrase, curiosity killed the cat…curiosity may have contributed, but a mole clawing your cat’s face off because your cat was curious enough to poke its head in the mole’s hole was

The post How To Get Rid Of Any Burrowing Animals With This Dawn Soap Solution appeared first on Mental Scoop.

How To Make A Living On A 5-Acre Farm

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Josh Volk

Many homesteaders wrongly believe they must have a big farm – and hundreds or thousands of acres – to make a living off their land.

But this week’s guest on Off The Grid Radio says that with only five acres and a little bit of patience and work, any homesteader can transform their land into a compact farm and a career.

His name is Josh Volk, and his book — “Compact Farms: 15 Proven Plans for Market Farms on 5 Acres or Less — profiles people who have made a career out of their small farms.

Josh give us an overview on what he discovered, including:

  • How a five-acre “compact farm” provides benefits that a larger farm does not.
  • What you can grow on your compact farm to make the most money.
  • Why organic methods often work best and keep costs down.
  • What someone who wants to start a “compact farm” should do first.

Finally, Josh gives us ideas on where the produce from a compact farm can be sold. (Hint: It’s not simply at a farmers’ market.)

We learned a lot from talking to Josh … and you will, too!

 

7-Year-Old Boy Makes Twisted Joke At School … So CPS Seizes Him

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7-Year-Old Boy Makes Twisted Joke At School … So CPS Seizes Him

Image source: Health Impact News/family

Eight police officers surrounded a couple’s home and took their seven-year-old son away because of a disagreement with school officials over ADHD and mental health, the parents say.

Christian and Katie Maple lost custody of seven-year-old Camden because they disagreed with school officials’ assessment of the boys’ mental health, they told Health Impact News. He attends Bowman Primary School in Lebanon, Ohio.

They describe him as a normal American boy: He has five siblings and enjoys Star Wars, Pokemon, football and Legos. He even has tested a grade above his current grade, the website reported.

“The school thinks he is ADHD, we as parents disagree,” the couple told Health Impact News. “We believe that it stems mostly from boredom and not being challenged in the classroom. The school has tried on several occasions to get us to have him diagnosed, so that he can be medicated.

Turn Drive Time Into Learning Time For Your Kids — Without DVDs!

“We as parents do not have the problems the school claims to have with him, at home. We know how to deal with a rambunctious 7-year-old, but the school is content with making him believe that he is a bad child, we disagree.”

The controversy began when the parents were called to pick up Camden following an incident at school. Camden had been disruptive in class and had told a school counselor that he was upset because he felt that he was bad and he wanted to “erase himself from the earth.” The counselor asked how he would have done that, and he responded that he would have stabbed himself in the eye, Health Impact News reported.

Christian and Katie had a lengthy conversation with their son after they left school. They saw the incident different than the school saw it.

“Camden said that he did not want to hurt himself and just said that because he was upset and wanted to see what the counselor would say,” they told the website. “The school thought we should have taken him to the hospital emergency room for a mental health evaluation, but upon assessing the situation and speaking to him at home, it was clear to us that he posed no threat to himself and just said it to get a rise out of the counselor. He has never said anything about harming himself prior to this incident or after. This was one time, one day … most likely repeating something he heard somewhere.”

They added, “If we really believed that he would have really hurt himself, then we would have taken him to be assessed. They’ve blown this way out of proportion.”

Put God Back Into History With These Amazing Stories For Kids! Read More Here.

The next day, school officials phoned the couple to ask if they had taken him to the hospital. They also wanted to know the details of the couple’s conversation with the boy. When the parents refused to disclose what was said, the school contacted CPS, according to the parents.

Two weeks later, Christian and Katie learned that there was a court hearing “later that day” on March 3. The judge sided with the school and CPS, and police officers were sent to the home to assist in the boy’s removal. He remains in state custody.

The parents were ordered to get a psychological evaluation and drug and alcohol tests. The psychological tests came back normal. The drug and alcohol test results were clean.

“How can this be?” Katie asked. “How can CPS get away with ripping children from loving homes without just cause? … CPS should not have this much unchecked power.”

They added, “There is nothing to stop this from happening to anyone.”

What is your reaction? Share it in the section below:

Family Vacation & Still Prepping

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Family Vacation & Still Prepping Host: James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio in player below! I know we dedicate a lot of time and money to prepping and survival but I am a firm believer in balance. I think as important as it is to be prepared it’s just as important to hit the road … Continue reading Family Vacation & Still Prepping

The post Family Vacation & Still Prepping appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Top American Knives: Best Folders & Fixed Blades Made in the USA

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Top American Knives: Best Folders & Fixed Blades Made in the USA

The USA will always have a legendary status in the knife world. As a relatively new country (speaking as a European), the bulk of modern designs stem from the States due to a positive legislative and cultural environment. Other countries manufacture knives too, naturally, but the reality is that 99% of people who would EDC… Read More

This is just the start of the post Top American Knives: Best Folders & Fixed Blades Made in the USA. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


Top American Knives: Best Folders & Fixed Blades Made in the USA, written by Thomas Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

Reload: Cyber attack, what you don’t know could get you killed!

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When most people think of a cyber-attack, they think of someone stealing data or something to that effect. The truth could not be farther from the truth. In today’s post, we are going to…

The post Reload: Cyber attack, what you don’t know could get you killed! appeared first on American Preppers Online.

How To Make A Potato Pot

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I love potatoes. Boiled, mashed, fried, baked – it doesn’t matter how they’re served, I’ll eat them. They help stretch your food supply and provide energy when you need it the most.

Unless you have a place to grow a traditional garden, you may have discarded the idea of growing them, but you can make a potato pot and grow them wherever you want – and you can even take them with you if you need to bug out.

If you’re shooting for the “potato” that offers the most health benefits, shoot for yams or sweet potatoes. Though the names are often used interchangeably, they are not the same vegetable, nor do they have the same nutrients, though they’re both high in vitamins, particularly vitamin A. Technically, neither one are even potatoes but that’s outside the scope of this article.

How to Store Your Potatoes

If you were raised in the country, you likely remember the root cellars. Ever wonder why they’re called that? Me too, and the best explanation I can come up with is that they were used to store root vegetables – traditional white, yellow, or red potatoes, onions, garlic, carrots, etc. All of these will store all winter if kept at the right temperature. The important thing is to not wash them because the dirt extends their shelf lives.

Unlike other potatoes, sweet potatoes love the warmth – unlike traditional spuds, room temperature is great for them. They’ll keep up to a year! Again, don’t wash them. And if you’re growing them yourself, as you’re going to be after you make your pots, do your best to leave them somewhere warm – 80 degrees is great – for 10 days or so after you harvest them. This promotes the growth of a chemical on the skin that protects them from rot and also “cures” them to make them sweet.

Another advantage to growing sweet potatoes is that you have a tremendous yield. Believe it or not, you can yield as much as 130 pounds of sweet potatoes from just 3 potatoes.

You can grow both sweet potatoes and “regular” potatoes in pots, but the process is different. We’ll take about the easiest and fastest way first, then tell you how to grow sweet potatoes.

Now, are you ready to get your hands dirty and make a potato pot that will produce a great crop of potatoes? Good. Let’s get started.

These lessons of yesterday will teach you the basic skills for survival cooking! 

Making a Standard Potato Pot

First off, I have to say that this is the perfect  idea for a prepper because once you get it going, you’ll have potatoes literally forever without even needing to add dirt or fertilizer. It’s absolutely brilliant, but so simple that anybody with 1 potato, soil, water, and access to clover can do it.

Of course, any potato crop is self-perpetuating, but with this one, you don’t need fertilizer and you won’t have to dig in the garden.

Expect to yield about 10x (perhaps just a bit less) the weight of potatoes that you plant; that’s ten pounds for every pound, so you don’t have to do math.

  • First, choose your container. You can grow them in anything from a 5-gallon bucket up. Use a bucket or container that has never been used to store any type of chemical or poison. A great place to get food-grade buckets is local restaurants and bakeries. They usually buy in bulk, and items such as pickles, lard, sugar, flour, and frosting often come in 5-gallon buckets.
  • Fill your container with a mixture of potting soil and compost. I’ve even heard of people using sand and sawdust, but for this method, use the potting soil and compost.
  • Let your potato sit long enough to start growing eyes. That way you know that it will grow because some are treated with chemicals that keep them from sprouting in order to extend shelf life. While you’re waiting, prepare your bucket and get your clover growing.
  • Drill holes in the bottom of your bucket for drainage and make sure that you have a place to put the bucket so that it’s not in direct contact with something such as dirt that can clog the holes and prevent drainage.
  • Put a few inches of gravel (and sand if you’d like) in the bottom of the bucket and fill it with soil to within several inches of the top.
  • Sprinkle white clover seeds across the top of the soil and just run your hand over them to get a bit of soil over them.
  • Once your potato sprouts eyes and you know it’s good to grow, your clover should be starting to grow, too. Dig a hole 12 inches deep or so in the center of the bucket. Don’t worry if you have to dig through the clover – it will grow back.
  • Plant your potato at the bottom and cover back up with dirt.
  • You’ll see a plant within just a couple of weeks, then all you have to do is water it once or twice a week and let it grow. After 3 months or so, the plant will die back. When it does that, your potatoes are ready to harvest.

Video first seen on Hollis & Nancy’s Homestead

Making a Sweet Potato Pot

This has several steps and takes quite a bit of advance wait time, but your yield will be awesome. Plus, sweet potatoes are delicious and nutritious just as they are. Not to say that a good old regular potato isn’t delicious, too!

Because the yield is so high, you may want to use 20 gallon buckets for this. That’s what was used here – if you’re only using 5-gallon buckets, just put one slip per bucket. You’ll know what that means in a minute.

  • Start with a single sweet potato. Unless you want to be overrun with them, or intend to sell them or trade them, you don’t need more than a couple because one potato seriously can yield forty pounds or so.
  • Find cups, jars, or containers that are wide enough and deep enough to accommodate one half of the potato, lengthwise.
  • Stick 3 toothpicks into the potato at equal distances around the middle so that you can dangle one end of the potato (half of it or so) into the glass or jar and have one end sticking out. You want to have at least a half-inch or so all around the potato between it and the inside of the container.
  • Put the potato into the container so that it’s suspended by the toothpicks.
  • Now it’s time to wait for the slips to grow. Slips are basically shoots that grow into individual plants, and one potato can yield up to 50.
  • The slips will begin to grow off of the bottom and up around the potato and will be ready to separate after a couple of months.
  • Once they are, separate them out into different jars, and you can even cut and root new slips off the first ones as they grow. Once you have the slips that you want and they’re at least 12 inches tall, it’s time to plant them.
  • You’ll want a trellis behind them because sweet potatoes vine, and they root where they touch the ground, so if you’re using containers, you don’t want them vining all over your yard.
  • Fill the buckets with equal parts potting soil, peat moss, and compost to about 6 inches of the top.
  • Ramp the dirt so that one side of the container (the one furthest away from the trellis) is 8 inches or so more shallow than the side closest to the trellis and soak it with water.
  • Place 3-6 slips in each bucket so that the tops are facing the trellis and the roots are at the side of the bucket that’s furthest away from the trellis.
  • Add soil mixture to cover the roots and make the dirt level. It’s OK if you cover up some of the leaves and only just the tops are sticking out.
  • Water it again a bit and cover with straw or mulch to keep weeds from growing.

Video first seen on OFF GRID with DOUG and STACY

They love hot weather and take about three months to mature. They’ll get super bushy, so try to encourage any long vines to grow up the trellis. The plants will also grow really pretty flowers, which makes them great for ornamentals. Since the good stuff isn’t visible, if people don’t know what they are, they’ll just think they’re bushes – hiding your garden in plain sight.

The leaves will start to turn yellow. After that, leave them for another week or so and test a part of the bucket by digging down to see if they’re ready. Or, you can just dump a bucket and see how they are. Though remember – you only get one shot if you do it that way.

Now you know how make a potato pot.

Potatoes are the ultimate survival crop and they were included almost in every meal during the Great Depression.

Discover more about how our forefathers handled their survival food.

Click the banner below and uncover their secrets!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

Gear Review: Acke 24 watt Grow Lamp

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I love growing my own vegetables, and I have been searching for ways to do this inside, becasue of this I have used a bunch of different grow lights.  The cheap ones don’t work, and the good ones are expensive – and they all take a lot of electricity. I was pretty pleased to get […]

The post Gear Review: Acke 24 watt Grow Lamp appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Bugging Out vs. Full Time Retreat

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Bugging Out vs. Full Time Retreat   Bugging out is no light weight issue and its good to read an article that looks at it that way as well. One of the greatest injustices done to preppers across the nation by the Nat Geo Doomsday Preppers nightmare was the representation of the bug out. It …

Continue reading »

The post Bugging Out vs. Full Time Retreat appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

How to Get the Most Calories per Foot Out of Your Homestead Garden

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An ideal way to get the most calories from your homestead garden is to plant high-calorie plants. The best plants for homesteading are staple crops that form the bulk of the human diet. And these crops should return good yields, be calorie-dense, easy to grow, harvest, and store. A calorie-dense crop is one that can […]

The post How to Get the Most Calories per Foot Out of Your Homestead Garden appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Fishing For Survival: Top 5 Tips Revealed

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Ever found yourself in a survival scenario within the wilderness with little or no fishing gear at your disposal? Such a situation might be not only stressful but also dire. You’re bound to be hungry and frustrated. Luckily, one way of fending for yourself or your crew is by hitting the local waterway and hauling […]

The post Fishing For Survival: Top 5 Tips Revealed appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Why You Should Include Cash in Your EDC

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Why You Should Include Cash in Your EDC   The amount cash that is being saved by Americans is terrifying. We are a plastic society. More than half of all Americans do not have access to enough cash to survive for two months. This is a real problem! ATMs only give out 300 per day …

Continue reading »

The post Why You Should Include Cash in Your EDC appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Taking Care of Your Fishing Reels

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Do you want to be able to maintain and repair your own fishing reels? Most anglers do, but the problem is that it’s not that simple. The best fishing reels these days are just as complicated as the most sophisticated automatic watches, and they come with tiny parts that work in mysterious ways. But you […]

The post Taking Care of Your Fishing Reels appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

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Today it’s all about how to store as much water as possible for any disaster or unforeseen emergency. This post follows yesterday’s “how to store food storage” in a small home. Today, I’m going to show you how I store water several different ways. I love getting emails asking how do I store water, food storage and just about everything else. So, I decided to invite you into my home and show you how I store my emergency preparedness items. There are so many ways to store water, some are expensive, some are fairly cheap. Keep in mind, I didn’t buy all of these items in a day. Please note when filling any water container be sure to use a lead-free hose like this one: NeverKink 8612-50 Boat and Camper Hose, Drinking Water Safe, 5/8-Inch-by-50-Foot

I live in a fairly small home that’s 1900 square feet. I mentioned yesterday, I have a three car garage. Here’s the deal, there is no way you could get two normal size cars in the double garage. The third stall we store our emergency prep items. I live in Southern Utah where the temperatures get up to 120 degrees sometimes in the summer. All my food storage is stored inside my house.

Let’s get started with how to store as much water as possible! This is a queen size bed in my guest room. The room is very small. I have 16 WaterBricks (the 3.5-gallon ones) under the bed filled water and Water Preserver. 55 Gallon Water Preserver Concentrate 5 Year Emergency Disaster Preparedness, Survival Kits, Emergency Water Storage, Earthquake, Hurricane, Safety The reason I use Water Preserver for water preservation is because I only have to rotate the water every five years. If you decide to use bleach in your water containers, you will need to rotate the water every six months.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Now, this picture is in my master bedroom where I have a dresser shown kitty-corner. It’s not flat against the wall and looks awesome in the bedroom without anyone knowing I have 12 cases of Blue Cans stacked neatly behind the dresser. Please brace yourself for the cost of these. This stack of water is one of the things I have been saving money to buy. They last 50 years and taste better than any water I have tasted. I have reverse osmosis in my kitchen, so I’m pretty fussy as to the taste of water. These can be stored up to 145 degrees, awesome, huh? If you look at the website they are cheaper, if you can pick them up. I ordered mine off of Amazon. Blue Can – Premium Emergency Drinking Water Please check this website if they have a distributor near you: Blue Can Water I bought these Blue Cans to store and not have to worry about rotating due to age, or fret due to the temperature in my home. I can sleep at night, yes I would call it a luxury, that’s how I roll with water.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

This tank below holds 160 gallons and has two spigots. You can find these at most emergency preparedness stores. I like the fact that I can fill it on the top and fill a bucket with one of the spigots, or drain the entire tank from the lower spigot. I used three containers of the Water Preserver when I filled this tank. We put it on 2 by 4’s on the garage floor to keep it off the concrete.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Now, this picture I had a hard time taking because it’s HUGE, it holds 250 gallons and has two spigots as well. When Mark and I saw it at the store we didn’t realize how big the tank was. The store delivered it to our home and we started to laugh, how in the world are we going to get this in our garage. After laughing, we rinsed it out (that was a little challenging) then we put it on 2 by 4’s on the garage floor to keep it off the concrete. Then we filled it. We did strap it to the wall, but if we have an earthquake I’m not sure how well it would hold it in place. I do feel more secure having it strapped. You can buy large tanks like this at most emergency preparedness stores. This tank is about 84 inches tall and 32 inches in diameter. In this tank, I actually used a 16-ounce bottle of Nano Silver (63 ppm) that came with the purchase to keep this water purified.  I will trade out the water in five years and refill it with fresh water and a new bottle of Nano Silver.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

These are the usual 55-gallon water barrels with a UV/sun protection cover that will reflect the sun and help keep them from getting as much damage. I didn’t want to buy tarps because we have critters here that would have loved making a nest under the tarps. Remember, I live where the heat can get up to 120 degrees in the summer. Because I stored these outside, the likelihood that they may freeze is always a possibility, so I filled them using one bottle Water Preserver and left a four-inch space for the water to expand. The Barrel Bag WB-381 ”The Barrel Bag” 55-Gallon Drum Cover Grey Here’s the deal on these bags, I never used them when I lived where it was colder. These bags do keep the barrels from discoloring and cracking in the heat where I live, but they are expensive. I only bought them for their UV/sun protection. I have seen these barrels at Walmart, Costco and some grocery stores. Remember to get a pump to pump the water out when needed. They usually have the pumps sitting next to the barrels at most stores. I used one bottle of Water Preserver in each barrel. I will rotate these after five years with fresh water and preserver. You also need a bung with these to tighten the cap on top. BUNG: Duda Energy dwrench Aluminum Drum Wrench for Opening 10 gal, 15 gal, 20 gal, 30 gal and 55 gal Barrels Standard, 2″ Bung Racing Fuel Methanol, 2″ PUMP: Blue Drum Water Pump

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Please store as much water as possible, you don’t want to be the family standing in line at the grocery store waiting to see if there is any bottled water left on the shelves after a disaster. Trust me on that one! May God bless you for being prepared for the unexpected.  You may have some other ideas for effective water storage.  I’d love to hear what you’ve done so I can share it with my other readers. Thanks so much for your loyalty and for staying on top of issues relating to emergency preparedness.  You are the best!

The post How To Store As Much Water As Possible appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Today it’s all about how to store as much water as possible for any disaster or unforeseen emergency. This post follows yesterday’s “how to store food storage” in a small home. Today, I’m going to show you how I store water several different ways. I love getting emails asking how do I store water, food storage and just about everything else. So, I decided to invite you into my home and show you how I store my emergency preparedness items. There are so many ways to store water, some are expensive, some are fairly cheap. Keep in mind, I didn’t buy all of these items in a day. Please note when filling any water container be sure to use a lead-free hose like this one: NeverKink 8612-50 Boat and Camper Hose, Drinking Water Safe, 5/8-Inch-by-50-Foot

I live in a fairly small home that’s 1900 square feet. I mentioned yesterday, I have a three car garage. Here’s the deal, there is no way you could get two normal size cars in the double garage. The third stall we store our emergency prep items. I live in Southern Utah where the temperatures get up to 120 degrees sometimes in the summer. All my food storage is stored inside my house.

Let’s get started with how to store as much water as possible! This is a queen size bed in my guest room. The room is very small. I have 16 WaterBricks (the 3.5-gallon ones) under the bed filled water and Water Preserver. 55 Gallon Water Preserver Concentrate 5 Year Emergency Disaster Preparedness, Survival Kits, Emergency Water Storage, Earthquake, Hurricane, Safety The reason I use Water Preserver for water preservation is because I only have to rotate the water every five years. If you decide to use bleach in your water containers, you will need to rotate the water every six months.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Now, this picture is in my master bedroom where I have a dresser shown kitty-corner. It’s not flat against the wall and looks awesome in the bedroom without anyone knowing I have 12 cases of Blue Cans stacked neatly behind the dresser. Please brace yourself for the cost of these. This stack of water is one of the things I have been saving money to buy. They last 50 years and taste better than any water I have tasted. I have reverse osmosis in my kitchen, so I’m pretty fussy as to the taste of water. These can be stored up to 145 degrees, awesome, huh? If you look at the website they are cheaper, if you can pick them up. I ordered mine off of Amazon. Blue Can – Premium Emergency Drinking Water Please check this website if they have a distributor near you: Blue Can Water I bought these Blue Cans to store and not have to worry about rotating due to age, or fret due to the temperature in my home. I can sleep at night, yes I would call it a luxury, that’s how I roll with water.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

This tank below holds 160 gallons and has two spigots. You can find these at most emergency preparedness stores. I like the fact that I can fill it on the top and fill a bucket with one of the spigots, or drain the entire tank from the lower spigot. I used three containers of the Water Preserver when I filled this tank. We put it on 2 by 4’s on the garage floor to keep it off the concrete.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Now, this picture I had a hard time taking because it’s HUGE, it holds 250 gallons and has two spigots as well. When Mark and I saw it at the store we didn’t realize how big the tank was. The store delivered it to our home and we started to laugh, how in the world are we going to get this in our garage. After laughing, we rinsed it out (that was a little challenging) then we put it on 2 by 4’s on the garage floor to keep it off the concrete. Then we filled it. We did strap it to the wall, but if we have an earthquake I’m not sure how well it would hold it in place. I do feel more secure having it strapped. You can buy large tanks like this at most emergency preparedness stores. This tank is about 84 inches tall and 32 inches in diameter. In this tank, I actually used a 16-ounce bottle of Nano Silver (63 ppm) that came with the purchase to keep this water purified.  I will trade out the water in five years and refill it with fresh water and a new bottle of Nano Silver.

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

These are the usual 55-gallon water barrels with a UV/sun protection cover that will reflect the sun and help keep them from getting as much damage. I didn’t want to buy tarps because we have critters here that would have loved making a nest under the tarps. Remember, I live where the heat can get up to 120 degrees in the summer. Because I stored these outside, the likelihood that they may freeze is always a possibility, so I filled them using one bottle Water Preserver and left a four-inch space for the water to expand. The Barrel Bag WB-381 ”The Barrel Bag” 55-Gallon Drum Cover Grey Here’s the deal on these bags, I never used them when I lived where it was colder. These bags do keep the barrels from discoloring and cracking in the heat where I live, but they are expensive. I only bought them for their UV/sun protection. I have seen these barrels at Walmart, Costco and some grocery stores. Remember to get a pump to pump the water out when needed. They usually have the pumps sitting next to the barrels at most stores. I used one bottle of Water Preserver in each barrel. I will rotate these after five years with fresh water and preserver. You also need a bung with these to tighten the cap on top. BUNG: Duda Energy dwrench Aluminum Drum Wrench for Opening 10 gal, 15 gal, 20 gal, 30 gal and 55 gal Barrels Standard, 2″ Bung Racing Fuel Methanol, 2″ PUMP: Blue Drum Water Pump

How To Store As Much Water As Possible

Please store as much water as possible, you don’t want to be the family standing in line at the grocery store waiting to see if there is any bottled water left on the shelves after a disaster. Trust me on that one! May God bless you for being prepared for the unexpected.  You may have some other ideas for effective water storage.  I’d love to hear what you’ve done so I can share it with my other readers. Thanks so much for your loyalty and for staying on top of issues relating to emergency preparedness.  You are the best!

The post How To Store As Much Water As Possible appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Dehydrated vs Freeze Dried Food

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Dehydrated vs Freeze Dried Food   Its a topic among peppers and survivalists that gets plenty of time on forums across the net. Though it may seem trivial the differences in dehydrated and freeze dried foods can be a very big deal based on your plan. This article has broken down each one of these …

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How To Prevent Hacking

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How To Prevent Hacking This topic may have nothing to do with food storage or AR15s but it is a very relevant topic in this day and age. It comes from wikihow and I think they are some of the most efficient articles written on the net. In a time like this where media and content …

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LED Grow Lights For Indoor Plants

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LED grow lights are made up of light-emitting diodes, and are advantageous over other methods of plant lights because they consume much less electricity and the typical LED has a life span of 50,000 hours (if on a 12 hour timer, 11 years). If you use an alternative energy source in your home (e.g. solar […]

A Prepper’s DIY: Building Your Own Cleaning Kits for Firearms

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ReadyNutrition Readers, there can never be enough emphasis placed on the importance of weapons cleaning and maintenance.  We had a piece recently on how to maintain your weapons during the wintertime.  Keep in mind: the game changes completely when you fire the firearm.  You cannot afford to allow that weapon to sit with carbon buildup after you’ve fired it.  The moisture will come into play, and neglected, the weapon will be in really bad shape in about a week’s period of time or less.  If you are taking the tips on a regularly-scheduled maintenance program seriously, then it should be no problem whatsoever to incorporate your cleaning sessions into it after you have fired.


Keep this in mind: If you’ll maintain your car, can you do any less for your weapon…a piece of equipment where cleanliness and function may mean life or death?


Building Your Own Cleaning Kits for Firearms

So, how about a cleaning kit for your weapon?  Here’s what you need: One large “mothership” cleaning kit for general purpose and maintenance, and one cleaning kit that is portable, for what you carry or tote into the great outdoors.  There are plenty of different brands to choose from, and in the manner that fishing gear is more tailored to catch fishermen than fish, the same principle applies to cleaning kits.  You need some basics, and it is the basics we’ll cover.  First, your component parts:

  1. Cleaning rods: brass or steel is preferable; aluminum if there’s nothing else.  You want enough sections to be able to clean out your longest rifle barrel, and extra sections and handgrips for pistols and other rifles, as well.
  2. Bore Brushes: these are often stamped with the caliber (.22, .38, .45, etc.) on the base just past the threaded part you screw into the rod. They are also made for your chamber…to clean where the cartridge is actually seated when fired.  The ones stamped with the caliber are meant to pass through the entire length of the barrel. If you have multiple firearms, consider getting this bore brush kit.
  3. Patch-tips: have an “eye” hole at the end, and are threaded to screw onto your cleaning rod. The larger the eye, the bigger the patch it takes.
  4. Cleaning brushes: You will have some that are made with nylon bristles, akin to a toothbrush, and some with wire/metal bristles. This latter group is especially helpful with carbon buildups.
  5. Patches: can be 1” square, 2” square, and so forth; usually made of cotton or muslin fiber to clean the inside of the barrel and other locations with your firearm.
  6. Pipe cleaners: especially helpful for small holes and other locations that have interworking mechanisms, such as trigger or hammer assemblies. Very useful in cleaning out carbon from around springs, deep within the magazine well, and in front of your firing pins.
  7. Bore light devices: Once again, there are numerous types to choose from. I carry a small “mini Maglite” that uses one AAA battery; however, I recommend the little Plexiglas 90-degree angle “sticks” that are L-shaped.  You place one end into the end of your barrel, and the other end point toward a light source (a light bulb, the sun, etc.) and it will illuminate your barrel.
  8. Lubricant: Self-explanatory here. The function is to clean and also to coat with a light coating.  If you caught my other piece, then you may recall: I recommend 5W/30 Mobil Synthetic Motor Oil, available at about $7 to $8 per quart.  All the name-brand oils (Outers, etc.) sell for little 1 – 2 ounce bottles for about $3 to $4.  You do the math.  The Mobil Synthetic is a better oil, and far less expensive.
  9. Bore Solvent: On this one I don’t cut corners, because other solvents can leave a film…I pick up the brand-name stuff from Outers, RCBS, etc. A small bottle of it will last you a long time if you stretch it.  You need it to clean off hardcore powder fouling…the type coming from when you burn off more than a couple of hundred rounds in a weapon.  Search your catalogs, and you can find volume deals for a gallon at a time.
  10. Cleaning rags, pouches, and other accessories (magnifying glass, scraping tools, etc.)

Now as we mentioned in the beginning, what you can do for ease of simplicity is work from the “mothership” principle: consolidate the majority of your supplies in one box/chest, and “work” off of smaller, independent “kits” for individual firearms.

You want the ability to clean each weapon no matter where it is.  If they’re consolidated in one location?  Fine, but you want the ability to throw together a pouch with all of the supplies and materials listed above specific to any firearm.  Tote the kit with you along with the firearm when you leave home, away from the consolidated supplies (the mothership).  You will find that you can build numerous “kits,” or pouches for each firearm.  Keep them all together until the time you take the firearm away.

The rule of thumb: if the firearm is away from the home, the cleaning kit should be with it.  You will find military issue nylon pouches (they have three snaps) are exceptionally useful for these individual kits.  They hold all of the rods (broken down), your brushes, patches, and a small bottle for your oil.   This photo shows an issue kit you can order from www.amazon.com for $16.20 called a UTG Model 4/AR15 Cleaning Kit Complete with Pouch

Although specifically for an M-4 (AR-15), as it is a 5.56 mm/.223 caliber weapon, you will find it can be used for a variety of different weapons cleaning applications.  Use your imagination, as necessity is the mother of invention.  You want to keep your cleaning kits and supplies in a water-tight, sealable case that will prevent moisture and perhaps take a beating.  Supplement this kit with cleaning rags and a small tool kit.  Patches you can make from something such as a white or cream-colored bedsheet that has outlived its original use.

Use your creativity and your imagination to make what you want and tailor it to your use.  Bottom line: your weapon can’t take care of you unless it is properly taken care of.  You can be smart and use some of these tips to lessen the bite to your wallet.  Just don’t cut corners when it comes to maintenance.  When you’re done at the range, either take it down and clean it there, or take it home and clean it right away.  Practice hard, clean those firearms, and keep in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prepper Book Festival: Survive In Style The Prepper’s Guide to Living Comfortably During Disasters + Giveaway

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Survive In Style | Backdoor Survival

Survive in Style: The Prepper’s Guide to Living Comfortably During Disasters is a handbook for accomplishing self-sufficiency in the areas of water, energy, food, transportation, economics and just about anything else you can think of. In this newest Prepper Book Festival title, enjoy an interview with author Dan Chiras and enter to win a copy for free. There will be three winners.

The post Prepper Book Festival: Survive In Style The Prepper’s Guide to Living Comfortably During Disasters + Giveaway by Gaye Levy first appeared on Backdoor Survival.

Are You Prepared for Natural Disasters?

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Are You Prepared for Natural DisastersTalking about natural disasters is not up there with the most “sexy” or “fun” aspects of prepping, but it’s important to make sure we are prepared for these natural disasters none the less. The odds of a natural disaster or a personal doomsday happening in our lifetime are far greater than a global or national disaster scenario…although these odds are changing daily.

The basics of preparedness are the same regardless which disaster(s) you are preparing for. Preparing for these natural disasters is a great way to build your foundation, and become become better prepared for even the smallest disaster situation or personal doomsday.

The truth is, if we don’t have the basics covered, we really aren’t prepared at all. We could have the perfect bug out bag, but without an escape and evasion plan, we could be in for a tough time.

I recently published this video about 10 basic things we should have taken care of to be prepared for any disaster scenario. How many of these do you have checked off your list? If you only get 7 out of 10 you might have a little work to do.

Here are the 10 tips from the video…

  1. You have enough food stored
  2. You have cash set aside
  3. You have out of area emergency contacts
  4. You have water stored
  5. You have a plan for the family
  6. You know where you’ll go (including pets)
  7. You have a good first aid kit
  8. You have first aid training
  9. You practice for a disaster
  10. Your car is in good mechanical condition

SPP195 Are You Prepared for Natural Disasters?

In this weeks show we went over some of the basics of preparing for a natural disaster. This might all seem very simple to you (especially if you’ve been prepping for a while) but they are areas that sometimes get overlooked because they are so simple.

Sometimes what you thought was a perfect plan will not work out like you thought it would. Sometimes we get so focused on the bigger details, we forget about the small details. Having the greatest bug out vehicle that can bust through a concrete wall is worthless if it runs out of gas, or gets a flat tire.

Topics Covered In The Show…

Here are a few of the things we talked about in this weeks show. We went into quite a bit of detail with all of these, so make sure and listen.

Stay Informed

Before: A little bit of extra warning can go a long way in a disaster situation. With a hurricane or blizzard you will have plenty of warning, an earthquake or tornado is a different story. At this point you will have TV, radio and phone service…make sure you use them.

During: Some of these services might be out during a natural disaster, but a shortwave radio might still be useful. I have this Crank Radio which also has a solar panel and light.

After: A natural disaster can cause quite a bit of damage. The first thing we will want to do is make sure everyone is safe. You can register on the Red Cross website to check in as “safe and well”. You can also check in on others who might be affected, as long as they know to use the website.

Evacuation Planning

Home and Away: Evacuation planning is not just choosing a bug out route, it could mean getting out of the house in the first place. Earthquakes and tornadoes could destroy your home leaving you trapped, and in a house fire you would need to find the safest escape route.

Escape Routes: This could be anything from escaping the house, to escaping the neighborhood. Make sure everyone knows which routes to take and why. Make sure to always have a plan B, and also a plan C.

Timing Is Everything: While you would have plenty of time to prepared for a hurricane, some natural disasters won’t afford you that luxury. This is why staying informed and having supplies ready to go is important.

Destinations: It’s not only important to have your destinations picked out, it’s important that everyone is on the same page. Make sure everyone knows where you will meet, and where you will meet if that isn’t an option. This could be anything from the front yard, to a school paring lot, to a relatives home.

Include the Pets: If you own pets you are going to want to have a plan and supplies for them as well. If you need to evacuate you will need supplies for them, as well as a suitable location. If you plan on going to a relatives home, make sure they are OK with Fido coming along.

Family Disaster Planning

Contact Information: These days we don’t know peoples actual phone numbers, they are just names in our cell phone. You can make wallet sized cards with contact information, as well as important medical information. Wallet size contact cards are great for teenagers because they don’t need to remember anything other than where it is when they need it.

Important Websites: You should also add important websites to these cards, the SafeAndWell website I linked to above is one of them. While the internet might be down during the natural disaster, it could be available in the future. It could also be available in other areas.

If You’re Separated: The entire family is rarely in the same place all the time. Parents go to works, kids go to school, and a disaster is not going to wait until we are ready. This is why having pre planned meeting points and contact information is so important. If we know that they know, it can make an already stressful situation a little more bearable.

Money on Hand: In a natural disaster scenario money will not be useless, but ATM’s might. Everyone should carry some emergency cash in their wallet for event’s like this. This could be $100 in small bills, or whatever you can afford.

Practice Your Plans: Having these plans is only the first step. The more important step is making sure everyone understands these plans and is on the same page. The family might not take this as serious as you, but when the time comes they will remember.

Around the House: During or after a natural disaster there are some safety precautions we need to make sure everyone understands. Make sure everyone knows where the breaker box is (and how to shut if off) and where the gas shutoff is. Make sure a bad situation doesn’t get worse by something that could have been avoided.

Survival Skills

The Basics: Making sure the family knows survival skills doesn’t mean they need to know how to use a ferro rod to start a fire, but do they know how to use a fire extinguisher? Do they know what to do during a house fire? Or do they know the basics of first aid.

And Then Some: While we might not be able to get the whole family on board with the more advanced survival skills like trauma care, CPR  or bugging out, they are important to learn. We never know what situation might present itself, so the more we know, the better our odds will be.

Disaster Supplies

3 Days Minimum: FEMA recommends that we have 3 days worth of food and water stored. As preppers, if we only have 3 days worth of supplies, we think we are severely slacking.  In the event of a natural disaster 3 days is probably OK, but I feel much better knowing I’m covered if day 4 or 5 rolls around.

Staying or Going?: Having 3 days worth of supplies doesn’t just mean around the house. If we find ourselves in a situation where we need to leave, we need to have some of these supplies ready to go. This means food, water, bug out bags, and other supplies.

The Right Tools For the Job: The supplies you need will depend on the natural disaster you are preparing for. While the basic survival supplies like food water and first aid might be the same, some tools will be specific to the disaster. A pry bar or a pick ax might be useful after an earthquake, they might not be during a blizzard.

This is just a general list that would cover a number of disaster scenarios. Make sure you have these covered, and then refine this list depending on which natural disaster scenario you are concerned about. If you have any ideas or thoughts, let me know in the comments below…

The post Are You Prepared for Natural Disasters? appeared first on Survivalist Prepper.

Journaling Your Forgiveness Journey

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Do you journal? Have you thought about journaling as part of your forgiveness journey? Today I want to talk about this in a bit more detail. Welcome to Day Seventeen of 30 Days to Forgiveness.

One great tool as you move along the path to forgiveness is a journal. The format is far less important than the content, though.

There are many benefits to journaling. If you’ve kept a diary in the past, you might be familiar with them. If you have never tried it, why not start now? Just as when teenager girls spill their secrets to “Dear Diary”, a journal is always available and ready to listen as you pour out your thoughts and feelings.

A journal can be as simple or fancy as you like. You probably have everything you need.

You can use a simple notebook, one from that box or six that you bought when they were on sale for ten cents each so you bought enough to get all four … children … through … Was it just me? (My mother-in-law saw them recently and said, “Don’t you ever buy another notebook!” That IS the plan, actually!)

Or  you could look through your shelves for that beautiful blank book that you bought and never got past writing the first entry. If you don’t have any beautiful blank books, this is a great excuse to get one.

I am told that I have an addiction to beautiful blank books. Maybe …… There’s actually something about those high quality blank pages that just invite me to start writing. And it’s actually just a general love of books, from ten cents scribblers to leather-bound journals to ones that actually have words in them.

Let’s get back to the topic, though!

Your journal certainly does not need to be on paper.

Some people prefer keeping a digital diary. Open a Word document on your computer and start typing. Or turn on your phone’s video and talk, saving the file to your Dropbox. I’m sure there are some apps out there that can help you with your journaling.

For most of us, a journal is going to be a very private thing, so I don’t recommend that you use your tumblr, Facebook or Livejournal (do people still use that?) account.

But you can format it any way you like, so long as you find a way that works for you.

The most important aspect is going to be choosing something that’s easy and natural for you. If you spend your days typing and dread writing out anything by hand, you are probably not going to spend the time it takes to hand write a journal. It doesn’t matter how pretty it is. You’ll write one or two entries and then fall into the “Uh, I’ll do that later. Yea, later.”

If you struggle with the written word but really love to record vlogs (a vlog is a video log, just like a blog is a web log), then set up a place to save your videos privately and make a commitment to journaling that way every evening.

And if you really want to be wild and reckless, or if you decide it’s not working as well as you thought, change it up. Nothing says you can’t move from a written journal to a video one or the other way around. Your journal, your thoughts – pick the way that works best for you.

Much more important than the format, though, is the content. What you write down or record will help you process your thoughts and feelings, and it gives you a record that you can look at down the road. When you’re having a bad day or struggling to find thoughts of love and forgiveness, it can help to look back and see how far you’ve come.

A journal can help you clear your thoughts and see the path ahead. It can help remind you and focus your thoughts and feelings on why you need to embrace forgiveness.

If you’re not sure what to write about, start with a quote or Bible verse about forgiveness and then start writing your thoughts about it. There’s no right or wrong.

One great tool as you move along the path to forgiveness is a journal. The format is far less important than the content, though.

The 5 Best Medicinal Plants You Can Grow In Your Backyard

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The 5 Best Medicinal Plants You Can Grow In Your Backyard

Image source: Pixabay.com

Self-reliance often means relying on old wisdom to address health problems. My family believes in the use of medicinal plants to cure ailments.

Our herb garden serves a greater purpose than increasing the flavors of our dinners. We use these plants to create medicinal teas, herbal baths and healing salves. Here are the top five medicinal plants to grow in your backyard, along with some simple ways to use them in your everyday life.

1. Feverfew

Once it blooms during spring, it continues to grow throughout the season. Feverfew has been used for centuries to — you guessed it — reduce fevers. It also has properties that help to reduce headaches and stomach illnesses.

Families can use feverfew in a variety of ways, but one of my favorite methods is as an herbal bath. That is a fantastic way to reduce fevers in small children. For centuries, people have chewed on the leaves or drank herbal teas to relieve headaches, as well as fevers. (Check with your doctor about its use among very young children.)

2. Echinacea

One of the most popular medicinal herbs is Echinacea, which produces a beautiful purple flower. Echinacea grows up to 36 inches tall and has a long growing season. You will notice an abundance of bees and butterflies attracted to your garden, as well, helping to pollinate.

Learn How To Make Powerful Herbal Medicines, Right in Your Kitchen!

Echinacea can be used to boost the immune system if you have the flu or cold. Historically, people used it to fight infections, relieve pain, treat snake bites, reduce coughs and heal sore throats.

While you can use Echinacea in a multitude of ways, most people opt to make an infusion or decoction. You can steep the leaves and petals or the dried roots in boiling water, creating an herbal tea. To fight a cold, you could combine other herbs, such as feverfew or chamomile, for additional healing properties.

3. Lemon balm

Everyone needs at least one type of mint plant in their garden. Lemon balm happens to be one of my favorites! You can add it to teas to create a delicious tea, but it does more than that. Those suffering from insomnia, anxiety, an upset stomach, or a viral infection can find lemon balm useful. Our family uses it as a natural mosquito repellant and treatment for colicky infants.

There are so many great ways to use lemon balm! Make an herbal syrup to reduce anxiety at night with honey. Using fresh leaves, make a homemade tea bag for an upset stomach. Another great way to use lemon balm is to add it in homemade salves, helping to heal minor cuts.

4. Yarrow

The 5 Best Medicinal Plants You Can Grow In Your Backyard

Yarrow. Image source: Pixabay.com

Yarrow is a multi-purpose herb to grow, and is beneficial if you have kids in the house. It can reduce fevers, shorten flu and colds, help kids to relax and lessen cramps. You also can use yarrow topically to help with skin itching and rashes. Some people have success relieving allergy symptoms by drinking yarrow tea!

Beet Powder: The Ancient Secret To Renewed Energy And Stamina

There are a plethora of ways to use yarrow. Create herbal teas, combined with other herbs like lemon balm or chamomile. Tea also helps with a cold or congestion. A yarrow salve heals dry and itchy skin. Also, bathing in yarrow tea reduces fever. Native Americans used yarrow for centuries as an astringent by creating poultices.

5. Calendula

While I grow a variety of herbs and flowers, calendula is, by far, one of the most useful flowers. The beautiful, orange flowers pop in the summertime against the green grass. Calendula petals are edible; try adding them to your salads.

For centuries, people found ways to use calendula to disinfect minor wounds, treat infections, heal skin irritation and reduce pain. One of my favorite ways to use it is by creating a homemade diaper cream for rashes. Making a healing salve from calendula is simple and makes a fantastic addition to your first-aid kit. All you need to do is spread it over irritations and small cuts.

Healing with herbs does require a bit of knowledge, but it is worth it.

Get started by selecting a few of the best medicinal plants. Best of all, many of these choices have pretty blossoms that make them visually appealing options.

What is your favorite medicinal plant? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Discover The Secret To Saving Thousands At The Grocery Store. Read More Here.

The Stranger In the Woods

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hike_march_bug_outHave you ever wondered what it would be like if you had to bug out by yourself and live alone? Or what it would be like after TEOTWAWKI living by yourself? I approached Michael Finkel’s book, “The Stranger In The Woods,” with curiosity on several levels.  First, the events described take place less than forty-five minutes from where I live, and second, I’ve often wondered what it would be like to just walk away from it all and go live in the woods.

By Jarhead Survivor, a Contributing Author of SurvivalCache and SHTFBlog

Have you ever gone for a hike or an extended camping trip and wondered to yourself, “What would happen if I just kept going? What if I didn’t go back?”  I read the book hoping for some insight and think I found an answer, or at least a partial answer.

In case you haven’t heard the curious tale of the “The North Pond Hermit“, in 1986 Christopher Knight drove his car into the Maine woods as far as he could, threw the keys on the dash, and walked away.  Over the course of several months he worked his way through the forest staying in one place or another, until he found a good sport for his camp near North Pond in Rome, Maine.  He didn’t want to be a part of society and distanced himself from human contact, but a hermit’s gotta eat, so he started breaking into places to get food.

For the next twenty-six years he lived in his little camp, near people, but never communicating with them.  Anything he needed he stole; food, clothes, a small radio, battery operated tv, sleeping bags, tent, etc.  He wasn’t proud of this and when he was finally caught he readily admitted to stealing and said how sorry he was that he had to do it.  He never lit a fire and was careful never to travel after the snow fell so that he would never leave tracks by which he might be discovered.

Finkel has done an impressive amount of research on being alone and looks at both voluntary isolation (monks, hermits, etc,) and involuntary isolation (prisoners, prisoner of war, castaways, and the like).  It was found that after ten days being alone was enough to cause nearly physical suffering in people who aren’t voluntary hermits.  Prisoners said that being alone was enough to cause great suffering and they’d rather have been with someone they didn’t like than be alone.

As to Chris Knight, legends grew up around him.  His image was caught once or twice on trail cams and he actually ran into a hiker once by accident.  This was the only time he spoke to another human being in 26 years.  He said, “Hi,” avoided contact and kept walking.  The guy barely paid him any attention and kept going.

Alone

Regardless of whether you think he’s a thief and it’s about time he got caught, or a legend who lived off what society had to offer without being a part of it, the fact remains that he spent a bunch of time by himself.

cabin_aspens_bug_outI like to get away sometimes and spend a little time to myself; who doesn’t?  But Christopher took that feeling to a whole new level.  Most “normal” people need social interaction, which is why solitary confinement is such a powerful form of torture for most people.  But Chris didn’t.  Indeed, he thrived on being alone and when he was in jail suffered greatly because he didn’t like being around other people.

Over the years, I think about the longest stretch I ever did by myself was around a week.  That’s quite a long time to go without human interaction and I admit I was ready for some company at the end of that camping trip.  It’s nice to be alone, but if you’re wired the way most people are (I hesitate to use the word “normal” here,) then after a few days you’re looking for human interaction.

People are different depending on their genetics and upbringing.  I’ve known people who couldn’t stand being alone for more than an hour at a time.  Literally!  I’ve also known people who could disappear from society and probably would be fine only talking to other humans once a month.

Check Out: Fortifying Your Home

But twenty-six years?  That’s a new record and an astonishingly long time to be by yourself.  Finkel explores the fact that Knight might have a form of Asperger’s disease, or maybe a form of schizophrenia.  Regardless, Knight showed an extreme resilience to being on his own for a long time.

In the end you’ll get caught if you’re breaking the law and that’s what happened to Chris Knight.  A game warden set up one of Chris’ favorite spots with some new high-tech surveillance equipment and caught him red handed.  Knight was taken to jail and shortly after that the story broke about the “North Pond Hermit” and he rose to fame, although he didn’t want anything to do with it.

He did answer Finkel’s letter however, which is how the story came to be written.  Finkel strives to keep the story straight and without sensation, which I welcomed instead of the typical story that could have really gone wild about Chris’ exploits.

Chris showed himself to be an intelligent guy with little or no patience for societal niceties.  Over the years I’ve known a couple of guys like this; those who don’t care about how you feel, or maybe they do, but don’t know how to “be nice” when talking to someone.   He told Finkel straight up he didn’t want to be visited and that he was being a pain, but Michael – in the true sense of the press – didn’t give up.  Eventually Chris talked with him and shared his story.

Answers

Camp trailerI said earlier that I think the author found a partial answer to how I would feel in the wilderness for long stretches by myself.  Having spent a little time alone I think I’d be ok for  a month or two, but to go twenty-six years is beyond comprehension.  Unless I was stranded on an island somewhere by myself I think I’d want some company.  Tom Hanks character in Castaway needed companionship even if it was in the form of an imaginary friend, “Wilson.”  (Remember Wilson?)

Read Also: The Best of Survival Fiction

I think it’s safe to say that to voluntarily be alone for twenty-six years is an extraordinary feat probably brought on by some personality trait 99.9% of the population doesn’t have.  Like me, I’m sure many of you day-dream about the idea of walking off the grid and living “out there” by yourself for long periods of time, but the reality is that you need money to survive, even if just a little, otherwise you’ll be doing the same thing Chris did and stealing in order to survive.

In my opinion Chris isn’t someone to be emulated because even though he appears to be reasonably intelligent, he couldn’t seem to come up with a way to live off the grid without breaking the law.  His ability to be alone is admirable to those who find that a positive trait, but in the end he should have approached the whole thing keeping in mind that just because you don’t like society doesn’t mean you can break the law and get away with it forever.

Has anybody else out there read the book?  If so, I’d love to hear your views! Questions?  Comments? Sound off below!

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