15 Slow-Growing Seeds Smart Gardeners Start In March

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15 Slow-Growing Seeds Smart Gardeners Start In March

Image source: Pixabay.com

Is it spring yet?! As the days stretch out longer, and temperatures become increasingly mild, we start to feel the tug of the garden.

Many areas are still experiencing frost in March, but most of us can start planting seeds. Whether or not you can go ahead and start seeds depends on a number of factors, including your hardiness zone, your last frost date, which seeds you aim to plant, and whether you intend to start your seeds indoors or out.

Determine Your Last Frost Date

Your last frost date is important. It will help determine when to plant your various seeds. While information specific to our hardiness zones gives us a rough idea of our last frost date, it’s best to use an interactive calculator, like this one at The Old Farmer’s Almanac for a more exact date.

Sort Your Seeds

There are basically three types of seeds: 1) those best sowed directly into your garden; 2) those that can be sowed directly or started indoors; and, 3) those that most people should start indoors. Start by sorting your seeds into these three groups.

Seeds to Sow Directly

For a variety of reasons, some seeds do best when sowed directly into the ground. Some don’t transplant well. Others are cool-weather crops that can handle light frost and flourish in cooler temperatures.

Need Non-GMO Seeds? Get Them From A Company You Can Trust!

If you have any of the seeds listed below, pull them out and put them aside:

  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Dill
  • Carrots
  • Cilantro
  • Corn
  • Onions
  • Parsnips
  • Peas
  • Potatoes
  • Radishes
  • Rutabaga
  • Turnips
  • Leafy greens, including lettuces, arugula, kale, spinach, collard greens, mustard greens, chard

15 Seeds That Should Be Started In March

Some seeds must be started indoors in most parts of the country — otherwise their fruit may not come to maturity before fall frosts. If you have any of the seeds listed below, pull them out and make a second pile:

1. Basil

2. Broccoli

3. Cauliflower

4. Celery

5. Eggplant

6. Kohlrabi

7. Mint

8. Oregano

9. Peppers

10. Tomatoes

Seeds That Can Be Started Indoors or Out

While some seeds do perfectly fine when sowed directly into your garden, you also can start them indoors in order to get a jump on the growing season. It’s great to be able to enjoy some vegetables earlier in the summer. Plus, you also can stagger your planting by putting out transplants at the same time as directly sowing seeds of the same variety, so that your harvest lasts for several weeks.

The All-Natural Fertilizer That Doubles Your Garden Yield!

On the flip side, it can get daunting to find enough space, lighting, and time to look after large numbers of seedlings. Plus, don’t forget that you’ll need to haul your seed flats in and out for a little while, too, to harden off your seedlings before transplanting. Consider how many seedlings you must start indoors, plus the pros and cons listed, in order to decide whether to start any of these seeds indoors, too:

11. Cabbage

12. Cucumbers

13. Melons

14. Parsley

15. Squash – summer and winter, including zucchini

Determine Planting Dates for Indoor Seeds

Now that you know which seeds to start indoors, the next step is figuring out when to do it. Using the information on the seed packages, count backward from your last frost date to determine when to start your seeds. For example, some vegetables, such as broccoli, should be started 10 weeks prior to the last frost date. Cherry tomatoes should be started nine weeks prior, and full-size tomatoes eight weeks prior.

Have you started seeds indoors yet? When do you start them? Share your gardening and growing tips in the section below:

Bust Inflation With A Low-Cost, High-Production Garden. Read More Here.

15 Slow-Growing Seeds Smart Gardeners Start In March

15 Slow-Growing Seeds Smart Gardeners Start In March

Image source: Pixabay.com

Is it spring yet?! As the days stretch out longer, and temperatures become increasingly mild, we start to feel the tug of the garden.

Many areas are still experiencing frost in March, but most of us can start planting seeds. Whether or not you can go ahead and start seeds depends on a number of factors, including your hardiness zone, your last frost date, which seeds you aim to plant, and whether you intend to start your seeds indoors or out.

Determine Your Last Frost Date

Your last frost date is important. It will help determine when to plant your various seeds. While information specific to our hardiness zones gives us a rough idea of our last frost date, it’s best to use an interactive calculator, like this one at The Old Farmer’s Almanac for a more exact date.

Sort Your Seeds

There are basically three types of seeds: 1) those best sowed directly into your garden; 2) those that can be sowed directly or started indoors; and, 3) those that most people should start indoors. Start by sorting your seeds into these three groups.

Seeds to Sow Directly

For a variety of reasons, some seeds do best when sowed directly into the ground. Some don’t transplant well. Others are cool-weather crops that can handle light frost and flourish in cooler temperatures.

Need Non-GMO Seeds? Get Them From A Company You Can Trust!

If you have any of the seeds listed below, pull them out and put them aside:

  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Dill
  • Carrots
  • Cilantro
  • Corn
  • Onions
  • Parsnips
  • Peas
  • Potatoes
  • Radishes
  • Rutabaga
  • Turnips
  • Leafy greens, including lettuces, arugula, kale, spinach, collard greens, mustard greens, chard

15 Seeds That Should Be Started In March

Some seeds must be started indoors in most parts of the country — otherwise their fruit may not come to maturity before fall frosts. If you have any of the seeds listed below, pull them out and make a second pile:

1. Basil

2. Broccoli

3. Cauliflower

4. Celery

5. Eggplant

6. Kohlrabi

7. Mint

8. Oregano

9. Peppers

10. Tomatoes

Seeds That Can Be Started Indoors or Out

While some seeds do perfectly fine when sowed directly into your garden, you also can start them indoors in order to get a jump on the growing season. It’s great to be able to enjoy some vegetables earlier in the summer. Plus, you also can stagger your planting by putting out transplants at the same time as directly sowing seeds of the same variety, so that your harvest lasts for several weeks.

The All-Natural Fertilizer That Doubles Your Garden Yield!

On the flip side, it can get daunting to find enough space, lighting, and time to look after large numbers of seedlings. Plus, don’t forget that you’ll need to haul your seed flats in and out for a little while, too, to harden off your seedlings before transplanting. Consider how many seedlings you must start indoors, plus the pros and cons listed, in order to decide whether to start any of these seeds indoors, too:

11. Cabbage

12. Cucumbers

13. Melons

14. Parsley

15. Squash – summer and winter, including zucchini

Determine Planting Dates for Indoor Seeds

Now that you know which seeds to start indoors, the next step is figuring out when to do it. Using the information on the seed packages, count backward from your last frost date to determine when to start your seeds. For example, some vegetables, such as broccoli, should be started 10 weeks prior to the last frost date. Cherry tomatoes should be started nine weeks prior, and full-size tomatoes eight weeks prior.

Have you started seeds indoors yet? When do you start them? Share your gardening and growing tips in the section below:

Bust Inflation With A Low-Cost, High-Production Garden. Read More Here.

5 Super-Quiet Guns That Don’t Need A Suppressor

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5 Super-Quiet Guns That Don’t Need A Suppressor

Image source: AimSurplus.com

Most of the time when shooters are looking for quiet firearms, they will look for something on which they can mount a suppressor. That is all fine and well if you live in one of the 42 states where silencers are legal and if you can shell out the money ($250 -$1500) for a proper suppressor plus $200 for the permission slip from the ATF. Even if you go the form 1 route to make your own, there are still material costs and once again the $200 tax stamp.

However, if you stop and think about it, there are a number of firearms that are “quiet” in their own right. They may not give you the level of comfort experienced by shooting a suppressed rifle or pistol all day, but a handful of shots from one of these will definitely not “ring your ears” — and some are as quiet as an air rifle.

1. Mosin Nagant M91/30. If your Mosin’s barrel has been cut down in any way or is something like an M91/59 or M44, please do not attempt this, as you will go deaf. I found out by accident on the M91/59.

I had been testing a group of rifles, three suppressed and one unsuppressed. After replacing a target from a suppressed string of fire from an M1A, I went back to my bench and picked up a Mosin Nagant M91/30 sniper rifle.

After charging the rifle with a stripper clip of copper-washed military surplus (milsurp) ammo, I fired a shot. Then I fired another and another and finally realized that my ear protection was sitting on the bench next to me. My ears were not ringing. Out of curiosity, I cranked off another shot. My ears still were not ringing.

Be Prepared. Learn The Best Ways To Hide Your Guns.

Since much of the noise from a gunshot has to do with the combustion of the powder before the bullet has left the barrel, I came to the conclusion that the powder charge was well-contained within the optimal length of the barrel. Coupled with the fact that the long 29-inch barrel was putting that signature about three-feet away from my ears meant I could shoot that all day with no indication of tinnitus.

Make no mistake, if you shoot something like this, people from a mile away may hear it, but you probably will not damage your eardrums if you have no ear pro.

2. Beretta M950. It seems like yesterday that these pistols were everywhere. It was a distinctive-looking, small 22 Short semi-auto pistol with a tip-up barrel. However, these pistols were notoriously quiet because there is just not a whole lot of powder in a 22 Short case. Fully extended, that barrel is going to be three feet away from my eardrums, even if I use the longer 4-inch version.

I used mine about 12 years ago to shoot a field mouse on the back porch. No ears rang, no neighborhood dogs barked, no neighbors came out to investigate and no police were called. The sound signature is like a pellet gun.

3. Marlin 25MG. This was a short-lived rifle manufactured by Marlin and has been out of production for at least 15 years. They were only made for about four or five years and were designed to be a “quiet” garden gun.

Chambered in 22 WRM and intended to use shot-shell loads, it has a smoothbore, like a shotgun. They were bought up by airports, warehouse workers and even a few museums for pest control without NFA hassles. They are a bit expensive when they come up for sale, but if your survival scenario calls for short-range small-game hunting without waking up the countryside, this is the one you need.

4. Smith & Wesson Model 17. This one does require special ammunition be used. I have tried it with Gemtech Subsonic, CCI Quiet and Remington Subsonic. Most 22 match ammo that uses a lead bullet and has a low velocity will do the job, too. You can use other double-action revolvers like a Ruger Single Six, Colt Scout or NAA Mini Revolver to the same effect.

I mentioned the Smith & Wesson Model 17 because that’s my double-action rim fire revolver of choice with an 8 3/8-inch barrel. All of those subsonic rounds that would not cycle my semi-autos work like a champ in this revolver, and if the cylinder gap is close like in my Smith, it sounds like a kid’s cap gun (back when they let kids play with cap guns).

5. Remington Rolling Block in 45-70. That may seem like an unusual choice based on the size of the bullet and case. But if you are a hand-loader, you can get a 200-plus grain bullet moving about 750 feet per second that meters about 130 decibels on a sound meter. Because it’s a long-barreled, single-shot rifle, you won’t be able to put too many lead balls in the air close enough to damage your ears.

These are but five examples that I found worked for me, but if you do a little research you may find some of your own, like a 148 grain Hollow Based Wad Cutter through a 38 Special with only two grains of Bull’s-eye powder behind it, or maybe a 30-inch goose gun single-shot 12 gauge that brings down birds without alerting the neighbors on the next ridge.

What is your favorite quiet gun? Share your advice in the section below:

Pump Shotguns Have One BIG Advantage Over Other Shotguns For Home Defense. Read More Here.

The Quick & Easy Way To Tap A Maple Tree For Syrup

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The Quick & Easy Way To Tap A Maple Tree For Syrup

Image source: Pixabay.com

When it comes to sweet delectable gifts given to us from nature, maple syrup ranks as one of the best. Tapping maple trees for sap and making it into syrup is a surprisingly simple process, can be done at any scale, and is achievable by anyone with access to maple trees and a few basic supplies.

The Basics of How Tapping Works

The rudimentary science goes something like this: the natural fluids inside trees tend to remain dormant during the cold of winter, but begin to rise and fall between the roots and branches when spring arrives. This brief period, during which the temperature rises well above freezing during the day but continues to dip back to cold overnights, is the best time to extract the fluid — or sap — from the tree by way of tapping it.

The way to do this is to drill a hole through the bark in order to access the sap, insert a specialized funnel-shaped spout called a “spile,” and hang a bucket under the spile to collect the liquid.

The Basics of How Sap Becomes Syrup

Anyone who has spent any time in the kitchen knows that boiling liquids in an uncovered pan causes the liquid to “reduce,” or become thicker. The more surface area in the pan and the hotter the heat, the faster liquid will evaporate into the air.

Making maple syrup works along the same principles. It begins with sap, which is more water than sugar, and boiling reduces it into a thick sweet syrup. It takes roughly 40 units of sap to yield one unit of syrup.

Equipment You Need to Make Syrup

The equipment needed for a syruping operation varies widely, depending on the size of the project. That is one of the beautiful aspects about making syrup — you don’t need to invest in a bunch of supplies if you want to just try it out.

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For an easy first-time one-tree backyard tapping project, you need:

  • Drill, either cordless electric or hand-crank, with a 7/16 bit for standard-size spiles.
  • Spile with hook, made out of metal or plastic, available online or at hardware stores and specialty retailers.
  • Hammer or rubber mallet.
  • Bucket, either one made specifically for sap collecting or a jerry-rigged one. Covers are nice to keep out debris and precipitation, but not crucial. You can rig one out of recycled materials if needed.
  • Heavy stockpot.
  • Filtering material — cheesecloth or paper coffee filters.

How to Tap

Select a tree for tapping. Sugar maples, also known as rock maples, are best, but other maples — and even other kinds of deciduous trees — can be used. The tree should be healthy, eight inches or more in diameter, and ideally have a widespread crown.

Drill a hole in the tree 2 and ½ inches deep, holding the drill at a slight upwards angle. I wrap masking tape around the drill bit so I can tell when to stop. Run the drill in reverse to get out the pulp.

The Quick & Easy Way To Tap A Maple Tree For Syrup

Image source: Pixabay.com

Attach the hook to the spile before inserting it. Using the hammer or mallet, gently tap the spile into the hole, with the pour spout on the bottom.

Hang the bucket and wait for the sap to run. Depending upon the tree and the weather, you could get as much as two gallons a day, or as little as a few drops.

It’s important to check your tap every day. The warmer and sunnier it is, the more it will run. Between boils, you will need to keep it cold to avoid bacteria growth.

You can drink sap the way it comes out of the tree. It is tasty and said to have health benefits, but take care not to overdo as it can have laxative properties.

When the tree begins to push buds, the sap will begin to taste bitter and it’s time to pull the spile out of the tree. You can do this with pliers. Wash it well and put it away for next year. The hole in the tree will heal over in a year or two, with no long-term ill effect.

How to Make Syrup

If you can possibly boil your sap outdoors, that is ideal. The reason is because all of that humidity coming out of the reducing sap has to go somewhere, and could leave a sticky residue on your walls and ceilings and even contribute to peeling wallpaper. That said, people do get away with boiling small amounts indoors, especially if their house is very dry from wood heat.

You can boil outdoors using a propane camp stove, but always make safety a paramount concern. Use appropriate practices, keep children and pets at a safe distance, and follow manufacturer’s directions. You also can set up a firepit and build a wood fire.

No matter where or how you boil down your sap, the method is simple. Use the widest, shallowest container you have, and cook it at a full boil. Tend to it carefully. It can roil up unexpectedly every now and then, and you will want to back off the heat if it does. As with any reducing liquid, particularly one containing sugar, you will want to stir it more often as it thickens to keep it from sticking and burning.

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When the syrup is reduced to the thickness you like, strain it while still hot to remove any fine debris, foam or grit. There is no wrong answer when it comes to thickness, but simply personal preference — and if you decide later it’s too thin, you always can cook it more.

Homemade syrup can be stored in a glass jar in the refrigerator for quite some time. If you question its freshness at any point, you can skim it and reboil it.

Ongoing Options

Once you have made and used your own homemade maple syrup, you are unlikely ever to want to return to store-bought stuff again, and you eventually may want to step up your game and tap more than one tree. When it comes to the many permutations of tapping and syruping, on any scale from 10 trees to 10,000 trees, the sky is the limit.

After trying a single tap, you may choose different style spiles or buckets or perhaps even abandon buckets altogether and go for plastic tubing instead.

Your boiling options include everything from homemade outdoor wood-fired evaporators made out of masonry, metal or earthworks, to retrofitted turkey fryers, to commercially manufactured evaporators.

You may end up purchasing specialized felt filters with paper liners, skimmers, maple-leaf-shaped syrup bottles, and other useful and fun accessories.

As with any hobby or venture, it makes sense to start off small and expand gradually. With maple syruping, you will want to research each component as you go, evaluating cost and balancing needs to create your own customized process. But for now, a few dollars and a little time can result in delicious maple syrup and bragging rights of having made it yourself.

What advice would you add on tapping trees for syrup? Share your tips in the section below:

Bust Inflation With A Low-Cost, High-Production Garden. Read More Here.

No, Garlic Is Not Healthiest When It’s Raw. (Ferment It! Here’s How.)

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You’re Consuming Garlic All Wrong. (Ferment It! Here’s How.)

Image source: Pixabay.com

If you’re trying to take advantage of all garlic has to offer, you have to eat it raw.

Garlic contains a property called alliin, which turns into something called allicin once it’s been crushed and exposed to air. Allicin is responsible for all of garlic’s amazing features and its distinctive smell. However, allicin has a very short life span. It is most potent 10 minutes after a clove has been crushed and almost completely gone after 30 minutes. Even though it makes food taste wonderful, cooking destroys nearly all of the health benefits in a clove of garlic.

But even in its raw state, our bodies cannot digest and process all of garlic’s nutrients. However, lacto-fermented garlic far surpasses the nutritional value of fresh garlic. In other words, if we want to experience all of the health benefits in a clove of garlic, we can maximize it through consuming fermented garlic.

The antioxidant activity of fermented garlic is much higher than that of fresh. The fermentation process also produces high levels of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide, something our bodies produce naturally, eliminates harmful bacteria, viruses and fungi. As a result, fermented garlic is one of nature’s most powerful antibiotics. Plus, because of the fermentation, it also contains good probiotics. Fermented garlic really is a superfood!

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So how do you make fermented garlic? Let’s take a look:

1. Peel enough cloves of garlic to fill a one-quart jar about three-quarters of the way full. This typically takes 9 to 12 heads of garlic.

2. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of sea salt.

3. Fill the jar with filtered water, leaving one inch of space at the top of the jar.

4. Cover with an air-tight lid. Let it sit on a countertop at approximately 75 degrees Fahrenheit, out of direct sunlight, for at least 10 days. For best results, let it culture for up to 6 weeks. Don’t open the jar until you’re ready for it to be done. When you open the jar it should smell fresh and garlicky!

As the garlic ferments it will bubble and expand, filling the extra space at the top of the jar. After a day or two, sometimes it is necessary to “burp” the jar. Don’t remove the lid; just loosen it a little, let some of the pressure out and tighten it again. This usually only needs to be done once.

Most people enjoy eating the cloves of garlic whole, as the taste of fermented garlic is salty and milder than fresh garlic. Alternatively, you can substitute fermented garlic in recipes that call for fresh, such as hummus, salsa, guacamole and homemade salad dressings.

If you really are struggling with the idea of eating a clove of garlic, you can crush a clove of garlic shove it into an empty gelatin capsule and swallow it quickly before the capsule starts to dissolve.

If some of your cloves turn purple, blue or green, don’t fret, it’s natural. The sulfur compounds in the garlic can react with the copper that is found in most drinking water. These cloves of garlic are still safe to consume.

Do not consume if you notice mold growing or if it has an aroma other than the wonderful smell of garlic.

A jar of fermented garlic should last for up to one year once it’s placed in the refrigerator and if it does not become contaminated. Always use a clean utensil when removing garlic from the brine.

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please consult with a qualified health professional first about this method.

Have you ever made fermented garlic? Share any tips or questions in the section below:

Harness The Power Of Nature’s Most Remarkable Healer: Vinegar

Reverse culture shock – going ‘on-grid’

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Prisoners in fron of the fire see only their shadowsIf you ever study the faces of people who have recently returned from time off-grid or long periods of adventure travel, they seem to have this strange sharpness in their eye. It’s almost like they mistrust their newfound mod-con environment (perhaps rightly so).

I think of it in a Plato’s Cave kind of way. Plato’s Cave is an allegory written by the Greek philosopher Plato, and describes a situation where many prisoners’ are living in a cave and only have fire light to see by. They see their own shadows cast by the fire behind them onto the wall in front of them, and conclude that is the reality.

This cave is the prisoner’s entire reality until one escapes and realises they had been living in a cave all along.

The point of the story is meant to show that without education and knowledge of things greater than ourselves, we are confined to live in a distorted reality and mistake superficial appearances for truth.

Going off-grid is rather like moving from the cave to the sunlight. It’s also why going back can be difficult too; it feeling strange to suddenly bury yourself deep underground again.

Going back ‘on-grid’ after being off-grid can be even more shocking than the other way round.

As it is winter now, some of us will be thoroughly back ‘on-grid’ waiting for the summer to come back around.

But never fear, during these times of duress we will be here to entertain you, inspire you and comfort you with stories and information about getting back out there!

Also if you have any good going ‘on-grid’ stories share below or write to news@off-grid.net!

Like Charlton Heston discovering the decimated Statue of Liberty protruding out from the ocean on an island run by monkeys; returning to civilisation can sometimes make you want to scream, ‘you maniacs’ and start hysterically pounding the floor.

The post Reverse culture shock – going ‘on-grid’ appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Tiny house build in Alaska

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I’ve never been to Alaska, I live in what most would consider a challenging place to live, on an undisclosed mountainside in the high desert of far west Texas… but I have to give props to those who live year round in Alaska, those are some really tough people 🙂

The people have to be tough, and their homes have to be equally as tough, this tiny house is built very to withstand the wilds of Alaska and honestly has most (if not all) of the amenities I would want to have. I thought that having an elevator bed, one that would go up and down would be a great idea, apparently someone else had the same thought and actually did it. This works and works great!

I really love the amount of open space as well as the storage space. Each space has been well thought out and is multi-functional, most components have at least 2 to 3 functions each, I’d say that this tiny home is the pinnacle of all the tiny homes I’ve seen to date.

https://youtu.be/lHjJd4tkvSU

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Reader Comment- Cache Stuff

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Good to hear, you do have that stuff on hand now right!?
Like most survivalists who have been at it awhile I have put a decent amount of stuff back over the years.   I hesitate to pick an exact start point for me as a survivalist as I always had some of those tendencies but if I did it would be roughly a decade ago. 
On a tangent to newer survivalists overwhelmed with all the stuff they think they need I would say to be patient. Even on a fairly tight budget if you are consistent you will have all the stuff you need in a lot less time than you would think. 
As survivalist we have a nasty tendency to just stockpile stuff in our garages, basements and barns. Same with guns in our safes. You don’t need the stuff for a 3rd or 8th spare bug out bag at your primary residence. You need it somewhere else. Somewhere you could end up in a bad situation. 
For this cache the only stuff I have purchased is the ammo and a can to put it in. There is some fudging that because I put in stuff like underwear, some jeans and a pair of boots I will probably end up replacing. However at a minimum that will let me spread out the cost of the cache over a little but more time. 
Sort of like Meister said I am caching good stuff. For me the caveat to that is I think caches can be a great place for functional but maybe not perfect stuff. Like in this cache I’m putting an Ontario Air Force Shrvical Lnife I ordered once just cuz I was curious about them. Fine serviceable knife, just not one I see myself putting into a core system. For clothes useful outdoor stuff that may not be fashionable for everyday wear makes sense. Example, in this cache I am including a green fleece with a unit logo I got at a goodwill for like 3 bucks and an old BDU gortex jacket I must have stolen a decade ago as a dirty specialist. Fleece and great outdoor stuff, just not what I would wear for everyday stuff.

So I put together kind of a combination operational/ survival cache. Basically the stuff to go from being normal everyday Le to an active combatant and some outdoor gear too. Roughly equivalent to a level 3 sustainment set up with a ruck n some sleeping stuff.

I guess the total cost of this cache would be about 3 grand but I had the stuff on hand minus the amp which I’m having delivered there.

Sorry about the lack of links and probably some spelling stuff. I’m posting from my phone as my laptop is basically toast. 

Skills Workshop-Eve Gonzales-Pt 2

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Eve Gonzales is back for the second half of our interview. We talk about her upcoming free survival skills workshop at Laura S Walker State Park. Reserve your spot today for A Time with Experts.

Watch through the eyes of Noah Parker as the world descends into chaos, a global empire takes shape, ancient writings are fulfilled and the last days fall upon the once great United States of America. The Days of Noah is now available as a complete box set for Kindle.

Ready Made Resources is a trusted name in the prepper community because they’ve been around for 18 years. They offer great prices on Night Vision, water filtration, long term storage food, solar energy components and provide free technical service. Get ready for an uncertain future at ReadyMadeResources.com!

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The post Skills Workshop-Eve Gonzales-Pt 2 appeared first on Prepper Recon.

Tips For Building Emergency Food Stocks

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Tips For Building Emergency Food Stocks Have you been trying to build an emergency food supply, only to turn around and use up all you worked to stock up? It can be incredibly frustration and make you feel like you’re failing when that likely isn’t the case at all! Most people, when first starting to …

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Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (3/4/17)

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Here are the top 7 articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks.  But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

I’ve also included one honorable mention that I think you should read.

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 2/27/17 – 3/4/17

Peace,
Todd

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The Bitter Melon Experiment, Part One

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Bitter Gourd (Japanese Variety), aka Bitter Melon

 I am trying an experiment this year in growing Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia), also know as Bitter Gourd. I’ll be posting updates on this experiment throughout the year, letting my readers know the progress, for good or bad. This article (Part One) will introduce people to Bitter Melon, and why I am conducting this experiment. If successful, Bitter Melon could be an important vegetable to include in survival gardens due to its possible medical uses.

If you haven’t heard of Bitter Melon, it is an Asian vegetable which looks similar to a large and very wrinkled cucumber. It is in the same botanical family as squashes and gourds. It has a somewhat bitter taste (the more ripe it is, however, the less bitter). 

Bitter Melons grow on vines that can reach 12′ to 16′ in length under optimal growth conditions, so it is suggested that it be grown along a fence or using trellises. Typically, Bitter Melon is gown in tropical regions of Asia and the Caribbean. It will be interesting to see if I can grow it successfully in North Carolina. 

As a vegetable, it can be eaten raw, added to salads, or cooked into  variety of dishes. It can also be juiced.

The traditional Okinawan dish goya chanpuru (photo by Nesnad)

Possible Health Benefits and Medicinal Purposes

As you may know, I am a diabetic (non-insulin dependent).  So I am always searching for possible natural and alternative treatments for diabetes. In any disaster or post-collapse situation, folks may not have ready access to insulin and other diabetic medications, and be forced to make do as best they can until access is restored. 

Bitter Melon may hold some potential as a possible emergency replacement for insulin or other diabetic medication. According to my online research, Bitter Melon contains a chemical compound (Polypeptide-p) that acts similar to insulin and appears to have a hypoglycemic effect that may reduce blood sugar levels. According to several articles I’ve read, this only works if the Bitter Melon is consumed raw or in juice form. According to those articles, the powdered Bitter Melon that you can buy in capsules at health food and vitamin stores is not effective in lowering blood sugar. 

In addition to  its potential benefits to diabetics, Bitter Melon also has other health benefits. It has significant amounts of Vitamin C, Folate, and Zinc, as well as smaller amounts of various other nutrients. Bitter Melon may also have certain anti-cancer benefits and may help protect against heart problems.

Please research these potential health benefits for yourself. You can check out the articles on Bitter Melon at WebMD, Wikipedia, Bonnie Plants, LiveStrong, Dr. Axe, and Dr. Andrew Weil, among others.

Last week, I received the Bitter Gourd seeds that I ordered through Amazon (for only $2.95 with free shipping!). I will be planting those seeds as soon as any chance for frost in my area has safely passed. 

NOTE: I am NOT a doctor or other medical professional. Nothing I present in this article is meant to diagnose any disease or to recommend any treatment. It is only meant as “food for thought” and a starting point for your own research and consideration. Please see your doctor for medical advise when dealing with diabetes or any other illness. 


Social Unrest Unleashed: Radical Political Activists Violently Attack Opposition Again

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More political rallies turn violent over the weekend as radicals start openly calling for civil war and violence in the streets. […]

The post Social Unrest Unleashed: Radical Political Activists Violently Attack Opposition Again appeared first on Off Grid Survival – Wilderness & Urban Survival Skills.

Off grid living: Grow 25 pounds of sweet potatoes in a bucket

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Although sweet potatoes are an important staple food for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners, this versatile, orange root tuber can be added to many other meals all year round. While sweet potatoes have been used for ages by many cultures around the world, until recently they weren’t a regular sight on American kitchen tables outside of the Holiday season.

In the past decade, however, the sweet potato has found its way to our hearts. According to the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center, the root vegetable’s popularity has skyrocketed between 2000 and 2014, with its consumption increasing by nearly 80 percent. And for a good reason; sweet potatoes pack a powerful nutritional punch.

They are loaded with essential micronutrients to promote overall health and have fewer calories than ordinary potatoes. Essential nutrients found in sweet potatoes include fiber, protein, beta-carotene, vitamin C, manganese, potassium, and many vitamins of the B-complex.

What’s more, you actually don’t need a big garden or a lot of space to grow your own supply of sweet potatoes. Read on to find out how to grow sweet potatoes at your home.

Easy steps to grow sweet potatoes in a bucket

  1. Select the right sweet potato – Rooted sweet potatoes will give you the best result since you can be sure that they are not treated with pesticides to stop the sprouting process.
  2. Create some heat – Unlike regular potatoes, sweet potatoes love the heat. While sweet potatoes will still grow at a minimum temperature of 50 °F (10°C), they seem to do much better at room temperature. So, if you live in a colder climate, make sure to keep them indoors.
  3. Prepare a 5-gallon bucket – Once you have selected the right sprouted potato, fill a container that has draining holes in the bottom with moist soil. Plant one potato per 5-gallon bucket, tops exposed.
  4. Waiting for “slips” to emerge – After a while, green shoots or slips will start to grow out of the sweet potato. This step will take about 90 days.
  5. Transplant the slips – Once the slips are big enough, about 6 to 12 inches, it is time to gently remove them from the sweet potato and transplant them to a larger 20-gallon container. In each 20-gallon container, you can plant six sweet potato slips.
  6. Pick the right season – As mentioned before, sweet potatoes are a heat-loving plant. If you are planning to grown them outdoors, make sure the last frost of spring has already passed. Late spring is the ideal time of the year. Also, make sure they stay well-watered.
  7. Harvest time – After about 3 to 4 months – or when the leaves and vines start to turn yellow – you can start digging up the sweet potatoes. If you grow outdoors, this is usually just after the first frost. After digging up the sweet potatoes, shake off any excess dirt, but do not wash them with water as sweet potatoes need a curing process to create their delicious, sweet taste.
  8. Cure sweet potatoes – Next to enhancing their flavor, curing allows a second skin to form over scratches and bruises you made while digging up the potatoes. This protective layer makes it possible to store sweet potatoes at room temperature for up to a year. To cure, store the harvested tubers in a warm, humid place (80°F or 27°C) for two weeks.

As reported by Off The Grid News, bucket-grown sweet potatoes will have a yield of about 25 pounds for each 20-gallon container. (RELATED: Find more information about off-the-grid living at OffGrid.news.)

Source : www.naturalnews.com

Make sure you like BackdoorPrepper on Facebook to be updated every time we find an article for innovative ways you can become a better prepper .

 

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Want To Disappear From The Grid? Here’s What You Need To Know

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You might be thinking, “Why disappear?” There has long been speculation that the government is playing more of a role in our lives than ever. What we learned about the NSA and the inherent spying in the name freedom is that we are compromised. All Americans are compromised by the digital footprints they have created. […]

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EveryDay Carry (EDC) Long Term Review

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Everyday carry is a popular subject, often interlaced with the two is one and one is none concept.  There are multiple ends of the spectrum as with anything, folks who go bare essentials and others who have 2 or 3 of everything they carry (read: redundancy) complete with stuff loaded into cargo pockets and strapped to their ankles – or in the pockets of their super incognito fisherman’s vest.   I must admit that my EDC loadout changes sometimes as I tweak things or change out kit, what follows is a long term review of the items I have carried on my person for at least the last year.  I should add one note in that I do not believe my personal loadout is the be all end all, everyone has their preferences which align with their comfort level and training.

EDC Loadout

You’ll see in the above picture my basic loadout, I’ve included my belt because I think that is a very important and often overlooked item.  After all almost everything pictured hangs off of my belt, that leather braided belt from 1991 won’t cut it in 2017 if one is serious about stability and comfort.

Glock 19 / Surefire XC1 / G Code XC1 Inside the Waistband (IWB) Holster

Glock 19 with Surefire XC1

I won’t spend much time here as everyone has their personal preference with respect to weapons but I totally dig the Glock 19.  I’ve carried many other weapons and I think the Glock 19 offers the best combination of concealment and performance.  The Surefire XC1 is a great light which isn’t too bulky, I’ve seen folks run a Streamlight TLR IWB and it’s just too much for me.  Granted the XC1 doesn’t put out as much light but it does the trick.  All this fits nicely into the G Code holster, a nice sturdy holster which is also very comfortable and functional.  I’ve run many holsters in the past and my current favorite and go to is the G Code (I have two of them).;

Benchmade Mini Barrage (Serrated)

Benchmade Pocket Knife

This has been a fantastic pocket knife which I use almost on a daily basis.  I’ve done everything from start fires with it to cut gouda cheese on the countertop.  I have carried a few knives in the past and for me this size (2.91 inch blade) is perfect, I’ve yet to encounter a situation where I wished I had a larger blade.  The blade does keep its edge very well, I use a Spyderco Tri Angle sharpener to tighten it up occasionally.

Casio Pro Trek Watch

Casio Pro Trek

I’ve worn this watch just about every day for over 2 years and have found it to be a key addition to my EDC.  Although it has a boatload of features I primarily use it for: current time and date, stopwatch, altitude check, compass (occasionally).  The fact that it keeps a charge via the sun is a bonus, no batteries to worry about changing out.  I’ve worn it on long hikes and jumped out of airplanes with it, it’s a great watch at a decent price point.

KA-BAR TDI Law Enforcement Knife

KA BAR TDI Self Defense Knife

I run this knife on my left side, pretty much centered between my spare mag holder and belt buckle.  Good placement for a quick grab with my non-dominant hand but still accessible with my other hand.  Fortunately I’ve never had to use this knife but it is there in case I need it.  The small kydex holster with clip work well and slide in and out nicely.

Bravo Concealment Spare Mag Carrier

Bravo Concealment Mag Carrier

Lots of options out there for spare mag carriers, all of which pretty much do the same thing.  I will say that I prefer to run a single mag carrier, OWB, on my left hip.  It’s what is comfortable for me and even though I carry my Glock 19 IWB (Appendix) I still prefer my spare mag to be in the traditional location.

5.11 1.75 inch TDU Duty Belt

5.11 Duty Belt

Simple, sturdy, effective.  This belt really doesn’t have any of the fancy features of many other duty belts but at $15 who is going to complain?  These can be picked up just about anywhere and are reversible for all of those who need to color coordinate.  Great belt which I highly recommend.

The Bottom Line

There is no one right answer to EDC, what I run and you run may be completely different.  What I run today I might not be using in 6 months or a year as I try out new gear or make adjustments in what I carry.  I do believe the most important thing is that the gear you carry is tested, ready to use and comfortable in an all day (wearing it) setting.  On a final note I should mention that I sometimes run a CAT-TQ and Quikclot Combat Gauze on my person but when I do not it’s always within reach.  Since I do not carry those items 100% of the time I intentionally left them out.  Good luck with your own EDC and remember to train with it!

 

Cordwood Building – An Old-School Building Technique

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Cordwood building – An old-school building technique The first time I found out about cordwood construction was while visiting a close friend of mine. He built a great retreat in the woods of North Carolina. He did it after researching his family history and the way his ancestors build houses. After seeing his cabin and …

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How To Acid Stain Concrete Floors, Patios or Basements In 4 Simple Steps

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Ever since publishing an article last summer about using acid stain on the concrete floors in our Simple House, we have been bombarded with requests for more information. So today, we thought we would take you through the entire process

The post How To Acid Stain Concrete Floors, Patios or Basements In 4 Simple Steps appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

4 reasons you’re better prepared when you know archery

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Editor’s note: Please welcome Dave from the archery site Targetcrazy.com. Dave has generously contributed an article on why skill with archery and bows should be a part of your preps! James has kindly let me guest post on his site because I’d like to get you to think about archery. I love the sport and […]

The post 4 reasons you’re better prepared when you know archery appeared first on Plan and Prepared.

How To Choose A Good Pressure Cooker

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Ahh  … the much revered and often feared pressure cooker.

Your mom makes delicious pot roasts in them, and you can cook food in a fraction of the time that it takes to cook it on the stove or in the oven. The problem is that you’ve heard horror stories about pressure cookers that blow up and spew hot food and liquid all over the place.

That’s a reasonable fear. I cook with a pressure cooker at least once every couple of weeks, but I have had an explosive incident when I was young and learning to use it. It was a completely user error.

I was using an old pressure cooker with the top jiggler and I didn’t put it on correctly, nor did I properly seal the lid. The jiggler blew clear through the dry wall in my ceiling, and my roast beef blew all over my kitchen.

They say there’s no better teacher than experience. Fortunately for me, I had my mother to tell me what I did wrong, after she made sure I was OK, then laughed for ten minutes when she saw my kitchen.

Don’t let this story scare you. It’s a rare thing, and if you’re buying a modern pressure cooker, much of the mysticism and dangerous flying objects have been removed so that anybody can use one without needing to patch their ceiling.

For that matter, if you’re buying an old one, you’re gonna be just fine after you read this article.

Can I Can Foods in a Regular Pressure Cooker?

The short answer? No. don’t do it. And this is coming from somebody who laughs in the face of most government-issued warnings.

And here’s why you shouldn’t use a pressure cooker to pressure can foods. Pressure cookers don’t maintain a steady heat and pressure. Both rise and fall, and you don’t have control of heat other than high, medium, or low.

It’s imperative that your pressure-canned food maintain a minimum temperature for a set amount of time in order to kill pathogens that won’t kill you in 2 months or 2 years when you get around to opening that jar. Buy pressure canners specifically meant for canning. You can find these at thrift stores and yard sales, too.

Discover the ingenious recipes that helped our ancestors stay alive!

Types of Pressure Cookers

There are two types of pressure cookers: rangetop and electric. Electric pressure cookers may be better for you if you’re especially timid because they work very much like a crock pot does; well, at least they’re more goof-proof. On the other hand, they are useless during blackout unless you have a good and steady energy source.

A stovetop pressure cooker can be a bit trickier, especially if you’re using an older one. One is no better or worse than the other and the end result is the same as long as you use them properly. Rangetops do typically cook faster, though.

Video first seen on thenewsurvivalist.

Tips to Buying a Good Used Pressure Cooker

Like most of my good kitchenware, I inherited one of my pressure cookers and picked the other two (yes, two) up at yard sales. There are five traits to consider when you’re buying a used pressure cooker.

  • First, make sure that the seal is in good condition. You’ll find this in place in a ring around the inside of the lid. Pull it out and inspect it. If it crumbles in your hand or shows signs of dry rot, skip it.
  • Next, make sure that the pot and the lid are in excellent condition. This isn’t one of those products where you can overlook a few dings. You want to make sure that the sides all feel even and that the lid seals tightly onto the pot. Most have a locking mechanism that falls into place when the lid is properly locked, so check that if there is one. Lock it down to make sure that it works. The handles should line up and stop. If they just slide right past each other, skip it.
  • Don’t forget to look at the jiggler. It’s technically called a regulator and most that you find will have at least five- and ten-pound capabilities. Make sure it’s there because the pressure cooker won’t do you a lick of good without the regulator.
  • Make sure that the rack is in it. Pressure cookers have a rack that sets in the bottom of the pot. This keeps the food suspended above the bottom so that pressure can circulate all around it, and it keeps the food from burning to the bottom of the pan.
  • Finally, look for a good brand name. Even if you buy an older one, if it’s by a well-known brand name, chances are good that you’re going to get a good product and will likely be able to buy a replacement seal if yours goes bad.

After all, a pressure cooker is something that you’ll be able to pass to your kids. One of mine is over 50 years old and is still as reliable as an April shower. Or snowstorm, depending on where you live.

Two excellent older brands that are still producing pressure cookers today are Presto and WearEver. Newer brands include Imusa, Fissler, WMF, Tramontina, and Fagor. Two of mine are Presto and the other is WearEver. I don’t have any experience with new ones.

Tips for Buying a New Pressure Cooker

First of all, you’re going to have to decide whether you want to buy an electric pressure cooker or a rangetop pressure cooker. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Rangetops typically cook faster and the pot can be used by itself as a stockpot. You’ll have to regulate the pressure via the regulator and the heat settings on your stove.

Electric models automatically pressurize and depressurize according to how you set it and most of them can be used as slow cookers and steamers. They take longer to cook, though.

Which type of pressure cooker you need is up to you. They come in different sizes and some offer only a couple of pressure settings while others offer 3 of 4. The electric ones can get pretty fancy and have many settings. It’s all a matter of what you want and need. Good Housekeeping did a review on top pressure cookers that may help.

In general, you’re going to need to pick a size based upon what you plan to cook in it, and you’ll have to decide between electric and rangetop. Look for a pressure cooker that has a good seal, and I recommend one with a locking mechanism for somebody just learning to use one. That takes away the chance of not aligning the lid and pot properly.

What’s up with the Different Pounds on the Regulator?

The pressure regulator is what determines the pressure inside of the pressure cooker. Typical pressure settings are 5, 10, and 15 though many of the electric models have ranges from just a couple of pounds up to 15 pounds. That number is how many pounds of pressure build up inside the cooker.

Different foods require different pounds of pressure. For instance, delicate vegetables like spinach may only need 5 pounds, while roasts require 10 or 15. In many new cookers, this will likely be expressed as low, medium, and high.

Now that you know how to choose your pressure cooker, you can easily go ahead with the best recipes for your family.

Find how our forefathers handled their survival food, and steal their secrets for your own survival!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia.

Matthew 5:3-12

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And He opened His mouth, and taught them, saying, Blessed are…

      This begins what the Bible calls “The Beatitudes”, which means condition or statement of blessedness.  As Jesus teaches the multitudes on an undisclosed mount, He reveals the ethics or value system of the Kingdom of God, about which He was sent to preach the Good News (Luke 4:43).  In the prior chapter of Matthew, Jesus called for “repentance, because the Kingdom of God was at hand”. In Matthew 5, Jesus explains how repentant people should live their lives under God’s rule.  The world has yet to recognize the Kingdom, but by following the moral codes and standard of behavior laid out in the Beatitudes, the followers of Christ will be prepared for the Day that God will judge the world and reign on earth.  
     These Kingdom ethics will not be easily embraced by the selfish and arrogant of the world, but will be words of comfort and solace to the brokenhearted. The words were radical for those who first heard them, and are still revolutionary to the modern mind and intellect. But those who humble themselves and embrace these principles will be blessed in this age and the age to come.  Here is what Jesus wants us to understand….
     Blessed are the poor in spirit; for their’s is the kingdom of heaven.  Without Jesus and the Holy Spirit, I am spiritually bankrupt and without moral virtue.  I am like a beggar who must rely on God’s Power in my spirit and in my life.  Only those who recognize their poverty in spirit will be rewarded with the kingdom of heaven.
     Blessed are they that mourn; for they will be comforted.  I express my deep grief before God for my fallen state; I recognize my depraved state and that I am worthy of His judgment and Death.  But because of my humble assessment, I have found a path to God, and I will be comforted by His grace and mercy.
     Blessed are the meek; for they shall inherit the earth.  I proclaim my willingness to be obedient, and to submit and work under the authority and power of Jesus.  My reward and inheritance will be to rule and reign with Him on the earth.
     Blessed are they who hunger and thirst after righteousness; for they shall be filled.  It will be my lifelong mission to hunger after a life that reflects Jesus.  With this thirst for more of Him I will develop the character traits of mercy and a pure heart, which will result in greater intimacy with the Lord.
     Blessed are the merciful; for they shall obtain mercy.  I will extend the same mercy to others, that my God has given me, whether they deserve it or not.  For, I certainly did not deserve it, yet God stretched out His hand to me.  I trust that the Lord will honor my acts of concern for others.
     Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.  The heart is where the Holy Spirit takes up residence, and I will endeavor to live a life that maintains a heart that is genuine, sincere, and uncontaminated by the world.  And with a pure heart, I know that I will enjoy greater intimacy with God, which is the ultimate goal in my relationship with Him.
     Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children [the sons and daughters] of God.  I pray that I can become a person of great passion for reconciliation between all people. I want to reflect the peace and harmony of heaven on earth, and to be a person of action to bring it about.
     Blessed are they who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake; for their’s is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are you, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for My sake.  Rejoice, and be exceeding glad; for great is your reward in heaven; for they persecuted the prophets in the same manner; those prophets who came before you.  Persecution is how the world will receive those of us who follow Christ, because our values and character traits are opposite of the world’s thinking and the principles they embrace.  But, by sharing in and enduring the persecution that our Lord and the prophets experienced, we will be declaring to the world and our spiritual Enemy whose side we are on. When the End of this Age comes, and the world is judged, we will receive our reward and inheritance as the sons and daughters, and co-heirs, with Christ. 
     In summary, the Beatitudes convey the blessings of belonging to the Kingdom of God and the spiritual implications of Jesus’s rule in our lives.  These should be the spiritual attitudes, goals, and character traits of all Christians. I must admit that I have been surprised to find that a great number of Church-going Christians cannot explain the meaning or ramifications of these blessings that are a central component of Jesus’s Gospel of the Kingdom. That is a sad appraisal of the state of the Church.  Let us determine that from this day forward we will embody these principles so that all the world will know what it means to be a Christian, and the extent of His rule in our lives.   
      

Survival Tips for the Senior Apartment Prepper

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com I heard that one of my favorite aunts and her husband recently moved to an assisted living facility.   They have a one bedroom unit in a complex that has medical personnel available to check on the residents periodically.  One of the things she mentioned about her new abode is the small size, so storage is an issue just as it is with other apartment preppers.  We have not discussed the subject of senior […]

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Some Thoughts On Food…

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can

 

I just want to start by saying thanks for all the comments and suggestions on my recent question about ‘what Do You Think’. I’m going to go through the comments and choose some questions to answer in these coming weeks. I will highlight (as some people said in the comments) that a LOT of these questions are already answered, in a LOT of detail in my online courses.

I have two separate courses. ‘One Year in Hell’ which goes in to a lot of detail about how I survived in my city during war, and ‘Survival Bootcamp’ which is a great step by step guide in getting prepared. Both courses are popular, informative and unrivaled and, as always, I am giving it to you for the most affordable price I can. You can see more details of the courses and join here:

 

OK, today I’m going to look at something very specific. As you know I like looking at the aspects of survival mindset, and I find it most important when it comes to surviving hard situations in longer or shorter periods of time, but yes, I agree that you may have the mindset of a warrior or really hard survivalist but still some basics need to be covered.

Basics like food.

Food

Food is something that you cannot live without, and just like about any other basic survival topic a whole bunch of books are being written about it, what and how to store, prepare etc.

While I am not going to write book about food, I will mention few basic things that you need to consider, based on my SHTF experience.

Have What You Like to Eat?

Yes, it make sense to store food that you kinda like to eat. But on the other hand if you hate canned tuna, for example, and there is sudden huge discount of canned tuna why not buy it and store it, you can trade it, or simply (trust me) you will eat it if you have to.

Do not miss a great deal just because you do not like some food (or you think you do not like it)

Other point here is that SHTF is stress for your body (and mind), huge stress.

Your body will need food that is balanced and good (healthy) for you more then ever. So if you have wrong eating habits, eat too much unhealthy food, maybe it is about time to change your habits, learn some stuff, start to eat good food, and start to store it.

When SHTF you will need your maximum strength, and since you ‘are what you eat’ you can conclude that stuff in your pantry will have a big role in how tough you are going to be when SHTF.

What Food?

It is matter of being practical, or having common sense (again).

You are storing food for SHTF, so it make sense to think about few things that food needs to “cover”:

1. It needs to be in amounts big enough to cover your or your family needs over a certain period of time, so do some calculations in order to have clear picture what amount of food will get you through how long a period of time

2. Needs to be packaged in a way that gives you options to move it quickly or hide it in different places (small packaging, cans, vacuum sealed, MREs, sealed buckets, small packages of sugar,and similar packaging is preferable), that also gives you less chances of spoiling whole storage if something goes wrong (water, infestation etc.)

3. Preparation of the stored food preferably needs to be as simple as possible, not time consuming, and need to have as little impact as possible on your other resources (for example if you store food that needs a lot of time to be prepared and lot of wood to burn in order to make it ready for eating you are doing something wrong). MRE’s are a good example of foods that require ‘minimum’ preparation.

In lot of cases you will have just enough time to eat something quickly, not to spend a couple of hours to make complicated meals.

“Fancy” items

Yes and no. If you are preparing on a budget then forget about fancy items, stuff like junk food items, useless candy stuff and similar.

On the other hand if you covered your basics really good then why not. Have things that you can use for trade, because in any situation there are always going to be people with extra money (or resources) who will want to spend it on “fancy” things.

Also think about items that may be kind of “comfort food” for you and have some of that stored too. There will be days when piece of food like that will make a huge difference for you.

I just want to be clear, make sure you have all of the ‘basics’ well covered before you worry about adding ‘fancy’ items to your food supplies.

 “It Is All In Your Head”

 

But still, do not forget about mental aspect of everything.

Here is one small memory from the war, from the first period of “adapting” to it, it is not a pleasant memory, but I cannot erase it, let s try to use it here in order to make my point more understandable for you:

 I was visiting my buddy, his father had broken ribs as a result of being partially buried under the rubble after shell hit house.

After checking his ribs, and giving some advice, they offered me meal, and of course I took it.

Me and my buddy went out at the yard with two bowls of macaroni, we sit down in pitch dark with our backs to the house wall and we ate and look at the city with sporadic explosions and fires in it.

At the moment we had Czech 22 sniper rifle so we were trying to see something in dark, hopeless, but we simply were eating in the dark, chatting, scoping… some kind of weird SHTF break I guess.

It was hot summer weather, and when you close eyes and “catch” break between explosions and gunfire you could almost imagine barbecue and beer.

And then I felt something weird in my mouth, I was paralyzed for a second, then I moved to the corner of the yard in order not be visible when I lit my lighter, and I checked what exactly is in the bowl.

Bowl was almost empty, some macaroni were left there in water, but also together with that there were bunch of worms floating there.

I checked again, yes-bunch of small grey worms, was not sure but I could swear that some of them was still alive.

I felt immediate urge to throw up. I close my eyes and remembered that I did not eat whole day, that macaroni was my first and only meal that day, and I started to repeat to my self: “do not throw up, do not throw up, I need that full stomach, do not throw up…”

And in next second I throw up everything.

I walk to my friend and ask him “what the f… you gave me to eat, it is full of worms”?

He answered me:” I know man, all what I have is infested with it, it is like that for weeks, I do not mind, and I thought you not gonna notice it in a dark”

I was angry, for a moment, I felt urge to shoot him in the face, then I was angry at myself because I did not check the food.

And then minute later I was angry because I saw warms, I checked it, and now my stomach is empty.

Biggest “highlight” was that my stomach is empty.

It was in the let’s say “adapting” period of SHTF.

Later, I have learned to eat what was available. Expired food, infested food, raw food, weird food.

Over the time you simply want to fill your stomach with something, hunger gets into your pores somehow and you do not mind for some things.

Often I would intentionally go into the dark with my bowl, just not to check too much is there anything else inside.

I assure you, as the situation deteriorate, you will eat lot of stuff that you would not usually eat.