Travel trailer living with 3 boys?

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Travel trailer living with 3 boys?

…and 2 dogs. Wow, that is amazing, I’ll first give my un-requested opinion about it… honestly I don’t know how they do it, living in an RV with one or two consenting adults is one thing, even with a young (read YOUNG) child, but once you have more than one kiddo, especially when they start getting near the teen years, I just can’t imagine. That being said, apparently this family is doing this and doing it well.

I think this must be some good experience for the 3 boys, being home schooled on the road, they are getting an education they would never get in public school, and I suspect it’s a much safer environment since they can choose where to stay at any particular time.

I did enjoy getting the tour of the trailer, there are many really interesting and handy features of this trailer, I especially love the large pull out drawers. The square nesting pans really caught my eye as well, I cook on a stove that came out of an RV so I have the same issues with round pans bumping into each other if I use more than one pan at a time, will have to look into that.

Another thing I enjoyed about this video is it’s real, this is how they live, it’s clear they didn’t do any major tidying up before the camera came in, I’m sure there was some tidying up, but I noticed the washcloth hanging in the shower and the stuff laying around, so this speaks real to me.

I don’t know how long they will continue living this way, I’d love to know what the 3 boys think of this lifestyle. I do believe this will be a positive life experience for them. Enjoy the video and let me know what you think below.

https://youtu.be/C9suPtfAWSk

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Former CIA Director Warns Of Attack That ‘Would Blackout North America And Kill Millions’

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Former CIA Director Warns Of Attack That ‘Would Blackout North America And Kill Millions’

WASHINGTON — A former CIA director is warning that it would be “profoundly dangerous” to underestimate North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, who he calls a “sociopath” who doesn’t follow the standard protocol on nuclear weapons.

James Woolsey, CIA director under President Clinton, and Peter Vincent Pry, chief of staff of the congressional EMP Commission, co-wrote a column for The Washington Times asserting that the U.S. isn’t prepared for North Korea’s threat.

“Kim Jong-un is a sociopath who inherited absolute power from his father and grandfather,” Woolsey and Pry wrote. “Like them, Kim is mentally and spiritually absolutely corrupted. Kim is so suspicious of his own followers that he is purging his political and military elites, inventing sadistically ingenious ways of killing even close relatives.”

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They called him “Caligula in the third generation, armed with nuclear weapons.”

“His paranoid personality is exactly the type to start a nuclear war,” they wrote in the March 26 column.

Western analysists, they wrote, “wrongly assume” that North Korea will follow a testing regime “similar to that for U.S. missiles,” with multiple flight tests. Instead, North Korea is rushing untested weapons into deployment.

“North Korea sees itself in a long nuclear crisis with the United States, always on the verge of nuclear war, necessitating that missiles get rushed out the door based on component testing and maybe some minimal flight testing,” they wrote. “Pyongyang is in a panic, like Moscow during World War II rushing not properly tested tanks to the front from the factory floor — except Pyongyang’s panic is over nuclear war.”

That explains why North Korea deployed 30 intermediate-range ballistic missiles (IRBMs) for nine years without flight testing them until recently, they wrote. The country also has deployed mobile intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) without flight testing.

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“Pyongyang’s panic explains why we should be a lot more worried about their KMS-3 and KMS-4 satellites orbiting over the U.S. If nuclear-armed, these satellites could make an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack that would blackout North America and kill millions,” Woolsey and Pry wrote. “Surprise EMP attack by satellite is such an unconventional gambit it is still not on the mental radar screens of most analysts — exactly as Pyongyang hopes.”

The two men asserted that the U.S. must do four things to protect itself:

  • “Harden the national electric grid against EMP and cyberattack, starting by appointing new commissioners to the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission who care more about national security than essentially representing the electric utilities.
  • “Redeploy Aegis guided missile cruisers to plug holes in the National Missile Defense, especially in the southern Gulf coastal states — Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas.
  • “Modernize the U.S. nuclear deterrent, including development of EMP and cyber weapons capable of neutralizing nuclear missile threats preemptively.
  • “Launch a new Manhattan Project to resurrect President Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative and deploy space-based missile defenses to make preemptive warfare unnecessary.”

What is your reaction? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

Solar Generator vs Fuel Generator

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Solar Generator vs Fuel Generator One of the first purchases I made when getting into serious preparedness was a gas generator. Not only the necessity for electrify drove me but also the importance of creature comforts. My power goes out and then it comes back on. I am happy with my gas generator. That said …

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Vital Considerations About Shelf Life of Food

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By Denis Korn           60102_Forever Young Mac & Cheese_MD_RGB

When I consult with preparedness planners about the various food options for long term storage, the foremost question is, “What is the shelf life?”  Shelf life considerations for preparedness foods is an essential factor in effective preparedness and survival provisioning.

HISTORY

When I began in the natural foods/outdoor recreation/preparedness industry in the mid 70’s, shelf life concerns of dried food products was confined to the military, backpackers and the few folks who were preparing for the unforeseen and the impending tribulations.  For the average person – who needs foods that will be palatable 10 – 20 – 30 years in the future?  Packaging for longer shelf life dried foods was limited 40 years ago, and there were few companies at that time in the industry.  Pouch foods for backpackers and campers had at best a few years shelf life.  The companies that packed in #10 cans usually didn’t do anything effectively to ensure long shelf, which meant reducing residual oxygen levels.  It was hit and miss depending on the specific food that was being canned.  There were two exceptions that I knew of at the time – Arrowhead Mills in Texas and Oregon Freeze Dry in Oregon.  Both companies would have the cans in a vacuum chamber and introduce nitrogen to displace oxygen.  This is what my company at that time – AlpineAire Foods – did in the late 80’s with our can products called Gourmet Reserves.

In about 1990/91 things changed dramatically for effective shelf live packaging.  I was introduced to Mitsubishi Gas Chemical America and their Ageless Oxygen Absorber.  We had our cans and pouches tested by them and the results were extraordinary.  Where military specs required a 2% residual oxygen level, the Ageless Absorber could reduce the levels to 0.1% or less!  This significantly increased shelf life by reducing oxidation of foods.  I was the first person in the industry to embrace this technology, and my company immediately began using these absorbers in our cans and pouches – and the rest is history.  Currently it is an industry standard to use oxygen absorbers in foil pouches and #10 cans of dried foods.  Companies that are still only using nitrogen flushing to reduce residual oxygen are utilizing an ineffective method and outdated technology.

WHY OXYGEN FREE?

Basically there are 2 reasons for wanting to store food in an oxygen free environment – (1) eliminate the possibility for infestation and spoilage from insects and microorganisms, and (2) control oxidation, which leads to the rancidity of fats and oils, foul taste, off color, and nutritional deterioration.  The lower the oxygen levels – the more effective in preserving the integrity of the foods stored.  Some foods are more susceptible to oxidation deterioration than others.  It is important to know how susceptible the foods you are storing are to oxidation, because as you will see the type of container you store your foods in may at some point no longer be an adequate oxygen barrier.  Research by Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Company, the inventors of oxygen absorbers and manufacturer of the Ageless® brand absorber, indicates that in an oxygen free atmosphere (their absorbers can reduce the residual oxygen level in the proper container to 0.1% or less) all adults, larvae, pupae, and eggs of the most prevalent dry food insects are killed within 14 days.  Freezing a product – grains, beans, cereals, etc. – will not kill all microscopic eggs.

While oxidation has a distinct effect on most foods, there are some dried foods that are not as susceptible.  Whole grains and beans being the most obvious, however there are some dried vegetables and processed cereals that seem to have an inherent long shelf life.  That is why when opening containers of very old dried foods, some are spoiled and others may still be edible.  The old adage still is applicable – If it looks OK, if it smells OK, and it tastes OK it is OK.  Over long periods of time some nutritional value can be lost, however in an emergency situation you will have food to eat.  It is still recommended that all long term storage foods be packed in a very low residual oxygen atmosphere.

BOGUS CLAIMS

I need to once again alert all those reading this article to be discerning, cautious and on your guard when buying so-called long term pouched emergency foods!  I have written extensively about the deception and misinformation being delivered by businesses that call themselves emergency and/or survival food companies.  I have over 40 years in the natural foods, emergency preparedness and outdoor recreation industries – I know deceitfulness when I see it.

The #1 red flag that indicates a deceptive claim and is used by the newer and untrustworthy companies is the fabricated 20 – 25 – 30 year shelf life claim of pouched foods in plastic buckets.  It is interesting that some of these companies are now adding in small print the term “up to” on their packing and literature.  I suppose if you stored your foods in Arctic conditions it might last that long, however most people do not store foods for 20-25-30 years in ideal conditions, and when you evaluate the packaging material and process, they are also less than adequate or ideal for these very extended shelf life claims.  Also keep in mind that these companies are so new that there is NO anecdotal evidence of their misleading claims.

MATERIALS

The material in which a dried food product is packed is essential in insuring an optimal shelf life.

Plastic buckets (HDPE – high density polyethylene) – 5 and 6 gallon round and square sizes with handles are very popular for packing grains, beans, and other commodities in bulk

Pro:

  • A convenient container to store larger quantities of dry foods – stores and stacks well, is compact, and can be carried easily.
  • Inexpensive new and can be obtained used from a number of sources.
  • A thick walled (90 mil) container with the proper gasket can be used effectively to control the atmosphere within for up to 2 to 4+ years.
  • Can be used in conjunction with foil pouches for convenience of storage.
  • You can use multiple foil pouches stored in the bucket for convenience of use.
  • Insects don’t easily penetrate the thick walls.
  • Can withstand some rough handling.
  • Because insects at all stages are destroyed within about 14 days, the short term effectiveness of using an oxygen absorber to create an oxygen free environment is useful.

Con:

  • HDPE is a permeable (porous – albeit microscopic) material and gas transmission rates (the length of time gases such as oxygen will travel through a given material) indicate that it will take 2 to 4 years for the atmosphere within the bucket to match the atmosphere outside (our normal atmosphere is normally about 21% oxygen and 79% nitrogen with a very small amount of other gases such as carbon dioxide).  This means that if you started with an oxygen free or low level to begin with, that over time the oxygen level in the bucket will continue to increase until it reaches parity or equality with the normal atmosphere.  Some foods will still be fine after the atmosphere has been equalized.
  • If you want the atmosphere to remain constant inside your container, or be oxygen free for extended periods of time, HDPE plastic buckets are not appropriate – check with the manufacturers (as I have done) and find out their specifications and recommendations for your needs and the specific container you want to use.
  • The ability to maintain whatever atmosphere you desire within the container will depend not only on the quality of the HDPE walls, but also the integrity of the gasket seal.
  • HDPE will absorb odors and they will eventually permeate into the contents of the bucket.  Direct packed foods will also absorb the odor.  Do not store plastic buckets in areas that have a strong smell. (NOTE: Foil pouches within a bucket will prolong the odor absorption)
  • Rodents and other animals can easily break into plastic buckets if left unattended for extended periods.
  • Not recommended for long term storage (4+ years) of directly packed oxidation susceptible foods, although should be OK for whole grains and beans.

Pouches – There are literally hundreds of possible combinations of materials and sizes available to create a pouch that will contain food.  Normally a food manufacturer or packer goes to a company that specializes in manufacturing pouches and gives the company their specifications and requirements for the specific foods to be packed.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  It is common these days among those who sell empty pouches for food storage, or food already in pouches, to use the term “Mylar® pouch.”  This is very misleading.  By itself the term can mean anything and it tells you nothing of importance so that you can make the appropriate decisions on what pouch to use.  The “Mylar®” brand is the registered trademark name of a PET polyester film manufactured by DuPont® Teijin Films.  They produce hundreds of variations of this polyester resin material.  It is a component used in the production of many variations of packaging material.  It can be clear or opaque such as in wrappers for food bars or Mylar balloons – that look “metalized” yet contain no foil.  Mylar® by itself is not an appropriate material for long term pouched food.  Ask you supplier what they mean when they say “Mylar®.”  A reliable pouch must have an appropriate layer of foil to be effective.

For those reading this article the requirements needed are to pack dry foods for the long term.  If you buy stock pouches from a distributor you need to tell them what you plan to put in it and what your expectations are for the long term.  You should insist on knowing the specifications (especially the gas and vapor transmission rates) of the pouch and whether they suit your needs.

If you want a pouch that gives you the longest possible shelf life for your foods, you will need a laminated pouch consisting of multiple components and layers.  As far as pouches are concerned, one of those layers must be foil (NOTE: All plastics are gas and vapor permeable – some rates are very high – meaning that gases transmit through them very quickly – and some plastics both individually and in combination have slower rates).  Only quality foil is a beneficial gas and moisture barrier – that is foil without microscopic holes).  TRICK:  Take an empty pouch into a dark room and put a small flashlight inside.  No light should escape from the solid portion of the pouch.  often you will see “pinholes” of light indicating a poor foil layer and/or rough handling, or significant light indicating no foil at all.

Ask the distributor the specifications of the pouch, the different components used – not only for barrier properties but also for durability, the transmission rates if not foil, if foil – its thickness, and the reliability and reputation of the manufacturer.

Pro:

  • The variety of available sizes offers flexibility in choices of quantities to store.
  • Costs are reasonable.
  • Can be effective as a short term oxygen free container.
  • Small pouches of food can be very useful for bartering and distributing among those in need during in an emergency.

Con:

  • Not recommended for very long term packaging of products for an oxygen free environment.  Shelf life of pouched foods is recommended for 5 to 15 years depending on type of food product, storage conditions, handling, and composition packaging materials.
  • Excessive or rough handling, loss of seal integrity, and pressure of sharp edges on the pouch from the products within can create “pin-holes” (microscopic holes in the pouch material) that eventually will cause gases to be transmitted through the pouch (NOTE: I am concerned when I see and hear some folks instructing people to cram and squeeze foil pouches into plastic buckets).
  • Rodents and other creatures can easily penetrate pouch material.

Metal cans – For food storage purposes #10 size (about 7/8 gal) and #2 ½ size (about 7/8 qt) are the most popular used with the proper can sealers.  It is possible, if you keep searching, to find 5 gallon square metal cans with a large pressure lid on the top side.  These are ideal for bulk food storage, although they may be hard to find (NOTE: I sold these cans packed with foods at AlpineAire Foods about 20 years ago).  You also may want to consider clean or new metal garbage cans as a means to store smaller size foil pouched foods.

Pro:

  • Ideal for long term food storage.  The atmosphere within the cans, with the proper sealing, can remain oxygen free indefinitely.
  • Metal is non-permeable for gas and water vapor – a zero transmission rate.
  • Difficult for rodents or animals to penetrate.
  • Can withstand some rough handling.

Con:

  • Costs can be higher than other materials.
  • Extra attention must be given to proper sealing.
  • Metal containers may be difficult to obtain.
  • Sealing equipment can be costly
  • Some non enameled cans may rust if exposed to moisture.

Glass

Pro:

  • Excellent for long term food storage.  The atmosphere within the jars, with the proper sealing, can remain oxygen free indefinitely.
  • Glass is non-permeable for gas and water vapor – a zero transmission rate.
  • Difficult for rodents or animals to penetrate.
  • Easily obtainable and relatively inexpensive.

Con:

  • Very fragile – must be stored and handled with care.
  • Practical only in smaller size containers.

ABOUT GAS TRANSMISSION RATES FOR POUCHES

A gas transmission rate is the rate that atmospheric gases such as oxygen, nitrogen and water vapor will penetrate a pouch.  Most pouches referred to as “mylar” have three layers known as PAL pouches.  Plastic – usually a type of polyester film known as mylar®;  Aluminum – a foil layer that should be at least .35 mil;  Polyethylene – the material that seals the the pouch.  All “mylar” pouches have transmission rates depending on the thickness and composition of the layers, and there are hundreds of different pouch sizes and compositions.

Basically a transmission rate is designated as the volume of gas (or weight in grams of water vapor) in cubic centimeters per a given area transmitted in a period of time.  When looking at a typical good quality “mylar” pouch spec the O2 transmission rate is: 0.0006/cc/100 sq. in. in 24 hours.  This means that 6 ten thousand’s of a cubic centimeter will transmit through a single side of a 10″ x 10″ pouch in one day.  This is pouch material in an ideal condition and not the seams.  While the transmission rates are slow in a quality pouch, over time the residual oxygen levels increase.  Rough handling, poor seam sealing, puncturing from foods within and the side seams themselves can also cause additional “pin-holing” and leakage that will effect transmission rates.

Try this experiment yourself at home:  Take an empty “mylar” pouch that is new or one from the pouched foods you are storing – have a small and powerful flashlight and insert it into the pouch – move it around the inner surface and seams.  You will see light coming through at the seams, and depending on the thickness of the foil and pin-holing, you will see dots of light.  These are the visible (there are still invisible and microscopic) areas in which gas transmission will occur.

The reason I have included this section in this article is to give some basis to appropriate shelf life claims.  If shelf life is equated with very low residual oxygen levels – (and hopefully proper storage conditions) – then claims of a very long shelf life of pouched dried food products is compromised by ever increasing levels of oxygen over time within the pouch itself.  Beware of long shelf life claims of pouched foods.

STORAGE CONDITIONS

There are six conditions (plus Time) to be aware of when storing food for emergency preparedness food storage, or outdoor recreation.  The foods being referred to in this post are shelf-stable freeze-dried, dehydrated, dried commodities.  Optimal storage conditions can also be applied to wet pack:  retort, MRE’s, canned goods, and other specialty longer term wet pack foods.

NOTE:  The six conditions listed are chosen because these are factors in which we have the control to optimize for the longest reliable shelf life.  TIME is the one factor that we can not control – and it does have a significant effect on the shelf life of various foods.  Nutritional value is lost with many foods over time.  To know with certainty the viable nutritional value of all food reserve items at any given time after a lengthy period of storage – is at best complex or most likely mere conjecture and guesswork.  What we can do is to apply proper planning procedures – do your research with trusted resources, rotate and consume your storage foods, and be realistic about how long you will really need the foods you choose to store.

  • Temperature– This is the primary factor affecting the storage life of foods.  The cooler the better. 40 degrees-50 degrees would be great. Room temperature (65 degrees-72 degrees) or below is generally fine.  Avoid above 90 degrees for extended periods of time. The longer food is exposed to very high temperatures the shorter the edible life and the faster the degeneration of nutritional value.  Note:  There are some “foods” available for emergency preparedness that are known as “emergency food or ration bars.”  These products are generally referred to as “life raft bars” because they were originally designed for life rafts and can withstand high heat for extended periods of time.  They primarily consist of white sugar and white flour, and were not meant to be the sole source of nutrition for a long period of time.
  • Moisture– The lower the better.  Moisture can deteriorate food value rapidly and create conditions that promote the growth of harmful organisms.  The moisture level contained in foods varies depending on the type of product it is.  Have foods in moisture barrier containers (metal, glass) in high humidity areas. NOTE:  “Mylar” bags or plastic buckets are not a long term (over 3 years for buckets and 10 +/- years for bags) moisture or oxygen barrier. The moisture and gas transmission rates through these materials vary depending upon the specifications of the manufacturers.  Plastic absorbs gases, moisture, and odors.  NOTE:  Be careful where you store dry foods in cans.  Very cold flooring or any condition where there is a dramatic temperature differential may cause a build up of condensation inside the container.
  • Oxygen – A high oxygen environment causes oxidation, which leads to discoloration, flavor loss, odors, rancidity and the breakdown of nutritional value in foods. It also allows insects to feed on dried food reserves. Without oxygen, insects cannot live, nor can aerobic (oxygen dependent) organisms. Whole grain and beans have natural oxygen barriers and can store for long periods of time in low humidity and if free from infestation. All other processed grains, vegetables, fruits, etc. must be in a very reduced (2% or less) oxygen environment for long term storage.  NOTE:  Mylar® bags or plastic buckets are not a long term moisture or oxygen barrier. The moisture and gas transmission rates through these materials vary depending upon the specifications of the manufacturers.  Plastic absorbs gases, moisture, and odors.  The best long term storage containers are glass and metal.
  • Infestation – Examples include rodents, insects in all their stages of growth, mold, microorganisms, and any other creatures that get hungry – large or small.  The proper packaging and storage conditions are required to control infestation and not allow critters to both get into the food, or have the necessary environment for them to flourish if they are sealed into a container – such as in the form of eggs or spores.
  • Handling – Rough handling can not only damage the food itself, but it can also adversely effect and compromise the integrity of the container in which the food is stored.  Glass of course can break; any pouched item can develop pin-holes, tears, or cracks.  The seams on buckets and cans can be tweaked, twisted, or damaged to allow oxygen to enter the container.
  • Light – Food should not be stored in direct sunlight.  Both for the potential of high temperature, and its affect on food value.  Sunlight directly on stored foods can destroy nutritional value and hasten the degeneration of food quality, taste, and appearance.  Foods packed in light barrier containers do not pose a problem with the affects of light.

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Another Home Invasion. No Legal Right to Defence in Australia.

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Image supplied By 7 News.
The Australian government doesn’t give a damn about the safety of the public. Gun control has nothing to do with public safety. We are not allowed to own, carry or use anything specifically meant for use in self defence or in the defence of others. Now the government has banned the use of firearms for defence. Australians are left defenceless unless we break the law. We should have the right to defend ourselves and our families in whatever way we consider necessary. Surely this is a human right?! The Australian government is denying us this right!

Sooner or later I think Australian citizens will have to ask themselves this question: Would you rather be judged by 12 or carried by 6 ?!

How to Hunt Deer with a Bow Effectively

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

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Editor’s Note: This post has been contributed by Joseph. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter the Prepper Writing Contest today.


Deer hunting can be done in two ways; either by using rifles or using bows. If you are one of the many hunters who prefer the latter option, this is the perfect article for you to know the practice tips to hunt deer with a bow. Dedicated hunters will know that practice sharpens your skill on shooting a bow with precise and accurate shots. Thus, here are a few tips to pave your way to become a skilled bow hunter.

Practice during unfavorable conditions

Obviously, a good hunt is scheduled during the peak seasons when the weather is favorable for hunting and trekking. However, weather can be a greatly unpredictable thing, and while out on a hunt, it’s better to be prepared for anything.

Practicing in windy conditions where the direction and force of the wind can greatly affect your accuracy can improve your bow skills. Think of this way; if you can shoot well in crappy weather, then you can do so better in normal conditions. More importantly, you are prepared for any kind of situation when you’re out hunting.

Take it slow

If you’re planning to shoot your first buck from a tree stand, you cannot do so successfully without learning how to shoot from a higher position.

 

It’s not wise to push your limits while at the beginner stage of bow hunting. The best strategy to gauge your skills is to start slow. Start shooting at small distances until you can perfect your shot at that distance. Only then should you further increase the increments.

This strategy can also minimize frustration because it will let you know the farthest distance where you can shoot most accurately. On the field, it will help you gauge your Effective Kill Range (EKR), or the distance range wherein you are most likely to take down a deer without messing up the shot.

Learn how to use a bow sight

A bow sight is an essential tool when shooting long distance. The best bow sight can greatly enhance your long-distance shooting by a tenfold. Basically, it has pins set at different distances which can help you shoot long-distance targets from stagnant position, such as a tree stand.

Other than a bow sight, you should also use other essential bow accessories such as a bow stabilizer. A bow stabilizer, on the other hand, is an accessory that helps minimize torque, stabilize shots, and increase the accuracy of your shots.

Know how to shoot from a higher position

If you’re planning to shoot your first buck from a tree stand, you cannot do so successfully without learning how to shoot from a higher position. Because the trajectory will change once you shoot from an elevated place.

So one of my tips is to practice shooting dummy targets from a tree stand. Once you get a hold of this skill, you’ll find tree stand hunting an easy task.

Target for easy-kill areas

The most humane way to kill a deer is to shoot it in the chest area, where the arrow can pierce through the lungs or heart and deliver almost instant and painless death. To practice this skill, you can use target print-outs of a deer in order to enhance your ability to kill instantly.

Moreover, this will also minimize the possibility of the deer running away because of a shot in the belly, hind, or legs. With accurate shots to the chest area, you can harvest your kill easily.

Don’t hesitate to ask questions

If you’re not sure about something, ask a more experienced bow hunter than you. Remember that it’s not a competition of who is best. Every great bow hunter starts somewhere, and while you’re a beginner, it’s best to take advice from experts and use it to work on your weak points.

Other than constructive criticism, you can also form bonds with other bow hunters and potentially join them on their next bow hunt. This will be a big plus for you: because not only do you have new hunting buddies, you also have a lot of people to help you work on your skills.

Practice with your bow in low-light conditions

You can also master shooting with it during near sunset or near dawn conditions.

Most often, whitetail deer make an appearance before sunset when the light is dimming and your bow sight is getting difficult to use. Although most bow sights come with a glow-in-the-dark pin feature, it will be much wiser and a skill-builder to practice shooting in low light.

If you have a bow sight with a low-light feature, you can also master shooting with it during near sunset or near dawn conditions. In this way, you won’t need to fumble with your bow sight while on the field.

Adjust your bow according to the wind

The wind plays a big role in the accuracy of your shot because, as said before in this article, it can affect the direction and/or trajectory of your shot. When hunting deer with a bow, you’re also most likely confined to shooting from far distances. Therefore, it’s better if you learn to adjust your aim with the wind.

Most importantly, with this skill you can reap rewards when a supposed to be sunny day turns into a windy one. Remember: the weather is completely unpredictable, and as a hunter, don’t expect it to always be in your favor.

Work on your form

As a beginner, the best form for archery is one of the most difficult aspects to master. It’s imperative that you work on your form every time you practice shooting. Moreover, you can also ask an experienced bow hunter to evaluate your form and tell you the mistakes that you’re making.

Why does this need to be done? Well, a great form will directly affect the accuracy of your shot and help you shoot better. Otherwise, a bad form can lead to inaccurate and imprecise shots that will just leave you discouraged. Thus, remember to work on this aspect along with everything else.

Learn how to wait for the perfect shot

In deer hunting, timing is everything, whether you shoot with a bow or a rifle. The proper timing of your shot will decrease the chances of a botched kill. Since deer are highly receptive of sound, you can scare away a bunch of them if you have off timing with your shots and they end up on a nearby tree or the ground.

Unfortunately, the only way to practice your timing is to do it on an actual deer. Because automated practice targets have predictable movements, they aren’t great options for practicing timing. Unlike with deer, you can learn how to assess their movements and make it predictable to you.

Conclusion

Here, we’ve highlighted the best practice tips to hunt deer with a bow. It’s not the actual camping and hunting that’s the most difficult part, but the practice on shooting a bow. Thus, the best option you have in order to be the most prepared hunter in the world is to practice at every chance you get.

Did you like this article? If you did, leave us a comment below and tell us what you think. You can also share this with your friends. Thanks for reading!

 

About the author: Joseph Gleason is the founder of Captain Hunter. CaptainHunter.com is a site dedicated to the sport of hunting. We have a deep respect for nature and for the environment, and we therefore take the sport of hunting very seriously.

Never think that you are alone in the woods again. Our goal is to share what we know with who needs it most.

If you liked this article, please rate it.

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Antibiotics In Our Water Supply: The Hidden Threat

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There’s no denying it. The looming threat of drug-resistant bacteria is turning into a very real problem. In fact, antibiotic resistance is quickly becoming one of the greatest global health challenges of the 21st century, and a big reason for concern might be right in your tap water.

Every day, pharmaceutical drugs are contaminating water sources like groundwater, lakes, bays, and rivers, and sewage treatment plants are finding it hard to keep up. In fact, they are struggling with the impossibility of filtering out chemicals they were never designed to deal with in the first place.

You’re wrong if you think the problem won’t affect you.

Researchers have discovered that traces of pharmaceutical drugs can be found in the drinking water of over 40 million Americans,[i] meaning that millions of people are exposed to unregulated levels of antibiotics every day, and far too few have any idea what the sinister consequences can be.

The Spread of Antibiotic Resistance

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention[ii], every year an estimated 23,000 people in the United States are killed by infections that modern medicine should be able to vanquish — but it can’t. These infections are caused by drug-resistant bacteria; microbes that have been exposed to antibiotics so many times throughout previous generations that they have evolved traits that let them withstand the antibiotics designed to kill them.

The development of resistance in bacteria is a natural process and an example of “survival of the fittest” that happens to every living species that produces offspring with variable traits.

Yet the overuse and misuse of antibiotics has given bacteria more opportunities to evolve and develop antibiotic resistance.[iii] While there are many factors to blame, a big part of the problem comes from the ways that antibiotics enter the water system.

Antibiotics’ Growing Threat to Water Systems

Antibiotics transformed the world of medicine, but decades of widespread use have come at a high cost for the environment.

Since their discovery, millions of metric tons of antibiotics have been produced, used, and disposed of, and many of these drugs wind up in the water system. Unsettlingly, a nationwide study by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2000 [iv] found that 80 percent of the rivers and streams they tested had detectable levels of pharmaceuticals like antibiotics and antidepressants.

The future impact of pharmaceutical drugs on natural ecosystems is still unknown, but initial research has shown that hormone disruption, antibiotic resistance, and the development of female genitalia in male fish is already occurring. Pharmaceuticals are also messing with the gender rates of fish species, and in some places the ratio of female to male fish exceeds 10 to one.[v]

The effects for fish and amphibians is clear, but what the long-term impacts for humans exposed to this tainted water is still unknown.

How Are They Getting in the Water?

Considering the sheer number of antibiotics manufactured around the world every year, it’s no wonder that a large percentage of them wind up in water. Antibiotics wash into the general water supply from agriculture, medicine cabinet purges and even wastewater treatment plants ill-suited for dealing with them.

Antibiotics wash into the general water supply from agriculture, medicine cabinet purges and even wastewater treatment plants ill-suited for dealing with them.

(1) Antibiotic Overuse in Agriculture

Antibiotics agriculture

Whether they are necessary or not, the meat industry is notorious for over-prescribing antibiotics to livestock.

In many cases, daily servings of antibiotics are used to achieve more rapid growth rates, and a good portion of the two trillion pounds of animal manure produced in livestock production sites across the country is tainted with growth hormones and antibiotics. Because only a small amount of this manure is properly disposed of, trace amounts of antibiotics often leach into the groundwater supply or get swept into rivers and streams after rainstorms. In many cases, these levels are high enough to pose a risk.

Recent reports[vi] found that water tested near a factory farm in Nebraska had more than four times the recommended amount of trenbolone, a hormone that’s used to add weight to cattle and has been found to change the testosterone levels in fish.

(2) Disposing Medications Down the Drain

Over 60 percent[vii] of Americans are currently taking prescription drugs, and finding ways to properly dispose of expired or unwanted medications is a common problem. Many homes have medicine cabinets filled with unused and expired medication, and most of these won’t be disposed of safely.

Instead, less than 2 percent of unwanted medications are returned to the pharmacies where they came from and roughly 35 percent of medications are simply flushed down the toilet.[viii]

Nursing homes and other health care institutions are also part of the problem. While hospitals often have on-site pharmacies that are willing to take back unused drugs, many nursing homes are known to quietly flush away old medications, especially after a patient dies.

Even more worrying, some chemicals still get into the water system when medications are used exactly as intended. Human bodies only metabolize a small fraction of the drugs they take in, meaning that a good portion of the active ingredients are excreted through urine and feces or sweated out.[ix] This means that when you relieve yourself or take a shower, traces of the chemicals from your medication may wind up in the water system.

(3) Wastewater Treatment Plants

Processing antibiotic-tainted water through wastewater treatment plants doesn’t necessarily mean they’re removed from the water supply.

Deep inside the holding tanks of untreated sewage sludge, diverse communities of bacteria have time to proliferate. This muddy mixture often contains an alarming concentration of antibiotics that were either flushed down or expelled through human waste which interacts with nearby bacteria and destroys all but the most drug-resistant varieties, therefore speeding up the evolutionary process of antibiotic resistance.

Even more sinister, the soupy sludge created in wastewater treatment plants give bacteria plenty of time to mingle together, and occasionally different varieties will swap strands of DNA with each other in a process called horizontal gene transfer.[x]

This means that nonresistant bacteria can pick up resistant genes from other microbes and quickly evolve into superbugs that can’t be treated with any known antibiotics.

This means that nonresistant bacteria can pick up resistant genes from other microbes and quickly evolve into superbugs that can’t be treated with any known antibiotics.

Worst of all, these ever-evolving strains of bacteria and antibiotic drugs rarely stay contained in wastewater treatment plants.

Traditionally, treatment plants have focused on removing organic material and nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen from water, and pharmaceuticals are a relatively new concern for them to deal with. While a major portion of dangerous chemicals are removed from the water system by the treatment process, facilities aren’t required to use filters for pharmaceutical chemicals.

While a major portion of dangerous chemicals are removed from the water system by the treatment process, facilities aren’t required to use filters for pharmaceutical chemicals.[xi] The laws regulating clean up procedures haven’t kept up with the influx of antibiotics on the market today, and few treatment plants are equipped to properly pull them out of the water.

Even when all but trace amounts of a pharmaceutical are removed from water, it can still be biologically active.

Research has shown that 10 percent of ibuprofen and naproxen in wastewater treatment plants is discharged out again, and even when it is properly filtered out, the medications simply become heavily concentrated in sludge instead. Because some of this sludge may eventually be released back into the environment for use as fertilizer (possibly even for food crops), the problem doesn’t go away.[xii] [xiii]

In light of these concerns, wastewater treatment plants are pursuing better ways to remove all traces of pharmaceuticals from sewage. The range of potential techniques include relying on medication-munching microbes[xiv] and treating water with ozone.[xv] However, these treatment options are still more advanced than what most plants can handle, are extremely expensive, and still can’t completely remove every trace of pharmaceuticals from treated water.

5 Ways to Reduce Pharmaceuticals  & Antibiotics in the Water System

In many ways, the best way to keep water systems safe from antibiotics is to prevent them from getting there in the first place. If you follow these suggestions, you’ll be able to prevent your share of antibiotics from tainting the water system and ensure this shared resource stays a little cleaner everyone.

  1. Limit Bulk Medication Purchases: It might be cost effective to buy your medication in bulk, but the odds are good you won’t have a chance to use it all before it expires. Buy only what you know you’ll need, and you’ll lessen the odds of ending up with big bottles of pills that need to be disposed of.
  2. Don’t Flush Medications Down the Drain: At bare minimum, don’t be guilty of putting your medications directly into the water system. Though the FDA recommends that some narcotic medications should be flushed to prevent overdoses or dangerous recreational use, there are usually drug take-back programs that will properly dispose of your medications for you.[xvi]
  3. Take Advantage of Drug Take-back Programs: In 2010, a federal law[xvii] made it easier than ever to dispose of unwanted drugs, so check out your local area for information about drug take-back days that you can be part of.
  4. Throw Away Meds Responsibly: Though decomposing in a landfill is arguably better for medications than spreading though the water system, chemicals can still leak out of the landfill and into groundwater. To carefully dispose of your meds, remove them from packaging place them in a watertight plastic bag and mix in a small amount of water so that the medication will dissolve.
  5. Start Using “Kitchen Medicine” To Treat Common Illnesses (i.e. 100% Natural Herbal Remedies):  Instead of rushing to the doctor for another prescription every time you’re sick, start learning to treat common illnesses and injuries at home with natural remedies.  And skip the pharmaceuticals entirely!

Ways to Remove Pharmaceuticals & Antibiotics from Your Water

If you’re looking for a way to make your own water safer to drink, the solution isn’t to subsist on bottled water instead. Studies have found that almost a quarter of bottled water comes directly from municipal sources, meaning most brands aren’t any safer than the water from your tap.[xviii]

Home filtration systems might not work either, and the process of oxidizing chemicals might even make your water more toxic. The exceptions are reverse osmosis and activated charcoal systems that can remove many (but not all) pharmaceutical drugs.[xix]

In Summary

At this point, scientists are only just beginning to understand the effects of pharmaceuticals on the natural world.

While they will continue to investigate the consequences of widespread antibiotic use, the evidence is clear that keeping antibiotics out of the water system is extremely important.

By educating yourself on the impacts of antibiotics in water and the ways they wind up there in the first place, you can start to take the necessary steps to keep you, your community, and the entire world safer from the threat of antibiotic resistance.

Natural antibiotic home remedy

Sources

[i] Scientific American: External Medicine: Discarded Drugs May Contaminate 40 Million Americans’ Drinking Water

[ii] Center for Disease Control: Antibiotic/Antimicrobial Resistance

[iii] European Medicines Agency: Antimicrobial Resistance

[iv] The Associated Press: Pharmaceuticals Found in Drinking Water

[v] Emerging Wastewater Contaminant Metformin Causes Intersex and Reduced Fecundity in Fish

[vi] Identification of Metabolites of Trenbolone Acetate in Androgenic Runoff from a Beef Feedlot

[vii] Rx for America: Nearly 6 in 10 Adults Take Prescription Drugs, Study Says

[viii] Harvard Health: Drugs in the Water

[ix] Drugs can Pass Through Human Body Almost Intact: New Concerns for Antibiotic Resistance

[x] Antimicrobial Resistance Learning Site: Horizontal Gene Transfer

[xi] Scientific American: Only Half of Drugs Removed by Sewage Treatment

[xii] Cleaning Up the Breeding Ground for Antimicrobial Resistance

[xiii] Crops Absorb Livestock Antibiotics, Studies Show

[xiv] In a Tiny NY village, Bacteria Do a Big Job on Drugs in Wastewater

[xv] The Scientist: Drugging the Environment

[xvi] US Food and Drug Association: Disposal of Unused Medicine: What You Need To Know

[xvii] Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010

[xviii] The Truth About Tap

[xix] Harvard Health: Drugs in the Water

The post Antibiotics In Our Water Supply: The Hidden Threat appeared first on The Grow Network.

Experimental Tech in Desert Village

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off-grid village, desert, village, platform, technology, Israel,

An off-grid village in the dry desert has become the place to develop solutions for off-grid living in undeveloped communities.

An off-grid desert village in Kibbutz Ketura, Israel is being used as a platform for tech companies and entrepreneurs to develop innovative off-grid technologies. The village was set up in 2014 via a collaboration between the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies and Eilat-Eilot Renewable Energy Initiative. The project is aimed at developing off-grid solutions for undeveloped areas, encouraging experimentation. It is the key step between development and implementation in areas where whole communities have no grid access.

There are four key areas for off-grid living which are currently being developed and worked on in the village.

Desert Village Building:

There are three types of structure in the village, based on existing building types within in off-grid communities. The rural structure is based on a traditional design and has a thatched roof to help with ventilation, but lacks natural light. Therefore, to adapt it, the village has added windows to the buildings to provide natural light for reading and other activities, as well as providing more ventilation.

The urban structure is based on a design most commonly seen in urban slums. The modifications to this design are the double roof structure and wall insulation. The first roof layer is made of palm leaves for ventilation purposes and the second consists of metal for protection against the rain. Plywood walls have insulator material like sheep wool within the wall to keep thermal balance in the building. The structure is mainly based on plywood which is low priced and the design is simple to construct.

Finally, the earthbag dome design was first developed in the 1980s, using soil sacks to construct huts. The bags of soil provide a rigid, stable structure with a balance of temperature. There is no need for deep foundations or a separate roof structure, due to the dome shape. These buildings are rapid to construct, simple and cheap.

Energy:

The desert village has some different energy technologies within its boundaries. The Kalipack solar suitcase can produce energy from three sources – electricity, a vehicle or solar power. Storage takes the form of a lithium ion battery and can power a small refrigerator, laptop or lighting, amongst other things. The village also has a small domestic biogas system which has efficient waste disposal whilst producing methane gas for cooking, water heating and home lighting.

LuminAID have introduced some chargeable and easy to use solar lighting. But GravityLights have also been developed at the village. These work by combining kinetic energy with potential energy. A weight of some sort is elevated and connected to a pulley system which powers a generator. The result is a light which is five times brighter than a kerosene lamp. Surveys with families using the lights have been very positive so far.

Water:

Clearly something that is very important in every community is clean water. The desert village has a solar water distillation system developed by SunDwater. This technology converts contaminated water to drinkable clean water through a process of concentrated radiation, requiring no external energy source. Plus, it’s completely green and eco-friendly. NUFiltration have also developed a water purifier unit in the desert village which provides waste water treatment. Once again, easy to use, requires no electricity and produces 500 litres of clean water per hour. There’s also no maintenance or spare parts required as it’s all done using man power! The village also has a solar powered water pumping system for agriculture and farming.

Food:

We all need fuel and that means food! The village has a hydroponics system developed called the LivingBox. These modular units are like Lego, therefore they can be fitted together and remodelled to suit different needs. They can grow a wide variety of fruit and veg and save up to 80% of water that would be used in other techniques. Solar ovens and cookers are used for cooking food. Plus, an energy generating pot has been developed which produces electricity from a heat source. The pot can then be used as a charging point for phones and other devices.

These are just some of the developed technologies that are in the village. Check out this video below to find out more about renewable energy in the Off-grid demonstration village!

The post Experimental Tech in Desert Village appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Two Amazing 100 Year Old Mead Recipes

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Two Amazing 100 Year Old Mead Recipes Mead or honey wine is the oldest alcoholic drinks known to man. It is made from honey and water via fermentation with yeast. It may be still, carbonated, or sparkling; it may be dry, semi-sweet, or sweet. These recipes are for educational purposes only. We do not take responsibility if you make these recipes wrong and become sick! Do your homework and research making your own alcohol, it can be very dangerous and even deadly! Old School Mead Recipe This old but very delicious mead recipe makes around 1 gallon of mead. That is

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A Beginner’s Guide to Survival Shelter: A Prepper’s Primer

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Shelter is a prepper’s most valuable asset. Food, water, and security mean nothing if you are constantly exposed to the elements. Whether you’re preparing for a natural disaster, a strike on the electrical grid, or worse, your first question should be: do I have access to sufficient shelter or the means to build my own? …

The post A Beginner’s Guide to Survival Shelter: A Prepper’s Primer appeared first on Know Prepare Survive.

6 Reasons Archery Features in your Dystopian Future

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You’re preparing for the end of the world right? Or at least some sort of cataclysmic event that changes the game completely. Maybe a horde of blood-thirsty, bone-crunching zombies surrounds you. You’ll have to fight your way out. Luckily, you have your trusty handgun with you. You take it out, aim, and click. No ammo. No headshot. No you.

You should have chosen a bow and arrow instead.

You laugh now, but you won’t be laughing when your precious shotgun fails you, jamming up in the humid air caused by hyper global warming, failing to protect you and your store of canned goods and bottled water as you are besieged by your crazed neighbors, all signs of decency gone since the complete collapse of American society, probably caused by a particularly nasty Presidential Tweet, or PNPT, as it shall come to be known.

No Infrastructure Means No More Guns

Look, I’m not saying I don’t like guns. Of course I do! I’m not against firearms of any sort, just strongly against their misuse in the wrong hands. What I’m saying here though is once we go through armageddon or some sort of radiation-based apocalypse, guns are going to be hard to find. They’re already hard to find in some parts of the world like the UK. Unless you own a manufacturing plant or live in a foundry, you probably don’t have the means of producing a gun on your own. Once society breaks down and all the WalMarts and Cabellas have been raided and their contents stashed by the greedy, what happens? Sure, the ones you already have will still be there, until they get taken from you or need replacement parts or become damaged, without a solid government and clear social structure I doubt anybody is going to be making and supplying you with any more.

You Can Make Your Own Bow (and Ammunition)

There are lots of different bow types available today, but it is completely possible to make your own bow. How do I know? My 8-year-old nephew made a long-bow in an after-school class called “Crafts for Boys.” It used a length of PVC pipe for the bow and paracord for the string. Shot pretty decently, too. If you don’t have PVC pipe, and you find that all hardware stores have been commandeered by a soviet regime and will no longer sell you supplies, you can also fashion a bow from oak, lemon tree, hickory, yew, teak and many more hardwoods and you’ll need nothing more than a sharp knife to help you. For the string you’d be able to use rawhide, thin rope, hemp cord, fishing line or just ordinary twine.

Arrows are nothing more than sharpened sticks sometimes hardened in fire and the art of fletching them (adding the feathers) is entirely optional depending on how far and accurately you’re trying to shoot. Making your own arrows is also a pretty simple job.

You can find instructional videos to take you through the process. If you’re smart, you’ll watch a YouTube video about how to do it right now. I’m pretty sure the internet won’t be working when most of our infrastructure has been disabled or destroyed.

Hunting!

Hungry? Can’t go to Chili’s; it’s been overrun by mutants with a taste for Southwestern food and your blood. Guess you’ll have to strike out on your own. A bow would be perfect for this situation! You can hunt all sorts of game with a bow, birds, deer, your neighbor’s dog (hey, it’s the end of the world, remember?), all of which will cook nicely on a spit over an open flame. Modern bows with broadhead arrows (lethal looking things, look them up) have been used to takedown elephants, and that is no easy feat, but it shows you the versatility of the bow and why it shouldn’t be discounted.

Ever heard of Bow Fishing?

Live near a stream? If you’ve done your target practice, you’ll be able to spear a fish on the end of an arrow. You can just shoot the thing right out of the water, and the arrow may even stick into the river bed, allowing you to easily retrieve your dinner (Let’s see you do that with a .22). If it doesn’t, no bother really, the arrow will be easy enough to find and if you’re lucky to have the kit handy modern bows like the Sabercome with all the necessary fittings for bowfishing reels which allow you to reel in a freshly speared fish, just like a fishing rod. But with bowfishing not only fish are on the menu, if you can find them in the shallows or some clear water you can hunt eels, alligator, ray even small barracuda and shark all with the same bow and arrow.

Let’s get this out of the way, it’s an armour piercing weapon!

Personally I like to think that due to the fact that archaeologists discovered what they believe to be the first signs of actual bow use somewhere in a well preserved encampment in northern Europe (Stellmoor), and that the signs pointed to those bows being used to hunt reindeer, that bows were developed primarily as a tool to aid in hunting. However, should you need to defend yourself from a swarm of undead, a bow will help you out in that department as well. Just don’t eat your kill in that case. Ew.

A decent broadhead is a lethal and dangerous thing, with modern technology they are surgically sharp, but even a slimmer bullet or field point will pierce soft shell armour, and well…. just who knows exactly what you’ll be up against. I remember once reading a sci-fi book where the protagonists were protected by force fields that no metal or energy based weapon could penetrate and the only thing that would get through was a good old fashioned wooden arrow. That was a long time ago back in school, but the image never left me! I just wish I could remember the name of the book!

The Noise!

When you go to a shooting range, you wear ear protection. (And if you don’t, you really should. You’re damaging your hearing when you don’t.) But let’s say you don’t care about your ears right now because you’re fighting for your life. You’re up against one of them and they’re after you and yours… you shoot it with a firearm. Maybe it goes down, maybe not. But guess what? You’ve attracted the attention of everything within a pretty sizeable radius out there, and they’re now headed your way! In end-of-days scenarios, you always want the most silent weapon. Don’t mess with a gun and a separate silencer. A bow is naturally quiet, the truly silent-but-deadly choice. You can even silence a bow using special string silencers that help to calm the vibration, making you even more undetectable.

In The End

If you agree or disagree feel free to let me know! If you’ve any sense you’ll at least entertain the idea of learning the skill of shooting a bow, and possibly take a look at some of the best beginner recurve bows available in the market today. Who knows where you’re going to be living and just what you’re going to be up against!

The post 6 Reasons Archery Features in your Dystopian Future appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Where to drop out in the USA

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Nipton Hotel

You may never leave

Does your life ever get you to the point where you want to just drop out and leave the system behind? Here are four options for starters. There are many more – you can hook up with others using our free classified ads service or posting on our searchable map – landbuddy.com

NIPTON
In the Mojave desert town of Nipton, the spirit of the western frontier has transformed a forgotten outpost into a self-sustaining ecotopia where the dream lives on.
A former long-haul trucker with a bowie knife strapped to his hip, Jim Eslinger serves as caretaker and hotelier of Hotel Nipton, its existence marked by a wagon-mounted sandwichboard that reads:
WELCOME TO NIPTON, CA B&B HOTEL & ECO-CABIN STORE, RV PARK & CAMPING RESTAURANT
Eslinger added a cluster of tented eco-cabins, outfitted with platform beds and wood-burning stoves.
A faded settlement of about 20 permanent residents, the town consisted of an assortment of structures, some solid and occupied, some as vacant and splintered as an Old West movie set. Computer Gamers might know Nipton for its cameo in Xbox 360’s Fallout: New Vegas, where it played a post-apocalyptic wasteland infested by giant mantises. But otherwise it was your typical drive-through desert community, fixed at the crossroads of Nowhere Special and Wherever You Were Going when Eslinger arrived. There was one notable exception: Nipton, and everything in it, was for sale.
There a cluster of tented eco-cabins, outfitted with platform beds and wood-burning stoves. Popular with today’s 30-something crowd, the cabins were based on a design by Frank Lloyd Wright. There is a solar plant, which produces 40 percent of the town’s power. It sits on the outskirts behind a barbed wire fence, its rows of reflecting harvesters mirroring the sun as it moves across the sky.
There is a hydrogen system in order to store clean energy.
The town of Nipton is for sale.

KALANI HONUA
A solar-powered village tucked away on 120 acres of lush Hawaiian rain forest sounds a lot like Lost: Season 3, but it’s actually an eco-minded retreat center in one of the best areas in the state to drop out. Here in the heart of the Big Island’s Puna District, residents and volunteers are busy harvesting papaya and avocado, cooking farm-to-table meals, and taking classes in hula and tauhala weaving. Book a night in one of their cottages, pop in for a gong bath, or grab some honey produced from the on-site apiary. From $95; kalani.com.

SYNCHRONICITY
There’s no rule that says you must drop out in a rural location with hippies running nude through the woods. Case in point: Synchronicity, a creative community set in L.A.’s bustling Koreatown. Though a small group of artists calls it home, the door is always open to guests, who can stop by for weeknight dinners and a monthly art salon. There’s even a private room on hand for passersby to crash, free of charge up to a week, though payment in the form of a cooked meal, live performance, or carpentry is accepted. synchronicityla.com.

ARCOSANTI
Set on 860 acres overlooking central Arizona’s Agua Fría River valley, Arcosanti tweaks modern means to live greener. The late founder Paolo Soleri encouraged his town to live leaner-efficiently making use of labor, space, and design to create a place that’s elegant and resourceful. Drawing some 50,000 tourists each year, the sleek mini city amid the prickly pear and cottonwood trees offers guided tours, workshops, live music performances, and a gallery of intricate wind bells that are built by residents and serve as a perfect souvenir. Not so much a home for dropouts as a place to drop in. arcosanti.org.

The post Where to drop out in the USA appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Finding Remains in the Field

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At a recent Search and Rescue (SAR) conference I sat through an excellent presentation by the state of Oregon’s medical examiner.

She offered her suggestions regarding the discovery of human remains in the field.

First, don’t move the remains or other items such as clothing, shoes and other personal effects.  You may have found a crime scene.


Second, take a picture of the bone that is found.  A cell phone camera is fine.  Put a reference to determine size for the examiner.  For example, a ruler works best but the sole of your boot or a knife would help too. 

Use your GPS to  record the geographic coordinates of the scene.

Consider marking the location with flagging tape.

Contact and forward the image to the local law enforcement authorities.

The image below says it well.





Go Home And Stay Home

  A friend and I were talking the other night, and during the conversation, I mentioned that I’ve usually only met two types of people in the moolisha. The first is the guy who wants to hear or read something that makes him think he has a chance. The second is the guy who wants […]

5 Old-Fashioned Toothache Remedies That Really Do Work!

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5 Old-Fashioned Toothache Remedies That Really Do Work!

I don’t know about you, but I really (really) hate going to the dentist. Unfortunately, this means that I often wait until I’ve made the problem worse with my procrastination. I know I should go regularly, but I always seem to find a reason to put it off.

You have to admire our ancestors, though. Imagine having a toothache with no dentist (or money for a dentist) in sight. How did they live with it?

Most times, people used herbs to relieve toothache pain until they could find a dentist or until they could find someone to pull the tooth! Other types of mouth pain, such as sores from ill-fitting dentures or canker sores, were made bearable through pain-relieving and healing herbs.

Although most of these remedies have been forgotten due to over-the-counter pain relievers and better dental care, there might come a time when we wish we knew what these herbs were.

Let’s take a look at the top 5 herbs that work to relieve mouth pain or a toothache.

1. Cloves

This is perhaps the oldest and best-known remedy for relieving toothache pain and helping gums to heal. My dentist actually has a little homemade concoction that his grandfather used to make to help with these problems. He won’t tell me everything that’s in it, but I can taste cloves and I must say that this stuff really worked to heal a stubborn sore on my gum!

Need All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effect?

The active ingredient, eugenol, is in the oil of the clove. In fact, many dental items you buy today contain oil of cloves. Cloves have antimicrobial compounds, as well as a numbing effect, which makes them perfect for tooth or gum pain. Crush a couple of cloves and place it where the pain is for 10 or 15 minutes.

2. Cabbage

This common food once had an uncommon use — as a dental pain reliever! When applied topically, it is said to help heal mouth sores quickly, as well as numb the pain. Cabbage leaves were softened with a rolling pin, and then rolled up like a tortilla and placed where the pain was. This very old-fashioned remedy calls for using 4 to 6 leaves a day.

3. The toothache plant (Acmella oleracea)

5 Old-Fashioned Toothache Remedies That Really Do Work!

Toothache Plant. Image source: Wikipedia

This little plant works so well, its medicinal use has become its name! Other names include buzz buttons or sechuan buttons. The flowers of this plant have a super-numbing effect in the mouth, even more so than cloves. If you look at the flowers, they do remind you of a tooth with a red “sore” spot in the middle! The remedy calls for using just the fresh flower and holding it on the painful area.

4. Onions

Onions seem to appear on every medicinal herb list, don’t they? Some people claim that onion juice is so effective at relieving pain that it’s better than ibuprofen. I don’t know if that is true or not, but the remedy is that you cut a large piece of onion (apparently yellow onions are best for this, as they are the strongest) and place it between the teeth, as close to the painful area as you can.

Beet Powder: The Ancient Secret To Renewed Energy And Stamina

Now slowly bite the onion, but only until you feel the juice come out. The idea is to get as much of the juice from the onion as possible. So bite slowly, turn the onion piece a bit, and then repeat until the pain is gone.

5. Sage and vodka

This old remedy came to America via German immigrants. Since sage has antibiotic and anti-inflammatory compounds, this remedy makes sense. Two teaspoons of dried crushed sage leaves were put in a small glass container, along with one teaspoon of salt and about one-fourth cup of vodka. This mixture should sit for five minutes before using. Mix this solution gently, and then take a sip and swish it around, biting the mushy sage leaves. Then spit. Don’t drink this or you will most likely end up vomiting. Repeat two or three times, and then throw out any leftover. This needs to be repeated three times a day with a fresh mixture, as it supposedly goes “stale” after just 15 to 20 minutes.

What all-natural methods do you use to relieve mouth and tooth pain? Share your tips in the section below:

Solar Cooker Types Compared

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Solar cookers come in all shapes and sizes – from portable units to permanently mounted units. While they come in different designs, they all work the same way. They concentrate the sun’s energy into a small space at temperatures sufficiently hot to cook food. You can literally cook anything you want in one of these…

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Prayer Plant Care – Growing The Maranta Plant

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The post Prayer Plant Care – Growing The Maranta Plant is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Prayer plants are some of the most beautiful houseplants you can find. They’re great in hanging baskets as they spread low and wide.Whether you’re just starting out with houseplants or an an expert grower, the prayer plant is an excellent choice. Quick Navigation Prayer Plant OverviewTypes of Prayer PlantPrayer Plant CareLightWaterSoilFertilizerRepottingPruning​PropagationProblemsGrowing ProblemsPestsDiseasesFAQs​ Prayer Plant Overview […]

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Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

One Shotgun Fires 10 Different Rounds (video)

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I must really be into conversion kits lately but this one has to take the cake, it’s the Chiappa M6 Combination Folding Shotgun With X-Caliber 12-Gauge Adapter Set which can be found for between $600-700 online. About the only problem I see with it is that it’s a single shot, but apparently this guy’s review … Continue reading “One Shotgun Fires 10 Different Rounds (video)”

Why Everyone Should Use Coupons To Get Prepared Quicker

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Couponing has always received a lot of negative attention. For far too long people have felt embarrassed to use coupons, in order not to have their friends ridicule them or have sales clerks look down on them. But as you’ll see in the infographic below, coupon users had the right idea all along. Why shouldn’t … Read more…

The post Why Everyone Should Use Coupons To Get Prepared Quicker was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Grandma’s Forgotten ‘Everyday Survival Skills’

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skills grandmother

Our grandparents didn’t spend their spare time watching TV or playing video games. The truth is they didn’t have spare time. Keeping the family fed, fields tended, livestock healthy and a roof over their heads kept them busy from dawn to dusk. They did whatever it took to survive and thrive.

While grandma and grandpa each had everyday skills that all homesteaders and survivalists should learn, today we’ll focus on Grandma’s day.

Grandma was a dynamo. She rose before dawn with a mile-long to-do list in her head. Feeding the family a hearty breakfast and sending them on their way was first priority. She then could get to her own busy day. Housework, fixing a fence with grandpa, helping the cow give birth, making pies to trade, fixing lunch, canning peaches and pulling weeds were checked off the list. Then it was time to make dinner and send everyone off to bed.

“The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets” — Every Homesteader Needs A Copy!

Parking or storage for trailers, ATVs, snowmobile

Here are some of the skills that helped her succeed at all of these tasks.

Feeding the Family

Grandma didn’t just run to a drive-thru to grab dinner after work. She planned ahead and made meals from scratch. She knew the night before what she would make for dinner. To accomplish this, she knew how to do these things:

1. Cooking from scratch – When grandma made dinner, she created masterpieces with no help from any cardboard box mix. Her meals were nutritious, tasty and far less expensive than any of the quick foods today. Love and care for her family were the special ingredients in every meal.

2. Cast iron cooking – It is amazing how many different dishes grandma made in her cast iron cookware. An entire meal, from soup to dessert, can be made with just one cast iron pot or skillet.

3. Preserving foods – Many of us remember coming home with jars of jelly, apple butter and pickles from grandma’s. Her cellar or pantry was always lined with shelves full of preserved goodness. Learning to preserve food via canning, pressure cooking or other methods is a wise investment in your own future.

Growing or Raising Food

Running to the grocery store each day was not an option to grandma. She essentially could shop every day in her own pantry or backyard.

4. The kitchen garden – No matter what grandpa grew in the fields, grandma always had a kitchen garden. She could walk out back and pick fresh dinner fixings. She often had fruit and nut trees, as well as her herbs and vegetables.

5. Animal husbandry – Grandma tended to be the one who cared for the livestock — a cow or goat for milk, a steer or pig for meat and then, the chickens. It was hard to find a homestead that didn’t have at least a few chickens – if not more. Aside from eggs, many times an old hen or rooster ended up as Sunday dinner. Which leads us to the next set of skills …

Want Out Of The Rat-Race But Need A Steady Stream Of Income?

6. Butchering livestock – Although it was more often grandpa who killed the large animals, grandma was the one who usually cut up or butchered them. Her skills with the butcher knife were admirable. She also could efficiently wring the neck of that old hen for the stew pot.

‘Jill of All Trades’

Our ancestors did as much as they could for themselves. Things were made to last, and those that didn’t were repurposed. Here are just a few more things that grandma did in caring for her family and home:

7. Crafty creations – Grandma needed basic sewing skills to keep her family clothed. She might even be talented enough to make clothing in addition to repairs. Quilting and weaving were other abilities which could provide additional income, as well as add to her family’s warmth and comfort.

8. Stretching a dollar – Being thrifty came naturally to grandma, as nothing went to waste. She reused, repurposed and recycled everything. She often was a skilled negotiator and bartered goods or her skills for things she needed or wanted.

9. Medical care – Doctors and hospitals weren’t readily available. Grandma was required to have basic medical skills and more. She even might doctor animals as well as people. Her familiarity with medicinal herbs and plants came in very handy.

So, how did your day compare to grandma’s? Did it seem a bit lacking? It’s not too late to start learning some of these skills that she used on an almost daily basis. So put down the remote and game controller and invest your time in useful endeavors. These skills could even save your life and those of your loved ones.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Julie Dees is a freelance writer from Central California who also happens to be a real, lifelong cowgirl. She enjoys writing about her animals, her interest in homesteading and anything related to the outdoor life. Visit her website, TheCowgirlWrites.com.

9 Forgotten ‘Everyday Survival Skills’ From Grandma

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Grandma's 'Everyday Survival Skills’

Our grandparents didn’t spend their spare time watching TV or playing video games. The truth is they didn’t have spare time. Keeping the family fed, fields tended, livestock healthy and a roof over their heads kept them busy from dawn to dusk. They did whatever it took to survive and thrive.

While grandma and grandpa each had everyday skills that all homesteaders and survivalists should learn, today we’ll focus on Grandma’s day.

Grandma was a dynamo. She rose before dawn with a mile-long to-do list in her head. Feeding the family a hearty breakfast and sending them on their way was first priority. She then could get to her own busy day. Housework, fixing a fence with grandpa, helping the cow give birth, making pies to trade, fixing lunch, canning peaches and pulling weeds were checked off the list. Then it was time to make dinner and send everyone off to bed.

“The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets” — Every Homesteader Needs A Copy!

Parking or storage for trailers, ATVs, snowmobile

Here are some of the skills that helped her succeed at all of these tasks.

Feeding the Family

Grandma didn’t just run to a drive-thru to grab dinner after work. She planned ahead and made meals from scratch. She knew the night before what she would make for dinner. To accomplish this, she knew how to do these things:

1. Cooking from scratch – When grandma made dinner, she created masterpieces with no help from any cardboard box mix. Her meals were nutritious, tasty and far less expensive than any of the quick foods today. Love and care for her family were the special ingredients in every meal.

2. Cast iron cooking – It is amazing how many different dishes grandma made in her cast iron cookware. An entire meal, from soup to dessert, can be made with just one cast iron pot or skillet.

3. Preserving foods – Many of us remember coming home with jars of jelly, apple butter and pickles from grandma’s. Her cellar or pantry was always lined with shelves full of preserved goodness. Learning to preserve food via canning, pressure cooking or other methods is a wise investment in your own future.

Growing or Raising Food

Running to the grocery store each day was not an option to grandma. She essentially could shop every day in her own pantry or backyard.

skills grandmother4. The kitchen garden – No matter what grandpa grew in the fields, grandma always had a kitchen garden. She could walk out back and pick fresh dinner fixings. She often had fruit and nut trees, as well as her herbs and vegetables.

5. Animal husbandry – Grandma tended to be the one who cared for the livestock — a cow or goat for milk, a steer or pig for meat and then, the chickens. It was hard to find a homestead that didn’t have at least a few chickens – if not more. Aside from eggs, many times an old hen or rooster ended up as Sunday dinner. Which leads us to the next set of skills …

Want Out Of The Rat-Race But Need A Steady Stream Of Income?

6. Butchering livestock – Although it was more often grandpa who killed the large animals, grandma was the one who usually cut up or butchered them. Her skills with the butcher knife were admirable. She also could efficiently wring the neck of that old hen for the stew pot.

‘Jill of All Trades’

Our ancestors did as much as they could for themselves. Things were made to last, and those that didn’t were repurposed. Here are just a few more things that grandma did in caring for her family and home:

7. Crafty creations – Grandma needed basic sewing skills to keep her family clothed. She might even be talented enough to make clothing in addition to repairs. Quilting and weaving were other abilities which could provide additional income, as well as add to her family’s warmth and comfort.

8. Stretching a dollar – Being thrifty came naturally to grandma, as nothing went to waste. She reused, repurposed and recycled everything. She often was a skilled negotiator and bartered goods or her skills for things she needed or wanted.

9. Medical care – Doctors and hospitals weren’t readily available. Grandma was required to have basic medical skills and more. She even might doctor animals as well as people. Her familiarity with medicinal herbs and plants came in very handy.

So, how did your day compare to grandma’s? Did it seem a bit lacking? It’s not too late to start learning some of these skills that she used on an almost daily basis. So put down the remote and game controller and invest your time in useful endeavors. These skills could even save your life and those of your loved ones.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Julie Dees is a freelance writer from Central California who also happens to be a real, lifelong cowgirl. She enjoys writing about her animals, her interest in homesteading and anything related to the outdoor life. Visit her website, TheCowgirlWrites.com.

Stacy Lyn Harris’ new book HARVEST

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My mouth has been watering for Stacy’s new book ever since she told me she was writing it a few months ago.  HARVEST is finally out and I think it’s her best title yet.  With a freezer packed with wild meats from this year’s hunting season, HARVEST couldn’t have been released at a better time of year.

Harvest has heart. The very nature of the book is coordinated around food that has families working together in order to bring them together. For Stacy Lyn, food is much more than sustenance, it is the medium through which familial ties are strengthened. The time and effort Stacy Lyn has put into cultivating and crafting recipes that will draw you back to the fond memories regarding your own family’s table is evident throughout. The masterfully shot photographs of the dishes alone will have your senses in a delicious uproar!

Harvest includes Stacy Lyn’s cherished family recipes, free-range meat dishes derived from her husband’s hunting obsession, and lighter takes on decidedly southern classics—all prepared simply, in the freshest way possible. The book covers food from the garden, pasture, woods, and water in four sections:

  • “The Garden” features Fried Green Tomatoes, Jalapeño Poppers, Corn Chowder, Fried Squash with Tomatoes and Pesto, and other recipes to make you wish it was summer all year long.

  • “Beyond the Garden” delves into beekeeping and raising chickens for an amazing Honey Butter to pour over Cinnamon Pear Buns and your favorite Egg Salad Sandwiches with Refrigerator Pickles.

  • “From the Pasture” focuses on free-range, pasture-fed game recipes like Braised Short Ribs, Black-Eyed Pea Gumbo, and Juicy Pork Chops, plus a how-to on sausage-making.

  • “Seafood and Fish” includes Stacy Lyn’s favorite entertaining recipes, Best Ever Clam Bake and Perfect Fish Tacos.

  • For city dwellers or anyone who feels Stacy Lyn’s way of life is out of reach, 15 “how to” articles, peppered throughout the book, offer steps for cooking and eating sustainably in any setting—including container gardening, saving seeds, preserving, foraging, composting and more.

For more information about Stacy Lyn, subscribe to her websites, stacylynharris.com and gameandgarden.com and follow her on your favorite social networks @stacylynharris on Facebook and Instagram.

Find HARVEST on Amazon here:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0983879931/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wwwwillowhave-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=0983879931&linkId=cec183912fdf97032f811fe6568e8a23

Stacy Lyn Harris’ new book HARVEST

My mouth has been watering for Stacy’s new book ever since she told me she was writing it a few months ago.  HARVEST is finally out and I think it’s her best title yet.  With a freezer packed with wild meats from this year’s hunting season, HARVEST couldn’t have been released at a better time of year.

Harvest has heart. The very nature of the book is coordinated around food that has families working together in order to bring them together. For Stacy Lyn, food is much more than sustenance, it is the medium through which familial ties are strengthened. The time and effort Stacy Lyn has put into cultivating and crafting recipes that will draw you back to the fond memories regarding your own family’s table is evident throughout. The masterfully shot photographs of the dishes alone will have your senses in a delicious uproar!

Harvest includes Stacy Lyn’s cherished family recipes, free-range meat dishes derived from her husband’s hunting obsession, and lighter takes on decidedly southern classics—all prepared simply, in the freshest way possible. The book covers food from the garden, pasture, woods, and water in four sections:

  • “The Garden” features Fried Green Tomatoes, Jalapeño Poppers, Corn Chowder, Fried Squash with Tomatoes and Pesto, and other recipes to make you wish it was summer all year long.

  • “Beyond the Garden” delves into beekeeping and raising chickens for an amazing Honey Butter to pour over Cinnamon Pear Buns and your favorite Egg Salad Sandwiches with Refrigerator Pickles.

  • “From the Pasture” focuses on free-range, pasture-fed game recipes like Braised Short Ribs, Black-Eyed Pea Gumbo, and Juicy Pork Chops, plus a how-to on sausage-making.

  • “Seafood and Fish” includes Stacy Lyn’s favorite entertaining recipes, Best Ever Clam Bake and Perfect Fish Tacos.

  • For city dwellers or anyone who feels Stacy Lyn’s way of life is out of reach, 15 “how to” articles, peppered throughout the book, offer steps for cooking and eating sustainably in any setting—including container gardening, saving seeds, preserving, foraging, composting and more.

For more information about Stacy Lyn, subscribe to her websites, stacylynharris.com and gameandgarden.com and follow her on your favorite social networks @stacylynharris on Facebook and Instagram.

Find HARVEST on Amazon here:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0983879931/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wwwwillowhave-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=0983879931&linkId=cec183912fdf97032f811fe6568e8a23

Companion Plants In The Garden – What You Plant Where Matters!

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When it comes to companion plants, what you plant where in your vegetable garden can have a big impact on its overall success! As you plan out your garden layout, it’s important to take into consideration the relationships that plants

The post Companion Plants In The Garden – What You Plant Where Matters! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Is Your Labor In Vain?

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     This is a touchy question when it comes to the Body of Christ.  The word “Labor” conjures up one of the Church’s “sacred cows” … Labor = Works, and All works are invalidated because Ephesians 2:8-9 says, For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that [salvation is] not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; not as a result of works, so that no one may boast. Satan has twisted this Scripture and convinced much of the Church that we are not to do works at all. Therefore, much of the Modern Church’s teachings deplore the idea of works, and we are left with an ineffective Body which has abandoned the mandate and directives of Jesus.  Let me explain…
     There are two different aspects of this doctrinal position.  The first is the issue of inheritance and rewards.  Colossians 3:23-24 says it pretty plainly: Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the inheritance as your reward. You are serving the Lord Christ. That word “work” signifies “labor”, and obviously, when we work hard for the Lord, we can expect rewards from Him.  But that is not the aspect I want to address today.

     I want us to think about Jesus’s heart in this matter.  In Matthew, Chapter 9, we get a very good picture of His heart when it came to healing people.  In this short chapter, we see Him healing a paralytic; the daughter of a synagogue official; a woman who had been hemorrhaging for twelve years; two blind men; and a mute, demon-possessed man.  At the end of the chapter, it says He went “through all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues and proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom, and healing every kind of disease and every kind of sickness”.  And then, in the last verse, it tells us why He healed them all … He had compassion on them.
     That word compassion, in the Greek, literally means to have the bowels yearn. The bowels were considered by the Hebrews to be the seat of tender affections, so the fact that Christ felt “compassion” means He was so moved with tender mercy for the multitudes [who needed healing] that He physically felt it. But it is the last two verses of Chapter 9 that I hope will dispel the Church’s sacred cow regarding “works”.
     In verses 37 and 38, after seeing the multitudes who cried out for healing, and feeling mercy to His very core, Jesus turns to His disciples and says, “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few. Therefore beseech the Lord of the harvest to send out workers into His harvest.” Can you grasp the immensity of this situation?  The Greek word for “send out” is ekballo, and it means “to throw out”, “to cast out”, “to drive”… all with force and effort.  It is the same word used when referring to casting out demons, and denotes the intensity and the need for the action.  Here, in Matthew 9, Jesus is saying, “There is such a multitude [or plentiful harvest] that need healing and delivering and saving, that I can’t get to them all.  Please ask the Lord to send out [with intense force and effort] workers and laborers to gather His Harvest [of lost and hurting souls].”
     At this point, it is evident that Jesus is not concerned about how skilled the laborers are — it is about how much time we have to save the harvest.  If we don’t gather the harvest, the harvest will die! How true is that today??? How many people need to hear us preaching and teaching the Gospel of the Kingdom so that they can receive God’s grace and avoid the fires of hell?  How many people need to hear the message of the Gospel and God’s Kingdom on earth so they can be healed from the Enemy’s  spiritual oppression?  How many need to feel the power of Jesus in our hands as we heal their physical illnesses? Are we, as Jesus’s Church, doing what He asked those disciples to go and do in Matthew, Chapter 9?  Do we think the need is any less today than it was 2,000 years ago?
      You see, the Modern Church puts the emphasis on the readiness of the Laborer [if they even consider that work needs to be done, in the first place]. They will say, “We can’t get out ahead of God!” “We better be careful — we might make a mistake, and make it worse!” “We just need to Wait!!!”
     But Jesus’s emphasis was on the readiness of the Harvest.  There are people who DESPERATELY NEED the Message of the Kingdom, and healing, and casting out of their demons. As the Church, we don’t need to wait any longer for a special sign from Heaven!  If you believe it is truly Jesus doing the work in and through us, then you’re ready to wade into His Harvest. The Church is still waiting for a door to be opened for them.  But Jesus said, The gates of hell will not prevail [against My Church]. So, what does that tell us?  Hell has gates! And Satan is not going to willingly open the door or gate for us!  Sometimes we have to kick some doors open!
     Sometimes I get the impression that the Church is waiting for Heaven to open up and give us permission to delve into the spiritual aspects of the Kingdom.  But Heaven opened up the minute Jesus returned to His Father and the veil was torn away! Heaven opened and received Him — and it has never closed!
     It is very clear by Jesus’s instructions to us as His disciples that we are the conduit between Heaven and earth. He has given us a commission to bring in the harvest before it withers away and dies. We are to engage with those who are hurting and need healing, and that means we will have to engage with the darkness in this world [because it is the darkness that is oppressing both believer and unbeliever, alike].  But the Church only wants to take The Light where it’s already light. We’re afraid of the dark!
     But our examples are Jesus and those disciples who went forth to preach and teach the Gospel of the Kingdom.  [NOTE: Jesus didn’t preach about His death, burial, and resurrection — i.e., the Salvation Message — and neither did He tell these early disciples to teach the Gospel of Salvation. He didn’t reveal that until right at the end of His life and ministry]. But Jesus and these disciples taught the multitudes about the Kingdom of God; about the reign, rule, and superiority of God.  And then they demonstrated what they preached … they healed, and cast out demons, and proved that YHWH is superior to any demon or power of Satan.
     Isn’t that the same message that needs to be heard today? And don’t you think that those same lost multitudes exist today?  That the Harvest is plentiful? And can you see the need for Laborers in this massive Harvest? So, are you willing to work heartily for the Lord of the Harvest?  Or are you content with containing His Light in your comfortable surroundings?  Jesus said the Harvest is plentiful … God is waiting for us to move into the fields and begin sharing the Gospel of His Kingdom and doing the works as His ambassadors.  His Word says that by our fruits He will know us.
     The harvest is ripe and there are multitudes waiting for us — all manner of illnesses and diseases need to be healed; demons need to be cast out; and the power and authority of Heaven [through the Holy Spirit] is waiting to permeate every new disciple of Jesus Christ — all in His mighty and compassionate Name.
     It’s almost Harvest Time — Are you practicing your faith by laboring for the Kingdom of God — or is your faith absent of useful aim or effect; void of results for the Kingdom? We will all have to account for our works when we stand before Him. I beseech you — Do not labor in vain!

1 Corinthians 15:58   “Therefore, my beloved brothers, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that in the Lord your labor is not in vain”.

         

How To Make A 5 Gallon Bucket Survival Kit

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If you love buckets and survival, you’ve landed in the right place, as today’s article is about 5-gallon buckets and survival, or how to use an already-legendary item in the prepper community for building a survival kit.

And yes, I am talking about the famous 5-gallon bucket, which seems to be at the top of the list when it comes to survival and sustainable development.

Besides gardening, building pyramids, and putting a man on the moon, this inconspicuous item can be used for improvising an emergency/survival kit as it’s large enough to hold quite a few items of survival gear, it’s tough and water resistant, and it’s pretty easy to carry around depending on what’s in it.

These DIY emergency kits are easy and cheap to made, and in a crisis situation they’ll prove to be highly valuable.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

The idea is to have as many as possible placed in strategic places, i.e. one in your car, one in your basement, one in your vacation home, one in your office – you know what I’m talking about.

To begin with, let’s concentrate a bit on the bucket itself. Not all buckets are created equal; you need to get a good one that hasn’t been used to store toxic chemicals.

How to Choose a High-quality Bucket

Here are a few places where you can get a high-quality (as in solid) 5-gallon bucket for free:

  • Wendy’s
  • Tim Hortons
  • Dunkin Donuts
  • Sam’s Club
  • Chick Fill A.

You can also try Mc Donald’s, Walmart and Subway but these guys are so environmentally conscious that they usually recycle their plastic buckets. It’s worth a try anyway.

Also, you should go for food grade buckets at all times, because you never know what you’ll be storing inside after all, besides your emergency survival kit, alright?

Another important factor to consider is that your bucket is strong enough to withstand pressure and comes with a plastic lid – that’s quite important.

If cruising the multinational corporations proves to be unsuccessful in terms of acquiring free 5-gallon buckets, you can always go for the unthinkable option and buy some from Home Depot, Foodland, McHappy’s, Lowes or FireHouse Subs. A brand new bucket from these guys will cost you anywhere from 2 to 5 bucks, lid included (the lid may cost extra).

These are just a few ideas, so don’t start throwing rocks; I’m only a messenger. If you’re not happy with my tips and tricks, just use your imagination.

If you end up with free but stinky plastic buckets (the ones which were used for storing pickles are the smelliest) don’t worry, they can be cleansed in a jiffy with a solution made of 1 gallon of hot water and 1/3 cup of bleach. The same stuff can be used for cleaning your bathroom by the way, but don’t tell anybody.

Another interesting factoid to consider: the best food-grade buckets are marked with a 2 on the bottom. The number represents the type of plastic used in its construction and 2 is the least toxic variety. However, if you put Mylar bags inside, you can forget about the food grade status of your bucket.

If you’re definitely never going to store food inside the bucket, it doesn’t really matter what you use.

With the “how to choose the ideal-5 gallon bucket for my prepping endeavor”  science taken care of, let’s move on to the most important part of the story.

What to Put in Your 5 Gallon Bucket Survival Kit?

Well, there are various schools of taught about the actual content of a proper emergency kit, but let’s play it safe and follow the golden rule of survival, or the holy trinity.

The trinity of survival goes something like this: regardless of what you’re thinking about, whether it’s an alien invasion or a natural disaster, you’ll have to take care of 3 main things if you want to stay alive and tell the story to your kids, friends, or favorite pets: food, water and shelter, that about sums it up.

With all these simple things considered, your survival emergency kit must be able to provide you with the necessary items/gear/stuff or whatchamacallits for allowing you to eat, drink and stay safe for at least 3 days (the more the better).

Video first seen on Robert Martin

With water being a crucial survival item, you should pack 3-4 water bottles in your survival bucket, along with a quality water filter. The problem with water is that it’s voluminous and heavy to carry around, so you’ll have to figure that out for yourself (I am talking about how many bottles of water to store in your emergency kit depending on your geo-location).

Freeze dried meals are also must-have items in a survival emergency kit, together with a few protein bars, chocolate, and other long shelve life, easy to carry, light, compact, and high-calories foods. A rip stop tarp is essential, as it can be used for a number of purposes, including as a makeshift shelter (a 6×8 would be enough, and grommet holes are a must).

Tip: disguise your 5-gallon bucket survival kit into an Ottoman and hide it in plain view (think along the lines of easy to grab if SHTF).

Video first seen on Emma Catherine

These are the most basic items to store inside your 5 gallon bucket survival kit, i.e. food, water and shelter. But there’s plenty of room left, so let’s go a little bit more high tech: a gun would be nice, also a quality survival knife, which is essentially a multi-tool. Being able to protect yourself and your family, especially in a crisis, is crucial. A few extra rounds of ammo wouldn’t hurt either. 

A fire starter kit/BIC lighters, some weatherproof matches, duct tape, a mini multi tool (I’d go for a Leatherman), a whistle, and some wet wipes would be nice to have in any emergency situation I can think of, so keep those in mind too. A compass, an LED lighter with some spare batteries, a couple of N 95 dust masks and a small sliding saw would be also advisable to add to your survival stash.

A shortwave radio is essential in a catastrophe as it gives you the possibility to gather essential intel from local authorities, so throw one in just in case – the smaller the better.

Paracord! Need I say more? Check out my articles about paracord if you have any doubts. 25’x2 would do.

A cool addition for your survival kit would be several 30-gallon trash bags, as they can be used for various purposes, including as a makeshift rain poncho.

A first aid kit is a must, together with some over the counter/prescribed medicine, depending on one’s health condition.

A couple of Mylar thermal blankets would be nice as they’ re awesome if you have to camp outdoors and they take up so little room it really doesn’t matter.

If you still have room left, you can consider split leather gloves, extra batteries (for your radio/flashlight, remember?), glow sticks, safety goggles, a can opener, a sewing kit, a bar of soap and even some toothpaste/toothbrushes.

Another handy item to have in your emergency survival kit provided you have enough room for it would be a solar charger for your cellphone (I’d go for an old-school feature phone with long-lasting battery and all that). You can find those on the Internet (Amazon etc).

A 5 gallon bucket survival kit is a life saving equipment to grab in a crisis situation when panic is the greatest killer.

How long will you survive in a SHTF situation?

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This article has been written by Chris Black for Survivopedia. 

Teaching Situational Awareness to Kids

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We can be blissfully unaware of our surroundings and distracted much more than we realize. Teaching situational awareness to kids can be lifesaving | PreparednessMama

We can be blissfully unaware of our surroundings and distracted much more than we realize. Teaching situational awareness to kids can be lifesaving. Being married to a soldier changes how you view the world. Especially if you have a spouse who has served overseas and in combat. They struggle with crowded or confusing places and […]

The post Teaching Situational Awareness to Kids appeared first on PreparednessMama.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

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Today, I’m following up with my ideas on how to store emergency preparedness items. I have a small home, as I have mentioned before. It’s 1900 square feet, and you may remember, I have a three car garage. The third stall, which could hardly fit any size car, is where Mark and I organized all our emergency preparedness items. All my food storage remains inside the house. I only store emergency preparedness stuff that can withstand the heat here in Southern Utah in the summer. Outside temperatures have gotten as high as 120 degrees, making the temperature in the garage, even with all the insulation we have added, higher than food storage items can stand for any length of time. Yep, it’s hot here in the summer! We have a lot of dust here, so you see that I all of my stuff has been put in protective plastic zippered bags.

I hope this post shows the world several different options to store emergency preparedness items. I apologize for the different size pictures, but I wanted you to see as much as possible on each rack.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I have hanging shelves from my garage ceilings (I have seen the shelves at Costco). They are 4 feet by 8 feet and about 18-24 inches hanging from the ceiling. The portable washing machines are two 6-gallon buckets (one has drilled holes in it), a green Gamma lid and a mobile washer like this one: Breathing Mobile Washer Classic – Portable Clothes Washing Machine – Handheld – Manual – Mobile Hand Powered Laundry Solution – Superior Materials and Construction The large wash buckets can be found at most stores, these are made by Behrens. Behrens 2, 15-Gallon Round Steel Tub I went to an antique store to get a washboard. Bwbg7 Galvanized Washboard (Wbg7)

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I bought some heavy duty racks from Costco online and they deliver them to your house. They are 72 inches tall by 48 inches wide and 18 inches deep. They have some heavy duty rolling wheels which are nice when I need to move them.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I label everything with cardstock and place the 1/2 sheets in the buckets so I know what I have in each one. My 72-hour kits below are in plastic bags with a list of items that are in each one.

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

I have a very small kitchen, so I store my pressure canner and water bath canner outside in those bags as well. These are the bags that I buy, depending on the size of the item I’m storing: Richards Homewares – Set of 4 Md Chests 12 Guage Vinyl 12x16x8 each, Kitchen You can buy these at Bed Bath and Beyond as well. All of my Lodge Dutch ovens and cast iron pieces have Lodge bags, if available, and then they are stored in the appropriate size bags to keep them dust free. Set of 2 Clear Zippered Sweater Storage Bags

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

The buckets below are color coded for a reason. I can see at a glance how much FUEL I have. I have the regular propane tanks out on the back patio stored away from the house. I buy these colored buckets and Gamma lids from Pleasant Hill Grain: Gamma Lids (all different colors) and the 5-gallon colored buckets. Any bucket with a lid will work, I’m just an organized chick, it’s who I am.

  1. Green-clean scrap wood
  2. Red-oak lump charcoal
  3. Black-clean pine cones
  4. Blue-Kingsford’s charcoal briquettes without the starter fluid

How To Store Emergency Preparedness Items

Now, that I have shared some of my ideas on how to store emergency preparedness items, please share yours with me. I will add them to my post. May God bless us all when an unforeseen disaster strikes our community. We will be ready, that’s for sure.

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Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (3/25/17)

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Here are the top 7 articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks.  But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

I’ve also included one honorable mention that I think you should read.

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 3/19/17 – 3/25/17

Peace,
Todd

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These Aren’t Considered SHTF Survival Skills, But They Really Should Be

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MCan you grow your own food and raise your own livestock? Can you fix your own car? Are you a competent marksman? Can you hunt and fish? Do you know your way around a first-aid kit? Can you make your own biofuel? How about bartering?

Everyone who’s interested in prepping has heard about or considered learning some of those skills (among many others) countless times already. There are certain skills that seem essential for surviving a catastrophic event, and they are repeatedly mentioned and discussed ad nauseam in the prepper community. Of course they’re vitally important and sophisticated subjects that warrant lots of discussion, but there are a few skills that are often totally overlooked; probably because they seem mundane and unexciting.

That however, doesn’t mean they should be ignored. If you’re looking to tack a few more skills under your belt, or at least confirm that you don’t have any of these gaps in your prepper education, consider the following:

Learning Another Language

If society collapsed, then nation-state borders would temporarily lose their meaning. People living in immigrant enclaves, gated communities, and small towns across the country would be uprooted from their lives. Everyone would be wrenched away from their social bubbles. In other words, you would be running into all kinds of people who you would normally never meet, and a lot of those folks will speak a different language. The more languages you know, the less misunderstandings you’ll face after the collapse.

Driving Stick

As time goes on there are fewer and fewer vehicles with manual transmissions being built and sold, and the number of people who actually know how to drive a stick shift is declining. But this could become a vital skill after the collapse. Stick shifts tend to be older, and older cars tend to be easier to fix and maintain. Older vehicles are also a lot easier to hotwire (I’m not suggesting that you steal. There would be many abandoned cars if society collapsed). So if you don’t know already, now is a good time to learn how to drive a stick.

Investing

Investing sounds like a skill that is exactly the opposite of what you need to know to survive. When we think of investors, we imagine people who are reliant on the grid; people who work for investment firms and sit behind computers all day. In reality, investing is still an important skill to have when civilization crumbles. Being a good investor requires you to have a solid understanding of how the world works, so you can use that understanding to figure out what is going to be more valuable in the future. At a base level, there isn’t much difference between investing money in a promising company, and trading a can of soup for a pack of cigarettes that will be worth more in the future as supplies dwindle.

Negotiation, Persuasion, and Conflict Resolution

Preppers spend a lot of time preparing to survive violent situations. However, violence is messy and destructive. And more times than not it’s preventable with a little bit of tact and understanding. Don’t buy a dozen guns and thousands of rounds of ammunition without working on your own ability communicate with others, and find common interests with people who oppose you. If society collapsed, the only people you should have to physically protect yourself from, are the ones who refuse to talk to you.

Stress Management

In the modern world, most people deal with stress by consuming addictive substances and engaging themselves in an endless stream of entertainment. After the collapse, there will be no TV or internet, and the substances people use to take the edge off will be hard to come by. And this will happen as everyone is dealing with the most stressful event anyone has seen in generations. If you can’t handle hard times without the aid of a stiff drink and a cigarette, then you’re not ready to cope with an event that could destroy our civilization.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Gratitude Can Help You Forgive

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My life is full of things for which I’m grateful. From my family to my wonderful new (and at the same time very old) house, a church fellowship where I am loved and accepted and of course the fact that I have a loyal and wonderful readership, there are many great people and things in my life. Welcome to Day Eighteen of 30 Days to Forgiveness.

As a brain cancer survivor, I can even include my life and the fact that I’m (relatively) healthy and well. All surgery has risks, and doctors are careful to inform you ahead of time, but before surgery I was warned that any outcome in which I was breathing would be considered a success. Nine years later I am doing far more than “just breathing”!

When we spend time taking note of everything for which we are grateful, and we consciously express that gratitude, our entire manner of thinking starts to shift.

If you take the time to think about it and make a list, I am sure that you will come up with many wonderful things for which you are grateful. One of the most popular Question of the Day topics on my Facebook page is when I ask people to name three things or people for which they are grateful.

And I will ask you – if you’re willing – to take a moment and tell us some of your gratitude list in the comments.

Too often we take these blessings for granted.

In our world today, gratitude sometimes seems to have become a lost art. People are focused on the negative, fixated on what’s happening next and very, very busy.

Too busy, as the old saying goes, to stop and smell the flowers.

There is much to be said for actively appreciating the positive and living in the present.

Here my readers nod and raise an eyebrow in confusion, wondering what in the world this has to do with forgiveness.

It all comes down to your frame of mind. You see, if you’re focused on negativity, busy-ness and complaining, fretting about what’s next and worrying about what you need or want or … any of that, really, you are not at all in the right mindset to practice forgiveness.

When we spend time taking note of everything for which we are grateful, and we consciously express that gratitude, our entire manner of thinking starts to shift.

It becomes much easier to appreciate what we have and focus on the positive in our lives. As a result, we find it easier to let go of negativity, and that includes the pain, anger and need for revenge that we may be feeling.

Have you ever noticed this in your life?

It’s one reason we confuse sadness, caused by events in our lives, with clinical depression.

What I mean is that, in the normal course of our days, good and bad things happen. When something good happens, it is normal to react with happiness. (And the flip side is true – it’s completely normal to feel sad when bad things happen. It’s just not normal to dwell on it forever.)

When we are happy and grateful, it’s harder to become down and depressed. It’s harder to be angry and we’re more likely to forgive and move on.

Of course if your brain patterns and chemistry have shifted and you are suffering from clinical depression, it will take more than happy thoughts to get you healthy again. Clinical depression is a serious thing and needs proper medical care.

Think of it this way – healthy eating and exercise may help prevent the onset of diabetes, but once you have developed it, more serious intervention is required. The same with depression.

But for the rest of us, those who are experiencing the normal range of emotions, responding with sad feelings when things go poorly and feeling happy when they go well, why not look at gratitude as another great tool in your forgiveness toolbox? Start using it in an intentional way.

One of the very simplest ways to get started is to count your blessings. When you wake in the morning and as you go to sleep at night, give thanks. Be specific! One of the things that I have taught my children is that, when they can think of no other words to pray, “Thank you, Father God” is always sufficient.

When we give thanks with a grateful heart, our mood improves and forgiving becomes easier. If we look at the grace and mercy that we have experienced in our lives, while still acknowledging that we, too, have caused pain and harm, it becomes much easier to extend that same grace and mercy to others.

It really doesn’t matter what your life looks like right now. If you stop and look for it, you will find a lot to be grateful for.

One moment in seared into my mind forever.

Remember how the surgeon told me that success would be any outcome in which I came out alive? That was a pretty low bar to meet – brain surgery is dangerous. In fact, since the tumour was sitting right between my parietal and occipital lobes, she said it would be a success if I came out alive but with no vision and an inability to communicate properly or remember things.

Cheery thoughts when going into surgery.

Anyway, what you might not know is that our life was very rough at the time. We rented a geared-to-income apartment and accessed the food bank about once a month. Not only that, we were struggling with some major legal – and obviously, health – issues. To say our life was rough is actually an understatement. It was during this time that Psalm 27 became my go to affirmation and I memorized it. “Though war should rise against me, in this will I be confident …”

And so, in the middle of all of this difficulty, I was diagnosed with a large astrocytoma (brain tumour) that was just starting to turn aggressive.

When I opened my eyes after the surgery, sleepy and sedated, my first thought was “I’m alive!” and then I drifted back to semi-consciousness. My next clear thought, which brought me very much awake, was

I’m alive and I can SEE!

That’s when I started bullying my poor nurse to let me get out of bed because there was a life to be lived.

With that said, my memory is terrible now and I’m very grateful for notes and lists and digital calendars! And if I ever tell you to put something down on “that … um … that flat thing where we eat”, or if I suggest that you put the leftovers in the dishwasher and take the laundry out of the freezer, please don’t laugh too hard. Yes, I sometimes forget every day words. And people I see often. And names. The list goes on.

I have become used to hearing ‘Oh, don’t you remember …?” because usually, no, I don’t.

Maybe your list is going to start with that. I am grateful to be alive. I am grateful for my vision. I am grateful for lists because my memory is awful! I’m grateful for people who love me even when I forget what a table is called. I am grateful for universal health care. I am so very grateful for Dr. Schneider and her team.

Dig down and have fun with it. Make a list as long as you can possibly make it. Write it out and stick on a wall where you can see it every day.

Give thanks with a grateful heart.

When we spend time taking note of everything for which we are grateful, and we consciously express that gratitude, our entire manner of thinking starts to shift.

Sugar and Soured Health

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Sugar and Soured Health Bob Hawkins “The APN Report“ Audio in player below! The last APN Report was all about lowering the amount of salt in a diet as a good way to lose weight. Not so much of a diet but more of a lifestyle choice & awareness of what is in the foods we … Continue reading Sugar and Soured Health

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