That Time The U.S. Gov’t Rationed Food – And Threatened Jail For Those Who Didn’t

Click here to view the original post.

That Time The U.S. Gov’t Ordered Americans To Ration Food – And Threatened Jail If They Didn’t

If you were asked to picture people lined up at a grocery store with ration books in their hands, you would probably imagine people in war-torn Europe. However, during World War II, government-issued ration books were a very real part of American life.

To distribute food and other items that could be in short supply due to the war effort and also to create a sense of unity, the federal Office of Price Administration (OPA) established a rationing system for the nation’s citizens.

That Time The U.S. Gov’t Rationed Food – And Threatened Jail For Those Who Didn’t The government then launched a promotional campaign for the ration books that included widespread radio ads, posters and pamphlets. The campaign appealed to Americans’ patriotic sense of duty, and it warned that non-compliance could be met with stiff fines and even jail time.

For example, on the National World War II Museum website, you can see an image of the warning page from War Ration Book One.

Punishments ranging as high as Ten Years’ Imprisonment or $10,000 Fine, or Both, may be imposed under the United States Statutes for violations thereof arising out of infractions of Rationing Orders and Regulations.

Ration book covers included symbols of military aircraft and tanks to remind citizens of their purpose.

Initially, rationing began with gasoline and tires, as the government geared up to transport American troops overseas.

Nationwide, gasoline rationing began Dec. 1, 1942. A typical American with “nonessential” driving needs was allowed enough gasoline for roughly 3,000 miles per year. As a result, families put their vacation road trip plans on hold indefinitely.

Several months later, the rationing program expanded to include food and food products. Many processed and canned foods were in short supply because they were being reserved for the troops, and the transportation of fresh foods was becoming limited due to gasoline and tire rationing. In an effort to keep the distribution of food fair and equal (in other words, to discourage a black market), the OPA issued monthly ration books to every American.

Get Instant Electrical Power In A Convenient, Portable Briefcase!

That Time The U.S. Gov’t Ordered Americans To Ration Food – And Threatened Jail If They Didn’t

Image source

The books contained removable stamps good for specific items such as sugar, meat, cooking oil and canned goods. A shopper could purchase a rationed item only with the proper stamp. Once you used your stamps for the month, you could not buy any more of those particular foods that month. As a result, menu planning and menu creativity became an essential part of everyday life.

The system was complicated with points allotted to each item on the list.

Each household member received 16 points of red stamps and 48 points of blue stamps per week. Blue coupons were for canned and bottled fruits and vegetables, and red coupons were for meats, hard cheese and fats. Grocers displayed the ration points for items on their shelves, and shoppers would pay the total amount of stamp and cash owed when they checked out of the store.

If you wanted to splurge for sirloin one month (at about nine points per pound), you might have to limit your consumption of canned soup (four points per can). To make things even more difficult for grocers trying to keep up with the program and for shoppers aiming to get the most out of their ration books, the point values would change as supply and demand rose and fell.

Goofy Gadget Can Jump-Start Your Car — And Charge Your Smartphone!

Generally, fresh produce and baked goods were exempt from the ration program. In addition, many families planted “victory gardens” to supplement their food supplies. By 1945, an estimated 20 million victory gardens produced nearly 40 percent of the vegetables Americans consumed.

That Time The U.S. Gov’t Rationed Food – And Threatened Jail For Those Who Didn’t The ration books listed many rules and regulations for their use. Here are some of them:

  • “Every person must see that his War Ration Book is kept in a safe place and properly used. Parents are responsible for the safekeeping and use of their children’s War Ration Books.”
  • “When you buy any rationed product, the proper stamp must be detached in the presence of the storekeeper, his employee, to the person making delivery on his behalf. If a stamp is torn out of the War Ration Book in any other way than above indicated, it becomes void. If a stamp is partly torn or mutilated and more than one-half of it remains in the book, it is valid. Otherwise, it becomes void.”
  • “If you enter a hospital, or other institution, and expect to be there for more than 10 days, you must turn you War Ration Book over to the person in charge. It will be returned to you upon your request when you leave.”
  • “When a person dies, his War Ration Book must be returned to the local Ration Board in accordance with the regulations.”

American eating habits changed as a result of the rationing program. To save on ration points, for instance, many families switched from butter to Oleomargarine. To save on meat consumption, shoppers bought the new Kraft Macaroni and Cheese packaged product. Sales of cottage cheese skyrocketed from 110 million pounds in 1930 to 500 million pounds during the rationing program, as people used cottage cheese as a meat substitute in meals.

Although World War II ended in 1945, the rationing program continued until 1946. Gradually, life – and grocery shopping – returned to normal and the average American’s consumption of meat, butter and sugar rose to pre-rationing levels.

If you would like to know more about America’s food rationing program, visit the National World War II Museum website.

Better yet, talk with someone who lived through it to get a first-hand perspective.

Do you think something like this could happen in America again? Share your thoughts in the section below:

5 Portable, Takedown Rifles You Can Hide Anywhere

Click here to view the original post.
5 Portable, Takedown Rifles You Can Hide Anywhere

Savage Model 42

Takedown firearms, which can be disassembled for compact transport, are booming in popularity. Why? Who wouldn’t want long gun-scale effectiveness in a package that fits discreetly into a day pack or business case, or even under the truck seat? For hunting, varmint control and protection, these budget-friendly shooters are a great option.

Though takedown guns are available in high-power models, the focus for this article is lightweight models, usually in rimfire chambering with a couple of shot shell models thrown in. All are easy on the wallet. Within those parameters, here are five favorites

1. Ruger 10/22 Takedown

Sturm, Ruger, & Co. has a wise approach to business. Rather than peddle new guns that no one’s asked for year after year, they crank out new versions of proven ones. It’s a winning strategy that benefits the consumer. The internals of the 10/22, a 10-round semi-auto in 22 LR, are the same as ever. The takedown model comes with a handsome pack, a choice of finishes including but not limited to camo, TALO brights and tactical. Some even have a threaded barrel covered by a handsome flash hider. This little rifle delivers camp and prep-friendly convenience. Assembled, lengths vary by package, in the area of 35 inches. Weight is less than five pounds, unadorned by optics. New prices range from $250 to $550, depending on features.

2. Savage Model 42 Takedown

The Model 42, a longtime hit among small-game hunters, has been updated into a series of takedown models — regular and compact/youth. In any version, its over-and-under barrels offer the choice of firing 22LR or 22 Winchester Magnum on top, and .410 on the bottom. Its single action-only operation requires cocking the hammer, an element of safety for those who like to carry “hot,” as well as lending a traditional look to the profile. Another lever allows the user to choose which barrel fires.

The Self-Defense Weapon That Doesn’t Require A Firearms License!

A black synthetic stock features austere environment-friendly sculpting for easier grip and carry. The 42 Takedown is available in regular and compact models. Overall length of the compact version is 34.75 inches. An Uncle Mike’s carry pack is included. Although MSRP is $500, the Model 42 can be found new starting in the mid-$200s.

3. Chiappa Double Badger Takedown

5 Portable, Takedown Rifles You Can Hide Anywhere

Chiappa Double Badger Takedown. Image source: YouTube screen capture

With shoes and mopeds, consumers count on Italian design to be unique, with great quality. The same goes for guns. The first foreign entry on this list is Chiappa’s Double Badger. Unlike others featured here, it folds in half, rather than completely separating receiver from barrel. It is therefore a little harder to pack, as the V-shaped folded firearm takes up more space than the others. However, traditionalists will appreciate the classic look and feel of its lever-action operation and checkered walnut stock. Subtle but important modern touches include fiber optic sights. Like the Savage 42, it comes with 22LR/WMR and .410 or 20-gauge chambering. Chiappa sells a range of chokes to customize the shot pattern, too. A dedicated backpack is sold separately, which is a bit of a disappointment considering most others include the pack. Retail pricing for the Double Badger typically hovers in the mid-$300s, although feature-dependent pricing can push actuals $100 higher or lower.

4. Ruger 22 Charger Takedown

The second Ruger entry on this list is a short so-called pistol (okay, legally called a pistol) chambered in 22LR. The Charger has modern features like a Picatinny rail for mounting your favorite optic, and can easily be fitted with a bipod for stability, which is a helpful feature on this stock-less platform. It comes with colorful wood or synthetic furniture. The Charger’s 10-inch barrel breaks away from the lightweight receiver that features a pistol grip, making it a very compact package. Fully assembled, it’s only 19.25 inches long. Weighing in at 3.5 pounds, it’s also the lightest choice here, sans optic, which is necessary since it comes without front or rear iron sights. The Charger does have a threaded barrel, making it ideal for urban varmint sniping where legal. Unlike the 10/22, the standard magazine of this semi-auto holds 15 rounds. Ruger sells it with a hard plastic case. Although some accoutrements and effort are required to fire accurately, this is by far the most packable choice here. Some will take a shine to its non-traditional profile and will be happy to pick up a Charger/bipod set for under $400.

5. Browning SA-22

Stepping well into the zone of legacy, Browning offers several grades of its long-standing takedown model. For purposes of this article, we’ll discuss the plain and most practical Grade 1 SA (semi-auto) 22. The company makes a range of finishes, as well as centerfire models on the takedown platform. With a classic black walnut stock and 19-inch blued barrel, the SA-22 has a tubular, 10-round, bottom-loading magazine and crossbolt safety. It comes drilled and tapped for scope installation, or use the brass bead front sight and rear blade. At 37 inches with the 19 3/8-inch barrel attached, it’s the longest rifle on this list, but misses being the heaviest at just 5 pounds, 3 ounces. No bag is included. Expect to pay close to $500 for this classic. Also, expect it to hold its value for resale better than others presented here.

What is your favorite takedown? Share your thoughts on takedowns in the section below:

5 Portable, Takedown Rifles You Can Hide Anywhere

5 Portable, Takedown Rifles You Can Hide Anywhere

Savage Model 42

Takedown firearms, which can be disassembled for compact transport, are booming in popularity. Why? Who wouldn’t want long gun-scale effectiveness in a package that fits discreetly into a day pack or business case, or even under the truck seat? For hunting, varmint control and protection, these budget-friendly shooters are a great option.

Though takedown guns are available in high-power models, the focus for this article is lightweight models, usually in rimfire chambering with a couple of shot shell models thrown in. All are easy on the wallet. Within those parameters, here are five favorites

1. Ruger 10/22 Takedown

Sturm, Ruger, & Co. has a wise approach to business. Rather than peddle new guns that no one’s asked for year after year, they crank out new versions of proven ones. It’s a winning strategy that benefits the consumer. The internals of the 10/22, a 10-round semi-auto in 22 LR, are the same as ever. The takedown model comes with a handsome pack, a choice of finishes including but not limited to camo, TALO brights and tactical. Some even have a threaded barrel covered by a handsome flash hider. This little rifle delivers camp and prep-friendly convenience. Assembled, lengths vary by package, in the area of 35 inches. Weight is less than five pounds, unadorned by optics. New prices range from $250 to $550, depending on features.

2. Savage Model 42 Takedown

The Model 42, a longtime hit among small-game hunters, has been updated into a series of takedown models — regular and compact/youth. In any version, its over-and-under barrels offer the choice of firing 22LR or 22 Winchester Magnum on top, and .410 on the bottom. Its single action-only operation requires cocking the hammer, an element of safety for those who like to carry “hot,” as well as lending a traditional look to the profile. Another lever allows the user to choose which barrel fires.

The Self-Defense Weapon That Doesn’t Require A Firearms License!

A black synthetic stock features austere environment-friendly sculpting for easier grip and carry. The 42 Takedown is available in regular and compact models. Overall length of the compact version is 34.75 inches. An Uncle Mike’s carry pack is included. Although MSRP is $500, the Model 42 can be found new starting in the mid-$200s.

3. Chiappa Double Badger Takedown

5 Portable, Takedown Rifles You Can Hide Anywhere

Chiappa Double Badger Takedown. Image source: YouTube screen capture

With shoes and mopeds, consumers count on Italian design to be unique, with great quality. The same goes for guns. The first foreign entry on this list is Chiappa’s Double Badger. Unlike others featured here, it folds in half, rather than completely separating receiver from barrel. It is therefore a little harder to pack, as the V-shaped folded firearm takes up more space than the others. However, traditionalists will appreciate the classic look and feel of its lever-action operation and checkered walnut stock. Subtle but important modern touches include fiber optic sights. Like the Savage 42, it comes with 22LR/WMR and .410 or 20-gauge chambering. Chiappa sells a range of chokes to customize the shot pattern, too. A dedicated backpack is sold separately, which is a bit of a disappointment considering most others include the pack. Retail pricing for the Double Badger typically hovers in the mid-$300s, although feature-dependent pricing can push actuals $100 higher or lower.

4. Ruger 22 Charger Takedown

The second Ruger entry on this list is a short so-called pistol (okay, legally called a pistol) chambered in 22LR. The Charger has modern features like a Picatinny rail for mounting your favorite optic, and can easily be fitted with a bipod for stability, which is a helpful feature on this stock-less platform. It comes with colorful wood or synthetic furniture. The Charger’s 10-inch barrel breaks away from the lightweight receiver that features a pistol grip, making it a very compact package. Fully assembled, it’s only 19.25 inches long. Weighing in at 3.5 pounds, it’s also the lightest choice here, sans optic, which is necessary since it comes without front or rear iron sights. The Charger does have a threaded barrel, making it ideal for urban varmint sniping where legal. Unlike the 10/22, the standard magazine of this semi-auto holds 15 rounds. Ruger sells it with a hard plastic case. Although some accoutrements and effort are required to fire accurately, this is by far the most packable choice here. Some will take a shine to its non-traditional profile and will be happy to pick up a Charger/bipod set for under $400.

5. Browning SA-22

Stepping well into the zone of legacy, Browning offers several grades of its long-standing takedown model. For purposes of this article, we’ll discuss the plain and most practical Grade 1 SA (semi-auto) 22. The company makes a range of finishes, as well as centerfire models on the takedown platform. With a classic black walnut stock and 19-inch blued barrel, the SA-22 has a tubular, 10-round, bottom-loading magazine and crossbolt safety. It comes drilled and tapped for scope installation, or use the brass bead front sight and rear blade. At 37 inches with the 19 3/8-inch barrel attached, it’s the longest rifle on this list, but misses being the heaviest at just 5 pounds, 3 ounces. No bag is included. Expect to pay close to $500 for this classic. Also, expect it to hold its value for resale better than others presented here.

What is your favorite takedown? Share your thoughts on takedowns in the section below:

Green Potatoes DO Kill: 5 Old Wives’ Tales That Are Actually True

Click here to view the original post.

Green Potatoes DO Kill: 5 Old Wives’ Tales That Are Actually True

For centuries, grandmothers everywhere have given us advice on what is good to eat, what isn’t good to eat, when it will rain, and even what sex your baby will be.

In the same way that your grandmother passed on to you the family’s best biscuit recipe ever (and we don’t doubt that it is excellent), some well-meaning advice also gets passed down from generation to generation with no questions asked.

Often, such advice is quickly discounted, but – believe it or not – some of these old “wives’ tales” are true.

Want Out Of The Rat-Race But Need A Steady Stream Of Income?

Let’s take a look at five strange, but true, old wives’ tales.

1. Green potatoes kill

This is true; however, you would have to eat two very large potatoes. Of course, this all depends on body size and age, as well as the “dose.” Green potatoes contain the nerve toxin solanine. There are terrible tales of people who have eaten these green little tubers and died. Even just a few bites from a green potato is enough to make most people vomit, but you have to ask yourself: Why would anyone eat a green potato anyway?

2. An apple a day

Everyone knows this old saying. An apple a day keeps the doctor away, right? While apples are super-nutritious, full of vitamin C, pectin and fiber, we can’t go so far as saying that eating an apple each day will prevent things like diabetes, arthritis or cancer. However, a study in 2013 did find that if people over the age of 50 ate just one apple every day, they could help prevent heart attack and stroke.

3. Persimmon seeds and snow

Another old wives’ tale says that you can take a persimmon seed and cut it in half, and the shape you see inside the seed will tell you the kind of winter you are going to have. If you see a spoon shape, then there will be lots of wet, heavy snow. If you see a knife, there will be plenty of cutting, cold wind. A fork means a mild winter with only light, powdery snow.

This sounds a little crazy, but a study done in Jefferson County, Mo., found that this old wives’ tale has been correct 14 out of 18 years.

4. Hair of the dog

So you really went all out at that party and became close friends with Jack Daniels. You are paying for it this morning, however, and would give anything to stop that headache. One old wives’ tale says that “a little hair of the dog” that bit you (a shot or two of the same alcohol you were drinking) is a quick “cure.”

“The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets” — Every Homesteader Needs A Copy!

Although most doctors say this is a bad idea – you’re simply prolonging your hangover – one prominent writer — Adam Rogers, the author of Proof: The Science of Booze — says there is a bit of science behind why it works. Still, he discourages it.

“The people who admit to using hair of the dog as a treatment for their hangovers … turn out to be the ones more likely to have an alcohol dependency later in life,” he told WVTF.

Doctors say the best cure is to sleep.

5. Baby boy or girl?

There are as many old wives’ tales about how to tell if you are carrying a boy or girl as there are blades of grass! One of them, however, appears to be true.

Deliveries that are fairly quick appear to be, more often than not, girls. Long labor times, or hard labor, usually mean it’s a boy.

One study found that, while boys are not necessarily bigger or heavier than girls, their heads are generally larger, resulting in a longer and more difficult labor.

Final Thoughts

Old wives’ tales reminds me of a story I once read where a woman was making her grandmother’s famous pot roast recipe. The recipe started off by saying that you needed to cut the end off one side. The woman began to wonder why this was. Was it meant to make the piece juicier? To allow the sauce to permeate the meat better? She called her mother and asked why she should cut the end off the meat. Her mother didn’t know, so the woman called her grandmother.  “Oh, that,” her grandmother said, “it’s because I used MY grandmother’s roasting pan and it was very small, so we had to cut the end off the roast so it would fit.”

What old wives’ tales would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

The Very Best Vegetables To Grow In A Raised Bed

Click here to view the original post.
The Very Best Vegetables To Grow In A Raised Bed

Image source: Pixabay.com

 

One of the best benefits to having your own garden is the ability to pick and choose what you grow. There is nothing quite like harvesting a crop and serving it to your family.

With a raised bed, you have more flexibility than a traditional garden, so your planting options are endless. But what should you plant? Some vegetables do better than others in a raised bed. If you’re new to raised-bed gardening, start with some of these sure-fire winners:

Potatoes. A raised bed is perfect for growing potatoes. The loose soil allows the plant to spread easily, and also allows for easy draining, preventing the plants from rotting quickly. A contained bed makes it easy to add hills over the plant shoots and gives you easy access for harvesting.

Need Non-GMO Heirloom Seeds? Get Them From A Company You Can Trust!

Onions. For best results, onions need a long growing season. A raised bed lets you plant early and leave them until they mature; for most varieties, this can be up to 100 days. By customizing the soil, you can create an optimum growing medium for onions by mixing lots of compost in with your soil. The easy draining and loose soil are perfect for onions.

Root vegetables. Carrots, radishes, beets and other root vegetables grow best in soil that is loose and rock-free. Your garden bed allows these veggies complete growing freedom in an environment designed for success. You can customize the depth of the bed, ensuring that they have enough soil to grow.

Tomatoes. One year, I did an entire raised bed of tomatoes. To mix things up, I had several varieties: cherry, plum, beefsteak, green and yellow. Tomatoes thrive in a raised bed! Give them a rich, nutrient-dense soil and they will produce (and produce, and produce, and produce!).

The Very Best Vegetables To Grow In A Raised Bed

Image source: Pixabay.com

Have some specific gardening needs? You can still have success with your raised beds.

Problems With Shade?

If your yard gets less than six hours of sunlight a day, you can still have a bountiful garden. Try some of these shade-loving vegetables that do well in a raised bed: beets, carrots, kale and scallion.

Seamazing: The Low-Cost Way To Re-mineralize Your Soil

Some years, I purposely move my raised beds into a shady part of the yard so I can take advantage of early spring planting to grow a variety of lettuces. With a raised bed, I can plant earlier than in a traditional garden, so the less heat-tolerant plants have a better chance of success.

Have Young Gardeners?

Have kids (or grandkids) that love to help in the garden? Add interesting plants to help captivate their attention and keep them interested in what’s growing! Blue potatoes, carrots, peanuts, watermelon, and pole beans are all perfect raised bed plants. Add some cherry tomatoes for fun (they’re perfect to snack on while working in the garden), or Swiss chard for visual interest.

Want a Photo-Worthy Garden?

Make your neighbors (and your social media friends) jealous with a garden that is not only supplying you with vegetables, but has visual appeal. Jerusalem artichoke, fennel, asparagus, peppers and sunflowers are a delight for the eyes (and the taste buds). They do well in a raised bed and make an impressive display for front-yard gardens.

No matter what you grow in your raised bed, always try to add something new. You never know what new favorite you may discover!

What are your favorite vegetables to plant in a raised bed? Share your tips in the section below:

Brushbeater Talks Gun Logistics

Click here to view the original post.

Although I’ve done a number of posts about Survivalist firearms, I haven’t put my thoughts on the blog about the logistics of keeping them running. Brushbeater did a good job here of pointing out the problems and some solutions for long term firearms issues. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Running Spares- Keeping Your Weapon Going ON APRIL 2, 2017 BY […]

Failing US Infrastructure-Part 2

Click here to view the original post.

Paul Munson of Sun Oven International is back for the second half of the show. We discuss the failing US infrastructure and how you can prepare for the consequences.

Everett and Courtney Carroll have survived the Seven Seal Judgments which devastated the planet. But have their efforts to stay alive been in vain? The next series of judgments to fall upon the earth are known as the Seven Trumpets.With each subsequent Trumpet Judgement their odds of living grow slimmer. If Everett and Courtney are to survive, they’ll need perseverance, faith, and a great outpouring of providence from The Almighty. Buy your copy of Wormwood in audio, paperback or Kindle edition today!

Ready Made Resources is a trusted name in the prepper community because they’ve been around for 18 years. They offer great prices on Night Vision, water filtration, long term storage food, solar energy components and provide free technical service. Get ready for an uncertain future at ReadyMadeResources.com!

jm2

I use JM Bullion because they have the lowest over-spot price of any dealer I have found for silver and gold bullion. JM Bullion now offers free shipping on every order!

CATI_BANNER_MAY2016

Cati Armor offers affordable body armor including level III trauma plates made of AR-500 steel which can endure multiple rounds from pistols and rifles up to 7.62 NATO. Their plates are available with Rhino Linings coating to reduce spall.

The post Failing US Infrastructure-Part 2 appeared first on Prepper Recon.

27 Useful Items You Should Have In Your Bug Out Bag

Click here to view the original post.

Everybody has their own ideas about what are the most important things to include in a bug out bag. Different strokes, different folks. But whatever items you choose, make sure a lot of them are multipurpose items. Your bug out bag might not seem very heavy, but after carrying it all day, it will begin […]

The post 27 Useful Items You Should Have In Your Bug Out Bag appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Why You Might Want To Raise Ducks Instead Of Chickens

Click here to view the original post.

This article was originally published by Elise on  frugalfarmwife.com

 

I still remember it plain as day. 

My husband came in the house and said “I just ordered one hundred ducklings”.

It may have taken a few minutes to get my jaw off the floor, but eventually, I got around to asking him what in the world he was thinking.

It was pretty simple really: not everyone can eat chicken eggs for one reason or another.

And now, funnily enough, six years later, my husband is one of those people.

Yep. He got a legit allergy test and everything. he’s allergic to chicken eggs.

A few weeks ago, I shared that I still insist on having a few chickens for myself (as well as for the kids since our current batch of ducklings aren’t laying eggs yet) because I prefer the taste of the chicken egg yolk to the duck egg yolk, which is mostly only noticeable in fried over-easy eggs. Duck yolks are just so rich! And it’s easy to have both since they eat the same rations.

But that doesn’t mean I don’t love ducks – I do! They’re so sweet, quiet, and completely lovable, and there are a number of reasons why a person might want to raise backyard ducks rather than backyard chickens.

Why you Might Want to Raise Ducks Over Chickens

Food Allergies. I kind of addressed this above, but many folks who are allergic to chicken eggs, can handle duck eggs just fine. It’s a huge blessing to us food allergy families!

Duck eggs are fabulous for baking. Their richness, and high protein quality give baked goods a high rise, and delightful texture. Once you try baking with duck eggs, I promise you’ll never want to go back!

Ducks Are Quiet. Ducks quack – actually, they quack quite a lot. A few nights ago, we had their pen situated right outside our bedroom window, and we drifted off to the sound of soft quacks and clucks. But while they do spend a lot of time “talking” they talk quietly – no cackling, carrying on about the egg they just laid or the child who just spooked the living daylights out of them.

Their quietness is a huge bonus for those of us who live in neighborhoods – and yes, you can raise chickens (or ducks) even if you don’t live on a farm!

Ducks stick together. Unlike chickens, you can actually herd them. In fact, just five minutes ago, I stepped outside to see that all of our ducks had waddled out of their pen and parked themselves under the kids’ swing set. Apparently a certain two-year-old had opened a gate. Naturally, I hollered at Gabe, who walked outside and shooed them back into the pen without any problem thanks to their flock mentality (and by the way, that little incident was totally the inspiration for this article).

 

This extreme flocking together has been true of all of our ducks over the last six years regardless of how long they were out free ranging, though they do tend to split up into smaller groups when you have a lot of them.

Ducks don’t go ever fences. No wing clipping needs, ducks won’t even try to fly over a fence, which makes them so much easier to keep inside. We’re currently keeping our ducks in a temporary wire fence so we can move them, and it’s about four feet high – that would never keep a chicken in!

Ducks won’t terrorize your garden. Yup, that’s right! They done’t eat broadleaf plants. So while your ducks may waddle through and scare the dickens out of your, their really only eating out small weeds (grasses), and looking for bugs. I use to freak every time I saw them out in the strawberry patch, but I finally got over it. 🙂

Ducks love wet weather. If you have chickens, you probably know that they don’t care for rain, preferring to hid in a dry spot until the shower is over, which can greatly impede their foraging. On the other hand, when it rains, ducks couldn’t possibly be happier! It’s so fun to look out the window on a rainy day and watch the ducks forage around the backyard as if nothing at all is going on.

Ducks are cute. Yes, this is an actual, real reason why you should raise ducks. They waddle, they quack, they follow you around, and really, they just couldn’t be any cuter if they tried. I have noticed that egg laying breeds tend to be a little more drab looking than some of their fancier relatives, but they make up for it by being adorable.

Probably the only real drawback to having ducks is their love of water. Most folks think they need water (which makes sense, right?), but they can – and do – live quite happily on land. Still it’s nice to give them some water, and that can easily be done with a small watering trough, or child-sized swimming pool – those hard plastic things you can pick up for $5-10 dollars in the spring.

We don’t have one hundred ducks anymore – thank goodness! – in fact, our newest flock is only eleven strong, and I can’t wait until they start laying this summer!

So what do you think? Would you try raising ducks?

Source : www.frugalfarmwife.com

 

              RELATED ARTICLES : 

 

The post Why You Might Want To Raise Ducks Instead Of Chickens appeared first on .

What you NEED to know about body armor for preppers

Click here to view the original post.

Upon occasion, I have received questions asking about body armor for a SHTF scenario. That got me to thinking that the topic of body armor might make an interesting article for the site. So I decided that I would break down the different types of body armor (bullet resistant) and their ratings. I also thought I’d […]

The post What you NEED to know about body armor for preppers appeared first on Plan and Prepared.

6 Spring Crops That Rock – Garden Season Starts Now!

Click here to view the original post.

It’s time to start gardening with Spring crops! As the daylight extends a little more each day, and the soil temperatures gently begin to rise, its time to ease into garden season with a full array of spring crops that

The post 6 Spring Crops That Rock – Garden Season Starts Now! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

10 Survival Uses For Epsom Salt

Click here to view the original post.

I think that as preppers and homesteaders, we can all agree that three of the top things we look for in an item that we consider worthy of stockpiling is cost, versatility and utilitarianism. In other words, how many different things can we use it for, and how often will  we reach for it?

Well, using those criteria, Epsom salt goes somewhere near the top of the preparedness list, along with vinegar and duct tape. But why?

Epsom salt, sea salt, table salt, kosher salt … they’re all the same, right? Just different textures? Nope. Actually, it’s not a salt at all. Sea salt, kosher salt and table salt are at least 97.5% sodium chloride. Of course, kosher salt is, well, kosher, and sea salt also has minerals, but Epsom salt is a completely different beast – it’s actually magnesium sulfate. And it has a ton of survival and household uses.

Another big difference between Epsom salt and other salts is that it doesn’t really have culinary value – it’s bitter. It’s used more as  a chemical than a seasoning. So, don’t pull out your box of Epsom salts when you run out of kosher salt – you won’t be happy with the results!

Draw out Toxins and Impurities

This was actually the first use of Epsom salt. In the early seventeenth  century, people that would bathe or soak in the waters produced by springs in the town of Epsom, England because of the curative effects that it purportedly had. The wealthy began to travel there just to soak. A doctor began extracting the salt and the rest is history.

Though studies are contentious about the actual curative effects of soaking, there’s no denying the fact that it’s been used for that purpose to alleviate muscle soreness and fatigue, arthritis, and skin conditions ever since. It’s likely due to the magnesium.

Epsom salt dissolves well in warm water but not so well in oils or lotions, so there’s no need to complicate things. Just dissolve a cup and a half or so in a half-gallon of hot water and add it to your bath water. If you’d rather just soak a particular body part – say, your feet – just add a cup to very warm water and soak away.

Because it does have magnesium and sulfate in it, you shouldn’t soak in the tub for more than 15 minutes a day, or in a small container for more than 30 minutes. Follow the directions on the container.

Discover the health and healing secrets that helped our forefathers survive harsh times! 

Boost Magnesium in Soil

Whether you want greener, thicker grass, tastier tomatoes and peppers, or prettier flowers, Epsom salt is a good option because magnesium helps plants produce chlorophyll and allows your plants soak in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, and some plants need more of that that others. Many soils lack enough magnesium to do this. If you just want to green things up so that your yard looks great to both your neighbors and your livestock, add 2 tbsp./1 gallon of water and spray on your lawn with a garden sprayer.

To give a monthly magnesium boost to your plants, mix 1-2 tsp/gallon of water and saturate the soil around the plants so that it goes to the roots. If you’re using a mister, use 1-2 tablespoons per gallon. This recipe also works well when you’re germinating because seeds need both magnesium and sulfur. Just water your seeds with it as soon as you plant them.

To add magnesium to your soil when you plant, sprinkle 1 tbsp. around each transplant.

Video first seen on CaliKim29 Garden & Home DIY

Tan Hides

The first step to tanning a raw hide is to remove the flesh from it. Some remove the hair as well, but some would rather leave it on. With magnesium tanning, the Epsom salt is added after the flesh is removed and is used in as a “swelling agent” to soften the hide, increase durability, and decrease shrinkage. It may affect the color of the hide or leave stains on it.

Be careful using Epsom salts because magnesium can, in combination with the right chemicals, become explosive.

Deter Raccoons and Slugs

Raccoons love your garden, your garbage, and your hen house, but you’re probably no so in love with them. Good news – they hate the smell of Epsom salts. Sprinkle it around those areas and your coon problem will go away. Remember to reapply after it rains.

Of course, that won’t keep them from dropping down off a fence or finding another way in, so it’s best to use Epsom salt in conjunction with other practices such as keeping your garbage is tight-sealing containers.

To deter slugs from your garden or your planters, just sprinkle it around the perimeter. Remember that it will dissolve, so you’ll need to reapply after rain.

Splinters, Insect Bites, and Poison Ivy

I’ve used Epsom salt for splinters, bug bites and skin irritations many times! The problem with any of these conditions is that if they get infected, and they quickly can, then you can be in big trouble in a survival situation.

One such situation that could lead to this is a splinter that you leave in. Soak in Epsom salts as I described above and it’ll help draw it out.

If you have bug bites or poison ivy, you can make a paste with Epsom salt and apply it to the area and it will help draw out the itch and discomfort. Some sources say to bathe in Epsom salts for poison ivy, sumac, or oak, but that seems counter-intuitive, because hot water makes you itch more, and it’s possible that the bath may spread the rash.

There are opinions on both side of the fence on that, but when it comes to the possibility of spreading the misery, especially to tender spots, I’d rather not take a chance. Of course, that’s up to you.

To find natural anesthetics that may also help in these situations, check here.

Relieve Constipation

You need to be careful taking Epsom salt internally because of the magnesium and sulfur content. That being said, it’s long been used as a natural treatment to relieve constipation. Dissolve 2 tsp of Epsom salt in 8 ounces of water and drink it. If you don’t have a bowel movement within 4 hours, try a second dose, but don’t do it more than twice in a 24-hour period.

Reduce Inflammation

If you have swollen or sore muscles, you can either soak as I described above or you can make a compress by dissolving 2 cups of Epsom salt in a gallon of warm water, then let it get cold. Soak a towel with it, then wrap it loosely around the area and leave it there for 15 minutes.

Recharge Your Battery

This one is controversial because it can be extremely dangerous and it may not work. You’re dealing with battery acid and magnesium; a lot of bad things can happen. That being said, in an emergency survival situation, you’re left to your own devices and you can decide for yourself whether to do it or not.

Dissolve an ounce of Epsom salt in warm water to make a paste, then add a bit to each battery cell. This probably won’t help if the plates inside are worn out or if the contacts between the cells are in bad shape.

Always wear eye protection and sturdy clothes and shoes that the battery acid won’t eat through before you can get it off, just in case. This isn’t something you should try if you don’t have experience. And remember – being prepared by having  a properly maintained car is always better than trying to fix it when you need it the most.

Video first seen on Mentorcase

Scrubbing Tiles and Cookware

I’m not sure if Epsom salt works well to remove shower grunge and baked on foods because of the chemicals in them (it’s a debate), or if it’s because of the abrasive quality, but making a paste with water and dabbing it onto your shower tiles, then scrubbing will remove grunge, and for pots and pans, soak it in Epsom and hot water, or just sprinkle the salt straight in and scrub.

Great Skin

OK, this one isn’t really for survival, but even if SHTF, cosmetics are going to be important for physical and emotional reasons. Having toothpaste and a clean face can make all the difference in the world when you’re searching for a dab of normalcy. Epsom salt has been a common ingredient in beauty solutions for practically forever, or at least since the 1800s.

You can add essential oils and herbs to them to make bath salts, mix it with coconut oil or water to make an exfoliant (oils are good here, too), and some say that rinsing your face in Epsom salt water will help heal conjunctivitis and sties.

Remember that knowledge is the only thing that can save you in a survival situation.

Click the banner below to uncover more survival secrets that helped our grandfathers survive!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

10 Survival Uses For Epsom Salt

I think that as preppers and homesteaders, we can all agree that three of the top things we look for in an item that we consider worthy of stockpiling is cost, versatility and utilitarianism. In other words, how many different things can we use it for, and how often will  we reach for it?

Well, using those criteria, Epsom salt goes somewhere near the top of the preparedness list, along with vinegar and duct tape. But why?

Epsom salt, sea salt, table salt, kosher salt … they’re all the same, right? Just different textures? Nope. Actually, it’s not a salt at all. Sea salt, kosher salt and table salt are at least 97.5% sodium chloride. Of course, kosher salt is, well, kosher, and sea salt also has minerals, but Epsom salt is a completely different beast – it’s actually magnesium sulfate. And it has a ton of survival and household uses.

Another big difference between Epsom salt and other salts is that it doesn’t really have culinary value – it’s bitter. It’s used more as  a chemical than a seasoning. So, don’t pull out your box of Epsom salts when you run out of kosher salt – you won’t be happy with the results!

Draw out Toxins and Impurities

This was actually the first use of Epsom salt. In the early seventeenth  century, people that would bathe or soak in the waters produced by springs in the town of Epsom, England because of the curative effects that it purportedly had. The wealthy began to travel there just to soak. A doctor began extracting the salt and the rest is history.

Though studies are contentious about the actual curative effects of soaking, there’s no denying the fact that it’s been used for that purpose to alleviate muscle soreness and fatigue, arthritis, and skin conditions ever since. It’s likely due to the magnesium.

Epsom salt dissolves well in warm water but not so well in oils or lotions, so there’s no need to complicate things. Just dissolve a cup and a half or so in a half-gallon of hot water and add it to your bath water. If you’d rather just soak a particular body part – say, your feet – just add a cup to very warm water and soak away.

Because it does have magnesium and sulfate in it, you shouldn’t soak in the tub for more than 15 minutes a day, or in a small container for more than 30 minutes. Follow the directions on the container.

Discover the health and healing secrets that helped our forefathers survive harsh times! 

Boost Magnesium in Soil

Whether you want greener, thicker grass, tastier tomatoes and peppers, or prettier flowers, Epsom salt is a good option because magnesium helps plants produce chlorophyll and allows your plants soak in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, and some plants need more of that that others. Many soils lack enough magnesium to do this. If you just want to green things up so that your yard looks great to both your neighbors and your livestock, add 2 tbsp./1 gallon of water and spray on your lawn with a garden sprayer.

To give a monthly magnesium boost to your plants, mix 1-2 tsp/gallon of water and saturate the soil around the plants so that it goes to the roots. If you’re using a mister, use 1-2 tablespoons per gallon. This recipe also works well when you’re germinating because seeds need both magnesium and sulfur. Just water your seeds with it as soon as you plant them.

To add magnesium to your soil when you plant, sprinkle 1 tbsp. around each transplant.

Video first seen on CaliKim29 Garden & Home DIY

Tan Hides

The first step to tanning a raw hide is to remove the flesh from it. Some remove the hair as well, but some would rather leave it on. With magnesium tanning, the Epsom salt is added after the flesh is removed and is used in as a “swelling agent” to soften the hide, increase durability, and decrease shrinkage. It may affect the color of the hide or leave stains on it.

Be careful using Epsom salts because magnesium can, in combination with the right chemicals, become explosive.

Deter Raccoons and Slugs

Raccoons love your garden, your garbage, and your hen house, but you’re probably no so in love with them. Good news – they hate the smell of Epsom salts. Sprinkle it around those areas and your coon problem will go away. Remember to reapply after it rains.

Of course, that won’t keep them from dropping down off a fence or finding another way in, so it’s best to use Epsom salt in conjunction with other practices such as keeping your garbage is tight-sealing containers.

To deter slugs from your garden or your planters, just sprinkle it around the perimeter. Remember that it will dissolve, so you’ll need to reapply after rain.

Splinters, Insect Bites, and Poison Ivy

I’ve used Epsom salt for splinters, bug bites and skin irritations many times! The problem with any of these conditions is that if they get infected, and they quickly can, then you can be in big trouble in a survival situation.

One such situation that could lead to this is a splinter that you leave in. Soak in Epsom salts as I described above and it’ll help draw it out.

If you have bug bites or poison ivy, you can make a paste with Epsom salt and apply it to the area and it will help draw out the itch and discomfort. Some sources say to bathe in Epsom salts for poison ivy, sumac, or oak, but that seems counter-intuitive, because hot water makes you itch more, and it’s possible that the bath may spread the rash.

There are opinions on both side of the fence on that, but when it comes to the possibility of spreading the misery, especially to tender spots, I’d rather not take a chance. Of course, that’s up to you.

To find natural anesthetics that may also help in these situations, check here.

Relieve Constipation

You need to be careful taking Epsom salt internally because of the magnesium and sulfur content. That being said, it’s long been used as a natural treatment to relieve constipation. Dissolve 2 tsp of Epsom salt in 8 ounces of water and drink it. If you don’t have a bowel movement within 4 hours, try a second dose, but don’t do it more than twice in a 24-hour period.

Reduce Inflammation

If you have swollen or sore muscles, you can either soak as I described above or you can make a compress by dissolving 2 cups of Epsom salt in a gallon of warm water, then let it get cold. Soak a towel with it, then wrap it loosely around the area and leave it there for 15 minutes.

Recharge Your Battery

This one is controversial because it can be extremely dangerous and it may not work. You’re dealing with battery acid and magnesium; a lot of bad things can happen. That being said, in an emergency survival situation, you’re left to your own devices and you can decide for yourself whether to do it or not.

Dissolve an ounce of Epsom salt in warm water to make a paste, then add a bit to each battery cell. This probably won’t help if the plates inside are worn out or if the contacts between the cells are in bad shape.

Always wear eye protection and sturdy clothes and shoes that the battery acid won’t eat through before you can get it off, just in case. This isn’t something you should try if you don’t have experience. And remember – being prepared by having  a properly maintained car is always better than trying to fix it when you need it the most.

Video first seen on Mentorcase

Scrubbing Tiles and Cookware

I’m not sure if Epsom salt works well to remove shower grunge and baked on foods because of the chemicals in them (it’s a debate), or if it’s because of the abrasive quality, but making a paste with water and dabbing it onto your shower tiles, then scrubbing will remove grunge, and for pots and pans, soak it in Epsom and hot water, or just sprinkle the salt straight in and scrub.

Great Skin

OK, this one isn’t really for survival, but even if SHTF, cosmetics are going to be important for physical and emotional reasons. Having toothpaste and a clean face can make all the difference in the world when you’re searching for a dab of normalcy. Epsom salt has been a common ingredient in beauty solutions for practically forever, or at least since the 1800s.

You can add essential oils and herbs to them to make bath salts, mix it with coconut oil or water to make an exfoliant (oils are good here, too), and some say that rinsing your face in Epsom salt water will help heal conjunctivitis and sties.

Remember that knowledge is the only thing that can save you in a survival situation.

Click the banner below to uncover more survival secrets that helped our grandfathers survive!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

Jeremiah 7:2-4

Click here to view the original post.
Stand in the gate of the Lord’s house and proclaim there this word
 and say, ‘Hear the word of the Lord, all you of Judah, who enter by these gates to worship the Lord!’ Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, 
“Amend your ways and your deeds, and I will let you dwell in this place. 
Do not trust in deceptive words, saying, ‘This is the temple of the Lord, 
the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord.’

     I must admit something as I write this blog this morning … first, that Jeremiah is my favorite prophet because he seems so human; I can identify with him and his impatience with the stiff-necked people of Judah.  Like Jeremiah, I often harbor harsh criticism for those who are willing to accept the blessings of God while rejecting Him.  At the same time, I am filled with sadness for the reality of where they will spend eternity if they do not set aside their pride and worldliness in favor of surrendering all to God. I struggle with whether it is okay for me to be offended on behalf of Jesus.  But then I look at Jeremiah, and see myself.  
     In fact, in Jeremiah 7:2-4, I am seeing a situation that is being played out far too often in the affluent communities of America.  I have personally witnessed it, so I do not speak out of turn or about something that I know nothing of.  But I am offended when I see the wealthy in upscale communities vociferously competing for coveted spots for their children in Christian private schools.  Often, the efforts to place their children in these exclusive schools begins while the child is still in the womb! And it is not the desire for a Christian education that offends me, but rather the disinterest in knowing the Person upon whom the education is based.
     These parents are far too willing to set themselves (and their children) above what they consider a substandard education in the public schools, but they are equally consistent in denying faith [or any kind of relationship] in Jesus; He Who is the very foundation of the education their children are receiving. 
     But not all the blame can be laid at the feet of these defiant and rebellious parents.  Shame on the Churches and the Church schools who accept students whose parents do not support the Gospel of the Kingdom!  Is it all about the money that the parents pay that supports the Church organization [or should I say business]? Why isn’t the Church concerned that the home be [necessarily] a stronghold of Faith? Are these Churches aware of the Parable of the Sower and how the Word that was sown on stony hearts had no depth in which to nourish the seed, and it therefore did not take root?  Is it possible that this supposedly prized “Christian education” is more about the prestige and the status, than it is about Christ?
     I personally have heard Elitist unbelieving parents bragging about writing a letter of recommendation to help another unbelieving friend’s child gain entrance into their prestigious private school.  And my spirit saw Christ’s grief-stricken face as I fought to control my righteous indignation! Like Jeremiah, I wanted to shout for them to amend their blasphemous deeds and words.  I wanted them to know what an honor it was for their child to be taught the ways of Jesus, and I wanted them to truly know the Lord who died for them! 
     I wanted these parents to know what I think of those Church school officials who are so tolerant of disbelief [by accepting massive amounts of tuition money]. These parents are trusting in the [lying] words of those who tell them it is okay to continue to worship the gods of this world [money, status, privilege], and then give lip service to how wonderful it is their child is attending this Christian school. Their exclamations of “The School, the School, the School” is no different than the Jewish sinners shouting to God in His House, and  proclaiming “The temple, the Temple, the Temple”.
     Like Jeremiah, I am truly weary of this self-centered, egotistic, superficial, and self-seeking generation!  Why is Jesus and the Cross so offensive to these people who have everything?  They have no financial worries, no needs of any kind. Perhaps it is because nothing says you are a sinner more than the Cross, and no one says you are in need of a Savior, more than Jesus. He is a mirror that reflects our pride, our idolatry, and the darkness of our souls. And while I know that my indignation reflects what angers God, Himself, I need to be careful that my anger does not cause me to sin. So, for now, I will continue to bite my tongue. But I will never stop proclaiming my faith in Jesus — even when the looks of disgust surface, and the eyes roll, and the subject is quickly changed … And I will pray for their children; that they might bear fruit from hearing the Word and lead their parents to the knowledge of Jesus; a knowledge in which all the riches of this world pale in comparison.
      

My Favorite Kind Of Food Storage

Click here to view the original post.

This is my favorite kind of food storage, when you can stretch a meal from one can of meat, for instance, for an entire family. When my girls were growing up we always had taco Fridays. I bet you can picture what I’m about to say, I would add rice to stretch the cooked 1/2 pound hamburger for six people. Sometimes, I would add leftover hash browns. Right? Well, Pleasant Hill Grain asked me if I would do a review on some of the new food storage items they carry. You may remember that company because I mention them when I’m doing a post on my colored 5-gallon buckets with matching Gamma lids. Yep, that’s the company. These opinions today are my own, I will never agree to do a review on items I will not use or eat myself, so let’s get started. P.S. I can tell you I love everything they sell on their website. I’ve been using them to purchase so many products over the years.

These are the items I received, as shown above, for two reasons I will show you a few cans that are open. I wanted to see what was in some of the cans and I’m sure you do too! I have recommended the “Red Feather” butter in a can for years, its butter and It’s yummy! I have heard about the “Bega Cheese” from Australia, but had never tried it. It tastes a little like Velveeta cheese, but a little milder. It would be a great treat on crackers after a disaster! Trust me on that one, we will soon get tired of peanut butter and jelly on crackers. Although, that sounds pretty good right now! LOL! If you can’t or have no desire to make bread, store a few boxes of crackers that we’ll need to fill our bellies with some food. Add some of this meat with some mayo on the crackers, or add it to a casserole and we have a meal.

My Favorite Kind of Food Storage

The box came with a note and I quote part of it, “The largest consumption region for canned cheese is the Middle East, but Bega isn’t a Middle-Eastern company, it’s an Australian company and their cheese is produced in Austrailia. Bega uses the same packaging for cheese that’s shipped worldwide, so the labeling and certification is designed to best suit the areas where their products are most popular.” I’m using the cooked ground beef shown above in some chili tonight, add some beans, diced tomatoes, and spices and I’m good to go. I have grated cheese and chopped onion with crackers on the side. I love it!

I’ve seen this cheese available at so many emergency preparedness stores and wondered what it looked like. I was always hoping they had testers of the cheese like at Costco. I would buy it for sure now to add to my food storage stash. Add some salsa with it and bring on the tortilla chips, yummy!

Here’s a picture of the bacon right out of the “Yoder’s” bacon can. I did a post on Yoder’s bacon and compared it to a package of the slightly thin cooked bacon from Costco in the refrigerator section a few years ago. It’s the same thing, or seems like the same thing to me. It had the exact same number of slices, yes it did! Awesome, huh? Yet, the can takes up so little space on the pantry shelf (no refrigerations required). You will love some bacon in your food storage for a special treat when the freezers do not work because of a power outage. It makes me want a BLT as in bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich right now. Everything is better with bacon on it, don’t you think so?

My Favorite Kind of Food Storage

I was really glad Pleasant Hill Grain sent me a can of Ghee-Clarified butter. Here’s the deal, I took the classes last year from the USU via the USDA and passed the test to receive my Master Preserver Canning Certificate. I learned how to preserve (pressure can, water bath, dehydrate, etc.) many things. I did learn we cannot can the following items:

  1. Butter or Ghee (clarified butter, because it still has too much fat). Let me explain how you can use this can of Ghee. You can use it to barbecue your meat, saute and fry egg dishes, veggies, and dipping sauces. Use it for baking healthier cakes, pies, pastries, and candy. It has a great flavor on popped popcorn. you can use it in place of 1/2 to 2/3 as much of your regular cooking oils. It’s lactose-free and has no trans fat. The ingredients are fresh pasteurized cream.
  2. Bacon, it’s not safe, it has too much fat
  3. Eggs
  4. Milk, because of too much fat

I know I have received several emails saying people have links where you can follow on how to safely “can them”, sorry, I follow the USDA guidelines. They suggest we do not. I have been canning food for over 50 years and I follow the USDA rules. It’s how I roll. I love that commercial companies make it available in a safe way for us to store for future use on our pantry shelves.

The canned turkey and chicken have no water added, only salt and pepper. They would be great in casseroles, or add some mayo for sandwiches. The pork and beef chunks also have no water added, just salt and pepper. I grew up on roast beef leftover meat with mayo and relish, so that can is ready to open for me any day now! I like the size of the cans because I can make the following items and more with any of the canned meats:

  1. tacos
  2. enchiladas
  3. pork carnitas
  4. soups
  5. stews
  6. casseroles
  7. beef stroganoff
  8. pork burritos
  9. chicken burritos
  10. beef burritos
  11. creamed turkey over crepes
  12. chili

You get what I’m saying, the menus are not limited at all. The meats are all cooked, we just add them to any meal, easy peasy. Thank you, Pleasant Hill Grain for giving me the chance to share my favorite kind of food storage with my readers. May God bless you for your effort to fill your shelves with food your family will enjoy eating.

Pleasant Hill Grain meats

Pleasant Hill Grain dairy

The post My Favorite Kind Of Food Storage appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

2017 Suburban Steader Update – Week 12 & 13

Click here to view the original post.

I’m going to start right here by apologizing.  I haven’t written an article that isn’t a wrap-up since Week 10 and I didn’t even get to a wrap-up article last week.  There’s a reason for missing so much writing, but I’ll warn you that it’s not terribly exciting.  All that being said, let’s see what’s

Top 5 Best Anti-Carjacking Guns !

Click here to view the original post.

Top 5 Best Anti-Carjacking Guns Carjacking is any pugnacious attempt at stealing an occupied vehicle.  Thousands of carjackings occur in the United States each year, and if you don’t want to become another victim, keeping a gun in your car at all times is the best option possible.  A ‘car gun’ is simply a weapon … Continue reading Top 5 Best Anti-Carjacking Guns !

The post Top 5 Best Anti-Carjacking Guns ! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.