The Strange Truth Behind Those ‘Natural Flavors’ Labels

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The Strange Truth Behind Those ‘Natural Flavors’ Labels

Photo source: Justine McGregor. Flickr/Creative Commons . https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines “natural” as “being or composed of ingredients that are from nature and not artificial.”

With that definition in mind, it makes sense that when you see the words “all natural” or “natural flavors” on a food or drink label, you expect that the ingredients are “from nature.”

But you might be surprised at how unnatural some of those “natural” ingredients are. In fact, the Food and Drug Administration has no set definition of what “natural” means in labelling.

Since its 1906 Pure Food & Drug Act, the FDA has deemed that natural flavors must originate from a natural source, but the FDA does not stipulate what is done to that substance afterwards. In fact, many “natural” flavors become decidedly unnatural after spending some time in the lab.

A good example of the term “all natural” gone bad is orange juice. Although commercially produced orange juice includes orange juice as a natural ingredient, the product often undergoes an unnatural process before it hits your grocery store shelf.

New Capsule Protects You From Toxins And Pollutants!

In her book, “Squeezed: What You Don’t Know About Orange Juice,” Alissa Hamilton explains that orange juice companies first squeeze oranges into giant tanks that remove all the oxygen from the juice. Without oxygen, orange juice can be stored for up to a year before bottling.

The Strange Truth Behind Those ‘Natural Flavors’ LabelsHowever, without oxygen, the juice also loses its flavor. So, orange juice companies add orange flavor back in later with specially designed “flavor packs.” Although the flavor packs do contain some natural ingredients (such as orange oil and orange essence), they usually are mixed and formulated in a lab along with other chemicals and compounds.

As a result, all-natural orange juice is not all orange juice.

Likewise, natural vanilla flavor does not always come from vanilla beans. In another example, a British biotech company is working to create a grapefruit flavor from oranges, since oranges are less expensive and more readily available than grapefruits.

According to Popular Science, in order to create a grapefruit essence, the British scientists are isolating a chemical in oranges, called “valencene,” and combining it with an enzyme to manufacture a grapefruit flavoring, called “nootkatone.” A Boston company called Ginko Bioworks is working on a similar process to give yeast a vanilla taste.

While artificial flavors can come from petroleum or other inedible substances, “natural flavors” can come from a spice, a fruit or vegetable, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or anything fermented from those foods, according to the FDA’s Code of Federal Regulations.

Lab workers, called flavorists, can take a startling array of ingredients and work with them to mimic certain natural flavors. So, why not use the natural source itself? The answer is to save money. For example, real cherries are costly, but a lab-formulated “natural” cherry taste can be much less expensive.

Once flavorists find a tasty formula blend, the recipe is then manufactured at production plants.

In its database of more than 80,000 foods, the Environmental Working Group lists “natural flavor” as the fourth most common ingredient – behind only salt, water and sugar — listed on food labels. Unfortunately, the FDA does not require manufacturers to spell out what is in their “natural flavors.” The only exceptions are common allergens — milk, egg, fish, shellfish, peanuts, soy, tree nuts or wheat.

Therefore, the only way to really know if the “natural ingredients” in a product are really natural is to contact a food manufacturer directly to request detailed information.

Of course, another option is to bypass these types of processed goods entirely and to eat foods in their natural state as much as possible. That way, you’ll know exactly what you are eating.

What do you think about “all-natural” labels? Share your thoughts in the section below:   

Sources

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/cfrsearch.cfm?fr=501.22

http://www.ewg.org/foodscores

 

Flare for the dramatic

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,Rawles mentioned the a supplier for 26.5mm flares the other day.

Years back, Sportsmans Guide had a deal on genuine HK21A flare guns. As I recall, they were something like thirtyfive bucks or so and I bought a few. At the time there was a goodly amount of 26.5mm Czech flares on the market (26mm will work also). I wound up with quite a variety of projectiles and smoke. Hey, why not? They were cheap(ish) and definitely fun to play with.

Practical? Mmmmm….not sure. But..here’s where they shine – 26.5mm flares are far more…substantial..for your perimeter tripflare warning systems than those rinkydink 12 ga. Olin flares. A quick trip through the plumbing section of Home Depot gets you pretty much everything you need to build a tripflare warning system.

For the more DIY minded, I recall reading a how-to somewhere on the internet about nailing a rat trap to stake, and then attaching the pull chain off some of those Skyblazer flares to the trap bar. Set the trap, it gets triggered, bar snaps down pulling the chain and igniting the flare. Clever.

Of course, thinking about that sort of thing led me down the rabbit hole to how to make other perimeter warning devices using mousetraps. Interesting stuff.

Remember: primers are dangerous and they might ignite things you didn’t want to ignite that were in close proximity to them. So..be careful. Wink, wink, nudge, nudge.

Bonita domes

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bonita domes

I think I have always been attracted to unconventional homes (I live in a small castle after all…), when perusing my YouTube page with all the suggestions of what I might like to watch, this definitely caught my eye. I’m not sure how much was the color of the building, I do love the warm yellows and oranges, and how much was the dome shapes. As a teen, my father and I went on a short trek to Italy Texas to visit the Monolithic Dome homes factory, I fell in love with domes right then and there.

I LOVE the organic shapes on the inside as well as the outside of these structures, I wondered if the counter tops were custom cut, then on a closeup, I could see they looked like concrete, so they could be poured into any shape they could create. I like the individual separate spaces for each use, the shower dome, the kitchen area, the kiva pit. Living in the desert myself, dealing with the winds that blow, I know the importance of having a protected space if you want to have an open fire.

The shower dome looks really interesting, I want to make a separate shower space for us to use, it would be a seasonal space, used when the weather was warm, it would be away from the SkyCastle, organic in shape and using solar to heat the water, but I digress from the home I’m talking about here.

The best way for you to experience this is to watch the videos for yourself.
https://youtu.be/5SFnUjeS-AY

https://youtu.be/evsu9NOo4hQ

A dome to make me jealous!

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WWIII? Trump Bombs Syria; Russia Warns Strikes will Lead to Negative Consequences

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It looks like the Swamp is back in action, as yet another President has bombed a foreign country without congressional approval and without that country posing an imminent threat to the United States. […]

The post WWIII? Trump Bombs Syria; Russia Warns Strikes will Lead to Negative Consequences appeared first on Off Grid Survival – Wilderness & Urban Survival Skills.

Wanting to buy an island with others

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Do you want to go back in time, buy an island,  and live without running water and electricity and fish and garden and tend to chickens and rabbits and pick mangoes and coconuts and pineapples and live at the equator where the weather is perfect year-round? Us too – but we can’t afford an island and boat on our own – so if we can get several families to go in together and make this dream a reality, great! Christians encouraged to contact us. But we don’t discriminate. call and leave a message if you get voice-mail. I don’t have a good signal often, so at times my phone doesn’t ring. I’m in northern Arizona now. four-eight-zero-two-zero-two-three-four-zero-three. I listed this in the bahamas as I’m hoping that’s the area where we can go – maybe off the coast of honduras or something.

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The Stranger in the Woods – Book review and giveaway

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com Today we are featuring a new book, The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit by Michael Finkel. What is the book about? The book is about the the North Pond Hermit, Christopher Knight, who lived alone in the Maine woods, without any human contact, for 27 years. Having seen the stories about his capture in the news back in 2013, I thought it would make for an […]

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Your privacy was just sold: 5 steps to protect what’s left of it.

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You’ve probably heard the news already, but if you haven’t then know that the House quietly voted to undo rules that keep internet service providers — the companies like Comcast, Verizon and Charter that you pay for online access — from selling your personal information.

How the Republicans Sold Your Privacy to Internet Providers

What websites you visit, your location, everything they can get from you now is theirs to sell to the highest bidder.

Yay freedom!

Anyway, there’s not a lot you can do but every little helps. These are just five simple things the average Joe can do to protect at least some of that privacy.

1)Start Using Firefox

It’s the best browser anyway.
Here’s a link with some of the ad ons and set up to improve your privacy.

https://vikingvpn.com/cybersecurity-wiki/browser-security/guide-hardening-mozilla-firefox-for-privacy-and-security

2)Stop using Google

Yes, it can be done. Use Duck Duck Go instead as your main search engine. To be honest I still use Google when DDG isn’t giving me good results but not using google is probably the biggest step toward privacy. DDG basically uses Google, but it does it for you while remaining anonymous.

3)Stop using Whatsapp

Since it got sold to Facebook you know what to expect. Shameless abuse of your privacy. Telegram is pretty much the same thing and just as simple to use, but you get to keep your privacy.

4)Stop using Facebook

I’ll be honest. I don’t use it, and those of you that do probably see I hardly keep up with it. My blog posts are automatically reposted on Facebook but I just don’t know how to use 99% of it. The thing is, even if you do like and use Facebook, its as creepy as a company can be, with no regards whatsoever for your privacy of course. At the very least, try not posting vital information like your address, birthday, when you go on holydays or when you make big financial decisions. All of this isnt just about privacy, its about physical safety.

5)Cover the camera of your laptop

My wife first started doing this years ago. I thought she was a complete lunatic. “I don’t know who’s watching” she said. “baby, no one’s watching you” I said back then. Oh, I was so naïve its even cute now that I think about it. Yes, they do spy on you, they use facial recognition technology on you to get your biometric data and God only knows what else, how you react to different data, different products or ads? Disable your camera and microphone when not in use, or as Mark Zuckerberg does and FBI Director James Comey advices people to do, put some tape on it.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

2 Simple Ways To Eliminate Garden Weeds This Year

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2 Simple Ways To Eliminate Garden Weeds This Year The bane of any gardeners existence is the consistent and unrelenting growth of weeds. Its a nightmare each and every year the plucking and picking. Most gardeners threaten to place weed blocker down to assure nothing can grow through it and into your garden. But even …

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Make a Wooden Bow Grip

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Make a Wooden Bow Grip The bow really is one of the best all purpose survival weapons. Its reliability and near silent strike makes it ideal for any survival situation. The bow is easy to create and with practice it can become pretty easy to shoot. This article even offers ways that a high quality …

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Scavenging for Supplies

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Scavenging for Supplies Even the best military minds understand the idea of retreat. There are very real benefits in that. This article is about scavenging for supplies but it also works to remind you of the importance of retreat. In times of disaster, particularly prolonged disaster, you will find yourself seeking out supplies. This article …

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7 Essential Prepper Food Storage Containers

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7 Essential Prepper Food Storage Containers Food storage is essential for preparing for almost any disaster or SHTF situation. What you store your food in can make a big difference in it’s shelf life and longevity. There is not just one best container for storing foods, many different types are better for different uses. Whether …

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Ammo Supplies: Why You Can’t Relax Just Because Trump Won

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Ammo Supplies: Why You Can’t Relax Just Because Trump Won

Image source: Pixabay.com

It appears the current political environment concerning guns and ammo may have relaxed a bit. But constant vigilance by all who want to maintain an ammo supply for their favorite firearms should be the norm.

As a current firearms instructor in both civilian and law enforcement venues, it never ceases to amaze me as to how little thought is given to ammo and its availability. In many instances, students often arrive for training reporting they have limited ammo for that day’s range work because they could not find it at the local retailer in the required quantity. Likewise, ammo cost and supply are a constant concern and discussion in the law enforcement arena.

With increasing frequency, ammo is becoming the focus of control efforts by politicians on the local and federal level who view guns — and all associated with them — as evil.

The Self-Defense Weapon That Doesn’t Require A Firearms License!

The following are just a few of the challenges we are facing today when it comes to ongoing ammo acquisitions:

Leave your fingerprint/show a license to purchase ammo. California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois and Massachusetts all have passed such laws or are considering them.

Environmental. In a nutshell, the shaky theory holds that lead-based projectiles will compromise certain wildlife species (and humans, too) if ingested or physical exposure occurs. The result is lead-based ammo being restricted or banned.

Public safety. Attempts to eliminate .556 green tip or other “ballistic tip” ammo because it could penetrate all law enforcement body armor. Any high-velocity rifle round has this capability … it’s just political posturing.

Quantity restrictions. In some states, there are many restrictions on purchases of large quantities of ammo via the Internet. In addition, some retailers restrict how much of certain calibers one may purchase at any given time. This is still not uncommon for 22 rimfire ammo.

Import restrictions. There has been much discussion on limiting or banning importation of foreign-made ammo in such highly used cartridges as 7.62×39 and 5.45×39.

Non-availability. Ammo manufactures may limit how often they produce certain calibers based on the market demand. This means you better have laid in a good supply of all necessary reloading components if you need a particular, less common caliber. I personally have encountered difficulty in finding 218 Bee and 348 Winchester. To my knowledge, neither is currently in production. And one that’s around but continues to be difficult to find is 22 Magnum!

So, what are your needs and use for ammo? And how much is enough?  That depends on you. Uses and needs in my world encompass the following: hunting, shooting sports/competition, training, defensive, bartering/investment, and leaving something for kids/grandkids when they find ammunition even harder, costlier and perhaps commercially unavailable to obtain in the future.

Many methods exist for long-term storage. But keep in mind: It must be cool and dry! Also, don’t store all your ammo in one location; spread it out. This provides some degree of insurance against fire, theft and catastrophic events.

Bottom line, if you want to have ammunition available at all times, you need to have a continuous plan for acquiring and replacing it. Just remember that just a few years ago, it wasn’t merely rimfire ammo that became scare; many pistol and rifle calibers also were hard to find!

Can you have too much ammo? That is for you to decide.

What do you think is “too much ammo”? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Month-to-Month Homesteading To Do Lists

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This article was originally published by Isis Loran  on familyfoodgarden.com

Do you want to stay more organized?

Month-to-month goals and tasks can help you stay organized for the year.

You can’t always get it all done, but it helps to have a bit of a guideline for what you hope to accomplish, learn, make, do etc.

For these monthly homesteading lists I don’t write everything we harvest, for example we usually have a continuous supply of greens throughout the year, but I will mention the foods that are harvested specifically for those months in our growing zone 5. I talk about the foraging of wild foods as we’re consuming more and more of them as the years go by. I also use Brassica very vaguely rather than mentioning all of them (broccoli, cauliflower, kohl rabi, kale, collard greens, cabbages, brussel sprouts, mustards, turnips, rutabaga…).

Our homesteading currently consists of food gardening, foraging , preserving the harvests, fall/winter gardening and keeping chickens. We do not have any other livestock as of yet so our homestead to do lists reflect that.

january

  • January is a great ‘take it easy’ month to rest as well read more about gardening and homesteading.
  • Lots of browsing through seed catalogues.
  • Go over your garden journal notes & see what you need to make improvements of.
  • The off-season is the perfect time for garden planning! Make your sowing, transplanting and succession sowing schedules.
  • Grow some indoor fresh sprouts or micro greens to get your gardening or fresh veggie fix.
  • If you have chickens remember to turn the deep litter bedding  (if you’re using this method).
  • Turn the compost pile or keep in indoor vermicomposting set up (worm composting is great for the cold months).
  • Enjoy home preserved goods from the previous season and remember how hard you worked to achieve this wonderful food.

february

  • Seed starting begins! (onions, leeks, celery, herbs with Brassicas towards the end that are going in the greenhouse/hoop tunnels in March).
  • Greenhouse prep, soil amendments or garden bed building if the snow melts .
  • Enjoy the growing daylight hours!
  • Continue with the garden planning.
  • Keep up with the deep litter method for the chicken coop.
  • Grow an indoor herb garden to help with the winter blues!
  • Craft. Make art. Enjoy some of the slower time for reading and creating.
  • Sprouts!! They are the perfect nutritious winter food. You can even grow them for your chickens.
  • Ferment. This is a perfect thing to do in the winter months.
  • If the weather permits do a full clean out of the chicken coop and add fresh new bedding.

march

  • Sow outdoors in greenhouse/hoop tunnels weather pending. Use Heavy weight row cover for frost protection + mini hoop tunnels. Transplant Brassicas, maybe peas & favas under season extenders.
  • Start more seeds inside. This month we start the tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, more brassicas (collards, kale, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, brussel sprouts, kohl rabi), lettuce, green onions, cool season herbs like cilantro. If weather is looking decent enough chance an early sowing of peas by starting them inside and transplanting them. (it sounds crazy but I’ve done it before with peas & fava beans).
  • Get any new garden beds prepped or built if weather permits.
  • If no snow let the chickens free range (supervised) and stretch their legs after a long winter cooped up. Let the chickens eat some of the weeds in the garden.
  • Order and bring home chicks if we need any this year.
  • Celebrate spring Equinox by using any of the home canned food and any wild food that might be ready (like dandelion greens).
  • Do a full clean out of the chicken coop with fresh new bedding (do this in Feb is it’s warm).
  • If soil is workable add compost, decomposed manure, any soil amendments needed.
  • If snow falls shovel and brush off snow from raised bed covers and polytunnel greenhouse.
  • Set up mini hoop tunnels within the polyunnel greenhouse for early Spring transplanting (Eliot Coleman’s tunnel within a tunnel system).
  • If the end of the month is looking favourable transplant early spring crops.
  • Relieve gardening restlessness by reading more gardening books.
  • Keep an eye on indoor transplants and make sure they’re happy.
  • Stare in wonder at the new seedlings and have gratitude for being able to grow food.

april

  • Sow cool season crops direct seed outside: carrots, parsnips, lettuce, arugula, radishes, green onions, spinach and orach, beets, turnips, swiss chard, mustard greens and bok choi.
  • Transplant kale, swiss chard, collards, broccoli, cilantro. Plant early and main-crop potatoes.
  • Look after baby chicks, adjust the old flock with the new.
  • Start transplants of peppers & tomatoes, basil.
  • Build a front garden gate & trellis over entrance. Build trellis to join up with the fence for scarlet runner beans.
  • Add more mulch to the garlic & other garden beds.
  • Be thankful & eat the wild free food as our spring detox greens (wild nettle, dandelions..)  Forage for: wild nettles, dandelion greens, dandelion flowers (make tempura, wine?), dandelion root, lambs quarters. Dehydrate wild nettle, dandelion roots for tea.
  • Plant new potatoes & storage potatoes.
  • Get the outdoor composting pile going again.
  • Call around tree service companies and ask for wood chips to use in paths as mulch. Mulch all pathways with woodchips.
  • Suppress weeds before they grow with cardboard to build new sheet mulched/lasagna garden beds.
  • Harden off early spring crops and transplant them under protection of polytunnel or hoop houses.
  • Mid-end of the month start winter and summer squash, melons, basil and beans (the latter apparently doesn’t transplant well but I’ve never had a problem).

may

  • Start indoors: Squash, pumpkins, melons, more basil.
  • Foraging: more nettle (dehydrate for tea, beer?), dandelions, elder flower (dehydrate), lambs quarters.
  • Do a second sowing of greens after May heat wave for June (many usually bolt by now).
  • Freeze arugula pesto cubes. Dry lemon balm & mint for tea. Freeze cilantro cubes.
  • Direct seed rutabagas, parsnips for fall crops.
  • Add onto the chicken coop run.
  • Fix or upkeep any outdoor homesteading buildings.
  • Be thankful for the sunshine again and things beginning to grow in the garden!
  • Harden off transplants.
  • Transplant the warm season crops mid-month or earlier with hoop tunnel or frost protection and add compost or seasoil under each plant.
  • Transplant the remaining brassicas and add compost under each plant. Sow lettuce and radishes around brassicas as a bumper crop until plants get larger.
  • Continue succession sowing the ‘come and cut again’ greens after the May heat wave for June (many usually bolt by now).
  • Harvest early spring crops. Pull up any overwintered veggies and replace with transplants.
  • Be super excited not to worry about last spring frost. Our last frost is May 20th although it’s often end of April. Early May I always expect a frost and have heavy weight row cover handy to cover plants if needed.
  • Create a good watering rhythm in the mornings.
  • Keep an eye for bolting plants and pests. Constant vigilance is the best gardening technique!
  • Sow flowers for companion planting and to attract beneficial insects and bees.
  • Thin out plants so they have space to grow and use thinnings in a salad or stir fry.
  • Keep up with bi-weekly weeding.
  • Direct seed any warm season crops if not growing transplants (bean, corn etc). Only seed bolt resistant lettuce varieties.
  • Continue composting.

june

  • Direct seed carrots, beets, turnips from bolted lettuce & greens.
  • Harvest all the fava beans and sow another crop. Transplant fall Brussel sprouts & fall cabbages.
  • Transplant remaining warm season crops if not done in May.
  • Harvest garlic scapes. Freeze basil into pesto cubes for freezer. Pick & freeze peas on a constant basis.
  • Lots of garden harvests, eat lots of the greens that will bolt with the summer heat. Enjoy some of the first root veggies.
  • Home canning: beets, carrots, green beans.
  • Keep sowing lettuce, radishes and arugula in shadier areas of the garden for the rainy season.
  • Start fall/winter garden transplants (more kale, cabbages, kohl rabi, broccoli).
  • Prune the tomato and pepper suckers.
  • Keep mulching the potato plants with straw and/or soil.
  • Keep up with bi-weekly weeding and daily watering.
  • Replace the spring crops with summer or fall crops. Add compost before direct seeding or transplanting to keep soil nutrients available.
  • Keep boosting tomato and pepper plants every two weeks. Same with corn or heavy feeding brassicas.
  • Keep and eye on pests. Companion plant to attract beneficial insects. Hand pick or kill many bugs (yay for organic gardening).
  • Harvest herbs and pinch off any basil flowers. Cilantro will have bolted by now so pull up and replace with something like green onions.
  • Harvest peas every couple of days (the more you pick the more you’ll get). Pull up vines end of June or let them go to seed for dry peas.
  • Harvest and enjoy as many salads as you can as it will soon be too hot to grow most salad greens through the summer. (kale, collard greens, malabar spinach and swiss chard cover our greens for the hotter months).
  • Add any bitter bolted greens/pea vines etc to the compost pile or give to the chickens.

july

  • Direct seed fall broccoli, cauliflower & cabbages into the outdoor seed beds.
  • Wild foraging: BERRIES!! yea! It’s wild berry season. Freeze, make jam, make pies! Dehydrate raspberry leaves for tea.
  • Dehydrate zucchini and root veggie chips for kids to snack on. Dehydrate lots of kale chips for the winter months.
  • Make jam and other fruit preserves.
  • Pick & freeze snap/string beans on a constant basis (every couple of days, the more you pick, the more you get!).
  • Harvest & dry Calendula flowers for Calendula cream.
  • Pull up pea vines if you didn’t do it in June and replace with a quick-growing fall crop like lettuce or turnips.
  • If your location has very few bees or other pollinators you might need to hand pollinate certain crops like squash or tomatoes. If your corn isn’t grown in blocks you’ll also need to hand pollinate.
  • Transplant fall brassicas. If it’s hot or you have lots of pests grow them under a tunnel of lightweight row cover to keep out cabbage moths and provide some shade from the sun. Add compost and any soil amendments into the fall garden beds so new crops have lots of nutrients to grow.
  • Keep mulching maincrop potatoes with soil or straw. Harvest early potatoes.
  • Harvest lots and lots of veggies.  Preserve the extra harvests or share them with friends, family members or neighbours.
  • Any crops that are ready to harvest mid-season direct seed the fast growing crops for a bumper crop.
  • Sow the rest of the fall root crops.
  • Harvest garlic when the tops have yellowed and have died down (stop watering 3 weeks prior and also remove any mulch to help keep bulbs dry).
  • Amend garlic bed with compost and decomposed manure and transplant or direct seed Fall/Winter garden low tunnel crops.
  • Reduce watering at the end of the month to create heat stress for the tomato and pepper plants to encourage fruit ripening.
  • Continue to hoe and weed on a regular basis to prevent weeds!

august

  • Transplant or direct seed fall and winter gardening crops.
  • Keep harvesting, dehydrating, canning. Freeze herbs into cubes or dehydrate.
  • Stop watering dry beans so they can dry on the plant. Harvest and shell for dry storage. Keep freezing string beans.
  • Keep an eye out for powdery mildew on squash and reduce watering.
  • Harvest & dry garden culinary, medicinal & tea herbs.
  • Direct seed lots of kale, swiss chard, lettuce, radishes, for fall garden.
  • Stop watering onions so the tops die down and yellow. Harvest and cure. Cure garlic for winter storage.
  • Harvest any early winter squash and begin curing.
  • Keep up with the weeding.
  • Make wild foraged Elderberry wine!!!  Dehydrate or freeze the berries to make elderberry syrup for cold and flu season.
  • Harvest & cure onions, garlic, some of the small squash (kuri, spaghetti, buttercup).
  • Tomato canning if they are ripe.. Tomato sauce, paste, salsa, ketchup. Hot sauce with the peppers. Make jam and other fruit preserves.
  • Harvest & make oregano oil tincture if we have enough.
  • Eat fresh melons and other fruit.

september

  • Direct seed fast growing fall greens after Sept heat wave (spinach, tat soi, bok choi, arugula, mache..) plus more radishes.
  • Harvest Echinacea root to make Echinacea tincture (after a frost, leave 30% to grow back).
  • Harvest all the summer & winter squash, beans, tomatoes, peppers, and any frost sensitive vegetable. If a hard frost threatens cover fall greens with heavy weight row cover.
  • Keep dehydrating greens, herbs..
  • Direct sow fall crops in the greenhouse.
  • Keep up with home canning, freezing and other food preservation.
  • Cure winter long storage squash carefully and keep aside jack o lanterns for Halloween carving.
  • Build cold frames.
  • Harvest maincrop/storage potatoes.
  • Sow fall cover crops.
  • Harvest and cure winter squash.
  • Add any old vegetable vines from beans, squash etc to the compost pile.
  • Succession sow arugula, radishes and spinach mid-Sept onwards.
  • Transplant polytunnel cold hardy greenhouse plants where heat loving plants were.
  • Sow cover crops mid- to end of the month.
  • Keep weeding and hoeing.
  • Allow any plants to flower for the bees as the days get colder (they need all the pollen they can get before winter).

october

  • Protect plants as needed from frost with heavy weight row covers.
  • Direct seed in cold frames.
  • Sow overwintering crops in cold frames or low tunnels.
  • Mulch the root crops, harvest some of them to store in sand.
  • If a hard frost threatens cover fall greens with heavy weight row cover. If snow threatens harvest anything left in the garden that isn’t being mulched or shovel snow off the winter season extenders.
  • Make vanilla extract to sit for 3 months so it’s ready for Christmas gifts.
  • Prepare garlic bed and plant garlic. Mulch the garlic bed with leaves.
  • Sow cover crops, overwintering fava beans and amend beds as necessary.
  • Harvest rutabagas & turnips and other root veggies.
  • Cover garden beds with a healthy layer of leaves to decompose over the winter and add nutrition to the soil.
  • Enjoy a wonderful Thanksgiving dinner from lots of homegrown veggies (our Thanksgiving is in Oct as we’re in Canada 🙂 )
  • Add any needed protection to the perennial plants.
  • Add any fall soil amendments.
  • General garden and fall clean up before the snow arrives.

november

  • Relax. Seriously. It’s been a long haul by now, and it’s time to enjoy the fruits of your labour on those first snow falls. Home canned fruit, tea, green bean casseroles…squash..yum
  • Make notes in a garden journal from this past gardening season, what worked, what didn’t, what needs to be improved, pests, etc
  • Keep snow off of season extenders and keep harvesting cold hardy greens from the low tunnels etc.
  • Harvest all the cabbages & broccoli before the first heavy snow fall. The kale & brussel sprouts can stay.
  • Enjoy winter squash meals, starting by using the thin-skinned ones first.
  • Allow chickens to free range in the garden to do weed and garden clean up.
  • Get the chicken coop ready for the deep litter mulch method.

december

  • Enjoy veggies from the greenhouse, cold frame, harvest brussel sprouts and rest of the kale before the heavy snow arrives.
  • Craft & make Christmas tree ornaments & gifts.
  • Relax with our little family!
  • Find a Christmas tree in our mountain forest.
  • Garden Plan, enjoy our preserved harvests for meals.
  • Eat lots and lots of squash, start to eat some of the long storage squash as they would of gotten sweeter by now.
  • Mid-December take off polytunnel greenhouse plastic and keep low tunnel over the greenhouse beds instead (less height reduces potential damage from snow).
  • If it warms up vent tunnels and cold frames.
  • Write a garden journal and set intentions & goals for the next year.

 

Source : www.familyfoodgarden.com

Make sure you like BackdoorPrepper on Facebook to be updated every time we find an article for innovative ways you can become a better prepper .

 

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FREE Kindle Book – Meals In A Pot Box Set

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Free KIndle book – Meals in a Pot Box Set (6 in 1) : Instant Pot, Slow Cooker, Air Fryer Recipes to Make Your Cooking Easy and Quick (One-Dish Meals)

Meals in a Pot Box Set (6 in 1) Instant Pot, Slow Cooker, Air Fryer Recipes to Make Your Cooking Easy and Quick

Get SIX books for up to 60% off the price! With this bundle, you’ll receive:

  • Instant Pot Cookbook
  • Slow Cooker Low-Carb Baking
  • Air Fryer Cookbook
  • The Art of Slow Cooking
  • Healthy Slow Cooker
  • Healthy Crockpot Recipes

In Instant Pot Cookbook, you’ll learn 30 Easy and Healthy Pressure Cooker Recipes You Can Make in One Pot and Feed Your Entire Fa
In Slow Cooker Low-Carb Baking, you’ll learn 40 Low-Carb Recipes for Cake, Breads, Fruit Desserts, and Much More
In Air Fryer Cookbook, you’ll learn 30 Easy and Healthy Recipes of American Favorite Meals for Smart Weight Loss Frying
In The Art of Slow Cooking, you’ll get 30 Tasty and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes for Comforting Weight Loss Meals
In Healthy Slow Cooker, you’ll learn 30 Low Carb and Paleo Everyday Recipes for Stress-Free Cooking and Weight Loss
In Healthy Crockpot Recipes, you’ll learn 30 Low Carb One-Pot Meals for Your Family or Just for the Two of You

Buy all six books today!

FREE Kindle Book – Meals In A Pot Box Set

Free KIndle book – Meals in a Pot Box Set (6 in 1) : Instant Pot, Slow Cooker, Air Fryer Recipes to Make Your Cooking Easy and Quick (One-Dish Meals)

Meals in a Pot Box Set (6 in 1) Instant Pot, Slow Cooker, Air Fryer Recipes to Make Your Cooking Easy and Quick

Get SIX books for up to 60% off the price! With this bundle, you’ll receive:

  • Instant Pot Cookbook
  • Slow Cooker Low-Carb Baking
  • Air Fryer Cookbook
  • The Art of Slow Cooking
  • Healthy Slow Cooker
  • Healthy Crockpot Recipes

In Instant Pot Cookbook, you’ll learn 30 Easy and Healthy Pressure Cooker Recipes You Can Make in One Pot and Feed Your Entire Fa
In Slow Cooker Low-Carb Baking, you’ll learn 40 Low-Carb Recipes for Cake, Breads, Fruit Desserts, and Much More
In Air Fryer Cookbook, you’ll learn 30 Easy and Healthy Recipes of American Favorite Meals for Smart Weight Loss Frying
In The Art of Slow Cooking, you’ll get 30 Tasty and Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes for Comforting Weight Loss Meals
In Healthy Slow Cooker, you’ll learn 30 Low Carb and Paleo Everyday Recipes for Stress-Free Cooking and Weight Loss
In Healthy Crockpot Recipes, you’ll learn 30 Low Carb One-Pot Meals for Your Family or Just for the Two of You

Buy all six books today!

Tickborne Diseases – A Comprehensive Guide

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A simple fact of an outdoor life is that you will get bit by bugs. Most of the time the bites are harmless, resulting in nothing more than some itching near the site of the bite. But sometimes they can lead to something more. Many bugs are carriers for a variety of mild to serious…

The post Tickborne Diseases – A Comprehensive Guide appeared first on The Weekend Prepper.

Why ‘Prepping’ Is A Bad Idea

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Josh Volk

A century ago, most Americans were self-sufficient, or at least had the skills to know how to survive. Today, though, most Americans rely on McDonald’s and Walmart for their survival – and wouldn’t know how to grow a garden if their lives depended on it.

But for the few people who are willing to learn, there’s hope.

This week’s guest on Off The Grid Radio tells us not only why we need to recapture the skills of self-sufficiency but also what we should learn. His name is Caleb Warnock, the author of several books on the subject, including “The Forgotten Skills of Self-Sufficiency” and “More Forgotten Skills of Self-Sufficiency.”

Caleb gives us a brief history of the self-reliant movement and even explains why he thinks prepping – as it is typically defined – is a bad thing.

He also tells us:

  • Which skills our society needs to recapture first.
  • What gardeners can do to get the most yield and become even more self-sufficient.
  • Which vegetables he recommends for long-term storage.
  • Why a study of World War II will dramatically change our outlook on self-reliance.

Finally, we hear the incredible story of dandelions and how the Pilgrims – yes, the Pilgrims – brought this “weed” over to the New World to eat.

We learned quite a lot during our discussion with Caleb, and we think you will, too!

 

10 Steps To Be Ready For A Flood

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PeteLinforth / Pixabay

Are there ways to stop your home from getting carried away from a flood, or to protect you and your loved ones? Yes, there are. Preparing for a natural flood is something every household needs to consider, especially in this era of weird weather. Here are ten things you’ll need to do.

Get flood insurance

Homeowner’s insurance doesn’t cover flooding. You need separate flood insurance for that. Yes, it will cost extra money, but might be the only thing that can keep you afloat after a major flood. Disaster relief funds from the federal government are actually a loan you have to pay back, so don’t rely on those.

Build a flood kit

Any standard bug-out bag will work for a flood, but you should make sure you have two extra things. First, you need enough water for everyone in your family for at least three days. Second, a hand-crank radio will help you know where to go. Floods are unpredictable and you won’t know which roads will be out. Consider a paper map as well. Expect to be out of your home for 3-7 days. Floods longer than that are rare.

Know where your shelters are

If you know where the shelters are, you can head there immediately if you have to abandon your home. Talk with your local disaster planning officials to know where to go. By knowing in advance you can practice going there before the flood comes.

Store valuable or important items high

If you have a second floor, keep your important papers and precious items up there. They will have the greatest chance of surviving if you keep them above the flood waters. You should also have copies in your bug-out bag. You don’t want to be caught without identification and insurance paperwork.

Know the weather warnings

Floods use the same warnings as other weather patterns. A watch means you should be ready to flee if necessary. A warning means there is a flood and it’s time to either leave or shelter in place depending on your local situation. However, if there is a flash flood warning and you believe you are in the way, you must flee. Flash floods are the most deadly kind of flooding and can wash a house away in an instant.

Learn how to sandbag

If you’re going to use sandbags, here’s what you need to do. Fill them only two-thirds full of sand, fold the end over then place it with the open end down on the ground. Stack them like bricks. Place them in front of doors, foundation entrances, and garages. For one door, arrange the bags in a ring so you can open the door after the flood. Sandbags swell and get very heavy when wet. The time to put them out is when there is a flood watch.

Check your sump pump

If you have a basement, you need a sump pump. Check it monthly to make sure it works by pouring water down into the sump hole. Also, make sure it works on battery power.

Install a backflow preventer

Depending on the size of the flood and your town’s sewer system, water may try to back up through your pipes. By installing backflow preventers on your drain lines, you can stop this from happening. Consult with a plumber for proper installation.

Avoid touching flood water

You should do your best to avoid wading in flood water or driving through it. Your car is no protection when driving through flood water. In fact, many deaths from flooding happen because people try driving through it. Flood water also carries unknown contaminants as it flows. Avoid touching it as much as you can.

Know what to do after

Keep the number of a plumber, your gas company, and a water damage repair company in your area with your bugout bag in case you need them. Also, keep a camera so you can photograph any flood damage for your insurance company. Call them first after the flood for instructions.

The post 10 Steps To Be Ready For A Flood appeared first on American Preppers Network.

The Best Potting Soils: How to Choose The Right Potting Mix For Your Plants

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The post The Best Potting Soils: How to Choose The Right Potting Mix For Your Plants is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

If you’re growing in containers, chances are good you’re using some kind of potting soil for your precious plants.But what if I told you that the “soil” in your pot isn’t technically “soil” at all? What if I told you that it’s a mix made of composted tree materials, peat moss, and a myriad of […]

The post The Best Potting Soils: How to Choose The Right Potting Mix For Your Plants is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

From Storage to Stovetop: Freeze-Dried Bell Peppers

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In this installment of From Food Storage to Stovetop Jodi shares about how she likes to use Freeze-Dried Green Bell Peppers and how they have helped her enjoy eating vegetables more. Freeze dried bell peppers a long shelf life and are so easy to use. We love that you don’t have to buy a whole pepper if you only need a half for a recipe, or a few slices to throw in an omelet. No more throwing away half-eaten rotten produce!

Freeze-Dried to Fresh Conversion

1/3 cup dry = about 1 bell pepper

Refreshing Instructions

Add 1/3 cup of water to 1 cup peppers; let sit covered for 3-5 minutes or until tender.

Favorite Recipes Using Green or Red Peppers

Vegetarian White Bean Soup
Breakfast Egg Scramble
Pizza Casserole
Southwester Farfalle Pasta
Texas Caviar aka Black Bean Salsa
Green Chili and Sweet Corn Brown Rice
Freeze-Dried Style Omelets
Sausage Lasagna Meal-in-a-Jar


The post From Storage to Stovetop: Freeze-Dried Bell Peppers appeared first on Food Storage Made Easy.

North Korea Defector’s Urgent Warning: ‘World Should Be Ready’ For Nuclear Attack

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North Korea Defector's Urgent Warning: ‘World Should Be Ready’ For Nuclear Attack

WASHINGTON — North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un would not hesitate to use nuclear attack on the United States and other countries, according to a defector who formerly served as deputy ambassador to the United Kingdom.

“Once he sees that there is any kind of sign of a tank or an imminent threat from America, then he would use his nuclear weapons with ICBM (intercontinental ballistic missile),” Thae Yong Ho told NBC anchorman Lester Holt. “Kim Jong Un is a man who can do anything beyond the normal imagination.”

Thae and his family defected to South Korea in August, becoming the highest-level defectors from North Korea in two decades. Thae risked his life to talk to Holt; Kim has demonstrated a willingness to murder his enemies.

“I am already a marked man,” Thae said. “Kim Jong Un wants to eliminate any person or any country which poses a threat to him. And I think I am really a great threat to him.

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“Kim Jong Un is a person who did not even hesitate to kill his uncle and a few weeks ago, even his half-brother,” Thae said. “So, he is a man who can do anything to remove [anyone in] his way.”

Others Agree

Thae is not the only one who believes North Korea is a grave threat. The commander of America’s Pacific Fleet is worried about the reclusive nation.

“They have the nuclear capability — they’ve demonstrated that,” Admiral Scott Swift told NBC News. “And then, where they’re going with the miniaturization of that, whether they can actually weaponize a missile, that’s what’s driving the current concern.”

North Korea has an estimated eight nuclear warheads, but no one knows if it has a working ICBM. An ICBM would be necessary to hit the United States from the Korean peninsula.

“It does feel more dangerous — I’ll give you three reasons,” retired Admiral James Stavridis told NBC News. “One is [Kim’s] own precarious situation in command of the nation. Number two is the instability in South Korea. We’ve just seen the South Korean president indicted, arrested, and incarcerated. And, number three, a new and more aggressive American foreign policy coming from Washington.”

Be Prepared! Store An ‘Emergency Seed Bank’ For A Crisis Garden

South Korean President Park Geun-hye was impeached over a corruption scandal last year and ousted from office during March of this year. Kim might see the constitutional crisis in South Korea as an opportunity to attack.

‘Only a Nuclear Weapon Can Guarantee His Rule’

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on March 17 said military action is on the table.

Kim thinks that possessing a nuclear weapon is the only to avoid the fate of tyrants like Saddam Hussein and Muammar Gaddafi, Thae said.

“That’s why Kim Jong Un strongly believes that only a nuclear weapon can guarantee his rule,” Thae said.

Thae added, “If Kim Jong Un has nuclear weapons and ICBMs, he can do anything So, I think the world should be ready to deal with this kind of person.”

What strategy do you think the U.S. should pursue with North Korea? Share your thoughts in the section below:

One Week of Food Prep in One Day

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Cooking from scratch is the best way to save money in your family budget. If you can do one week of food prep in one day you will be ahead of the game.

Cooking from scratch is the best way to save money in your family budget, but it can be time-consuming when you don’t have a plan. If you can do one week of food prep in one day you will be ahead of the game at dinner time. I’m excited to have my daughter Allison Easterling, […]

The post One Week of Food Prep in One Day appeared first on PreparednessMama.

Teen Prepping Meet Mallory

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Teen Prepping Meet Mallory James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio in player below! If you are looking to stay young mentally science is suggesting you must challenge your brain to learn new things. Like anything else if we put it on a shelf and don’t challenge our mind it gets weak. If you are on … Continue reading Teen Prepping Meet Mallory

The post Teen Prepping Meet Mallory appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Alternative Fishing Methods – When You Don’t Have Rod and Reel

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post has been contributed by Patrick. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter the Prepper Writing Contest today.


Fishing is a pastime that is enjoyed by millions of people.

There is nothing more relaxing for me than watching the sun rise while I cast a line into the water. However, there is much more to fishing than the fun part of it.

Around the world, fish feed more people than just about any other source of protein. This is part of the reason why a large percentage of the world’s population lives near the water. The waters of the world are bountiful sources of life for everyone.
I realized early in my survival career that fishing was one of the best ways to get calories when your body was craving for food.

Wild edibles are perfect for some vitamins and minerals, and they help you fill your belly. However, they do not provide much like calories or protein do. Hunting and trapping are challenging. But fishing is a more consistent way to get those calories and protein. Problem is, you do not always carry the gear that is ideal for fishing.

During my first survival challenge, fish gave me the fuel I needed to keep going. I went the first day without food as I spent my time building a shelter and purifying water. The next morning, I set out at dawn with a hand line and found a pond. I fished for about an hour before snagging one of the heaviest large-mouth bass I’ve ever caught.

The fire went out in the storm overnight, and everything was wet. It took me three hours to get the fire going again. After the fish was cooked and eaten, I felt the energy flow back into my body. I relied on fish for the rest of the challenge, cooked it in water to create a warm broth.

Alternative Fishing Methods

Remember that the rest of the world have other means of fishing aside from using a rod and reel. In most survival situations, you too do not usually have this gear handy. That means that knowing how to fish in other ways is vital to your survival.

In this article, I will cover a few effective alternative fishing methods as ways to fish without standard gear.

Hand Lines

Hand-line fishing with a buzz bomb in Barkley Sound, BC.

This method is the closest approach to using a rod and reel. You still have a line with a hook on the end and some bait or lure, you just don’t have the rod and reel apparatus.

With hand lining, you whip the line around in a circle with your dominant hand. The centrifugal force creates the momentum needed to launch it in the direction you choose. It can be hard to get distance, so weighting your line is important to help with your launch.

It is also good to have a spool of some kind to keep your line from tangling. A bottle or block of wood works well. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Wrap your line around the object towards one end and hold it on the other end.
  2. When you release the line through the air, keep your spool pointed in the same direction so it easily slides off.
  3. Then re-spool the line as you pull it back in.

For many people, this is the best way to use the little fishing kit you may have in your bug out bag.

Trot Lines

A trot line is a passive method of fishing in which you set several hooks and come back later to collect your catch.

To build one, stretch out a long primary line. I typically make it about thirty feet long and tie loops in the line about every three feet. I then attach secondary lines that can be anywhere from one to three feet long. A baited hook is connected to the end of each secondary line.

It is best to tie one end above the surface and weight the other end so it sinks to the bottom. This allows you to cover every depth and also cover a wide area of the water.

There are two peak times that fishes are more likely to strike — around sunrise and sunset. Therefore, it is best to check your line just after these times to collect fish and add any bait needed.

Nets

Nets are one of the most common methods for catching fish worldwide. They allow you to actively or passively catch multiple fish at once.

Gill Net

I like using a gill net. It is set up vertically so any fish swimming through that area is caught. Passive fishing is ideal in streams, rivers, and tidal areas but can be effective in any water.

I tested out my gill net a while back in our pond and caught eleven fishes in just a few hours. An ideal net is weighted at the bottom and has floats along the top to keep it vertical. It can be tied between two trees, or a pole can be installed to hold up one side.

Throw Net

A throw net is another popular option. It can be used in any water and are active in nature. It is cast out and spun so that it expands as it flies through the air. Then it sinks and tangles the fish underneath so that they can be drawn into it.

It takes some practice to get the hang of using a throw net, but it can be extremely useful.

Jug Fishing

If you like fishing with a bobber, you may like jug fishing too.

A jug or large float is tied to a weighted line with live bait. The hook and bait drop to your desired depth and many people like to jug fish at the bottom for catfish.

You know that the line has a fish when the jug starts to move. You can either wade out to place the jug and wade back to collect it, or you can attach a drag line to draw it back from the shore.

This method works best in still lakes or ponds. Several jugs are usually set to cover more water.

Sapling Lines

Fishing with saplings is similar to fishing with a rod and reel except that there is no reeling action.

Long saplings are cut with a line attached to the narrow end. The thick end is driven into the mud along the bank, and the baited hook on the other end of the line is thrown out into the water using the same motion used with hand lining.

You can either watch the tip of the sapling for movement, or you can attach a small bell to the end to alert you of movement. Typically, several saplings are set in an area to cover more water.

I use this method to go after channel catfish in small, muddy rivers. The challenge is dragging in the fish. I suggest using leather gloves to avoid cutting your hands on the line.

Fish Traps

There are a few fish traps that can be easily made in the wild for passive fishing.

Using a Plastic Bottle

This can be used in any body of water for smaller fish. All it requires is a clear, plastic bottle. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Cut the top of the bottle just below the taper.
  2. Reverse the top so the opening is facing down.
  3. Reattach the top using cordage to sew the pieces together.
  4. You can then cut the opening to your desired size and add bait inside the trap.

Fish will swim in the opening and will get confused trying to find their way out. You may want to use a weight to hold it in place.

Using Poles or Rocks

You can also use poles or rocks to create a large trap in the shallow water. Either shove poles vertically into the bottom, or pile rocks to create walls.

You want the shape of your trap to resemble a heart with an opening at the point of the cleavage. Then choose what to do next from these options:

  • add bait
  • throw rocks to scare fish into the trap
  • just wait it out

The fish again swims into the narrow opening and gets confused trying to find the way back out. In larger traps like this, you may have difficulty catching the trapped fish.

Try throwing a bundle of tall grasses or other vegetation onto the fish and then scoop the whole bundle throwing it onto the shore. The vegetation traps the fish as you fling it aside.

Hungry? Be Creative

As you can see, there are several ways to catch a meal without using conventional gear.

Any of these fishing methods can be accomplished using items in your bug out bag along with garbage or debris you might find along your way. If your belly is rumbling and you have the time, get creative and try out one of these alternative fishing methods.

Always remember: all nets, lines, and traps should be pulled out of the water when you are done so that no fish dies unnecessarily.

The post Alternative Fishing Methods – When You Don’t Have Rod and Reel appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

14 Financial Emergencies That Would Be Devastating With Low Savings

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14 Financial Emergencies That Would Be Devastating With Low Savings

There’s no short of reasons why you should have emergency savings. I’ve got a number of pretty common personal crises listed here, but there are plenty more; and likely I’ve left out some that are even more devastating than the ones I’ve listed. If you’re the kind of person who prefers to see a few financial emergencies… Read More

This is just the start of the post 14 Financial Emergencies That Would Be Devastating With Low Savings. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


14 Financial Emergencies That Would Be Devastating With Low Savings, written by Elise Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

Growing Cucumbers – How To Grow Your Biggest and Best Crop Ever!

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Growing Cucumbers! When it comes to backyard gardens, cucumbers are right up there with tomatoes as one of the most popular home-grown vegetables. It’s not hard to figure out why. Is there anything better than a fresh cucumber sprinkled with a

The post Growing Cucumbers – How To Grow Your Biggest and Best Crop Ever! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

How To Can Water At Home

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We’ve had some questions about canning water and to be honest, I’ve never really given it much thought because I just have bottled water stored, along with purification tablets.

I’m the first to admit that I thought the idea was a little over the top because of the expense and unwieldiness of canning jars, but after researching how to can water at home, I’ve changed my tune a bit, just like I did when I first heard about canning butter.

Don’t Waste Space

After I had a jar of spaghetti sauce fall over in the canner and break because I didn’t have a full canner, I started filling my canner with jars full of water. I’ve always just left the lid off and used it as a place holder, but then I saw the suggestion to boil the water first, then put it in a sterilized jar with a ring and seal and let it process along with whatever I was canning.

Still, I didn’t give this much thought because I didn’t want to waste a good seal on water. But – read on! Somebody suggested re-using an old seal. Obviously, I won’t do this with canned food because I have absolutely no desire to waste the food or risk botulism if the jar doesn’t seal, but if you’re only canning water, does it really matter?

I mean, you can look at it from one of two ways – if you really want it to seal, you can just dump the jar or use it to water plants, or even pop it in the fridge and have a nice cold jar of water to drink later. Nothing at all lost.

How many of us have stored tap water in soda bottles or rainwater in barrels? Storing unsealed water really isn’t any different than that, though I may suggest that you purify it before you drink it just like you would any of your other water if it’s not sealed.

I also found a suggestion that supposedly came from a Mormon lady – when you empty a jar of food, wash and sterilize the jar and seal and re-can water in it. Otherwise, you’re just going to throw away the seal and have an empty jar sitting around. When you look at it that way, it does make sense. The jar’s going to take up the same amount of space whether it’s empty or full.

This proven-to-work portable device provides clean fresh water 24/7! 

Canning  Water by the Book

If you want to ensure that your water is just as safe to drink as your canned foods are to eat, then follow the same procedures. Boil the water for at least 3 minutes – 5 if you live at elevations above 3000 feet – and sterilize your jars and seals. Pour the water into the jars and process in a pressure canner (it’s low-acid like meat and some vegetables) for 20 minutes, leaving at least 1/2 inch headspace.

Now, that being said for safety reasons, I don’t think pressure canning is actually necessary as long as your jars were sterile and your water was boiled because you’re not canning food that can spoil.

This can still be done while you’re canning other foods if you don’t want to just can a batch of water. Or, if you’ve decided that it truly is a waste for all of those jars to be sitting empty, then do a couple of batches.

Everybody in my family loves dill pickles, so I usually buy the gallon jars of them, then turn around and use the jars for pickled eggs later. Either way, I still have extra gallon jars sitting around taking up space because it kills me to throw them away. So, I decided to be bad and re-use the commercial lid that it came with to store water that I’d boiled.

Now that jar is actually being useful instead of sitting on the shelf taking up valuable real estate. I’m seriously liking this idea; it appeals to me on several levels – I’m not wasting jars or lids and filling landfills by throwing them away, my unused jars aren’t wasting valuable space, I have even more water on hand, and it’s free. Color me converted.

Video first seen on 2leelou Preserves

Is Canned Water Sterile?

As long as you boil your water as indicated and sterilize your jars ahead of time, and then follow the processing time that we use to kill germs in everything that we can, then yes, the water will be sterile. Oh, and as long as it seals. Basically, it’s just like any other canned food.

Honestly, I think that processing it may even be a bit overkill as long as the water is boiled and the jars are sterilized, but better safe than sorry. If you’re going to do it, do it right, I guess. Still, I have water stored in well-washed Coke bottles and juice jugs (BPA-free, of course), so I’m not necessarily buying into the whole need for utter sterilization.

One instance that I can think of that would be an excellent reason to store sterilized water? For medical uses such as cleaning wounds. At that point, since infection is going to be such a huge deal if professional medical help and supplies aren’t available, sterile water would be an excellent commodity to have.

How to Revive the Flavor

After water sits in a container for a while it starts to taste flat. This is because it loses its oxygenation. There’s a simple fix – just shake it up or pour it back and forth between two jars. It still may taste a little flat, but it’s perfectly safe to drink.

As with any stored item, I highly suggest recycling it – in this case, every few months. Don’t pour it down the drain, though. Either drink it, make tea with it, or water the plants – do anything with it. It’s still good, and it would be a waste to just pour it out. Yeah, I realize it’s “only” water, but with the way things are going, it’s becoming a finite resource, so get it’s best to get in the habit of not wasting it now rather than later.

As I said, the idea of canning water sounded silly to me when I was first asked about it, but now I can see the value in it, from several different perspectives.

Next time you have extra space in the canner or empty a pickle jar that you intend to save, store some water instead of just wasting space!

Now that you know how to can water, learn how to DIY your own portable device for an endless water supply.

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This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

How To Can Water At Home

We’ve had some questions about canning water and to be honest, I’ve never really given it much thought because I just have bottled water stored, along with purification tablets.

I’m the first to admit that I thought the idea was a little over the top because of the expense and unwieldiness of canning jars, but after researching how to can water at home, I’ve changed my tune a bit, just like I did when I first heard about canning butter.

Don’t Waste Space

After I had a jar of spaghetti sauce fall over in the canner and break because I didn’t have a full canner, I started filling my canner with jars full of water. I’ve always just left the lid off and used it as a place holder, but then I saw the suggestion to boil the water first, then put it in a sterilized jar with a ring and seal and let it process along with whatever I was canning.

Still, I didn’t give this much thought because I didn’t want to waste a good seal on water. But – read on! Somebody suggested re-using an old seal. Obviously, I won’t do this with canned food because I have absolutely no desire to waste the food or risk botulism if the jar doesn’t seal, but if you’re only canning water, does it really matter?

I mean, you can look at it from one of two ways – if you really want it to seal, you can just dump the jar or use it to water plants, or even pop it in the fridge and have a nice cold jar of water to drink later. Nothing at all lost.

How many of us have stored tap water in soda bottles or rainwater in barrels? Storing unsealed water really isn’t any different than that, though I may suggest that you purify it before you drink it just like you would any of your other water if it’s not sealed.

I also found a suggestion that supposedly came from a Mormon lady – when you empty a jar of food, wash and sterilize the jar and seal and re-can water in it. Otherwise, you’re just going to throw away the seal and have an empty jar sitting around. When you look at it that way, it does make sense. The jar’s going to take up the same amount of space whether it’s empty or full.

This proven-to-work portable device provides clean fresh water 24/7! 

Canning  Water by the Book

If you want to ensure that your water is just as safe to drink as your canned foods are to eat, then follow the same procedures. Boil the water for at least 3 minutes – 5 if you live at elevations above 3000 feet – and sterilize your jars and seals. Pour the water into the jars and process in a pressure canner (it’s low-acid like meat and some vegetables) for 20 minutes, leaving at least 1/2 inch headspace.

Now, that being said for safety reasons, I don’t think pressure canning is actually necessary as long as your jars were sterile and your water was boiled because you’re not canning food that can spoil.

This can still be done while you’re canning other foods if you don’t want to just can a batch of water. Or, if you’ve decided that it truly is a waste for all of those jars to be sitting empty, then do a couple of batches.

Everybody in my family loves dill pickles, so I usually buy the gallon jars of them, then turn around and use the jars for pickled eggs later. Either way, I still have extra gallon jars sitting around taking up space because it kills me to throw them away. So, I decided to be bad and re-use the commercial lid that it came with to store water that I’d boiled.

Now that jar is actually being useful instead of sitting on the shelf taking up valuable real estate. I’m seriously liking this idea; it appeals to me on several levels – I’m not wasting jars or lids and filling landfills by throwing them away, my unused jars aren’t wasting valuable space, I have even more water on hand, and it’s free. Color me converted.

Video first seen on 2leelou Preserves

Is Canned Water Sterile?

As long as you boil your water as indicated and sterilize your jars ahead of time, and then follow the processing time that we use to kill germs in everything that we can, then yes, the water will be sterile. Oh, and as long as it seals. Basically, it’s just like any other canned food.

Honestly, I think that processing it may even be a bit overkill as long as the water is boiled and the jars are sterilized, but better safe than sorry. If you’re going to do it, do it right, I guess. Still, I have water stored in well-washed Coke bottles and juice jugs (BPA-free, of course), so I’m not necessarily buying into the whole need for utter sterilization.

One instance that I can think of that would be an excellent reason to store sterilized water? For medical uses such as cleaning wounds. At that point, since infection is going to be such a huge deal if professional medical help and supplies aren’t available, sterile water would be an excellent commodity to have.

How to Revive the Flavor

After water sits in a container for a while it starts to taste flat. This is because it loses its oxygenation. There’s a simple fix – just shake it up or pour it back and forth between two jars. It still may taste a little flat, but it’s perfectly safe to drink.

As with any stored item, I highly suggest recycling it – in this case, every few months. Don’t pour it down the drain, though. Either drink it, make tea with it, or water the plants – do anything with it. It’s still good, and it would be a waste to just pour it out. Yeah, I realize it’s “only” water, but with the way things are going, it’s becoming a finite resource, so get it’s best to get in the habit of not wasting it now rather than later.

As I said, the idea of canning water sounded silly to me when I was first asked about it, but now I can see the value in it, from several different perspectives.

Next time you have extra space in the canner or empty a pickle jar that you intend to save, store some water instead of just wasting space!

Now that you know how to can water, learn how to DIY your own portable device for an endless water supply.

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This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

How to Effectively Pull Off Long Term Water Storage

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Are you prepared to effectively pull off long term water storage? Because the greatest and most immediate need in the event of an emergency will be water | PreparednessMama

One of the greatest and most immediate needs in the event of an emergency will be water.  Imagine the storm of the century, tornado, tsunami or a whole host of other factors hitting your area.  Are you prepared? Imagine a fire hits your location and you, along with the next several towns, are evacuated.  Have […]

The post How to Effectively Pull Off Long Term Water Storage appeared first on PreparednessMama.

The Stranger in the Woods – Book Review and Giveaway

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com Today we are featuring a new book, The Stranger in the Woods:  The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit by Michael Finkel. What is the book about? The book is about the the North Pond Hermit, Christopher Knight, who lived alone in the Maine woods, without any human contact, for 27 years.  Having seen the stories about his capture in the news back in 2013, I thought it would make for an […]

The post The Stranger in the Woods – Book Review and Giveaway appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

Room Darkening Material For Windows And Your Security

Not only will room darkening materials keep outdoor light from getting in but will also keep indoor light from getting out. Why might this be important and how does it relate to preparedness? Answer:   Keeping indoor light from being visible to the outdoor world might be a concern and a high level consideration for […]

Seize the Moment: How Preppers Can Maximize Their Training Time

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Readers, many of you have been involved in prepping and survival activities for a long time.  The line from the Mel Gibson “The Patriot” Movie by Chris Cooper exemplifies the mindset we need: “Stay the course.”  Perhaps this is an oversimplification for a complex stance, however, sometimes in simplicity lies clarity…and when you’re clear and uncomplicated in your purpose?  It may help you to organize more effectively.  Your training is what we’re talking about in this article.  You are responsible for your training and the analysis of how effective it is.

There were a lot of things we did in the Army that (if mimicked or duplicated) would serve you well individually and as a family unit.  I did an article that emphasized how important it is to make every member of your family learn, and (eventually) perform as an instructor.  This piece is for an emphasis on you as an individual.  If you strengthen your abilities as an individual, then it makes it that much easier when you teach, lead, and train your family as a group.

We had a thing in the Army called “hip pocket training,” that (when as a group we had some down time, such as when we were all sitting around ready to go through a range, or an exercise) we would take that “down” time and try to fill it with something productive.  A lot of soldiers didn’t particularly like it, however, these were the ones who didn’t want to be proactive with their time or their military career.  During this down time, we would gather in small groups and study different subjects on the cusp…unprepared training…such as our Sergeants taking us through a 9-paragraph operations order from memory, or doing some practice disassembling and assembling weapons…blindfolded, and for time.

Maximize Your Training

The point: to make maximum and effective use of our time.  The ones who weren’t shortsighted could see that this contributed to battle readiness.

I have written this before, and I’ll mention it again: How you train in peace is how you’ll fight in war.

What does this mean for you?  Well, to make maximum and effective use of your time.  This will involve some planning on your part.  What do you usually do on your “down time” during a workday?  Do you have the standard, ½ hour unpaid lunch break, or do you have an hour?  Do you set your own schedule and have (perhaps) some open or slow time in the morning that lasts an hour?  And then again in the afternoon?  How far do you live from work?  A long commute?

These are questions you can ask yourself to ascertain your free, or open spots that you can fill productively with some type of training.  We’re not talking about physical training or exercise…that is something entirely different, and your time with weightlifting or calisthenics needs to be a time that you concentrate only on that.  If you have a long commute to work (a drive of half an hour or more), why not put in an instructional cassette tape or CD with language lessons on it?  This is a good way to fill up that time and brush up on your Spanish or French.

So, that doesn’t seem like much?  Well, guess what?  If you have that half hour per morning…that would be 2 ½ hours per week.  With 52 weeks in a year, that would be 126 total hours, or 5 whole days of listening.  Do you know how much positive reinforcement that would yield?  Just listening passively to something such as that?  Can do you nothing but good.

Then on the return trip home, switch it off to something else equally productive.  Any subject under the sun…if it’s proactive and you’re learning something.  Maximum and effective use of your time is the goal…not to punch a clock, but to fill it with something that will benefit you.  Ben Franklin: “The best way to kill time is to work it to death.”

Those long lunch breaks?  Put your nose in a book for 15 minutes or so.  If you get a full hour, then even take one of those little portable DVD players with something instructional…it can be anything from gunsmithing to herbal remedies…first aid to land navigation.  Do this for four days on your lunch break.  Make that 5th day of lunch an “open” day…to fill it with either some type of reading, watching, or listening program, or to plan your training for the weekend and the coming week.

If you’re fortunate enough to work with a like-minded friend, well, get them involved. Why not?  “Iron sharpens iron,” we’re all so fond of saying.  How about living it?  Find a coworker with similar interests and bring up a thing to do for training for the pair of you.  Get him or her involved: get them to set up a time where they train you with something.

There are no limits to the scope of your training calendar except those you impose upon it.  That imposition can be through inactivity or procrastination.  Don’t do either.  Seize the moment, seize the day.  You can also give yourself 15 to 30 minutes each day before you go to work, and then again when you come home.  The bottom line: it really adds up to something in the end.  If you stick a dollar in a coffee can with the lid taped on through a slit in the top and don’t touch it for three years…if you do it every day…after three years, you’ll have over a thousand dollars.

Same principle here.  If you invest in yourself by filling your time with things that will fill you and improve you…then you’ll have something to show for it when you look at it down the road.  Training is important: to learn new things and to sharpen old skills and make them “current” again.  Let’s take a small scenario, say someone who lives in upstate New York.

Do you know French?  If you had to flee to Canada in the middle of the night, do you speak French well enough to get by?  Does your family…the wife and two teenage kids…do they speak French?  Do you know your route?  Ooops, an EMP just busted overhead, and New York City went dark, too…it became a glowing hole.  Did you stash stuff in Faraday cages?  Have your compass?  Are you guys ready to start that ’56 Ford pickup truck and roll out of there?

If you’ve trained and prepared for all that stuff, then it will make things easier (even if not less stressful) and give you an edge.  Take the time to make a definitive training plan that will allow you to maximize the amount of “free” time that you have…and then execute that plan.  The best plan in the world is of no use if you don’t use it when the time comes.  The time is now: time to formulate your training goals and implement them.  It has to do with your survival and the survival of your family.  Need it be emphasized any more than that?  So, buckle down, study and work hard, and implement that training plan, as the world is not becoming either any nicer or safer.  Stay the course, and stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Beware of These Prepping Pitfalls

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Beware of These Prepping PitfallsWhen it comes to preparedness, there are many pitfalls we need to be aware of, especially if we have been at this for a while. With prepping covering such a wide range of topics, it can be pretty easy to get overwhelmed and/or overspent.

spinning platesWhile there is no way to avoid every prepping pitfall, if we pay attention, and keep out head in the game, we can avoid most of these. I’ve probably said this a hundred time, but prepping isn’t brain surgery. It can however feel like spinning plates because there is just so much to do to become better prepared.

SPP196 Beware of These Prepping Pitfalls

This week in the Survivalist Prepper podcast Lisa and I talked about some of the areas of preparedness we need to pay more attention to, and some things to avoid.

Prepping can be hard enough without adding unnecessary headaches to the process.

Getting Too Wound Up

With all the cable news networks and thousands of websites, it can be hard to decipher between fact, fiction and opinion. It can be easier said than done sometimes, but we need to understand that there is only so much we can do. Yes, we do need to pay attention to all these disaster scenarios, but we can’t afford to let them paralyze us.

Fake News & Fear

With all these news channels and websites it can be hard to get the real story, and when you add in fear based marketing, it can seem impossible. Sometimes the truth is secondary to clicks and ratings. In this Prepper Website Podcast Todd talked about how this affects prepping websites also.

Gimmicks and Scams

I recently did a video about some of the gimmicks and scams we need to avoid. In that video I mentioned that some of these gimmicks can be interesting and useful (credit card knife), and some are just worthless (Everstrike match). We also need to be aware of outright scams. Like the saying goes, if it’s too good to be true…it probably is.

Going Into Debt

You might think that going out and buying all the preparedness supplies you need at once is a good idea…but it’s not. Maxing out your credit card(s) could lead to big problems down the line and leave you less prepared. If you create a prepping budget, and work within your means, you will find that in no time at all you will be more prepared than you thought possible.

Unbalanced Prepping

As we are building up our preparedness supplies we need to think about it as a time frame, not a list of supplies. Preparing for a week, then a month, then a year is better than getting food, then water, then bug out bags. If we have a years worth of food, but no water, we are not prepared at all.

Rotation/Spoilage

If we go out and spend money on supplies that have a shelf life, we want to make sure it is still good when we need to use it. Doing inventory at least a couple times a year, and storing food we actually eat will help reduce the spoilage factor.

Taking Bad Advice

Regardless what we are doing we should never take one persons advice on something. Just because something works for them, doesn’t mean it will work for you. We all know that person that has the answer for everything right? The “know it all”. No one is more invested in your future than you. Make sure you are making decisions that you are comfortable with.

Oversharing

We hear about operational security all the time. If you are on the internet, there is very little you can do to hide from the alphabet agencies, but we can control what we share with others. This also includes people we talk to in person. Make sure you trust the person you are talking to, and even then stay cautious.

Supplies & No Knowledge

There are literally hundreds of “gotta have it” prepping supplies out there, but if we don’t know how to use them they are pointless. If you own a ferro rod, make sure you know how to use it. If you want to build a solar generator, make sure you know how it works before you buy the parts.

DIY Project Fails

DIY prepping projects are a great way to learn, and might even save you money, but this is not always the case. Take the Sun Oven for example. There are many DIY versions of this, but none will work as well as the actual Sun Oven. The positive side of these DIY projects is they will teach you about alternatives if you find yourself with nothing.

Back to the Basics

We need to make sure that before we move on the the “bigger and better” aspects of preparedness that we have a good foundation to build on. Last week we talked about how if we aren’t prepared for the smaller scale disaster scenarios we aren’t prepared at all. This also hold true for basic supplies like manual can openers, batteries, crank radios etc.

Second Guessing Yourself

To a lot of people prepping is seen as “extreme” or “unnecessary” which can cause us to second guess ourselves. On the same lines of not listening to the “know it all’s” we need to trust our gut on this. As I said earlier, no one have a bigger interest in your future than you do, so do what you feel is right.

Tin Foil Hat Time

This week in the show we talked about how fragile our power grid is. Even though our government and public service companies know it, they refuse to do anything about it. This PDF from CenterForSecurity goes through what the affects of an EMP or CME would be.

The post Beware of These Prepping Pitfalls appeared first on Survivalist Prepper.

Prepper Book Festival: Smart Mom’s Guide to Essential Oils + Giveaway

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Smart Moms Guide to Essential Oils | Backdoor Survival

Essential oils are tools that preppers of all ages can use to their advantage to maintain health and wellness. Today’s book is a book written with moms in mind but that is just the beginning. The Smart Mom’s Guide to Essential Oils has information on the twenty-five of the most useful and commonly available essential oils. Plus, it is chock full of recipes of all types, including a robust section on using essential oils in DIY products for the home and for personal care.

In addition to an interview with the author, three copies of the print book are up for grabs in a giveaway.

The post Prepper Book Festival: Smart Mom’s Guide to Essential Oils + Giveaway by Gaye Levy first appeared on Backdoor Survival.

Prayer Can Help You Forgive

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Prayer and meditation are used everywhere, in every culture. I know that I have some of my Christian readers who are going to panic at the thought of meditation. That’s a shame because the Bible actually mentions meditation almost two dozen times and we’re commanded to do it! Let’s explore what I mean – as a Christian – when I talk about prayer and meditation. Welcome to Day Twenty-One of 30 Days to Forgiveness!

Both prayer and meditation, especially when used together, can clear your mind and focus your thoughts. Those who make these a regular part of their lives have better health and more happiness. That’s very powerful, isn’t it?

When we pray and meditate, we can clear our heads and let go of anger and pain. That’s a huge part of learning to forgive. Starting your day with prayer and meditation puts you in the right frame of mind for your day, with peace and happiness at the forefront.

What is prayer? Well, there are three main types – vocal prayer, meditative prayer and contemplative prayer. They are all very important, and it’s unfortunate that most Christians are only aware of vocal prayer.

Vocal Prayer

A vocal prayer – and it does not actually have to be spoken aloud – is a conversation with God.

It can be a plea for help, or it can be a way to share what’s going on in your life. If you have ever read through the Psalms, you know that the Psalmists shared very strong emotions with God, sometimes raging and furious, sometimes frightened. I have heard it said many times that you can read through the Psalms to find the entire range of human emotions – all in songs of prayer.

A prayer can also be a formal recitation of words that you’ve known for a long time. The Lord’s Prayer is an extremely well known example. A formal prayer can be a great way to start your conversation with God about forgiveness. The familiar words and phrases will help you calm your mind and be open for the conversation.

All major world religions talk about forgiveness. It’s a core principle in almost all religious practices and you can find stories and prayers about forgiveness no matter what your faith. Find them and include them into your daily prayers.

Meditative and Contemplative Prayer

Meditative Prayer is not the same as Eastern Meditation!

In the Christian faith, Meditative Prayer usually means that we read a piece of Scripture several times, absorb the words, and then quietly sit and think about its meaning in our lives. If you are familiar with the Catholic use of the Rosary, this is a method of meditation. Catholics use this to meditate on the mysteries surrounding Jesus.

One way to use this in your forgiveness journey is to meditate on Bible verses where Jesus talks about loving our enemies and forgiving our brother seventy times seven times. (For the record, that’s the ancient equivalent of us saying to do it “a million times” – it meant to do it over and over and over again until past when you lose track!)

Contemplative Prayer

Contemplative Prayer is much more like what Eastern religions call meditation. It has a long history of use in Christianity.

This involves quieting the environment around you, blocking out all of the busy-ness and noise and thoughts in our minds and … well, the expression is “Let go and let God!”

When Christians enter contemplative prayer, we rest in the presence of God and wait to hear from Him. Contemplative prayer requires a quiet prayer room or other place where we can eliminate distractions. If your idea of prayer has always been vocal prayer, think of contemplative prayer as God telling you to just sit down and listen.

How often should you do these? Dare I say that all three need to be a regular part of your life?

All forms of prayer will calm your mind.

Vocal prayer is wonderful for working through and letting go of anger and resentment.

You can meditate on forgiveness and on loving those who have hurt you.

Contemplative prayer, or resting in the presence of God, can help lower your heart rate and blood pressure. If you have ever been seething with anger, you know that calming your body and your mind is the first step towards letting go of those negative feelings. Of course that’s probably the most insignificant outcome of regular contemplative prayer – and it’s still life-changing.

And you may well need to use all three methods of prayer in the same prayer session if you are really working on a difficult situation!

All types of prayer – vocal, meditative and contemplative – work best when you do them regularly. Make them part of your daily routine. I encourage you to keep all three forms of prayer in your life for the long run. Both your body and your mind will benefit from it.