8 Insanely Fast Vegetables You Can Harvest In One Month

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8 Insanely Fast Vegetables You Have Harvest In One Month

Arugula. Image source: Pixabay.com

Let’s face it: gardening can be challenging. The idea of waiting weeks and weeks for produce to be ready seems disheartening.

This is particularly true if you live in a suburban area, like I do, where the nearest grocery store is less than a quarter-mile away. If I want fresh tomatoes, the expansive produce department at my favorite store has an ever-present supply. Why go through the trouble of waiting so long for a harvest when I can simply pick up what I need at the market?

There are plenty of reasons you should be gardening, but did you know that some plants can be harvest-ready in a matter of days? Yes, days. If you struggle wondering if the effort of a garden is worth it, then planting a few of these fast-growers gives you (almost) immediate results and can help you hold on through the long days of waiting for harvest.

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As you’re planning your garden, add in a few of these plants to jump-start your production. Of course, spinach and lettuce are popular quick-growing varieties, but here are eight others:

1. Sunflower Shoots. These tiny sunflower shoots are ready to harvest in about 12 days. Ready to be used when the stem has two leaves, they are a wonderful addition to salads. Even better, they’re packed with nutrition, so they’re a healthy “fast food.”

2. Radishes. Green shoots show up in a matter of days; most have growth three days after planting seeds. If you want continual growth, plant a few seeds every week to maintain a steady supply of this peppery vegetable. Use heirloom radishes to get a variety of colors and flavors These are a great starter veggie for small children to grow, as well.

3. Arugula. A popular salad green, arugula grows quickly and easily. It’s slightly peppery taste gives your salad a kick, and the quick growth gives you gardening satisfaction in around 20 days. Simply cut the leaves when they are large enough, and continue to enjoy fresh arugula all summer long.

4. Green onions. Sometimes known as scallions, these easy-to-grow onions are ready for harvest in 21 days. Harvest the green shoots when they reach about six inches tall. Leave the onion bulb planted for a continuous supply of shoots.

8 Insanely Fast Vegetables You Have Harvest In One Month

Bok choy. Image source: Pixabay.com

5. Bok choy. An Asian green, this plant not only tastes good, bit it’s beautiful to grow, too. Leaves can be harvested individually, or you can use the entire plant and use the bulb, as well. Plant seeds staggered through the spring for a sustained harvest of this exotic lettuce. Baby Bok choy is ready to harvest in 30 days.

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6. Tatsoi. Another fast-growing green, tatsoi is a mustard green that is perfect for salads and soups. Harvest when the leaves are four-inches tall, or wait until they reach full maturity at 40 days.

7. Chinese cabbage. A unique garden variety, this plant doesn’t tolerate heat well, so plant in a shady area of your garden. Harvest the entire head of greens in 30 days for a delicious addition to your salads.

8. Turnips. An old-fashioned garden staple, turnips are easy to grow and can be used in their entirety. Tender roots are mild when harvested early (around 30 days after planting), or you can let them reach maturity (in 60 days) and use the greens. Let bulbs grow to a diameter of about three inches before plucking at full growth.

Add some of these quick turn-around plants to your garden to give you immediate gardening gratification. Not only will it make your efforts pay-off, but the plants will add variety and interest to your table!

What are your favorite fast-growing plants? Share your tips in the section below:

Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (4/1/17)

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Here are the top 7 articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks.  But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 3/26/17 – 4/1/17

 

Peace,
Todd

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Making Time for Prepper Fitness

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Making Time for Prepper Fitness Its always an ugly topic to face, fitness. No one really wants to get in Post Apocalyptic shape. One of the greatest enemies of prepper fitness is time. The greatest excuse is that there is no time in the busy day for a fitness plan. The next best excuse is …

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Many People Refuse to Believe That The New World Order Exists — But the Proof is Overwhleming

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Sorry, sloppy quick post, didn’t want to lose these resources.

This site has a list of NWO quotes.
http://www.theforbiddenknowledge.com/quotes/index.htm
This is JFK’s speech in which he talks about Secret Societies.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdMbmdFOvTs
This site has the transcript of Kennedy’s speech.
“I think that his [Obama’s] task will be to develop an overall strategy for America in this period, when really a New World Order can be created.”
—Henry Kissinger, CNBC 2008
“In the next century, nations as we know it will be obsolete; all states will recognize a single, global authority. National sovereignty wasn’t such a great idea after all.”
—Strobe Talbot, Deputy Secretary of State, TIME, July l992
“One of the least understood strategies of the world revolution now moving rapidly toward its goal is the use of mind control as a major means of obtaining the consent of the people who will be subjects of the New World Order.”
–K.M. Heaton, National Educator

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CodeShutdown

If there is no New World Order, why do all these presidents and politicians talk about it?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2c9PMV3ZJg
The angry reaction of our friends and associates is telling; They are angry for a reason; they cant stand an upset in their world vision. The more the comfort zone of their world or religious ideology is upset, the angrier they get. Was the demolition of the world trade center an inside job? The ramifications are too much for them.
Emotion rules peoples reality, not facts and logic. There are always enough facts to argue endlessly. emotion decides the belief. Those people have not been divided from us by subversive organizations, they were ALREADY that way. They were snitches in Nazi Germany, they were angry and turned on their neighbor during the inquisition. Our friends are few indeed and the others we will never convince.


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Hawaii has 112,000 people in government housing (I don’t include the military in those numbers), and the most staunchly Democratic state in the union.
Indeed, the atmosphere was much more aggressive, upset. People got their undies all bunched up with the Hillary loss/Trump victory.
I have even gone on fake facebook to some liberal sites and tried to “fit in” and try to understand what makes them tick. I will let you know how that turns out…..lol, kind of entertaining.


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obewanspeaks

https://wakeup-world.com/2016/03/31/understanding-the-new-world-order-the-who-what-how-and-why/

 

POLL: What May Happen As A Result Of US Missile Attack In Syria?

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In this image released by the US Navy, the USS Ross fires a tomahawk land attack missile at a Syrian airfield. PHOTO: ROBERT S. PRICE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES   In case you haven’t heard, the United States has launched a missile attack within Syria in retaliation for the apparent chemical weapons attack there. The Wall Street […]

7 Modern Things Our Great-Grandparents Didn’t Have (That We Don’t Need, Either)

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7 Modern Things Our Great-Grandparents Didn’t Have (That We Don’t Need, Either)

Technology is wonderful, isn’t it? I mean, every day, someone is coming out with something new that they claim everyone just has to have. It doesn’t matter if we’re talking about the latest app for our smartphones or the latest gadget for our kitchens, there’s always something new out there for those who are looking for something to buy.

But I’ll have to say, while some technology has made life better for us, much of it has stolen the essence of life. While it has given us new things we never had before, it has stolen so much more. In today’s fast-paced, technologically driven society, we’ve traded meaningful relationships for staring at a screen. We’ve traded creating things with our hands, for using our hands to control a joystick.

Have these things truly enriched us? I think not. Of course, some of these marvels have saved us time, freeing us up for things that are more important in life. But all too often, that extra time is merely wasted on something that doesn’t bring a true reward.

It’s clear that our grandparents and great-grandparents lived a simpler life. Many times, I think they lived a better one, too. Oh, they didn’t have the medical advances we have today, that’s true. But there is little else that modern technology has given us, which we can’t do without. Let’s examine a few items.

1. Television

I’ve long said that television is the biggest time-waster there is. When I was a child, I’d run home from school and plop down in front of the TV, just like everyone else. We had a whole program of cartoons and comedies we’d watch for several hours, literally throwing our time away.

Then, one day, I realized how much time television was stealing from my life. So, I quit — just like that. It was amazing. I suddenly found that I had time — time to do all the things I had wanted to do.

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That’s not to say that everything that’s on TV is a waste of time. Some of it is actually quite valuable. But the valuable stuff is far outnumbered by the things that merely waste your time.

2. Social media

If there is anything that has replaced the television as the great time-waster, it’s social media. We no longer talk to people; now we just look to see what they posted. Personal relationships have been replaced by a quasi-relationship with a “friend” on social media.

Once again, social media is not without redemption. There are things that it’s useful for. But most of the time, it’s about people telling you trivial things about their trivial life. I mean, whatever gave people the idea that everyone needed to see pictures of their lunch or of their cat batting at a piece of string? We’ve all seen it before.

3. Computer games

7 Modern Things Our Great-Grandparents Didn’t Have (That We Don’t Need, Either)If social media is addicting, computer games are even more so. There’s always one more level you’ve got to get through and one more enemy you’ve got to beat. And what do you get when you finally beat them? The opportunity to do it again with the next level and the next enemy.

Granted, computer games are a lot of fun. I like them, too. But what do they help you accomplish? How do they enrich your life? What skills do they help you hone, which will serve you well? Truthfully, none. Plus, they’re addicting.

4. Many kitchen appliances

Like most people, I like food. I even like to cook. Once upon a time, I thought I might become a chef. But I went another direction before I could get serious about that. Still, I can remember kneading bread on the kitchen counter and cutting onions fine with a chef’s knife.

But in today’s kitchen, you don’t need to know how to knead bread or mince onions — you’ve got a machine to do it for you. Want fresh bread? Simply pay $59.95 and this machine will make you fresh bread every morning. Those onions? Don’t cry about it; buy a food processor and let it chop them for you.

Honestly, I think that most kitchen appliances were invented not to make life easier, but to make some company money. Oh, some are useful; I wouldn’t want to whip cream without a mixer. But who really needs a popcorn popper to pop their corn? Can’t they do it in a pan, like people have done for years? Or has everyone forgotten how to cook?

5. Fast food

Now here’s one that’s literally killing us… fast food. While I’m sure that there is some sort of fast food out there that’s actually healthy, most of it is high fat, high salt, high cholesterol and high calorie.

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America has a national obesity problem, and a lot of that is because of fast food and its brother, junk food. Yeah, we all love a greasy hamburger and pile of golden brown French fries, but that’s not the best thing for us to be eating. At least, it’s not the best thing for us to be eating if we want to have anything left of our health.

6. Diet & exercise systems

7 Modern Things Our Great-Grandparents Didn’t Have (That We Don’t Need, Either) Once upon a time, people worked with their hands, even working up a good sweat in their day. They didn’t need to go on a diet or go to the gym, because their daily workload kept them in shape. They didn’t need the latest fad diet and they didn’t need to spend a fortune on exercise equipment.

Modern work and life in general are very sedentary. Most of us don’t get enough activity in our normal work or family activities to burn the calories we need to burn. So, what do we do instead? We go on diets and go to the gym. Since we don’t do either regularly enough, our weight goes up and down, like a yo-yo.

7. Smartphones

Now, I will have to say that smartphones are very useful. I use one, just like everyone else. But as I look around at the world around me, I’m finding that I’m having to identify people by looking at the tops of their heads. No longer do people interact or even acknowledge each other’s presence; all our attention is focused on our smartphone.

How can anyone say that that’s a good way to live? Wouldn’t we be better off with a simpler phone and maybe actually talking to the people around us? Wouldn’t it be a good idea to look at something besides a screen? How many selfies do we need, anyway?

 _______________________________

I foresee a day when the zombie apocalypse will come. It won’t be like most people think, though. These zombies will be people who are wandering around lost, because they don’t have their television sets, their smartphones or their social media. They actually will have to talk to people and do real work with their hands — and they won’t know how.

There are too many things going on in the world today, to even think that life will continue as it is right now. When that time comes, what are we going to do?

What would you add to our list? Share your tips in the section below:

 

8 Dreadful Mistakes I Made When Creating My Dream Homestead (and How to Avoid Them)

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A little over 5 years ago my husband and I branched out into this lifestyle called homesteading. It was in the middle of winter of all times but something within us just clicked.

Oddly enough, the whole idea came while I was fretting over not being able to afford to feed our three children as healthy of a diet as I wanted to because of our meager grocery budget. Then, while watching an episode of Alaska: The Last Frontier, it clicked.

I saw Eve planting in her high tunnel, and I thought, “I need one of those.” Then my husband saw the chickens and said, “You know we could raise our own food instead of buying it.”

Just like that, the dream was born.

But looking back, we made a lot of mistakes. Some because of poor planning. Some because we had no idea what we were doing, and some because we had limited funds and had to do with what we had.

Today, I want to share a few of these mistakes with you. Hopefully, it can keep you from making the same ones.

1. We Failed To Plan

I know, that is literally one of the most foolish things you can do. But we literally had no game plan.

Honestly, I think it’s because we never really dreamed we’d make it this far.

Looking back, I think we literally thought we’ll only raise chickens for eggs, and a garden plus a greenhouse to extend our growing season. The thought of raising animals for meat hadn’t even entered our minds at this point.

I thought that would be it. But it wasn’t.

Had we taken the time to really think about what we were doing, our life could’ve been much easier. And we probably could have avoided a few of the catastrophes that we faced.

So if you can, look before you leap. Think long-term.

Give yourself some kind of direction so you can avoid some of the mistakes I’m going to talk about below.

2. We Took On Too Much At Once

As I said, we hit the ground running when we decided to homestead. A week after we watched the TV show that inspired it all, our greenhouse was up. Less than a week after that, we had a chicken coop and our first 5 birds.

We did not mess around. But unfortunately, we just kept doing the same thing over and over. We would have an idea and jump into it head first.

But this became a problem.

For instance, I got the idea that I wanted to raise small stature pigs just to feed our family, and I thought they’d be easier to contain instead of taking on a full-size hog. Well, before we did any research, my husband had already bid on a pig through an auction site and brought home our first pig for $7.

Granted it was a great deal, but I had nowhere to put the pig nor did I have a clue what I was getting into.

Now, guess who had a pig in her fenced in the backyard until my husband and oldest son could get a proper pig pen built? Guess who had a pig escaping every other day because the ‘proper pig pen’ still wasn’t strong enough to keep him inside?

Then we bought a mama pig and her baby.

Then the mama had babies.

And before I knew it, I had a full blown pig family and was completely exasperated because we had literally done very little right.

Then we did the same thing with bees. The idea came to mind, the opportunity presented itself, and we jumped in.

Yet again, we failed miserably our first year of beekeeping.

Thankfully, over the years we have learned but not without some hard knocks. So be sure you can chew the mouthful you are planning to bite off when it comes to your homestead.

3. I Put Livestock In The Wrong Spot

Our first investment in livestock and poultry was our chickens. So we built their chicken coop in our backyard so they would be easily accessible.

There have been some perks to the location of our chickens. I think they are better protected being that close to our house. They actually have two fences around them because of our backyard fence plus the fence in their chicken yard.

But there are some downsides.

We literally have no shade in our backyard. So now, I plant sunflowers around their coop each year to provide proper shade during our hot southern summers.

Learning from that mistake, I placed my goats in a very shaded spot that was farther off from the house. But then my goats would cry and cry because they wanted to see us and the other livestock we had.

So what I ended up having to do was to extend my goat area on around our property so they could come to a certain spot and see the backside of our house. That way when I’m out in the yard or on the back porch they can still see me, and I can talk to them.

(Yes, I talk to my goats like they are toddlers. I do the same to my chickens. But that’s a different story.)

Looking back, had I moved my goat lot over and put my chickens where my goats originally started everyone would’ve been happy, and I would have had to do a ton less work.

But you live and learn right? So when deciding where to put your animals think it all the way through so you can hopefully have to make fewer ‘adjustments’ than we’ve had to make.

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4. We Went From Zero To Sixty With Our Garden

When we got the idea to begin growing our own food, we had gardened a couple of years prior to that. We would grow a few green beans or some tomato plants in a small above ground bed.

It was just enough for us to make a meal or a sandwich out of.

We had never dreamed of canning or preserving our own food.

But that didn’t deter us from thinking we would grow this ginormous garden. And we did just that.

However, we learned the hard way that the larger the garden the larger amount of work that comes with it. I spent a lot of summers chasing my tail trying to keep this garden weeded and thriving.

Then we didn’t fully think through where we would like to place the garden. It is currently (and probably will always be) in the half of our backyard that isn’t fenced.

And it takes up a huge portion.

Looking back, I could’ve made it smaller and put it right out in my front yard. I live out in the middle of nowhere so I don’t have any strict regulations I have to follow.

Being in my front yard would have given my kids a lot more room to play in the backyard. Now, I have the swing set in our side yard along with a trampoline because our garden took up needed backyard play space. And we are getting a pool next year so who knows where I’ll end up putting it.

My advice is to really think about the placement of your garden. Make sure it isn’t so big that you can’t handle it. Because you can always go back and increase it later if needed.

Make sure it isn’t so big that you can’t handle it. Because you can always go back and increase it later if needed.

But you don’t want to forget that you need space for fun and living too. Otherwise, you’ll end up being like me and trying to figure out where to shove the play equipment without making your house look like a theme park.

5. I Had To Redo Things…A Lot

I catch myself saying things like ‘I wish’ a lot.

The reason is because anything you do with homesteading takes so much effort you rarely want to have to take it down and do it over again.

For instance, our perimeter fence.

It will have to be redone, no doubt. But I wish we had made it a larger priority. A perimeter fence not only keeps your animals home but it also keeps predators out.

Because we were short on funds when we started, we took the ‘free’ route. Granted something was better than nothing. But what we have really doesn’t function all that well.

We actually created our own perimeter fence out of pine slabs. We have a sawmill down the road that gives them away for free, and we utilized them. We hauled them for days but eventually got them all home, hammered them into stakes and trees. They completely surrounded our home.

But they didn’t last.

Between storms and children, some have collapsed. We keep repairing but it is something we put a lot of work into that will have to be taken down and replaced with a more sturdy option.

Realize that if you have livestock, you’ll need a perimeter fence. Find a way to create one that is the sturdiest option for your budget. Hopefully, you won’t have to constantly maintain or eventually redo something that you worked so hard on.

Just understand that no matter what you do you are probably going to look back on it and wish you had done it differently. I could tell you that I wish I had cleared certain trees at one time instead of going back and having to clear trees over and over.

The list goes on.

So pay attention to small details as you go so you won’t have the ‘I wish’ syndrome quite as badly as I tend to have some days.

6. I Developed The ‘Stress Yourself Out’ Syndrome

I’m going to be blunt. When you are building a homestead there are days your house and land will look like a junk yard.

That is just something that happens.

When you have 18 million projects going on at one time, don’t be surprised by this.

But I was. I had always lived in the suburbs with the manicured yard and it flat out freaked me out! So I stressed. And some days, I even cried because I wanted my house to look pretty and be a functional homestead. I wanted it all at once.

Well, the reality was, unless I wanted to go into major debt I was going to have to be patient. When I finally came to that reality, I let this syndrome go.

But the days I wasted stressing myself out instead of working on making our homestead our dream.

So if you are feeling the stress of your homestead, take a deep breath and realize it will all come together. It all just takes time.

7. I Failed To Locate Livestock Conveniently

Our chickens were the only animals we bought that we actually placed near our home for their convenience, and ours.

But after that, we kind of stuck the animals where we thought they’d fit. So the goats were off by themselves (until we made the extension.) Our pigs were down in the woods by themselves. And our rabbits were in two different locations because they ballooned faster than we had prepared for.

So, on winter days when I had to thaw and bring fresh water multiple times, I was hiking all over the place.

It was a mess. So needless to say, that had to be fixed. Yet again, we found ourselves redoing something we had put so much effort into.

So really consider yourselves when placing your animals. Obviously, you won’t want your pigs really close to your house.

But if you can place them even where it isn’t such a terrible hike on a cold, icy day then it will be worth it.

8. We Didn’t Create Proper Storage As We Expanded

We completely did not do this. And this is why our property stayed so messy for so long. As we built and added, we didn’t stop to think that we’d need additional space for the extra tools each addition required.

So for example, as the garden grew I had more tools I needed beyond what I used in my tiny above ground garden. And that equated to needing more space.

And I needed a garden shed.

Then we got a woodstove and needed a place to store wood.

But we are just now catching up to all of the storage we needed. We had to build a pole barn in addition to a few other storage spaces as well.

So when you are building your homestead, always think about storing anything you buy. You don’t want anything to get ruined and having proper storage will help with that and keeping your place neat and tidy.

Well, there are the top 8 mistakes I made as far as functionality on my homestead when I was just starting out. I hope these points will help you to rethink a few things so you don’t have to have as many hard knocks and redo’s as we had.

What were some of your biggest mistakes made when building your homestead?

We’d love to hear from you guys. Please leave your comments in the designated space below.

 

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Bushcraft Gear – 7 Of The Best Bushcraft Tools For Survival

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bushcraft gear - survival knife cutting

Bushcraft Gear For The Serious Survivalist

The ability to invent, create and use tools are one of the major ways humans differ from animals. Bushcraft gear is the group of tools we first invented as a species. The gear we first crafted from sticks, stones, and bones found in nature. In order to make knives, arrows, spears, fire, shelters, etc.

The best bushcraft gear is the tools that give the ability to make a large array of other tools. For example, having a bushcraft knife opens up a world of possibilities to build hundreds of other useful tools and items.

Before humans became advanced engineers and scientists, we played by the rules of nature. If you go back far enough in history, survival was an everyday endeavor; it was the only lifestyle we knew.

There was no comfortable couch waiting for us at home, or steamy hot shower either. There were no grocery stores and no prepackaged food to meet our hunger pains.

And worse yet, no indoor plumbing so when “nature called”, we were already there because the wild was our home.

Living in those circumstances required a very particular set of tools and skills. What we today call bushcraft.

So What Is Bushcraft?

Over the years we’ve refined and perfected our instruments of survival. And bushcraft became an art form, much like martial arts or rock climbing.

For centuries the tools have remained unchanged while our computers and iPhones seem to evolve every few weeks. However, bushcraft gear and tools are timeless.

Today living in a remote off-grid wilderness is much the same as it was for our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Our bodies need the same securities: fire, shelter, food, and water. And the tools used to secure those needs are impressive in their simplicity and functionality.

Now, in today’s society, we typically don’t get to choose when and where and under what circumstances we end up stranded in the wilderness. So a collection of bushcraft tools does you no good stored in your garage.

For example, if you go down in a plane over the high country, you’re not going to have many bushcraft tools with you. (And if somehow you do, kudos, that’s impressive).

So I’ve compiled a list of the best, most essential bushcraft gear. I’ll describe their purpose, where you can buy them and a brief explanation of how to improvise each. But first, let’s get one important definition out of the way:

Bushcraft is the art of surviving in the woods. The official definition is:

“The skill gained by or necessary for living in bush country.”

But I’m going to applying the term more generally in this article. I am not limiting it to surviving “in the woods or forest” but to in the wilderness at large.

Surviving in the mountains, lost in the woods, stranded on an island, or traversing a desert. Bushcraft is the art of survival anywhere. And bushcraft gear is useful in any survival situation.

Bushcraft Gear – The 7 Essential Tools You Must Own and How To Make Them In Nature

1 – Survival Hatchet

If you haven’t read Gary Paulsen’s book, Hatchet, you need to do yourself a favor and get it now. The book follows a young man, stranded in the wilderness with nothing but his trusty hatchet.

He then uses this hatchet to survive through a winter in the wild alone. It’s an incredible example of how versatile and useful bushcraft gear can be.

With a quality survival hatchet, you can cut wood for fire, shape branches for arrows/bows to hunt for food or build a shelter. The possibilities are endless! Which is exactly why I bring a hatchet with me on every excursion I go on.

For the most part, using a hatchet is relatively straightforward: just hack away. And, if the hatchet’s edge is sharp enough you can also use it to shave and score wood.

There are tons of places to buy a hatchet. Any outdoor store or hardware worth visiting will carry an assortment of hatchets.

And if you search online, you’ll find a selection of brands, shapes, weights, and styles to choose from. You’ll be able to find the right hatchet for you regardless of your style, need, or budgetary restrictions.

Don’t worry there’s a hatchet out there for you.

Wetterlings is my favorite company for hatchets and axes. These hatchets are high-quality but they are not the lightest (nor the cheapest).

If weight is your primary concern, then go with this Friskers 14-inch hatchet. This hatchet one only weights 1.4 lbs due to its light (yet still strong) Nyglass (nylon/fiberglass composite) handle construction.

Improvising a Hatchet

The most important part of any hatchet is the head. It needs to be thick and sharp. However, it doesn’t need to win a beauty content.

There are a lot of things that you can use to achieve this. Scrap metal and sharpened stones are usually the best improvisation options.

Once you have a hatchet head selected, lash it securely to a handle using cordage. When you are sure the head will not come flying like a lethal projectile, it should be good to go.

Here’s a video showing a stone hatchet without using cordage.

2 – The Fixed-Blade/Folding Survival Knives

Few tools in a bushman’s pack are as versatile as a survival knife.

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There is a reason the knife has been one of the most prominent survival tools throughout history. Knives are extremely functional.

They serve a lot of different purposes:

• Cutting
• Digging
• Self Defense
• Poking Holes
• Splitting or Batoning
• Perforating
• Shaving
• Using As A Utensil For Eating
• Skinning
• Flathead Screwdriver

In generally, if you think you can use a knife to do it, you most likely can.

Knives come in all shapes and sizes. Some fold, some are fixed, some are double edged, and others only single edged.

Some come attached to multi-tools, while others are as basic as possible. Some are expensive while others are cheap. Some are sleek, and some are just badass looking.

It all depends on what you’re looking for from your bushcraft knife, to decides which one to invest in.

If you want a big “screw-off” hunting knife, check out Kabars (the official knife of the US Marines).

If you want a super lightweight, reliable, folding pocket knife, you can’t go wrong with a Benchmade Knife.

For a fixed blade knife I like Helle knives and blades. They are traditional Norwegian made and reliable.

Improvising a Knife

Improvising a fixed blade cutting tool is far more efficient than wasting time, energy, and resources trying to make a folding knife.

Sure, you can do it. But if you’re in a survival situation and need to make something functional, go with a fixed blade knife. Fix blade knives are easier to make, and they get the job done.

The concept behind improvising a survival knife is similar to making a hatchet: you need a handle and a blade.

Blades are relatively easy to come by, just think like a jailbird and shive up. Use sharpened scraps of metal, sharpened stones, even glass can work.

Handles can be either fastened to the blade with cord/tape or made entirely by wrapping tape around the end until you have something to grip. (A note on using glass: not all shards of glass will work well as a knife blade – but some forms of glass, like obsidian, are better than even the sharpest metals).

Obsidian blades were commonly used by the Maya people, and are SO sharp they cut on a molecular level. Obsidian can still be found naturally today, so keep your eyes open.

3 – Survival Saws

When you are dealing in the wilderness, efficiently cutting wood is a lifesaving skill. And even armed with a hatchet and a pocket knife, you are not going to be removing felled trees from across trials. You won’t be able to cut precise lengths of wood for home building.

For that, you need a saw.

Saws are an ultimate bushcraft tool. Even if, in your day to day life you never need a saw, when bush crafting you’re undoubtedly going to use it. And use it often. That saw is going to be essential, I guarantee it.

There are so many types of specialty saws:

• Coping Saws
• Veneer Saws
• Hacksaws
• Crosscut Saws
• Keyhole Saw
• Fret Saw
• Table Saw
• Rip Saws
• Bow Saws
• Band Saws
• Meat Saws
• etc.

But no one is realistically going to lug their table saw with them in a “shit hits the fan” scenario. So here is a short list of my favorite survival saws.

Forester Survival Pocket Handsaw – This saw fits in your pocket, it’s lightweight and effective at cutting branches. Yes, it would be tough to bring down a tree with this one, but hopefully, you won’t have to.

Gerber Saw Folding Gator – Comes with a fancy little pack making for easy packing. The saw is a lightweight bow saw, with easily replaceable teeth.

Gerber Vital Pack Saw – This is a small, super packable backpacking saw. It will easily fit into some unused nook or cranny of your pack.

Ultimate Survival Technologies Saber Cut Saw – Yeah, the name is a mouthful, but the saw is minimalistic. It looks more like a loop of wire than anything that could detach tree limbs but don’t get fooled. This survival tool is adept at doing exactly that.

How to Improvise a Saw

Improvising a saw in nature is a bit tricky. Saw blades are both precise and unnatural as far as bushcraft gear goes. So you won’t find them lying around in nature.

The closest thing to making an improvised saw is to make a wire saw.

To do this, you will need two key rings, and a length of coarse wire (electrical fencing wire, stripped electrical wires, etc.). Measure out roughly 3 feet of wire and slip the first key-ring halfway along the wire.

Start twisting the wire around itself from the middle (so that you can use the key-ring as a handle). Continue twisting until you get to the end, and incorporate the other key-ring.

The twisted coarse wire should function as a wire saw. But remember this improvised version is nowhere near as effective as the real deal. But it’s better than nothing in a pinch.

4 – Flint and Striker

Fire is the granddaddy of a survival essential. I never leave the house without a lighter on me. I keep packs of matches in every backpack I own and bring a flint and striker on most trips.

I don’t usually use the flint/striker because I don’t usually need to. But the age-old spark making duo has saved countless lives over the years.

The best part about a striker and flint is that they even work if they get wet. So if you want to keep an emergency fire starter on your boat, you should use one of these. If you plan on backpacking through a coastal region, use a flint and striker instead of matches.

Lots of outdoor manufacturers and survival companies make flint and striker setups. Some are cheap and lightweight; others are a little more expensive and flashier. But they all serve the same purpose, and they are all reliable.

All-Weather Emergency 2-IN-1 Fire Starter & Magnesium Fuel Bar

Basic, simple, lightweight, reliable, cheap, easy to use, makes fire. What more could you ask for in a survival tool?

Traditional Hand Forged High-Quality Carbon Steel Fire Striker

Fancy, a little heavier, but very elegant. This handcrafted artisan flint and striker set up is for those who do not mind spending a little extra.

Survival Magnesium Fire Flint Steel Fire Starter Ferro Rod with Wood Handle

At only $8.99 (at the time of this post) this is by far one of the more economical ways to go. Buy a bunch of these and store one in your car, one in your bug out bag, and one in your backpacking pack.

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Improvising a Flint and Striker

The best part about this piece of bushcraft gear is the fact that it does exist in nature.

Unlike a saw or a knife, you can find the materials for a flint and striker laying around. Find two rocks that spark when banging them together. And then get banging.

Or, use a piece of metal to strike against a stone at an angle to generate some sparks.

Not all stone will work, so you may have to try a few different types. But sparks are possible to make in nature without any man made supplies.


5 – Compasses

With luck, you will never get lost in the woods without a compass. They are essential not only to bushcraft but all outdoor activities.

Whether you are hunting, hiking, fishing, kayaking or camping having a true sense of direction is key.

It makes it easier to explore the unknown and find your way back safely. There is nothing worse than getting lost; compasses help you avoid that.

However, investing in a compass relies heavily on how much you want to spend and how you’re planning to use it.

I keep a simple Suunto compass in my hiking backpack and transfer it into my other bags if I need to.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our #104 Item Bug Out Bag Checklist. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

But when I was mapping out geologic formations in Boulder we used a very high-tech, multi-purpose compasses. Specifically, one known as a Brunton Pocket Transit Geo Compasses.

Now obviously, these are not made for survival, but it illustrates the variety available.

Find one that serves your needs and fits your budget.

Improvising a Compass

Despite being a clever article of technology, the compass is simple to recreate in nature. And it requires only a few basic supplies.

Find a quiet pool of water – preferably a bowl, but in a pinch, a still puddle will work too. Get your hands on a metal needle. A sewing needle works but small lengths of wire also works so long as the metal is magnetic (i.e. contains iron, cobalt or nickel).

Next, place the needle on something that floats (a leaf or a small chunk of cork or on a small piece of wood) and gently set it into the center of the still water.

Make sure there is no breeze or wind.

The needle should align according to Earth’s magnetic field. This alignment indicates North and South. Magnetic needles are a tried and tested method, but requires a bit of patience and very stable conditions (i.e. still water and air).

6 – Whetstones

Equally important to any bladed bushcraft gear, are the tools which sharpen them. Whetstones have been around for as long as bladed tools have, and are vital to maintaining a sharp blade.

Here is a good video to learn the techniques of sharpening knives.

Get the stone wet, and run the blade backward along the rock’s surface at a consistent 20-degree angle. Repeat this until the edge begins to sharpen.

Whetstones are available at most hardware stores and outdoor stores. Wusthof, Accusharp and Culinary Obsession whetstones are a few common brand names available.

Make sure you get a whetstone with a coarse grit side and a fine grit side. These are by far the best for honing your blade edges.

Here are a few more unique ways to sharpen a blade.

Improvising a Whetstone

Almost all whetstones you find on the market are made from artificial stone. Plus, the material particles are all the same size and grit found in nature.

Finding sharpening stones in the wilderness is difficult. You need something very flat, smooth, and dense.

I have heard of people using cinder blocks to hone a rough edge, or flat river stones high in quartz. But finding a random rock that will work well to sharpen your blades is going to be a difficult undertaking.

7 – Fishing Line and Hooks

These two items are so light, cheap, and packable that every survivalist should carry them.

Hooks and line fit into small zip locks and weight close to nothing. And fishing is an essential bushcraft survival skill.

You don’tt have to have a full fishing rig to catch something; you just need a line, a hook, and some bait.

Fishing line and hooks are available nearly everywhere:

• sporting stores
• outdoor stores
• hardware store
• everything store
• dollar stores
• reuse stores
• military surplus stores
• even many grocery stores

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Improvising Fishing Lines and Hooks

As far as bushcraft gear goes, it doesn’t get much simpler than this. So you need to get your hands on some thin line, and a few aluminum can tops.

The can tops can be cut or broken/bent into a near-perfect improvised fish hook. Find some bait, and you are ready to cast your line.

The Final Word

Of any life skill, I would argue that Bushcraft is one of the most important. Kids who grow up never learning how to use a hatchet or to widdle things with pocket knives are not missing out.

They also are not being adequately prepared to handle themselves in the real ‘real’ world. There is always time to learn, though. It is never too late to get out into the wild and start practicing bushcraft. Who knows, you may even master the art.

Of course, no bushman was ever successful without their trusty bushcraft gear. The gear essential to the trade. And without them, you will struggle to survive in the wilderness.

The bottom line is owning key bushcraft gear is an essential preparation. But knowing how to improvise any one of these bushcraft tools is equally important. Because you never know when you might get stranded in the remote wilderness.

-Will Brendza
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The post Bushcraft Gear – 7 Of The Best Bushcraft Tools For Survival appeared first on Skilled Survival.

The Best Plant Humidifiers For Your Indoor Garden

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The post The Best Plant Humidifiers For Your Indoor Garden is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

If you’ve ever walked into a botanical garden or been fortunate enough to travel to a tropical area, you’ve been blasted by warm, humid air. When I first got into houseplants and tropical plants, I was shocked at how much humidity some of them needed to thrive. Taking care of my new plants seemed simple […]

The post The Best Plant Humidifiers For Your Indoor Garden is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Trump Orders Strike On Syria; Russia Responds By Pledging To Defend Country

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Trump Orders Strike On Syria; Russia Responds By Pledging To Defend Country

WASHINGTON – The Trump administration began the year with high hopes for a restart in relationship with Russia, but those apparently were dashed Thursday when U.S. destroyer ships fired 59 Tomahawk missiles into Syria in retaliation for that country’s use of a deadly chemical weapon that killed more than 70 of its own citizens.

“On Tuesday, Syrian dictator Bashar al Assad launched a horrible chemical weapons attack on innocent civilians using a deadly nerve agent,” Trump said Thursday night. “Assad choked out the lives of helpless men, women and children. It was a slow and brutal death for so many. Even beautiful babies were cruelly murdered in this very barbaric attack. No child of God should ever suffer such horror.”

Trump said he had ordered a “targeted military strike” on the Syrian airfield “from where the chemical attack was launched.”

“It is in this vital national security interest of the United States to prevent and deter the spread and use of deadly chemical weapons,” Trump said. “There can be no dispute that Syria used banned chemical weapons, violated its obligations under the Chemical Weapons Convention and ignored the urging of the U.N. Security Council.”

The Cool-To-The-Touch Lantern With THOUSANDS Of Hours Of Emergency Backup Lighting

Just a few months ago, the political establishment was joking about Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin being best friends. Now, they seem like long-time enemies – and just a few steps away from world war.

Russia’s Sputnik News labeled the chemical attack “alleged” attack, implying it never happened.

“President Putin regards the US attacks on Syria as an aggression against a sovereign state in violation of the norms of international law, and under a trumped-up pretext at that,” said Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov. “… Putin also sees the attacks on Syria by the US as an attempt to divert the international community’s attention from the numerous casualties among civilians in Iraq.”

The Russian defense ministry even said it would strengthen an air defense system within Syria to protect that country. Russia is Syria’s most powerful ally.

“In order to protect the most sensitive objects of the Syrian infrastructure, a system of measures to bolster and increase the effectiveness of the Syrian armed forces’ air defense systems will be implemented,” said ministry spokesman Igor Konashenkov

Peskov said the chances for a collision or war between the two countries in Syria had “significantly increased.” He even charged that the airstrike was “carried out for the benefit of ISIS and other terrorist organizations.”

Russian also announced it was suspending a September 2015 agreement that was intended to avoid incidents between U.S. and American aircraft.

Did you support the airstrikes on Syria? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Bamboo – Nature’s Gift to Preppers

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Written by R. Ann Parris on The Prepper Journal.

I have a love-hate relationship with bamboo. I’m from parts of the country where the stuff takes over the edges of some roadways and chokes out some of the natural diversity found in some locations, usually locations with a lot of uses for wildlife and foraging. On the other hand, bamboo is really useful stuff. Whether somebody’s looking at a long-term, widespread, nation-altering event and wants the sustainable source of materials, or whether somebody’s just trying to save a few bucks to get ahead of the curve or save up for basic preparedness, a stand or two of bamboo has a lot to offer us. Even hitting some examples for inside and outside homes, gardens, and livestock I can’t even touch on all its uses. Feel free to list out what I miss at will, from its use as cups to the impressive BTUs bamboo can offer, furniture to bridges. It really is a handy material to locate.

Harvesting Bamboo

I’m going to encourage you to drive around looking and knock on doors or don a blaze-orange vest and harvest from roadsides instead of planting bamboo. Try to wash off boots, vehicles, and tools after any harvest of wild species, especially in damp areas. There are all kinds of things from phrag grass to kudzu that will hitch rides, plus various diseases and pests we can transfer between locations.

The great *they* like to tell us that you’re supposed to harvest bamboo from as close to the ground plane as you can.

I don’t do that.

I prefer not to create future punji sticks and heel-catchers we can’t see from all the future leaf fall. Nor do I cut at knee-height.

I tend to cut up in the rib to head level. It eats up the earth space or footprint and takes longer to die back and be replaced, true. However, pretty much nobody is going to get speared when they kneel down, nobody’s going to snag a boot or toe, and nobody’s dog is going to gash its face.

What size bamboo you want is dependent on your task, but as you harvest, don’t just abandon the leafy bits.

Remember, bamboo is really just a big, thick grass.  In most cases, the leaves make fine mulch and compost. You can also use trimmings as a fiber element for goats – especially goats that are getting rich tree and shrub fodders. Chickens and rabbits can have it as well.

There is a handy knife-type saw the Japanese and Koreans each have specifically for bamboo. I use mine for all kinds of harvests. However, for bamboo, I’m more likely to go with either style of long-handled pruners, a laminate or hardwood blade on a hacksaw, or the same on a sawsall – it depends on what’s waiting closest in my truck and sometimes how much I’m planning to harvest.

The hacksaw or pruners are handy for dropping, then immediately bucking off the tops and the leafy “branches”, and sorting as I go. I tend to always have good one-handed pruners in my pocket or bag(s), though, so there are times I alternate cutting and stripping instead.

Garden Trellis

I can’t do an article about bamboo and not talk about one of its best-known uses as a garden trellis material. However, because it is so well-known, I won’t beleaguer the point.

What I’ll say instead is that bamboo is fairly long-lived, but not indefinite, especially in the damp-soil conditions of a lot of gardens. It’s not as strong as steel. However, it is pretty tough, and it does last out a season or longer, easily. The thicker the bamboo, the longer it lasts. I will also point out that unless it’s the UV-resistant type, or painted, PVC is also going to crack under a lot of conditions – sometimes in a season, sometimes after two or three.

So if you’re able to find it for free, and are looking for a long-term sustainable material that can be whacked and added to compost or used as mulch when it’s failing, bamboo can be a super alternative to buying tomato cages or lumber for squash and bean trellises.

I also want to point out a handy trick. Instead of using just cord, or any cord at all, you can drill out holes near the tops of your poles, and use thinner stalks as a pin.

I prefer drilling bamboo while it’s green, first with a thin “standard” bit, and then either a larger drywall bit or a narrow auger, depending on the size hole and thickness of the bamboo.

You can use other lengths of bamboo as a spacer to create a wider tripod, or keep it snugged up tight for a teepee type structure.

The amount of “top” left above the holes and pin can change what the bamboo will do for you. You can lay out another thick piece or pieces across the tops to move water, form a longer bean trellis, or support a row cloth or plastic cover. Or, you can trim it nice and tight for a neater appearance and create fewer perches.

Other Garden Uses for Bamboo

Bamboo can be used in lots of other ways for our food production.

It has been used to create irrigation systems in both frigid and steamy-humid parts of the world for millennia. We can use it to create “gutter” or “PVC” style tiered raised beds for shallow-rooted plants.

It can be split or small branches can be stripped and bent while green to create exclusion nets or frames – to keep butterflies and thus their caterpillars off our plants, or to protect plants from dog tails, birds, or chickens. The same types of frames can be used to create feed-through graze boxes for chickens, preventing just how much of a plant they can reach and damage, which allows the plant to survive and grow back for continuous feeding.

It has also been used to create the framework for hoop houses.

Bamboo can be used to create our whole greenhouse, point in fact, and to build raised garden beds. By size and desired style, it can create everything from neat, tidy faces to woven wattle. It can be left raw and rustic, or have boards added to smooth the upper surface.

Again, this stuff isn’t cedar, it’s not CMU brick, and it’s not landscaping timbers. It will have to be replaced more frequently than those. However, it’s been used pretty much forever and it does offer that free, sustainable material instead of paying for something.

Fencing

While we’re building our garden out of free, sustainable materials, we might also want to fence it. Bamboo can also help either lower those costs or eliminate them.

We can weave it in wattle style, or get artsy and cute. We can fill in gaps on rail fences to prevent dogs and rabbits from slipping through, or extend the height of fencing to deter deer.

We can place it tightly or weave nearly mats with it to help buffer winds and create snow fences as well, which lets us almost pick the places snow will pile up or spread the snow load out to create lower drifts over a larger area.

Housing & Enclosures

Bamboo can also keep our livestock housed and where we put them.

From bird cages to goat pens, and even for the live otter and primate trade in parts of the world, it’s been doing so for centuries.

We can create full sheds and barns out of it, using either the lap-roof, tile or thatching styles for roofs.

We can also create fish traps and boxes of various types. Those boxes can be used in our aquaculture and aquaponics systems to separate breeders and growouts without needing separate tanks, or to purge our fish before harvest depending on our feeding systems.

Bamboo can also be used to create the drop-out or crawl-out tubes for various types of BSF larvae or mealworms for our feed systems as well.

Construction

Around the world, from places like snowy Nepal to steam Thailand, bamboo gets used for long-term construction on a regular basis.

The most effective roofing style is the split-overlap that prevents drips, although roofing is also done with mats and thatching styles using bamboo stalks and leaves.

In many cases where load-bearing is of issue, you’ll find bamboo bundled into pillars and pillars closer than we use in 2×4 stick construction.

As mentioned with beds and trellises, construction isn’t going to last forever. However, folks have been using it for centuries and in places with high winds and snow loads, they’re still using it.

If we have running water, we can use some of those eons-old construction methods to make our lives easier.

Water wheels use running waterways to lift relatively small amounts of water up into aqueduct style irrigation systems or through channels or piping to cisterns – which either hold it, or are used to create pressurized tanks to then distribute that water elsewhere.

Bamboo is also used to build mills that Westerners are more accustomed to seeing. Those mills can be used to do work directly – like threshing and grinding grain – or to spin low-level turbines for pumps or generating energy.

Similar designs for slow-moving fish wheels exist as well, spinning in rivers and streams and using scoops to drop fish into catchments. They’re not super efficient, but like a yoyo, they’re fishing while we’re off doing something else.

Creativity – Corn Crib or Coop?

Even if we don’t see plans for something straight off, the flexibility of bamboo and our minds can help us cut costs.

There’s no reason a shelf system can’t be combined with a plan for hampers to create a drying rack for foods, herbs, tea, or seeds.

Likewise, with some modifications, a coconut caddy we see from the balmy East can be modified into a corn crib, or a hay feeder that will reduce wastes and costs – even now. That caddy and what we know about cages can be used to create a bird coop or rabbit hutch, or that hutch can be converted back to grain drying and storage or curing potatoes or sweet potatoes.

We aren’t limited to the styles we see, either. While slender wands aren’t as strong, we can use them pretty much anywhere bamboo would have been split.

We can also take inspiration from the uses for bamboo, and apply them to things we may have in excess in our area, like young stands of aspen, copious privet, or willow.

Seventh Generation

As much as I love bamboo for all the things it can do, it doesn’t really belong running loose in North America. While certain species are less invasive than others, and it can be controlled by mowing around it and keeping it contained, I caution against planting it. Some of that is the Seventh Generation outlook on life. Sure, even invasive stuff can be fairly easily controlled on a property now, with mowing or due to other plantings or the terrain. But what happens when we’re no long fit and able, and it’s no longer our property?

So while I love it, I highly encourage preppers and homesteaders and craftsmen to find a patch of bamboo, not plant it. They’re out there, California to Wyoming, Florida to Vermont. They’ll usually be found on a secondary highway or county road, routinely in damper areas along those roadsides, or near homes.

The post Bamboo – Nature’s Gift to Preppers appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

To Grow Or Not To Grow Marijuana For Medical Survival?

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OK, so this is a huge topic that seems to divide people.

Within the year prior to this post, Florida became one of the 28 states to legalize medical marijuana.

Do I think that’s a good thing? Yes, but this is an article about whether or not you should grow medical marijuana, not about what my (or anybody’s) political views are. Good thing, right? Lately, that’s a powder keg that will blow up any family reunion.

We’ll simply discuss whether or not marijuana is a good crop to grow for medicinal purposes in your survival garden. And to that end, I’m going to discuss it just like I do any other medicinal herb – does it have enough benefits to merit a spot in your garden?

Finally, it’s on you to decide what suits you!

7 Medical Conditions Medical Marijuana Can Address

Like many herbs, marijuana has been used as an alternative treatment for many different illnesses and diseases for centuries. It’s active biologically active components are called cannabinoids and perform several different functions in your body. The two that are the most highly studied are delta-9-tetrahydrocnniabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), though others are being studied, as well.

Nausea and Vomiting

This is the big one that most people think of when they think of medical marijuana from a serious perspective. Chemotherapy – and cancer in general – robs a person of their appetite and causes nausea.

The FDA has actually approved a drug called Dronabinol to treat nausea and vomiting caused by chemo and weight loss and poor appetite in AIDS patients. It’s a gel-cap that contains THC.

Get this lifesaving information about surviving when doctors and hospitals are shut down!

Cancer Treatment

You don’t often hear about marijuana being used to treat cancer – only the side effects of chemo. However, according to the American Cancer Society website, some studies have shown that THC, CBD and other cannabinoids slows growth and/or kill certain types of cancer cells and may slow or prevent the spread of the disease.

Of course, these studies are preliminary and research is ongoing, but it’s significant because so far, there’s not much out there that we could grow naturally that can claim this. That being said, it shouldn’t be used now, when more effective treatments are available, as your primary treatment. Does this make it worth growing in your survival garden? Maybe so.

Still, though cancer is a big thing, it may not be an issue that you have to deal with, so what else is medical marijuana good for?

Pain Management

Also according to the ACS and many other studies, patients with cancer, MS, fibromyalgia, and many other painful diseases often need less pharmaceutical pain medications when marijuana or cannabinoids are incorporated into their treatment plans. It’s been shown to relieve pain related to both muscles and nerves.

This is actually one of the primary uses for marijuana as an herbal treatment and it was widely used up until the 1800’s as a treatment for chronic pain. Studies have now shown that chemically, it does have a substantial analgesic effect.

As a matter of fact, there’s a cannabinoid drug being tested now for use as a pain treatment for people with cancer and multiple sclerosis. That’s likely to spread to other diseases if the drug continues to show results.

Anti-Inflammatory and Nervous System

Cannabinoids have also been clinically shown to have an anti-inflammatory effect. To get all scientific, our bodies actually have two types of cannabinoid receptors: CB1 and CB2. CB1 is mostly expressed in the brain and, to a lesser extent, the cells in our immune system, and CB2 is primarily found on cells in the immune system.

This is where scientists are really studying cannabinoids right now because of the immune response that happens when THC is introduced. It gets a bit complicated, but basically what it does is cause an immune response that kills bad cells and results in decreased inflammation.

That’s why it’s being used as an alternative treatment (and now sometimes as an active part of many treatment plans) for inflammatory and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, type 1 diabetes, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

Video first seen on Ride with Larry

Glaucoma

Yeah, this is the one that’s joked about the most – when somebody’s busted with pot, they protest – “But it’s for my glaucoma!” Well, that’s actually a thing. THC can lower the pressure on the optic nerve, which is what causes glaucoma, but as a warning, it can also lower blood pressure, which can make glaucoma worse, or increase your chances of getting it.

Once again, risks versus benefits according to your situation.

Epilepsy

This is actually one of the areas where medical marijuana really struts its stuff. In early studies, medical marijuana extracts have shown that they can cause a 50% reduction in certain types of seizures. That’s pretty darned significant when you figure that epilepsy is one of those diseases where medication is absolutely required.

Personally, if I or a family member were a med-dependent epileptic, I’d be studying which strain of marijuana was the best to grow for my survival garden.

Anxiety and PTSD

Anxiety relief is another historical use of marijuana, and studies are now showing that it has positive effects on one of the hardest diseases on the planet to treat – PTSD. How did we discover this? Because doctors started noticing that patients who were tired of taking 5 or 6 or 10 drugs to sleep and function as they dealt with PTSD were starting to feel better as they gave up on the meds that were causing them to feel like zombies.

When a handful of doctors bothered to ask what was causing the positive changes, large numbers of patients reported that they were self-medicating with marijuana. It turns out that, according to studies, they were on the right track.

About Growing Medical Marijuana

Actually growing marijuana isn’t hard and if you give the plants some love, you can get quite a yield in just a little bit of space. And it’s a great container plant. The problem, just like when choosing tomatoes or beans, is that you want to grow the right strain for what you need it for.

There are thousands of strains of marijuana. Some strains have higher amounts of THC (the chemical that causes the high as well as provides health benefits), but lower amounts of other beneficial cannabinoids such as CBD. Some are better at relieving pain than others, and some are so strong that they may actually make your nausea worse just because you’re not used to the drug.

My word of advice here to you is this: do your own research. Maybe talk to your doctor. If he doesn’t agree with the concept, and many old-school Western practitioners won’t, then find another doctor or an alternative healthcare professional who will advise you.

One final disclaimer here – you need to know your state laws because the government is serious about this. If it’s illegal, they will take you to jail – sometimes for a LONG time – if they catch you growing it. There are some states, such as Oregon and Arizona, where you can grow a small number of plants as long as you have the proper medical documentation, but as with everything we preppers do, know your laws and be smart  about them.

This is a huge topic and I know that many of you have questions or can offer advice. Let’s avoid the politics of it and share your thoughts and experience about the benefits/risks of growing medical marijuana for survival purposes.

Remember that knowledge is the only doctor that can save you when there is no medical help around.

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This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2828614/

http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000881

http://www.governing.com/gov-data/state-marijuana-laws-map-medical-recreational.html

Have We Lost Our Way?

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     I was intrigued with a recent article on the Charisma News website.  It quoted a prophetic statement made by Dr. Elton Trueblood, the former chaplain for Stanford and Harvard universities in the early 1900s. He was once asked what the church in America would look like in the last half of the 20th century. Dr. Trueblood stated, “By the year 2000, Christians in America will be a conscious minority surrounded by an arrogant, militant paganism.”  Well, we are nearly two decades past his prognostication, and I daresay that not only is the Body of Christ surrounded by paganism, but we are becoming increasingly comfortable with compromising with the pagan world.
    I feel confident in saying that because I see too much evidence that the Church and Christians are willing to let the “leaven” of the world infiltrate our professed faith in God.  Remember, in our discussion of God’s Feasts yesterday that He warned the Israelites about sweeping the corrupting influence of Egypt out of their lives. Yet, I’m afraid that I see the world and its corrupting values permeating the sanctity of our Church buildings and our faith.

     I’m pretty sure that some of what I’m about to say will be viewed as legalistic, rigid, and uncompromising.  But I would like to propose the idea that it is precisely because of our compromise and lack of obedience to God’s Word that the world is in the mess it’s in. Because the Church has presented only a picture of a Loving and Merciful God, there is no fear of Him or His Judgment.  In addition, we have let the ideology of “tolerance” overshadow the areas in which Jesus was intolerant. As followers of Christ, we have become tolerant about divorce; about what constitutes the Biblical concept of marriage; about wickedness in high places; about immorality, as evidenced by the existence of rampant pornography, sex trafficking, and pedophilia; and crime and godlessness have become accepted norms in society, with nary a peep out of the Church.
     We have forgotten that Jesus warned us to enter by the narrow gate. He said, narrow is the gate and difficult is the way which leads to life, and there are few who find it. This is perfectly illustrated by the Billy Graham Association, which wrote, “If you should ask a man the directions to New York City and he said, ‘Oh, just take any road you wish, they all lead to New York,’ you would question both his sanity and his truthfulness.  Nevertheless, we have somehow gotten it into our minds that ‘all roads lead to Heaven.’ ” Yet, even Billy Graham, himself, whose faith in Jesus is without question, when asked whether those who belong to religions that reject Christ as Savior (Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, etc.) and secularists will be saved, responded, “Those are decisions only the Lord will make. It would be foolish for me to speculate on who will be there [in heaven] and who won’t. … I don’t want to speculate about that.” I guess he’s forgotten the Word of God!
    In fact, there was a time when no professed Christian would have dared to entertain the thought that other gods offer a path to eternal life. What was once solid doctrine has slowly eroded into the acceptance of multiple paths to eternity. And with that sliding scale of righteousness, we are becoming the makers of our own moral values. The consequences of Biblical sin are diminished, while standards of Divine morality or Divine revelation go unspoken.  How convenient is that? When God’s standards are ridiculed or non-existent, then no one’s moral values can be judged wrong. And when there is no Divine revelation, then we become our own god; the world operates by the religion of man and his politics, and we will be saved by secular values…. the path is wide that leads to destruction. That is why the modern Church is in danger of operating more on man’s traditions and thought than God’s Word.
     Sadly, we have removed the profound sense of mystery that is God and His supernatural characteristics, and reduced Him to just a slightly larger image of ourselves.  And we have allowed occultism, mysticism, magic, and the mysteries and worship of other gods to grow and replace YHWH’s once exalted position. We are embracing Christian yoga, for goodness sake!
     And because we Christians have not stood firm in the Word as our guiding principle, we have seen the breakdown of the family; our youth abandoning their faith in God, as well as confusion over their God-given sexual identities; and the shocking increase of perversion in our culture.  I fear that we are headed for a showdown — a confrontation between true Believers and those who profess a faith that has no foundation in Jesus.  This confrontation is already apparent in our society and it will soon split our Churches.  Greed, idolatry, and adultery with the culture is permeating the Body of Christ, and Jesus will no more allow His Church to succumb to such wickedness as He allowed the moneychangers to defile His Father’s House.
     It’s time the Church and the Body take a good hard look in the mirror. We have not been about our Father’s business and we are now in a battle for hearts and minds, and the destiny of millions of souls hangs in the balance. I sense that we will soon hear a voice from Heaven announce, “Take your sickle and reap, because the time to reap has come, for the harvest of the earth is ripe.” I believe the Body of Christ in America is in for a big transition.  Will we become the kind of Bride Jesus is looking for? I, for one, will not be in agreement with the world; nor will I compromise with those in the Church who insist on taking the wide path. I’m ready for the battle that is to come, and I will not hide the Light that is in me under a bushel basket. I will expose the lies of satan and the unfruitful works of his darkness and death. And I will tell the Lost of the abundant Life available when we are in fellowship with Jesus. Let us join together to find our way once again; to recover our path to Jesus, and return this world to the Lord!

Proverbs 25:26   “Like a muddied spring or a polluted fountain is a righteous man who gives way before the wicked”.

   
   

Sleeping in the wilderness – Space Blanket vs. Sleeping Bag

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When equipping a bug out bag with necessary items for an overnight experience in the wild, things can get tricky. Many people will pick between a sleeping bag and a space blanket without actually comparing the two. To make things easier and help them decide, I’ve added my pros and cons based on my personal … Read more…

The post Sleeping in the wilderness – Space Blanket vs. Sleeping Bag was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Comparison: 9mm vs. .45 ACP

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by Nicholas

Of all the topics subject to debate in the world of firearms, the one that probably receives the most attention is the debate of 9mm vs. .45 ACP.  While some would say that this debate has gone on for far too long, others will be quick to point out that choosing a personal caliber is a decision that can only be made after much thought and research.

The purpose of this article isn’t to claim superiority of one firearm caliber over the other, but rather to present the arguments for or against each one. After going over the basics and pros and cons of each caliber, we’ll delve further into specific categories and the advantages a particular caliber has over the other under each category.

This article isn’t for those who have already chosen a caliber for their pistol, rather, it is for those of you who are trying to decide and have narrowed your options down to 9mm or .45.  The important thing for you to know up front is that these calibers are currently the two most conventional ones in the United States and have been around for many years.  Neither of them is a bad round, and both will probably do what you expect them to.  However, if you’re still unable to decide, hopefully, the information in this article will be able to help you.

Let’s start by talking about the 9mm…

9mm

The 9mm Luger round has a total bullet diameter of 0.355 inches.  It was designed originally for use by the German military in 1902 for the Luger pistol, which was then to become their standard service pistol.

After that, the 9mm grew rapidly in popularity all over the world.  Countries saw it as a versatile, good all-round service caliber and had new military sidearms chambered for it, such as the Browning Hi-Power and Walther P38, both of which served in World War II.

The 9mm continued to become even more widespread after the Second World War, and eventually became the standard pistol round of NATO.  Today, the overwhelming majority of armies around the globe use sidearms chambered for 9mm.

The 9mm is also the most popular pistol round in the United States.  Not only has it found favor with law enforcement and the United States military (who use the round in the current standard issue Beretta M9 pistol), but it is also used heavily by civilians for concealed carry, home defense, target shooting, or by preppers for SHTF sidearms.

There are many advantages to owning a pistol chambered in 9mm.  For one thing, because of its immense popularity, 9mm is extremely easy to find and currently the cheapest pistol round to buy. These days, you can expect to buy a box of 50 rounds of 9mm FMJ for around the $10 to $15 range, which is around half the price of what you can expect to pay for .45.

Because of its smaller size, pistols can carry far more rounds of 9mm in the magazine in comparison to other pistols.  The Glock 17, for instance, holds 17 rounds of 9mm in the magazine.  The Canik TP9-series of pistols holds 18 rounds.  The Springfield XD-series holds 19 rounds.  You get the idea; double stacked pistols with 9mm hold a lot of bullets.

The 9mm is also easy to shoot with mild recoil, which makes it a great round to use in teaching new shooters.  The mild recoil also means that you can get multiple shots off quickly without being thrown off your target.

On the other hand, opponents of the 9mm will be quick to point out some disadvantages.  It has been claimed that the 9mm, at least in FMJ form, is lacking in overall stopping power and delivers less energy and wound size than .45 ACP does.

.45 ACP

The .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) round has a total bullet diameter of 0.425 inches.  This is a true American caliber as it was originally designed by John Browning for use in the Colt M1911 pistol; this reason alone is often what makes people grow so attached to it.

In its more than hundred year service life, the .45 has gained a reputation for being a so-called ‘one shot man stopper,’ with the idea that it can bring down a human sized target with only a single bullet.

There is no doubt that the .45 ACP is a great round of self-defense even in the form of FMJ ‘ball’ ammo.  The diameter is also substantially larger than the 9mm, which naturally creates a larger wound cavity or hole when striking a target.

Despite being a large round, recoil for the .45 is still generally relatively soft or mild.  While it has definitely got a larger kick to it than the 9mm, the .45 has gained a reputation by some novice shooters for being a high-kicking round, which simply isn’t true.

On the other hand, .45 does have its cons.  First and foremost, it’s more expensive than 9mm (nearly twice as much), so it’s not the best round for the budget conscious shooter.

Since it’s a larger round, this also means that pistols chambered for .45 typically carry less than those chambered for 9mm.  The 1911 holds just 7-8 rounds in the standard magazine, and even ‘high capacity’ .45 pistols rarely hold more than 12-13 rounds.  The FN FNX Tactical is currently the highest capacity .45 pistol in the market, at 15 rounds, and it’s a very big and bulky gun.

Still, there’s no denying that the .45 packs a wallop, which may make up for its low round count.  Next, let’s put the 9mm and .45 head-to-head in a few key categories and see how they perform:

9mm vs. .45

  • Bullet Penetration. Penetration between the 9mm and .45 is fairly even, though the 9mm has the slightest edge overall. In the end, it all comes down to the type of bullet you are using.  A 9mm round can have anywhere from eight to sixteen inches of penetration, while a .45 will have anywhere from eleven to fourteen inches.  Special loads made for self-defense of both calibers may have greater penetration overall, as there are some .45s capable of reaching up to nearly thirty inches and 9mms that can reach forty.
  • Bullet Expansion. The .45, being the larger bullet, wins this one, though again by a slight edge. A .45 can expand up to 0.75 inches on average, while the 9mm will expand to around 0.35-0.50 inches. However, certain self-defense 9mm loads can come closer to the .45 on bullet expansion.
  • Bullet Velocity. The .45 is a slow-moving round and therefore has less bullet velocity than the 9mm. The 9mm can fire between 1,000 to 1,350 FPS (feet per second), but the .45 will average around 800 to 1,150 FPS.
  • Capacity. In general, most full-size service pistols chambered in 9mm will hold anywhere from 13 to 19 rounds of ammunition in a standard magazine. Full-size pistols chambered in .45 will generally hold anywhere from 7 to 13 rounds.  Although extended magazines are available for both calibers that will increase total round counts.
  • Price. The 9mm is around half the price of a .45 ACP. Expect to pay $12-15 for a box of FMJ 9mm, and around $25-30 for a box of .45.  Special self-defense loads in both calibers will be more expensive.

Conclusion

Remember that, in the end, both 9mm and .45 are pistol calibers and therefore underpowered compared to rifle rounds. Also remember that shot placement, or where you shoot an attacker, is more important than the round used itself.  In other words, the differences between 9mm and .45 are fairly marginal when you look at the bigger picture.

In that regard, the debate between 9mm and .45 isn’t really a debate over which caliber is superior. People are still arguing over which one is better suited to the tastes of a specific shooter.  You may find that you see merits in both 9mm and .45 and decide to buy a pistol in both calibers.  After all, two is always better than one, right?

Insect Killing Repellent For Your Clothing And Gear

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I just wanted to fill you in on a tip how to keep insects such as ticks, mosquitoes, chiggers, and mites off your clothes and your body… This stuff is also effective against the Yellow Fever Mosquito, which can transmit the Zika Virus. It is completely odorless after drying and ideal for any outdoor activity […]

Here’s the Key to Urban Prepping That Most People Don’t Consider

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new york city wikimediaIf you live in a rural or suburban area, you have a very distinct advantage over your fellow preppers who are living in densely populated cities. It’s not that you don’t have to worry about hordes of desperate, hungry violent people. It’s not that you’re more likely to live near a wilderness with fresh game, or that you have friendlier neighbors who you can rely on.

Although certainly those are all advantages, your biggest advantage is that you have more space. You have more room to grow your own food if you want. You have enough space to stock up on a wide variety of supplies. That allows you to hunker down, and wait for the chaos to pass.

That’s a bit more difficult for urban preppers. A family living in a tiny apartment can’t stock up on enough food to last for three months or more, much less any other essential supplies. Or they can, but only if they don’t mind losing their entire living room.

While it’s a good idea for every prepper to stock up on as many essential supplies as they can, that’s just not enough for most urban preppers. They require a slightly different strategy. Rather than trying to figure out how they can stock up and isolate themselves from everyone else, what will give the urban prepper the greatest chance at survival is figuring out how they can trade with everyone else.

If you stop and think about what makes cities and rural areas different, it makes sense. In rural areas, regardless of whether or not there’s a disaster at play, self-sufficiency is one of the most important virtues. In densely populated cities, cooperation is more important. That’s because your neighbors aren’t a mile down the road. They’re right up against you, all the time.

So if you’re a prepper in a city, you have to think more about what you can trade with your neighbors for. Rather than just focusing on filling your apartment with bins full of freeze-dried food, you need to also think about stocking up on stuff that you can trade away down the road when your limited supplies run out.

Preferably, these trade items should be small. And to give you the most bang for your buck, they should be items that are cheap now, but will be worth their weight in gold after a disaster. Consider the following:

  • Water filtration and disinfection supplies are usually very compact and affordable. Take for instance, the crystallized iodine that is found in Polar Pure. That tiny jar is capable of disinfecting 2000 quarts of water, and only costs $20 (but don’t stock up on it too quickly. Crystallized iodine is used to make meth so that might look suspicious). Alternatively you can stock up on pumps and especially filters. None of these items are particularly expensive now, but in a crisis, most people will give their right arm for them.
  • Reloading supplies. Specifically, you should buy up a wide variety of primers. Brass casings can be reused, lead can be scavenged, and gunpowder can be made just about anywhere. Primers are incredibly cheap and compact, but this is an item that you would be hard pressed (pun intended) to find during a prolonged collapse.
  • Over the counter drugs would also be a great idea. They’re cheap, small, and have a shelf life that’s a lot longer than what you see on the label. Same with most prescription drugs. Though you can’t stockpile them for obvious legal reasons, if you’re ever prescribed pain killers or antibiotics and have some pills left over after you recover, you should hold onto them.
  • Sewing kits are another really cheap and portable item. We live in a throwaway culture, and you’d be surprised by how many people don’t have this sort of thing lying around. But if society collapses, everyone will have to squeeze as much life out of their clothes as they possibly can.
  • And finally, consider building up a supply of supplements, especially multivitamins. There isn’t going to be as much food to go around, and the kind of food that’s available probably isn’t going to be nutritionally balanced. There will be a lot of diseases showing up in the population that are caused by poor nutrition. Unfortunately, you can’t stock up on too much of this because supplements have a limited shelf life. But boy, imagine what someone with scurvy will give you for a handful of vitamin C pills.

Do you have any more ideas for small, affordable items that urban preppers should stock up on? Let us know in the comments.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Don’t Go To Sleep Angry

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Have you ever heard someone tell you that the secret of a happy marriage is to never go to bed angry? It’s good advice. The logical addition to it is that you should stay up and fight – well, maybe not fight, but at least do something about it. Welcome to Day 22 of 30 Days to Forgiveness!

An argument just before bedtime is really a recipe for a rotten night’s sleep, which I’m sure you already know. If you go to sleep seething with anger or crying in frustration, your subconscious is going to have all sorts of unpleasant stuff to play with during your dreams.

Before going to sleep at night, forgive everyone for everything.

That’s easy to say, isn’t it?

Well, it’s the recipe for a great night’s sleep.

You will sleep better and your subconscious will be dialed into love and forgiveness. That will help strengthen your resolve and your new habit of forgiveness.

So just how do we go about doing this?

Here’s one little trick that we have at our home – there’s a list of topics that are never allowed to be discussed within the first or last hour of the morning. In other words, don’t get into politics, dig around on your ex’s Facebook page, make a snarky remark about how you’d pay less taxes if your spouse wouldn’t lose receipts (cough, cough, I promise to get more organized this year). It doesn’t mean you never talk about these things, but just not as the day is beginning or ending.

So what do you do as the day ends?

Before you go to bed, or while you’re lying there, waiting to go to sleep, think about your day and explore how you feel.

If you find yourself angry, or even annoyed about something, do what you can to make your peace with it.

Think about the positive aspects of what’s happened, or even in your life in general. It’s possible that what you’re angry about probably wasn’t as earth-shatteringly important as you initially thought. Do what you can to make your peace with it and find your joy and happiness before you go to sleep.

If you’re having a hard time letting go, try writing a letter about it. You aren’t going to sleep anyway, so get out of bed and grab some paper or open up your computer. Address your letter to the person you’re angry with and pour out your heart. You don’t have to actually send it or share it and in many cases you probably shouldn’t. In my experience, anything you write while furiously angry should be kept private!

The simple act of putting it all down on paper is often enough to lighten your burden. It will also help you let go of your anger and make your peace.

In the last post, I wrote about the three types of prayer. How would these work in a situation like this, when it’s time for bed and you are stomping mad?

Vocal prayer is probably the one where you’ll start. If you think you’re going to surprise God with your anger and desire for vengeance, guess again. Read Psalm 94 and realize that you probably have nothing on the fury and righteous indignation of the Psalmist!  David ends this angry prayer with a firm statement that God will destroy his enemies. Eeek!

Seriously, you won’t upset God with your emotions, not even if you’re angry at God. Trust me on this one – I am still blessed and loved by Him and there was a time in my life when I literally prayed “I hate you! When I die, I’m going to get to Heaven one way or another and KICK you! Stop wrecking my life.” (Okay, that’s another post all together, isn’t it?)

Vocal prayer can help you get those feelings out. Cry, scream, fall on your face – I’ve done all of these.

And then, once you’re ready for it, pull out Scripture that speaks to where you’re at and spend some time in meditative prayer. Focus on that and work on bringing your anger under control. As I said, work through the Psalms. Just make sure that you read the entire Psalm you’ve selected instead of settling in on the angry parts that are often found at the beginning.

If you’ve calmed your mind, you may be ready to spend some time quietly enjoying God’s love.

As I said, it’s not as though you were going to sleep anyway!

A few hours of restful sleep without those negative thoughts floating around in your head is better than eight hours of tossing and turning, seething and stewing. And that will set you up for a much better day when you wake up.

Give it a try and see if you don’t become a much happier and more pleasant person when you start to refuse to go to sleep angry.

How to Prep Your Emergency Bunker for Any Type of Disaster

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A well-stocked and maintained emergency bunker gives you peace of mind. If a natural or man-made disaster were to occur, you could evacuate to the bunker and protect yourself and your family. Keep these four steps in mind in order to prepare your emergency bunker for any type of situation.

Rotating Stockpiled Items

Some stockpiled items have expiration dates. It is important to go through the supplies in your bunker about every three months and rotate those items. As things such as canned food, medications and batteries near their expiration date, put them into the rotation of things that you use on a routine basis. For example, if the jars of peanut butter and packs of batteries are close to the use-by date, bring them inside and use them up. This will reduce what you spend on household groceries and supplies, and you can use those savings to replace the emergency supplies.

Installing New Locks

Your emergency bunker is one of the most valuable parts of your home and property. Installing new locks helps to protect your investment of money and time in preparing the bunker. Some companies, like A Carolina Locksmith, know that a strong, durable lock also protects your family in case you need to use the bunker. Be sure to have vandal-proof and weatherproof locks installed that can be used on the inside and outside of the bunker.

Checking the Condition of Equipment

Every three months, check on the condition of the equipment in your emergency bunker. Look for signs of rust on metal tools. Apply lubricant to locks and motors. Check for signs of pest infestation or water intrusion into the bunker.

Adding Supplies and Equipment As Your Budget Allows

If you want to be prepared for any type of disaster, you will need a wide range of equipment. Prioritize the types of disasters that are most likely in your geographic area. You may wish to invest in respirators for a chemical or biological emergency or a bow and arrows set if you may have to live off the land. Continue adding supplies and equipment as you can afford to. Maintaining a well-stocked emergency bunker takes time and resources, but the peace of mind is worth the investment. Prioritize the most likely disasters for your area and focus your prepping efforts on those issues. Once you are prepared for the most likely emergencies, then you can expand your prepping activities to include other types of emergencies that could develop.

About the Author: Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook: @RachelleWilber