The 9 Most Nutrient-Dense, Long-Term Storage Foods You Can Stockpile

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The 9 Most Nutrient-Dense, Long-Term Storage Foods You Can Stockpile

Image source: Pixabay.com

 

There are many foods that store well, and many foods that are super-nutritious or have high caloric value, but the number of foods that store well and are especially nutrient- and calorie-rich are much fewer.

Calories without nutrients won’t satisfy your body, leading to continual hunger that will cause you to eat more calories than you need, while nutrients without calories will lead you to eat your food stores more quickly. The below foods offer a balance of these two considerations.

Also important, of course, is learning different storage techniques, such as dehydrating, fermenting, vacuum sealing, and canning. These are beyond the scope of this article, but are skills you’ll want to acquire to ensure these foods reach their full storage potential.

1. Nuts

Hazelnuts are among the most nutritious nuts in terms of balanced nutrition, and store quite well. They are high in vitamins E, K, B6 and folate. Other high-nutritious nuts include Brazil nuts (high in the all-important saturated fats, magnesium and selenium), cashews (a good source of carbs, zinc and iron), macadamia nuts (high calories in general especially fat), almonds (high protein, fiber, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin E and calcium), walnuts (high in fat and folate) pecans (also high in fat and very similar to walnuts), pistachios (high in potassium and vitamin B6) and chestnuts (high in carbs, fiber, vitamin C, folate, healthy fats, iron, calcium and manganese).

2. Seeds

Seeds are high in nutrients and are good sources of calories, including protein and fat. Good seeds include: chia (omegas, carbs, protein, fiber, antioxidants and calcium), hemp (good fats including omegas and high-quality protein), sunflower (vitamins E, B1 and B6, copper, manganese, selenium, magnesium, folate and niacin), pumpkin (magnesium, manganese, copper, zinc, protein and many others), sesame (manganese, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc, vitamin B1, selenium and fiber).

3. Moringa powder

This powder is available at health food stores and is a great good source of bioavailable nutrients, including calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, phosphorous, vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, C and E, in addition to protein.

Beet Powder: The Ancient Secret To Renewed Energy And Stamina

If you don’t feel like shelling out the money to buy the powder, then you also can find seeds online to buy and grow your own. If in a cold climate, you might even be able to get them to produce seed in one year if you start them indoors three months before the last frost. Hang them to dry, and crush them up or grind for storage.

4. Extra virgin coconut oil

Fat is crucial in survival situations, and coconut oil has a lot of high quality fat and, thus, calories. It can last at least 18 months if stored properly (don’t get the non-extra virgin stuff for long-term storage, as it won’t last as long), and can be used in many of the same ways as butter.

5. Dried fruit

The 9 Most Nutrient-Dense, Long-Term Storage Foods You Can Stockpile Fruits are high in sugar, which means high calorie content. Especially good are high-nutrition superfood berries like goji berries, raspberries, blackberries, mulberries and currants, which are all generally high in vitamins, including vitamins C, K, A and folate. Also excellent are cherries (good for vitamin A and many health promoting compounds), mango (very high in sugar, vitamins A, B6, C and E, copper, and potassium), banana (vitamins C and B6, niacin, riboflavin, and thiamin, plus sugar), grapes (raisins, which are high in sugar, B vitamins, iron and potassium), and many others.

6. Grains

Brown rice, wild rice and quinoa are among the most nutritious, and most can be stored for many years if stored properly. Grains are a good source of carbs, and most contain a lot of magnesium, B vitamins, iron, phosphorus, selenium and manganese. Grains combine well with legumes (see below) to create full proteins.

7. Legumes

Dried beans, peas and lentils all can be stored for many years and are good sources of protein, carbs, fiber and many minerals and vitamins.

8. Honey

Honey is packed full of nutrition and keeps very well, for decades or even centuries. It also can be used to preserve other foods. It’s high in calories and sugar, but is also quite high in vitamin B6, thiamin, niacin, pantothenic acid, iron, riboflavin, amino acids, calcium, copper, magnesium and many other nutrients.

9. Unwashed free-range farm eggs

Eggs, if left unwashed, contain a bio-film that helps to preserve them much longer. They can last up to three months out of the fridge and a year or more if refrigerated. Free-range eggs are higher in nutrients than caged chicken eggs, and also are high in vitamins A and E, omega-3 fatty acids, protein, fat and iron.

What foods would you add to our list? Share your suggestions in the section below:

 

3 Reasons To Carry A Full-Sized Pistol Instead Of A Compact One

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3 Reasons To Carry A Full-Sized Pistol Instead Of A Compact One

Concealed carry is a big responsibility, but before you can begin “packing heat,” you first need to select the right pistol.

The decision, of course, can be intimidating. There are an abundance of different guns to choose from, ranging from tiny pocket pistols to big full-sized firearms.

Most people will favor something small, such as a compact single-stack 9mm pistol or a pocket-sized .380. But I carry a full-sized pistol, specifically a Walther PPQ M2 in 9mm.

Why do I carry a full-sized pistol instead of something that would be smaller and easier to conceal?

Let’s examine that question.

1. Greater capacity.

The single biggest reason I favor conceal carrying a large handgun is the greater capacity in the magazine. The PPQ holds 15 or 17 rounds, depending on the magazine you use. Why is this important? The answer is that you may find yourself going up against multiple attackers, and in this scenario it’s always better to have more bullets than less. In contrast to full-sized 9mm handguns, the single-stack counterparts such as the Glock 43, S&W Shield, or Walther PPS hold 6, 7 or 8 rounds in the magazine.

2. Recoil control.

Another huge advantage to the full-size pistol is greater recoil control. Not only does the increased weight and size help dampen the recoil, but you will have improved control over the weapon, as well. It always will be easier to shoot a Glock 19 or 17 than it is a pocket pistol like a Ruger LCP or Kel-Tec P3-AT

 3. Versatility.

Finally, I also prefer a full-sized pistol for its overall versatility. While I can conceal carry the PPQ, I also can strap it to my hip for open carry for a sidearm when I venture out into the woods, such as for camping, hunting or motorcycle/ATV riding. In other words, I don’t have to buy one pistol for concealment and another for general purpose use. I can use one gun for both purposes.

The Self-Defense Weapon That Doesn’t Require A Firearms License!

Now, could you technically also carry a smaller pistol such as S&W Shield in this fashion? Sure, but most people would agree that a larger pistol is more preferable for general purpose outdoor use than a smaller one.

Next, let’s go over a couple of tips you can use to make conceal carrying a full-sized pistol as easy as possible.

Invest in a quality belt and holster

Quality holsters almost always cost more money, but they are well worth the investment. Factors to look for in a holster include rigidness, touch stitches or rivets, and the ability to hold the pistol tightly while also permitting a clean drawn. High-quality leather or Kydex works great for this; nylon or anything cheaply made will not suffice.

In addition, don’t forget to buy a high-quality belt. Avoid some dress belts, as they may not be able to support your holster, firearm, spare magazine(s), and whatever else you have for the whole day and could end up breaking. Instead, go with a thicker leather belt made specifically for supporting the increased weight of your gun and equipment.

Be conscientious about what you wear

A major goal of concealed carry, regardless of which firearm you are carrying, is to minimize or prevent printing. The best way to prevent printing of a full-sized pistol is to wear loosely fitted outer layers, such as a long and loose T-shirt, jacket or sweat shirt. In addition, the darker the color of the garment, the less the pistol will show. Remember: You don’t want to draw attention to yourself, so wear something that looks as casual as possible.

What do you prefer for concealed carry – a full-sized pistol or a compact one? Share your observations in the section below:

Why You Should NEVER Use Rows In Your Garden Again

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Why You Should NEVER Use Rows In Your Garden Again

I recently wrote about how I often do things in the garden just because that’s how I’ve always done them. For example, I always plant all my seeds and seedlings in one big push after the last frost date. That’s what my mom always did, and I learned how to garden by working alongside her. And so, I was surprised when a local friend told me that he planted peas about six weeks prior to the last frost date. He explained that he followed the directions on the back of the seed packet, which said to plant as soon as the soil was workable. Go figure. People actually read seed packages?

Maybe I need to re-evaluate my gardening methods.

There’s another thing I do just because that’s the way I’ve always done it: Plant my vegetables in rows. And you know what? I have raised beds. Rows aren’t the best choice for any home vegetable garden, and they certainly aren’t the logical choice for raised beds.

Yep, you read that correctly. Row cropping is a bad idea for home gardeners. Think about it:

  • Traditionally, there is a path on each side of every row to allow space to tend to the plants. Simply put, rows waste valuable space.
  • When you walk on the garden, the soil gets compacted. Soil compaction can cause a number of issues, such as:
    • decreasing water infiltration.
    • decreasing air within the soil (and roots need air to breathe).
    • making it difficult for roots to penetrate the soil and grow.
    • decreasing the amount of soil roots can reach in their quest for nutrients.
    • decreasing yields.
  • Unless drip lines are carefully rigged, irrigation water may be wasted on the space between rows.

There are actually a number of alternatives to row cropping, but they all boil down to one idea: intensive gardening, which eliminates wasted space and maximizes the space you do use. Plants grouped closely together create shade for each other and reduce water evaporation, essentially creating their own little microclimates. Plants grouped closely together also discourage weed growth.

1. Raised beds

By their nature, raised beds get around the issues of wasted space in the pathways and soil compaction. But, if you’re still planting rows in raised beds — like I am — you’re missing out on the benefits of intensive gardening. Raised beds are best used in tandem with square foot gardening, hexagonal spacing, and vertical planting, all explained further below.

2. Square foot gardening

In 1981, Mel Bartholomew revolutionized the idea of intensive gardening with his book Square Foot Gardening: A New Way to Garden in Less Space with Less Work. Square foot gardening is exactly what it sounds like: creating a large grid of 12-inch-by-12-inch squares and planting within each square.

Why You Should NEVER Use Rows In Your Garden AgainPlanning is necessary when gardening by the square foot. Larger plants like tomatoes and potatoes should be planted one per square foot, while smaller vegetables like radishes could be planted at a rate of 16 per square foot. Spacing in intensive gardening is different from the spacing recommended on seed packets, which is determined for row cropping.

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A little online research will turn up sites that provide guidelines for intensive spacing. Also, care needs to be taken in regards to which vegetables are situated next to each other. Short sun-loving plants shouldn’t be placed next to plants that will grow tall and bushy and create shade. And this is a great time to take companion planting into consideration as well.

3. Hexagonal spacing

Similar to square-foot gardening, hexagonal spacing maximizes space even further. Suppose someone challenged you to fit as many round dinner plates on a kitchen table as possible. Lining up all those round plates in a grid pattern produces a lot of wasted space. You can get more plates on the table if you shift every second row over just a bit so that rows are staggered. Now envision this same scenario with plants like cabbages, tomatoes or eggplants. That’s hexagonal spacing in the garden. It’s absolutely OK for the leaves of the plants to touch when planted in this way, and indeed it is ideal that they touch. Planting densely helps minimize evaporation and conserve water. It also keeps the ground shaded and cooler, and discourages weed growth.

4. Vertical gardening

Vertical gardening is again exactly what it sounds like: making use of vertical growing space by using trellising systems. Plants with vines that sprawl and take up a lot of space are ideal for vertical gardening. Cucumbers, melons, squash, peas and pole beans all can be grown vertically. Some plants are natural climbers and will grab onto any support system they can find. Others need to be trained and/or tied. And if the fruit grows large and heavy, it will need to be supported so that it doesn’t drop off the vine. The toe ends of old pantyhose work perfectly for this purpose.

Of course, plants grown in this way will cast shade. If you’re integrating vertical gardening with either square-foot gardening or hexagonal spacing, take care where you place your trellising system and which plants you plant nearby the climbers.

Final Thoughts

Regardless of which intensive gardening method you use, remember to fertilize! All those plants will be sucking up every nutrient they can find in your soil. It’s important to replenish the soil by fertilizing regularly.

Do you use any intensive gardening systems? If so, share your tips in the section below:

4 High-Fat Foods You Should Eat Every Single Day

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4 Fattening Foods You Should Eat Every Single Day

Image source: Pixabay.com

Just the mention of “fat” turns off people, but some fats are good for your health and are part of an essential diet.

Better yet, they can lower cholesterol, prevent heart disease, improve immune function, aid in liver and kidney functions, and keep our bodies fit and trim.

The key to using these fats is to learn how to cook with them while using the most desirable options.

Ready to learn what fattening foods you should add to your diet?

1. Avocados

Avocados are crammed with heart-healthy monounsaturated fat as well as antioxidants. A potent amount of monounsaturated fat aids in the reduction of low-density lipoproteins, otherwise known as “bad” cholesterol. Hence, eating avocados increases high-density lipoproteins or “good” cholesterol levels. Additionally, this incredible green fruit is full of vitamins, plant nutrients, and minerals which support the liver’s overall health. It also contributes to breaking down other kinds of fats.

It gets even better!

Avocados have a smooth, silky, texture that can be used as butter or an oil substitute. In fact, if you mash avocados good enough, you can use the paste as a substitute in recipes that call for mayo. Avocado paste can make any recipe calling for mayo, butter or oil that much healthier without the worry of unhealthy fats clogging your arteries.

The key to using avocados as a delicious mayo, butter or oil substitute is in knowing how to pick out the best avocados! While shopping, you will want to look for avocados without blemishes. Plus, make sure they don’t have dents in them, either. They should be all the same color — a greenish-black — if you are going to use them right away. This color indicates ripeness, which makes them easier to mash. Using ripe avocados will add the most enriched flavor to your dishes. However, if you are not going to be using the avocados right away, pick out the more greenish ones. This will give you a couple of days before you need to use them. If they do not ripen quickly enough, you can put them in a brown paper bag for about 12 hours.

2. Nuts

All nuts contain fat and oils that fringe with elegant, but robust, toasty flavors. Plus, nuts are perfect for adding texture and taste to any recipe.

Nuts contain “good” cholesterol and contribute to lowering “bad” cholesterol levels in the blood. Further, nuts contain protein and carbohydrates. Some variety of nuts are high in calories, but if you think you need to avoid them to maintain your weight, think again. Nuts actually make you feel full quicker than eating other foods with the same amount of calories because they contain dense calories. This means you eat less and feel fuller. This is perfect for those on a diet!

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Walnuts contain a high level of amino acid l-arginine, which aids the liver in detoxifying ammonia and the kidneys in removing waste. Walnuts also include omega-3 fatty acids and glutathione, which contribute to natural liver-cleansing methods.

4 High-Fat Foods You Should Eat Every Single Day

Image source: Pixabay.com

There are several ways to extract oil from nuts to use for cooking. The easiest for home use might be by using an oil press. Oil from nuts can go bad quickly, so keep it in a tightly sealed jar, and in a cool, dry place.

You also can mash up nuts to use as a flour or filler substitute. Additionally, nuts are great roasted, on salads, and mixed with veggies, as well

3. Fish and shellfish

The fats in fish are extremely healthy for your heart. Salmon, mackerel, tuna and sardines are all excellent sources of omega-3s. Further, fish and shellfish are high in protein and low in bad fats. Omega-3 fatty acids are crucial to keeping your arteries clean and free-flowing. Otherwise known as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), omega-3 fatty acids play an essential role in brain function. Omega-3s may reduce the risk of heart disease, as well.

The key is to buy high-quality fish and shellfish. First, find a trustworthy seafood merchant. Then, when choosing fish fillets, make sure that they are clear and have no slits in the flesh. If you can, buy the fish whole as opposed to cuts, as a whole fish is usually of a better quality. When buying a whole fish, check the gills to make sure they are red and the scales to make sure they are shiny. The eyes should be clear and bulging.

4. Extra virgin olive oil

Olive oil adds refined flavoring, texture and aroma to almost anything. It’s the perfect medium for sautéing and isn’t overpowering.

Olive oil that is truly extra virgin has a distinguishing taste and is potent in phenolic antioxidants, the primary reason why (real) olive oil is extremely valuable to your health.

Extra-virgin olive oil can be your go-to for finishing and as a salad oil. Pure olive oil should have excellent clarity, and it should also contain a tinge of green to show that it was prepped when the olives were fresh and ripe. Light can damage olive oil, so store it in a dark bottle.

What foods would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Sources:

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Cholesterol/AboutCholesterol/Good-vs-Bad-Cholesterol_UCM_305561_Article.jsp#.WNV2pfnyuUk

http://www.webmd.com/heart/arginine-heart-benefits-and-side-effects#1

http://bodyecology.com/articles/6_benefits_monosaturated_fats.php

https://authoritynutrition.com/extra-virgin-olive-oil/

http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/omega3-fatty-acids

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyEating/Nutrition/Polyunsaturated-Fats_UCM_301461_Article.jsp#.WNV2WvnyuUk

https://medlineplus.gov/antioxidants.html

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf8002174

No go shopping

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no go shopping

Are you ready for no go shopping? What is no go shopping you ask? It’s when you live out in the boonies and there isn’t a place to go shopping within a reasonable distance. Where I live, it’s 20+ miles into the nearest town, takes about a half hour if everything is going right, of course there is the stopping to chat with a neighbor on the road, then the stopping to chat with a neighbor at the mailboxes… then when you get to town, you are likely to find someone to chat with, and at the store, no getting around the fact that you will most likely find someone to chat with there, so going to town for a quick trip to the grocery store isn’t going to be quick after all.

Where I live, if you want to go anywhere with real shopping, I’m talking malls, big chain grocery stores, WalMart, Sam’s Club, real restaurants and the such, it’s a good 3 hour drive at highway speeds. It’s something we don’t do very often, maybe a monthly thing at best, it’s usually more a quarterly thing, well planned and executed, it’s at least a day trip and sometimes requires an overnight stay.

What do we get in return for no go shopping? Well, living where there aren’t many other people for one, it’s nice to not hear or see your closer neighbors most of the time. It’s quiet, dark at night, and private.

We have come to rely on delivery services for many of our purchases, besides groceries (I wish we could order more grocery items) we can order just about anything we could want out here. I am an Amazon Prime member, it’s paid for itself many times over, it’s something I pay for each year without fail. I know my UPS delivery driver by name, I know the FedEx drivers too, though they seem to go through many more of them than the UPS company. Of course there is also USPS, we all know our postal workers, the only problem is our mailboxes are some 6 miles from my home, so for me, it’s more convenient to order things that will come UPS or FedEx so it gets delivered directly to my home.

I don’t even mind the few day wait, I know if I were to go to the closer town to buy what I would order, first if it was even available, it would be very expensive, taxed and I’d still have to wait a day or two before I’d be able to go there. If I planned to go to the bigger farther town, it might be a week or more before I could get out there, so it’s better for me to order through Amazon Prime and get it in 2 days, delivered to my door.

I just ordered a pair of boots, some socks (gotta have new socks to go with the new boots LOL), and some 200 clear plastic 5X7 sleeves. The boots and socks are obvious, but what’s up with 200 clear plastic sleeves? I’m finally getting my photos printed up to sell in one of the shops in town, actually several shops, I need to protect the prints, I can’t imagine where all I would have to go to pick up just those 3 things in a physical store.

So what do you prefer, shopping in a brick and mortar store or shopping online? Let me know below 🙂

Hate shopping?
Survivalist shopping list

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Tasmanian Winery

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 winery self sufficient

Fiona Weller – unplugged her business

Increasing number of businesses are unplugging.

Tasmanian Wine label Moores Hill recently installed a multi-million-dollar on-site processing facility powered by 108 solar panels, making it the state’s first off the grid winery.

Winery director Tim High was excited to test it out this vintage. “It’s off the grid in terms of electricity, it’s off the grid in terms of water, it’s off the grid in terms of effluent treatment,” he said.

“Basically, this is a standalone, 100 per cent, self-sustained Tasmanian winery.”

Co-owner Fiona Weller said the winery will open the processing facility to visitors as a tourist attraction.

“We can take them out into the vineyard, they can taste grapes and then they can come into the winery and see grapes being fermented and taste wine from the tank,” she said.

“While the investment… is large, over the long term it’s a very positive investment.”

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Iran and Russia threaten War with U.S. if President Trump takes further Action in Syria

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Iran and Russia are threatening to take military action against the United States if President Trump takes further action in Syria. […]

The post Iran and Russia threaten War with U.S. if President Trump takes further Action in Syria appeared first on Off Grid Survival – Wilderness & Urban Survival Skills.

A Crisis of Freedom-Vault 7 and TSA Expansion of Groping and Molestation-Part 2

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Todd Sepulveda of Prepper Website and the new Prepper Website Podcast is back for the second half of our interview. We discuss the continued assault against freedom. We encourage Americans to write President Trump to demand reform of the TSA and end the massive intrusions of the surveillance state.

Everett and Courtney Carroll have survived the Seven Seal Judgments which devastated the planet. But have their efforts to stay alive been in vain? The next series of judgments to fall upon the earth are known as the Seven Trumpets.With each subsequent Trumpet Judgement their odds of living grow slimmer. If Everett and Courtney are to survive, they’ll need perseverance, faith, and a great outpouring of providence from The Almighty. Buy your copy of Wormwood in audio, paperback or Kindle edition today!

tpitw

Trading Post in the Woods is ran by veteran crisis responders who know how important it is to be prepared. They specialize in comprehensive natural survival remedy kits, preparedness and homesteading supplies as well as skills training. Visit them online today at TradingPostInTheWoods.com.

Fish_300x250_A

CampingSurvival.com has all of your preparedness needs including; bug out bags, long term food storage, water filters, gas masks, and first aid kits. Use coupon code PREPPERRECON to get 5% off your entire order at Camping Survival.

silver-195x195

The dollar has lost over 90% of its purchasing power since 1971. Silver, on the other hand, has proved to be a very stable form of wealth preservation over the years. Silver.com offers fantastic prices on silver and gold. Check out Silver.com today.

Ready Made Resources is a trusted name in the prepper community, because they’ve been around for 18 years. They offer great prices on Night Vision, water filtration, long term storage food, solar energy components and provide free technical service. Get ready for an uncertain future at ReadyMadeResources.com!

Happy Prepping!

Mark

 

 

Everett and Courtney Carroll have survived the Seven Seal Judgments which devastated the planet. But have their efforts to stay alive been in vain? The next series of judgments to fall upon the earth are known as the Seven Trumpets.With each subsequent Trumpet Judgement their odds of living grow slimmer. If Everett and Courtney are to survive, they’ll need perseverance, faith, and a great outpouring of providence from The Almighty. Buy your copy of Wormwood in audio, paperback or Kindle edition today!

tpitw

Trading Post in the Woods is ran by veteran crisis responders who know how important it is to be prepared. They specialize in comprehensive natural survival remedy kits, preparedness and homesteading supplies as well as skills training. Visit them online today at TradingPostInTheWoods.com.

Fish_300x250_A

CampingSurvival.com has all of your preparedness needs including; bug out bags, long term food storage, water filters, gas masks, and first aid kits. Use coupon code PREPPERRECON to get 5% off your entire order at Camping Survival.

silver-195x195

The dollar has lost over 90% of its purchasing power since 1971. Silver, on the other hand, has proved to be a very stable form of wealth preservation over the years. Silver.com offers fantastic prices on silver and gold. Check out Silver.com today.

Ready Made Resources is a trusted name in the prepper community, because they’ve been around for 18 years. They offer great prices on Night Vision, water filtration, long term storage food, solar energy components and provide free technical service. Get ready for an uncertain future at ReadyMadeResources.com!

Happy Prepping!

Mark

The post A Crisis of Freedom-Vault 7 and TSA Expansion of Groping and Molestation-Part 2 appeared first on Prepper Recon.

Can I park my RV in a WalMart store parking lot?

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As an occasional user of the free overnight camping/parking in a WalMart parking lots, I have noticed the WalMart near my home has put up new signs in the area where over-nighters normally park. Previously, there were no signs there at all but recently they have put up new signage stating “2 Hour Parking” and in-between those signs, additional signs that say “No Overnight Parking”.
Wondering why this change, I spoke with a WalMart employee and he said: “it’s because this WalMart does not own the building and parking lot and must abide by the rules of the landlord”. This store is part of a large strip-mall with a dozen other stores renting in it. My guess is some of the other stores wanted it stopped because some campers make the area look like a homeless ghetto (bad for business). Crime, where I live is escalating at a rapid pace, car break-ins, home invasions, and parking lot robberies are now common.

It’s a shame that we lose the ability to stay for free because of a few people abusing this great option. Van-Dwellers, people living in their cars or full-time RV’rs who simply have to or want to escape the government mandated lifestyle are being squeezed out of free places and the methods to live free. I fully expect the government will soon charge a hefty daily fee with short maximum stay’s on BLMLand simply because they want to punish us for living free from debt and politicians personal BS agenda of harassing people whenever possible.

Just my thoughts!

So, what’s the truth about WalMart overnight camping/parking?

I went to the WalMart corporate site and found this statement in their FAQ’s:

“While we do not offer electrical service or accommodations typically necessary for RV customers, Walmart values RV travelers and considers them among our best customers. Consequently, we do permit RV parking on our store parking lots as we are able. Permission to park is extended by individual store managers, based on availability of parking space and local laws. Please contact management in each store to ensure accommodations before parking your RV.”

Some parking lot photo’s including the new signage:

No Overnight Parking signs are posted along the entire fence of the west end of the parking lot. (where the overnighter’s park).

How to Shoot a Slingshot without Losing Accuracy?

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One of the best ways to improve hunting skills is to use a slingshot. But how to shoot a slingshot is something that not many of us know. But that’s okay because the learning process is pretty basic and easy. And most importantly, it’s essential that you learn how to use the tool properly if […]

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Drinking Too Much Water Nearly Killed Me

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“Drinking too much water nearly killed me!”

That’s how the story started on a first-aid course I was teaching. I was into the middle of my spiel on hyponatremia (water intoxication) when one of the students blurted out that statement.

“It occurred on an organized long distance bike ride,” he continued. “We were riding along a ridge and I started to feel sick and was developing a headache. I thought I was just dehydrated and needed to rest, so I drank more water, but the headache was getting worse. I knew something was wrong and needed to go to the hospital. Luckily I wasn’t alone on the ride and an aid station was near by.

The post Drinking Too Much Water Nearly Killed Me appeared first on outdoor self reliance.

8 Alternatives for When Technology Fails You

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Modern human civilization has become so reliant on technology that we almost can’t cope at all without it. When was the last time you had to deal with a power outage, and how long did it last? A phone with a cracked screen or terrible phone reception when you really needed it? While technology has […]

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Can’t Live without Coffee Once the SHTF: Sharpen Your Pencil and take Notes

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According to the statistics, Americans consume more than 400 million cups of coffee per day. That adds up to over 146 billion cups a year. The United States leads the way in coffee consumption in the world. Can you get along without your morning cup, or afternoon cup or one after dinner? First, however, you […]

The post Can’t Live without Coffee Once the SHTF: Sharpen Your Pencil and take Notes appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

Progress!

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Phil made some progress on the boat yesterday. He got some pressure treated wood and tore out the old decking and put in new. Plus a compartment for storage. We’ll have to wait until next week to look into getting new seats, battery, cover, water-proof lights for the trailer (they are broken) etc.

Gardening Made Easy – How To Create Simple Raised Row Garden Beds From Scratch!

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With simple raised row garden beds, you don’t to have break your back or the bank to have a great garden. Whether you are already an avid gardener, or want to grow vegetables for the first time, raised row garden

The post Gardening Made Easy – How To Create Simple Raised Row Garden Beds From Scratch! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

John 15:1-5

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“I am the true vine, … I am the vine, you are the branches; he who abides in Me and I in him, he bears much fruit, for apart from Me you can do nothing”.

     These are the opening words of John 15, a chapter that is very likely familiar to most Christians.  It speaks of Jesus as the vine, and our Father as the vinedresser; of branches — both those that bear fruit, and those who don’t.  It presents the image of pruned branches that grow to produce more fruit, and branches that dry up and are cast into the fire where they are burned. And throughout it all, Jesus talks about abiding … He in the Father; us in Him, and He in us.  Yes, we are familiar with this Chapter, but do we know what He was really saying, and why He picked this particular imagery?
     First of all, I wonder how many discern that this metaphor of the vine, vinedresser, and branches is part of the discussion Jesus has with His disciples during His last Passover supper?  And that ultimately, He is disclosing to them the desired relationship of Believers to Himself and the Father?
     When I researched the attributes and the actions of a Vinedresser, it began to be clearer to me why He used these symbols. A vinedresser is more than a mere farmer. Grapes are more than an annual crop. The vinedresser’s grape vines remain with him for decades. He comes to know each one in a personal way, much like a shepherd with his sheep. He knows how the vine is faring from year to year and which ones are more productive or vigorous than others. He knows what they respond to and what special care certain one’s need. Every vine has its own personality. And the vinedresser comes to know it over the years. The vinedresser cares for each vine and nurtures it, pruning it the appropriate amount at the appropriate times, fertilizing it, lifting its branches from the ground and propping them or tying them to the trellis, and taking measures to protect them from insects and disease.
     But it becomes even more interesting when we note that the nation of Israel is often symbolized as “a vine” in the Old Testament.  Psalm 80:7-19 pictures Israel as the vine “God brought out of Egypt”; depicting the Father as the gardener, and picturing Israel in a state of judgment and destruction, calling to God to be restored. Isaiah’s “Song of the Vineyard”, in Chapter 5, verses 1-7 clearly identifies the house of Israel as “the vineyard of the Lord of Hosts”, and the “men of Judah as His delightful plant”. Once again, Israel is depicted with great optimism and potential, but ultimately judged because of moral and spiritual failure. 
     Moreover, being in Jerusalem during the Festival of Passover, Jesus and His disciples would have observed the unmistakable imagery of the vine when they visited the Temple. I found it interesting that Josephus, the First Century Jewish scholar, wrote of this great golden vine that hung over the entrance to the Jerusalem temple. Josephus describes it: “The gate opening into the building was, as I say, completely overlaid with gold, as was the whole wall around it. It had, moreover, above it those golden vines, from which depended grape-clusters as tall as a man.”
     Further evidence in the Old Testament of this imagery can be found in Hosea 10:1-2, where Israel is depicted as “an empty vine”; throughout Ezekiel (Chapters 15, 17, and 19) as a rebellious vine, whose root was plucked up, and fruit devoured; and in Jeremiah 2:21, as a once “choice” or “noble” vine, which has turned into a wild, degenerate, and foreign vine. So, when Jesus refers to Himself as the “true” vine, His meaning would have been unmistakeable to these original hearers. 
     They would have been very familiar with the idea of the house of Israel as the “choicest” or “chosen” vine of God. But they also would have caught a specific use of grammar that escapes our 21st Century understanding.  To begin with, He uses the definite article to describe Himself. (The definite article, in grammar, is used to refer to a particular member of a group or class. It may be something that the speaker has already mentioned or it may be something uniquely specified). Thereby, Jesus is saying, “I am the vine, not a vine”.
     Jesus’s use of “true” to describe Himself as “the vine” God cares for, is pointing to the nation’s failure, but also to the fact of His own good and authentic, genuine relationship with God. Where the nation failed God, Jesus was the complete embodiment of everything they were supposed to be. This same concept is evident in the first chapters of Matthew. There, Matthew describes Jesus’ early life and experiences before beginning His ministry as a parallel to Israel’s history … Israel came out of Egypt to the Promised Land; so did Jesus. Israel was tempted for forty years in the wilderness, and failed. Jesus was tempted for forty days, and did not fail. He was clearly proclaiming His Messianic identity.
     But we cannot fail to understand the rest of this parable of the vine and the vinedresser, and how it pertains to us.  While the Old Testament passages I have noted tie the image of the vine to the nation of Israel, Jesus changes the perspective. He doesn’t focus on the nation of Israel and what it should have been; on the nation’s sins and responsibility. Instead, He shifts the focus to His disciples bearing fruit.  He wants to emphasize the relationship Believers have with the Father and the resulting fruitfulness that brings. Thus, His real focus is on the nature of the vine. 
     And since He is the vine, what is His nature? I believe the most concise description that Jesus gives us of His nature, is found in Matthew 28:18 … All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth.  That word “power” is the Greek word exousia and is defined as “in the sense of ability, and privilege; force, capacity, competency, freedom, mastery, superhuman, delegated influence; the power of authority”. That is what the Father gave to Jesus, so that He might be endued (empowered) to accomplish His Father’s work here on earth. 
     And since we are the branches that are supposed to grow and produce fruit from that vine, what is our nature to be?  Jesus tells us in this analogy of the vine … He abides in us; He and His nature are present in us.  We abide in Him; we press into Him until we become His nature. And the result? We bear much fruit!  But let us not get too full of pride. He makes it very clear that this exousia power and authority is only available through Him.  Apart from Him, we are unable to accomplish anything. But by acknowledging and exercising His nature within us, we have the power and authority to help grow the vine by producing more fruit — “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”
     We can do that because He is “with us always”; abiding in us. We are the branches that grow from the vine; branches that the Vinedresser nurtures, cares for, and prunes, and protects. We can perpetuate “The Vine” and His nature by demonstrating His nature that is in us — doing the things He did and accomplishing the works He achieved for the Father’s Kingdom. This important passage in the Bible is more than an interesting allegory.  It is showing us who we are to be!
     
     
     


     

How Long Does Shelf Food Really Last

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Just about any food item that you pick up is going to have a date that says something along the lines of “sell by,” “best if used by,” or “use by.” The question is, though, how important are those dates? Well, in some instances, they’re important. In others, not so much.

Baby formulas have strict dates on them – they’re about the only foods absolutely required by law to have them. Stores can’t sell them beyond that date and it’s not recommended that you use them beyond that, either.

Perishable Items

Perishable items such as milk, eggs, and meats should be used by the date on the package. Most meats have a “sell by” date, which means that the store or producer has likely figured that you’re going to keep it in your fridge for up to a week after that, so they allow a little wiggle room.

If you buy perishables that are within a couple of days of the “sell by” date, either use it or freeze it within a day or so just to be safe. It’s always a good idea, especially with meat, to eat it or freeze it within a few days of buying it even if you haven’t reached that date. (Poultry – 1-3 days, other meats, 3-5 days) It’s better to be safe than suffer food poisoning.

Now, if you’re talking about perishables that came from your farm, you may have a little more wiggle room.

Discover the ingenious recipes that helped our ancestors stay alive!

Eggs

Eggs most certainly last longer – It’s not uncommon for an egg to be a couple of weeks old by the time you buy them at the grocery store so if you’re pulling them straight from under the hen as soon as she lays it, you have some extra fridge time on those babies.

When you buy them from the store, you still have a minimum of 3-5 weeks that they’ll be good. Want to know if an egg is bad? Use the water test. If you put it in a container of water and it sinks, it’s fresh. If it sort of hover-floats with one end sticking up, but the rest trying to sink, it’s not so fresh anymore but edible. If it floats like your bobber in the middle of a choppy sea, toss it.

Milk

Milk, on the other hand, may not have any extra time, especially if you don’t pasteurize it – which we never did. The good thing about milk is that you don’t have to guess if it’s good or not. One solid swig of spoiled milk and there’s no doubt left in your mind! I’ve found that the “sell by” dates on my store-bought milk (oh how I miss the good stuff!!) usually allows me a week or so beyond it to drink it up.

Other foods, such as canned foods or shelf-stable foods, have the same tags, but this often has more to do with quality than safety.

For instance, I found a box of mac and cheese in the cabinet (I rarely cook that type of food, so it had been there awhile). The mystery cheese powder was a little dark and I found that the “best by” date was nearing. Like within a week. I mixed it up and, though I didn’t get sick, it didn’t taste that great. This is a good reason to practice the First-In-First-Out rotation method.

Food Preserved at Home

Food that you preserve at home has expiration dates, too, or at least some of them do. So, let’s talk about expiration dates, when they’re relevant, why they’re important, and how you can keep track.

The best way to determine if perishable foods are good is to look at them, feel them, and give them the sniff test. Bad meat will smell “off” and may look a little discolored and feel slimy. Especially with poultry, if you suspect it may be bad, pitch it – it’s not worth the risk.

If you ever run across a commercial can of food that’s bulging or leaking, toss it. If your home-canned goods are leaking or the seal has popped, toss it. If, when you open either commercial or home-canned goods, the food is frothy, discolored, milky, slimy, or smells off, toss it. Those are all pretty good signs that botulism is present.

After you throw it away, scrub your hands in hot, soapy water. That’s a bug that’s meaner than old Aunt Sally when she’s lost her teeth and her panty hose are twisted, and you don’t want to mess with it.

Canned Foods

I grew up on a farm and learned about food preservation early. We always canned enough to get us through for two years each season. That means that often, even when we rotated the foods out, we had foods that didn’t get eaten for several years because we may have overestimated.

Mom always said it was better to have too much put back than not enough. Of course, foods like apple pie filling didn’t usually last that long! We lived on a farm and we all hunted, which means that we had plenty of meat. We typically canned the majority of that. We’d make spaghetti sauce, canned meatballs, soups, and other meals in a jar, in addition to canning them separately.

Some we dehydrated into jerky, but that was usually just for fun – it never lasted more than a couple of days.

As far as home-canned foods are concerned, most “official” agencies will tell you that it’s good for anywhere from 5-10 years. Some even speculate that it’s good for up to 20. I loved the part in the movie “Holes” where the kid was trapped in the desert and lived off of 100-year-old canned spiced peaches that he dubbed “sploosh” because they were just mush.

I don’t know if I’d let my canned goods go quite that long, but I’d be comfortable eating them at 10 years, for sure. As a matter of fact, I have.

Dried Goods

Foods such as flour, salt, sugar, rice, and beans all have really long shelf lives. As a matter of fact, the only one in the bunch that really has an expiration date is the flour, and even it’s good for at least a year, though some say 6 months. As a baker, I can tell you that I’ve used flour that was a year old and it was fine.

That was all-purpose, though. When you get into the self-rising, it may go bad faster so do a test batch and add more salt and baking powder if you don’t get a good rise.

You can tell when flour goes bad because it gets a rancid smell to it and it may get oily or have a weird, sticky texture and off smell.

The most important step to take to getting the most mileage out of all of your dried goods is to store them properly: keep them in air-tight containers in cool, dark places.

Vacuum Sealing

I’ve taken to buying all of my cheese vacuum-sealed. The same thing goes for deli meat, if you can find it. Air is every food’s worst enemy because bacteria (except botulism) need air to grow. I even smash my packages of cheese, etc. flat and squeeze out as much air as possible, and it’s seriously increased my shelf time since doing that.

If you have a vacuum sealer at home, use it! Seriously, it can double or even triple the shelf life of food.

Dating

Sharpies are your friend. If you’re canning or preserving food at home, date everything that you make with the date that you made it. Then you know how long you’ve had it when you reach for it. For that matter, do the same thing with canned and shelf-stable foods that you buy at the store. Use either the date you bought it or the “best by” date. Then you don’t have to break out the magnifying glass to find the “best by” date.

FIFO

Organize your food so that the oldest food gets used first. This is easy to do by just putting the new food behind the older foods every time you bring in something new. Then you know for a fact that what’s in front is what you should use.

Finally, the shelf life of foods is most certainly affected by how you store it. Canned goods should always be stored in a cool, dark place. Milk, meat, and eggs should be refrigerated at about 35 degrees, and veggies should go in the crisper drawer because the temperature is different there, too.

Just as an aside, milk, butter, and other dairy products will freeze just fine, though they may separate a bit. The texture of your cheese may be a bit weird, too, but it should still taste fine. You can also home-can butter.

Knowing the shelf life of your foods is important, but what’s more important is knowing how to tell if they’re bad. If you even ask yourself, “Hmm. This looks/smells/feels weird. I wonder if it’s good?” then the answer is to toss it. Food poisoning is, at the very least, brutal until you get through it 5-8 hours later, and at its worst can be fatal.

Go forth and eat safely!

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If you can think of any tips or advice about food shelf life that I’ve missed here, please feel free to mention them in the comments section below!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia.