Portugal Community Seeking Participation

Click here to view the original post.

Hello, we are a couple with 20 ha of land in the heart of Portugal. Our project of a permaculture farm and community has started right now. We are looking for participiants of any age to divide our live and working on the countryside. We are starting from scratch and there are lots of possibilities for new members to realize ideas, projects and dreams.

 

The post Portugal Community Seeking Participation appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Permaculture with perks – builder, solar-installer, garden-lover

Click here to view the original post.

Hi I’m Stuart.

I’m 31 and I’m fed up, like a lot of people, of the mundane day to day spend, work etc bull. So for years I dream and done to an extent self sufficantcy . I m looking at land in Cataliona Spain for full organic permaculture set up. Plus I have a few buisness / new ideas to keep a bit of cash flowing as in this world how it is you need s little . But saying that I want a group of loving friendly people to help and join this adventure . And pretty much live life to the max 👍If you wanna know more about my ideas and what I m looking for you can email me and we can Skype etc to see if we’re on the same wave length I’m based in London uk at the moment but have looked at many spainish property’s this year alone , just looking for the right people . Email stuartoleary198666@hotmail.com cheers hope to speak soon

The post Permaculture with perks – builder, solar-installer, garden-lover appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

5 Fun Activities To Create A More Prepared Family

Click here to view the original post.
5 Fun Activities To Create A More Prepared Family

Image source: Pixabay.com

It’s the reason many big companies today are advertising to kids. It’s the reason app developers have stopped pandering to adults as a middleman to the children. It’s in the actions taken by nonprofits and institutions around the nation to create junior ambassadors. The children are the future. Their power simply cannot be denied.

But if we are not growing our own little ambassadors to fight for the cause of liberty and freedom, then how can we expect that heavy torch to be carried into the future? How can we expect the kids to be more self-reliant and independent? The answer is we cannot.

In this age of technological convenience, we must be creative if we hope to grip our children with seemingly ancient ideas of freedom and preparedness. With services like Amazon that deliver anything you ever could want to your doorstep, how can you convince them that doing things the hard way and the old way is needed?

So, what can we do to create a more prepared family?

Are You Prepared For A Lengthy Blackout? Get Backup Electricity Today!

Here’s one solution: Blend their interests and desires into activities that bring them closer to self-reliance and preparedness. You see, to be an effective teacher or parent you must carry at least a bit of deception in your arsenal.

Here are five activities:

1. Geocaching.

If you are looking to get the family outside and hunt for some “buried treasure,” there is really no substitute for geocaching. It’s a game of following coordinates via GPS on your smartphone to a location where someone has hidden a cache.

5 Fun Activities To Create A More Prepared Family

Image source: Pixabay.com

These caches contain very small items … and sometimes contain nothing. You can trade for items in the cache or just sign the booklet inside to let the next explorer know who was there before them.

Geocaching gets the kids outside and teaches them about the powerful method of hiding survival caches. Your survival caches may be filled with bullets and food storage, but these are a little more kid-friendly.

2. Self-defense.

Gone are the days when martial arts were exclusively for the tough guys. Even MMA gyms have incredible kid’s programs that teach them self-defense, among other great lessons. There is simply no better method than to throw them in a class with people their age who will quickly become their friends.

Spend time teaching your kids the good stuff. There are a lot of martial arts out there, but the fact is some are just more effective than others. Consider getting your kids into the following disciplines:

  • Muay Thai
  • Jiu Jitsu
  • Krav Maga

3. Minecraft.

5 Fun Activities To Create A More Prepared Family

Image source: Pixabay.com

Minecraft is a totally creative buildable universe where your characters can work together not just to build cool structures but also to craft all the tools you’ll need to do so. This crafting element helps kids understand the manipulation of base materials and how they can be turned into something useful.

Example: If you are going to put glass windows in your home, you must collect sand and place it in your furnace. To power your furnace, you either will have to mine coal or make charcoal from wood.

The survival mode also requires you to hunt or farm to feed yourself. You must build shelter to protect yourself from many of the enemies.

In Minecraft, you also will have an inventory to manage. This means you will only have so much room to keep items that you collect.

The game is a blast with kids, and there is no other outlet where you can combine so many survival principles in a fun and enjoyable night-in. All the while, they will be learning about things like resources, crafting, farming, disaster, recovery and adaptability.

4. Shooting.

If your kids are old enough to shoot, then this is one of the most important things you can do as a family.

Be Prepared! Store An ‘Emergency Seed Bank’ For A Crisis Garden

Our Second Amendment rights are constantly under fire, and we need a generation of responsible gun owners to take our place. If our kids are going to fight for our rights, they must understand the truth about what a gun is, what it’s capable of and — most importantly — how to safely own and use one.

5. Camping.

You can mutate your camping trips into bug-out trips. It’s a very easy scenario to pose to the kids. Make your camping adventures a little more impromptu and try to utilize as little convenience as possible. Take your bug-out bags and use what’s inside of them.

5 Fun Activities To Create A More Prepared Family

Image source: Pixabay.com

Challenge your kids to leave the electronics at home and bring with them only their wits. Of course, this will put more pressure on you to keep them entertained. Don’t worry; I have answers for that, too.

  • Navigation with a compass.
  • Finding wild edibles.
  • Firecraft.
  • Fishing.
  • Watching wildlife.

Camping is a no-brainer, but you can take it to another level if you are smart about how you spend your time.

There is an old saying: “Bait your hook with your heart and they will always bite.” When it comes to your family, it’s no different. Show them your passion and then compromise to make it fun for them.

What advice would you add? Share your tips in the section below:

Be Prepared For A Downed Grid. Read More Here.

Early American Dairy

Click here to view the original post.

Early American Dairy

Published on Apr 10, 2017

Today Hannah Zimmerman from Historic Locust Grove sits down with Jon to discuss the history of early American dairy, as well as demonstrating the process of making butter.

Locust Grove Website ▶▶ http://locustgrove.org/

Help support the channel with Patreon ▶ https://www.patreon.com/townsend ▶▶

Twitter ▶ @Jas_Townsend
Facebook ▶ facebook.com/jas.townsend
Instagram ▶ jastownsendandson

The post Early American Dairy appeared first on WWW.AROUNDTHECABIN.COM.

North Korea Threatens ‘WE’LL NUKE YOU’ – Trump ‘Sending an Armada’ to Confront the Threat

Click here to view the original post.

The North Korea State Media warned that the government of North Korea was ready to launch a ‘nuclear attack on the United States’ President Trump dispatches an “armada” to the Korean Peninsula […]

The post North Korea Threatens ‘WE’LL NUKE YOU’ – Trump ‘Sending an Armada’ to Confront the Threat appeared first on Off Grid Survival – Wilderness & Urban Survival Skills.

Utility Gun: 7 Reasons to own a Winchester 9422 in 22LR

Click here to view the original post.

I make no apologies for saying that a Glock 9mm pistol should be the first gun you should own.

The way I see it if a gun is going to save your life, the most likely situation you’ll be involved in will be one of self-defense against two legged predators. A Glock will do that for you. It will protect you in your home, and it will do it when out and about when carried concealed, something no shotgun or rifle can do. I can’t think of many cases of home defense shootings where a full magazine of 9mm wasn’t enough and a long arm would have made much of a difference. On the other hand I know of numerous cases of people getting killed because they weren’t unarmed and simply unable to defend themselves.

Now, a handgun is just one firearm in your battery. I suggest getting a semi auto rifle, some people will go for an AR, maybe an AK. Those that hunt will want to have a good big bore rifle for such purpose, usually a scoped bolt action rifle and most people will agree a 22 is a must have as well. In my opinion you are best served with a semi auto 22LR such as a Ruger 10/22 or a Marlin. Having said this, when it comes to a reliable, accurate, built like a tank dependable carbine that will fire any .22 rimfire, S, L and LR, then the Winchester 9422 is what you’re looking for.

The utility gun

There’s one niche that most people will try to fill and that’s the one of a utility gun. A gun that is more of a tool in your toolbox, reliable, durable but most of all intended to fullfill certain practical, mundane roles.

Typically the shotgun has been that multi purpose utility gun. Especially when it comes to pump action shotguns like the Mossberg 500 with easily replaced barrels you can get one with a long barrel for bird hunting and a shorter one for slugs and for home defense. In my opinion this combo makes for the swiss army knife of the gun world.

Very hot on its heels though is the venerable 22LR carbine. The humble 22 may not be as versatile as a 12 ga shotsell but the round has been perfected over the years into what is today the most cost effective round in the planet, making it arguably the best all-round utility gun in most households for the money. Utility being defined as “capable of being put to use” the uses for a 22 carbine are many:

  • Small game hunting (and then some). When push comes to shove, for the same value, weight and volume, nothing puts as much food on the table as a box of 22LR. The round is clearly intended for small game, but larger animals are often dispatched with a well-placed round and even killing larger game (far from ideal though) such as deer or even hogs is possible with headshots.
  • Pest control. Sure you can blast squirrels with a 12 ga shell, but the ammo is more expensive, both gun and ammo are heavier and they make more of a mess. When you want to keep it simple (and you don’t want to blow up everything around the tree rat you’re trying to kill) then 22 saves the day. With the right load it can be pretty quiet as well given the ability to shoot 22 shorts and its 20 inch barrel.
  • Target practice and plinking. 22LR lends itself nicely for that. These are great guns to learn the basics with. Its easy for new shooters to understand the basic working of the firearm and identify the different components and moving parts. The lever action also happens to be one of the most enjoyable guns to operate. The mechanism forces the new shooters to take their time rather than spray the target, preserving ammunition and making each shot count. The fantastic trigger, nice sights and option of mounting optics means you can squeeze a lot of accuracy out of it.
  • If there’s one brand I’ve seen in shooting ranges around the world, guns worn and weathered with almost no bluing left, yet still running and running well, that would be Winchester. 22s can be picky at times, liking some ammo more than others, or downright refusing to run reliably all together unless certain ammo is fed. While semi auto is faster, in exchange for that speed the Winchester lever action gives you unparalleled reliability. Any .22 you feed down that tube will run.
  • Rimfire options. Unlike a Ruger 10/22, the Winchester 9422 can fire 22 S, L and LR. This can be quite an advantage when getting by with whatever ammo you manage to scrounge, again the lever action mechanism being a plus when dealing with older ammo that may not be in ideal condition.
  • The Winchester 9422 isnt the lightest of 22s, but it can be easily broken down in a more compact package. It’s easy to fit in a backpack along with a few hundred rounds of ammo and carry it without breaking your back.
  • Last ditch self-defense. 22LR sure isnt what you want for self-defense. Even if that’s what you have, a 22 semi auto with a large capacity mag would clearly be a better option. Still, when combined with a handgun, the Winchester gives you a platform to easily reach out and touch someone that happens to be further away and the 15 round magazine gives you a nice supply of ammo. Although there clearly are better options and you should have a fighting rifle in your battery, I wouldn’t like to be running around a field with someone taking shot at me with the Winchester 9422.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”.

Island Breath — Exposing the Death Of the Pacific Via Fukushima

Click here to view the original post.

http://islandbreath.blogspot.com/2017/03/collapse-of-pacific-salmon-run.html Collapse of Pacific Salmon run SUBHEAD: The meltdown of three Fukushima nuclear power plants continue to reverberate across the Pacific Ocean. By Admin on 19 March 2017 for ENEnews – (http://enenews.com/report-hundreds-of-millions-of-pacific-salmon-missing-presumed-dead-govt-issues-emergency-order-along-us-west-coast-japan-suffering-historic-collapse-fish-starving-to-death-all-forms-of) Image above: Mouth of the Klamath River near Klamath, California. From (http://www.heraldandnews.com/news/local_news/worst-klamath-chinook-run-on-record-forecast/article_dcbaf22f-f694-5bee-9c76-c7a7c1ea2647.html). [IB Publisher’s note: Certainly global warming, and other factors like tsunami debris, plastic gyres, military operations, over fishing and other factors are contributing to ocean die-off – we believe that the lack of any mitigation of Fukushima radiation entering the Pacific stands in the way of possible recovery of ocean life. The collapse of northern Pacific Ocean salmon population continues. We recommend not eating fish that has spent time in radioactive waters. See Ea O Ka Aina: Hawaii Seafood Guide. That would include all salmon caught off the west coast of the United States.] Report: Hundreds of millions of Pacific salmon missing, presumed dead — Government issues emergency order along US West Coast — Japan suffering historic collapse, fish starving to death — All forms of ocean life dying in stunning numbers across Pacific. South Yuba River Citizens League (SYRCL), Mar 16, 2017 The low salmon run size for the Yuba River appears to be part of another regional salmon collapse. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife point to preliminary data from the Sacramento River that indicates salmon runs have also dropped to record low levels. According to Dan Bacher’s reporting, last year’s salmon run on the Klamath River was a 38-year low… Gary Reedy, SYRCL’s consulting salmon expert reports that “A new crash for the Central Valley Chinook salmon is not unexpected.”… Mendocino Beacon, Mar 16, 2017: Returns of spawning Klamath River fall Chinook are projected to be the lowest on record in 2017… “The salmon runs this year will present a challenge for ocean fishermen and managers throughout the West Coast,” said Executive Director Chuck Tracy… “the low forecast for Klamath River fall Chinook is unprecedented”… “This year will be an exceptionally difficult year for ocean salmon fisheries, especially in Oregon and California”… said Council Chair Herb Pollard. The Oregonian, Mar 15, 2017: The worst run forecast on record for the Klamath River’s chinook salmon could close all salmon fishing along most of the Oregon Coast this summer… Juneau Empire, Mar 6, 2017: Spring king fishing canceled by emergency order… the Juneau area will be closed for king salmon fishing… biologists expect a second-straight year of record-low king salmon returns on the Taku River. “We’ve been in a period of low productivity, not just on the Taku, but on several rivers up and down the coast,” Juneau Area Management Biologist Daniel Teske said… Nobody knows exactly why Southeast king salmon are struggling, but biologists do know where the fish are being affected: in the ocean… The increased die-off must be happening in a marine environment, Teske said, otherwise numbers on the four rivers wouldn’t fall at the same time… Minato-Tsukiji, Mar 3, 2017: The harvest in Hokkaido was the worst in 24 years… Beginning with the Sanriku area, landings all over Honshu were below those of the previous year… The number of returning four-year-olds, which are regarded as the main shoal, was a record low… Russ George, Feb 3, 2017: Hundreds of Millions of Pacific Salmon Missing and Presumed Dead — Across 10,000 miles of North Pacific ocean pasture declarations from Japan and the USA are reporting a cataclysmic collapse of Pacific Salmon. The fish are tragically starving at sea as the plankton pastures have turned into clear blue lifeless deserts… Collapse of North Pacific ocean fish pastures has resulted in near total collapse of Pacific Salmon… It’s not just Pacific salmon that are dying in the North Pacific all forms of ocean life are being reported dead and dying [in] stunning numbers… Undercurrent News, Feb 1 , 2017: Japanese salmon fisheries in historic collapse — Landings in Hokkaido, Japan are the lowest in nearly three decades, reports the blog RussGeorge.net. The volume of salmon caught at main fishing ports, including Hokkaido, plunged 30-40% in 2016 from the previous year. The figure represented the lowest level in 28 years. The collapse has been confidently attributed to the starvation of four-year-old Chum salmon… Hokkaido Shimbun, Jan 31, 2017: Salmon landings in Hokkaido in 2016 are the lowest in three decades — The number of salmon caught in Hokkaido in 2016 plunged 29.4% from the previous year… The figure represented the lowest level in 28 years… Local fishermen have been increasingly concerned over the fact that the trend of meager catch that continued in recent years has not been held in check… Russ George, Jan 31, 2017: News from Japan is terrible for NW Pacific fish… Local fishermen have been increasingly concerned over the fact that the trend of meager catch that continued in recent years has not been held in check and indeed is worsening every year… Given the shortfall of fish and the scrawny condition of the fish that were caught all evidence points to a cataclysmic collapse of ocean pasture primary productivity and fish starving at sea… Across the Pacific ocean salmon pastures have failed… See also: Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima worse than ever 2/5/17 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima cleanup cost to double 12/9/16 Ea O Ka Aina: Tokyo damaged by nuclear pellet rain 9/24/16 Ea O KA Aina: Nuclear Power and Climate Failure 8/24/16 Ea O Ka Aina: High radioactivity in Tokyo 8/22/16 Ea O Ka Aina: Nuclear Blinders 8/18/16 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima and Chernobyl 5/29/16 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima radiation damages Japan 4/14/16 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima’s Nuclear Nightmare 3/13/16 Ea O Ka Aina: Fifth Fukushima Anniversary 3/11/16 Green Road Jounral: Balls filled with Uranium, Plutonium 2/19/16 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima impacts are ongoing 11/8/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Petroleum and Nuclear Coverups 10/21/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Radiation Contamination 10/13/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Radioactive floods damage Japan 9/22/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fir trees damaged by Fukushima 8/30/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Japan restarts a nuclear plant 8/11/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima disaster will continue 7/21/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Too many fish in the sea? 6/22/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima prefecture uninhabitable 6/6/15 Ea O Ka Aina: In case you’ve forgotten Fukushima 5/27/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Radiation damages top predator bird 4/24/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukshima die-offs occurring 4/17/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Impact Update 4/13/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima – the end of atomic power 3/13/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Where is the Fukushima Data? 2/21/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fuku-Undo 2/4/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima MOX fuel crossed Pacific 2/4/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima worst human disaster 1/26/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Japan to kill Pacific Ocean 1/23/15 Ea O Ka Aina: Japan’s Environmental Catastrophe 8/25/14 ENE NEws: Nuclear fuel found 15 miles from Tokyo 8/10/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Earthday TPP Fukushima RIMPAC 4/22/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Daiichi hot particles 5/30/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Japanese radiation denial 5/12/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Entomb Fukushima Daiichi now 4/6/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Disaster 3 Years Old 4/3/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Tsunami, Fukushima and Kauai 3/9/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Japanese contamination 2/16/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Bill for Fukushima monitoring 2/9/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Tepco under reporting of radiation 2/9/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Fallout in Alaska 1/25/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima engineer against nukes 1/17/14 Ea O Ka Aina: California to monitor ocean radiation 1/14/14 Ea O Ka Aina: Demystifying Fukushima Reactor #3 1/1/14 Ea O Ka Aina: US & Japan know criticality brewing 12/29/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Forever 12/17/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Brief radiation spike on Kauai 12/27/13 Ea O Ka Aina: USS Ronald Reagan & Fukushima 12/15/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Pacific Impact 12/11/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Berkeley and Fukushima health risks 12/10/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Madness engulfs Japan 12/4/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Edo Japan and Fukushima Recovery 11/30/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Reaction to Fukushima is Fascism 11/30/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Radioisotopes in the Northern Pacific 11/22/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima cleanup in critical phase 11/18/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima fuel removal to start 11/14/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima, What me worry? 11/13/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Remove other Fukushina fuel 10/29/13 Ea O Ka Aina: End to Japanese Nuclear Power? 10/3/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima & Poisoned Fish 10/3/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fuel Danger at Fukushima 9/27/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Reactor #4 Spent Fuel Pool 9/16/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima is Not Going Away 9/9/13 Ea O Ka Aina: X-Men like Ice Wall for Fukushima 9/3/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima House of Horrors 8/21/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Apocalypse 8/21/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Radioactive Dust 8/20/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Cocooning Fukushima Daiichi 8/16/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima radiation coverup 8/12/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Leakage at Fukushima an emergency 8/5/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima burns on and on 7/26/13 Ea O Ka Aina: What the Fukashima? 7/24/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Spiking 7/15/13 Ea O Ka Aina: G20 Agenda Item #1 – Fix Fukushima 7/7/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima and hypothyroid in Hawaii 4/9/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Japan to release radioactive water 2/8/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima as Roshoman 1/14/13 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushia Radiation Report 10/24/12 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Fallout 9/14/12 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Unit 4 Danger 7/22/12 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima denial & extinction ethics 5/14/12 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima worse than Chernobyl 4/24/12 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima dangers continue 4/22/12 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima children condemned 3/8/12 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima fights chain reaction 2/7/12 Ea O Ka Aina: Tepco faking Fukushima fix 12/24/11 Ea O Ka Aina: The Non Battle for Fukushima 11/10/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Debris nears Midway 10/14/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Radiation Danger 7/10/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Abandoned 9/28/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Deadly Radiation at Fukushima 8/3/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima poisons Japanese food 7/25/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Black Rain in Japan 7/22/11 Ea O Ka Aina: UK PR downplays Fukushima 7/1/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima #2 & #3 meltdown 5/17/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima sustained chain reaction 5/3/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Ocean Radioactivity in Fukushima 4/16/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Japan raises nuclear disaster level 4/12/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima No Go Zone Expanding 4/11/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima to be Decommissioned 4/8/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Poisons Fish 4/6/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Learning from Fukushima 4/4/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Leak goes Unplugged 4/3/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Stick a fork in it – It’s done! 4/2/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima reactors reach criticality 3/31/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Non-Containment 3/30/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Meltdown 3/29/11 Ea O Ka Aina: Fukushima Water Blessing & Curse 3/28/11

Cyber Security and Prepping

Click here to view the original post.

Cyber Security is the body of technologies, processes, and practices designed to protect networks, computers, programs, and data from attack, damage, or unauthorized access. Cyber and security do not belong in the same sentence anymore today. Given what we as individuals may have experienced and what we have seen happen to large companies, retailers, and the […]

The post Cyber Security and Prepping appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

Russia Warns: It And U.S. ‘One Step Away’ From War

Click here to view the original post.
Russia Warns: It And U.S. ‘One Step Away’ From War

Image source: Wikimedia

Some of America’s top enemies have sided with Russia in pledging to defend Syria following the U.S. missile attack on that country.

The U.S., for its part, isn’t backing down.

“We’re calling [Russia and Iran] out,” Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations,  told CNN. “But I don’t think anything is off the table at this point. I think what you’re going to see is strong leadership. You’re going to continue to see the United States act when we need to act.”

Haley’s words were prompted by statements of support for Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad from Russia and Iran. The two governments were joined in their support for Assad by the Lebanese terrorist group Hezbollah, the Associated Press reported.

Are You Prepared For A Lengthy Blackout? Get Backup Electricity Today!

“Both sides [Russia and Iran] noted the inadmissibility of aggressive U.S. actions against a sovereign state in violation of international law,” a Kremlin press release stated. “[Russia’s] Vladimir Putin and [Iran’s] Hasan Rouhani spoke in favor of an objective, unbiased investigation of all the circumstances of the chemical weapons incident on April 4 in the Syrian province of Idlib.”

Russia has implied that the chemical attack – which prompted the missile strike – never happened. On Tuesday, the White House alleged that Russia had helped Syria cover up the chemical attack.

Dmitry Medvedev, Russia’s prime minister, earlier said the U.S. was “one step away from military clashes with Russia”

Rouhani, Iran’s president, even called Assad to voice his support for Syria. Iran has troops from its Revolutionary Guard fighting for Assad in Syria’s civil war. The Russians have been supplying Assad with air support, artillery and technical advice.

Trump ordered the strike in retaliation for a nerve gas attack on the city of Khan Sheikhoun that killed around 70 people.

War Talk Escalates  

This prompted calls from U.S. allies for Assad’s removal.

“I am very clear that there can be no future for Assad in a stable Syria, which is representative of all the Syrian people,” UK Prime Minister Theresa May said.

But some in the U.S. say the White House should think twice about more military action.

“When the Trump administration uses the words ‘regime change,’ they are talking about a military effort to remove Assad,” U.S. Sen. Ed Markey told CNN. “And that would mean putting American young men and women on the ground in battlefield conditions in order to accomplish that goal. I don’t think there’s any appetite in the United States for a massive additional military presence.”

Do you think the U.S. should try and remove Assad? Share your thoughts in the section below:  

9 Strategies for Self-Sufficient Living

Click here to view the original post.

9 Strategies for Self-Sufficient Living There is something so wonderful about these listicle style articles. I really like reading them. They are easy to digest and bring lots of great ideas to the forefront. This article is no different. These are not concrete things to be done like BUY CHICKENS GET SOLAR POWER Instead this …

Continue reading »

The post 9 Strategies for Self-Sufficient Living appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Make Your Own Butter

Click here to view the original post.

Make Your Own Butter Most people think that butter is something magic that can only be found in refrigerated display cases. The fact is we have been making butter for a very long time. Its a skill that is not often taken advantage of because the access to heavy whipping cream is limited to what …

Continue reading »

The post Make Your Own Butter appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Self defence laws put Australians at risk.

Click here to view the original post.
Statewide man hunt ends in Tamworth pub after woman stabbed in face, and neck.

Yet another home invasion and the occupant left helpless to defend herself against a stronger attacker. In Australia it is now illegal to use a firearm in the defence of self and family. It is illegal to carry anything outside the home for self defence. The government would sooner citizens were murdered than attackers harmed or killed. Why is that?

The Post Collapse World Will Be Violent and Brutal

Click here to view the original post.

The Post Collapse World Will Be Violent and Brutal Brutal is the key word with this article. If you have a weak stomach or if you are opposed to seeing violence and even death this article is gonna bring all of that to you both in video format and the linguistic. BE WARNED!  Beyond that, …

Continue reading »

The post The Post Collapse World Will Be Violent and Brutal appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

How To Create And Maintain An Indoor Worm Composting Bin

Click here to view the original post.

Worm composting (aka vermicomposting) is a great way to recycle your kitchen scraps into a powerful nutrient mix for your garden. Many people create indoor worm composting systems either for convenience or to protect the worms from the cold. Some people even keep the bins right under the kitchen sink for the ultimate in convenience.…

The post How To Create And Maintain An Indoor Worm Composting Bin appeared first on The Weekend Prepper.

Statistically Relevant Scientific Proof That Chernobyl and Fukushima Are Highly Damaging to Plants and Animals and Microbial Population

Click here to view the original post.
Published on Apr 9, 2017
Dr. Timothy Mousseau, Professor of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina. Mousseau discussed his many studies on the health impacts on wildlife and biota around Chernobyl and Fukushima which soundly debunk the notion that animals there are “thriving.”

15 Most Nutritious Plants To Grow In Your Garden

Click here to view the original post.

When planning a survival garden, you can’t just focus on the number of plants you can grow–you also have to think about the nutritional value of those plants. Most survival food isn’t very nutritious due to all the processing and preservatives, so it’s a good idea to supplement your stockpile with healthy produce from your […]

The post 15 Most Nutritious Plants To Grow In Your Garden appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Don’t Move to These States; They’re in Serious Financial Trouble

Click here to view the original post.

Maybe you’re looking for a fresh start. Or perhaps you’re looking to find a different job, or you’re trying to get out of the city. Whatever the case may be, when you’re looking for a new place to live there’s a lot to consider. And if you’re thinking of crossing state lines to find a new home, there’s one vitally important detail that you need to think about and research.

Most people don’t consider this, but you should really look into the financial stability of any state that you’re thinking about moving to. If worse comes to worse, and the economy collapses, you want to make sure that the state you live in is fiscally responsible. States that have high debts and low credit ratings are living on the edge. Any major economic event could push them into bankruptcy.

That means pensions could go unfunded. Public services like law enforcement and firefighting would be understaffed. The infrastructure of the state would crumble, and public education would be decimated. Taxes would likely be increased, which would only exacerbate the financial problems of the state because businesses would leave, leading to more unemployment and a smaller tax base. Obviously, all of these factors could contribute to the risk of civil unrest.

In other words, any financial calamity that occurs at the national level, would be magnified at the state level.  The economy of these states would fall into a tailspin, which would make life for the average person exceedingly difficult.

So which states should you avoid? There are three factors you should look out for. There’s the amount of debt as a percentage of the state’s GDP, the amount of debt per person (debt per capita), and the state’s current credit rating.

The 10 states with the worst debt to GDP ratios are:

  • New York-22.71%
  • South Carolina-21.31%
  • Rhode Island-19.40%
  • Washington-18.83%
  • Florida-18.65%
  • Kentucky-18.50%
  • Illinois-18.45%
  • Connecticut-17.52%
  • California-17.18%
  • Pennsylvania-17.17%

The 10 states with the most debt per person are:

  • Massachusetts-$11,337.63
  • Connecticut-$9,297.33
  • Rhode Island-$8,919.27
  • Alaska-$8,516.41
  • New Jersey-$7,517.15
  • New York-$7,040.97
  • Hawaii-$6,194.64
  • New Hampshire-$6,152.00
  • Delaware-$5,962.86
  • Vermont-$5,259.69

And perhaps the most important factor is the credit rating of any given state. This gives you a good idea of how investors think a state will fare financially in the future, as opposed to a state’s current financial woes. According to credit rating agencies like Standard and Poor’s, as of last year the states with the five worst credit ratings are:

  • Illinois-BBB
  • New Jersey-A
  • Kentucky-A+
  • California-AA-
  • Connecticut-AA-

Though those ratings don’t look too bad, it’s important to keep in mind that those states have had sub-par credit ratings for a long time. There’s no indication that they’re going to get their act together any time soon, because they’ve been teetering on the edge for years. When the next wave of the economic collapse hits, these states (along with states that topped the first two lists, such as New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, South Carolina, and Connecticut) are going to be the first to feel the pain.

Think of it like this. If a storm arrived and threatened to flood a community, the homes that were built in low-lying areas are going to be underwater first. These states are like the houses near the river. So if you’re planning to move, look into the financial stability every state you’re considering, and seek higher ground.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Top 50 Long Distance Hiking Trails In The USA (link)

Click here to view the original post.

Looking for a new hiking adventure this coming summer? Try one of these 50 beautiful trails found all throughout the continental United States. Granted, they’re a bit too long for me (by about a few thousand miles in some cases… just as my wife) but if you’re into extended scenic trips then I’m sure you’ll … Continue reading “Top 50 Long Distance Hiking Trails In The USA (link)”

Medicines and a Nanny State

Click here to view the original post.

Just recently a friend has been having issues with pain. He is suffering from stomach pains and the NHS can’t find anything wrong. They have performed several tests, scans and nothings shows up. They are stumped.

He is taking new pain killers to reduce the pain although they only reduce the pain not eliminate it […]

Tips for Using Emergency Generators

Click here to view the original post.

Tips for Using Emergency Generators A backup generator can be a godsend during power outages, but making sure you’re prepared takes more than just buying one and “waiting for a rainy day.” In addition to making sure you understand how much power your property needs to function, you’ll want to make sure you get a …

Continue reading »

The post Tips for Using Emergency Generators appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

4 Careers That Teach Individuals Basic Self-Defense and Endurance

Click here to view the original post.

If you are looking a new, exciting, and rewarding career then you might want to focus you energy on enter a field that requires self-defense and endurance. Modern society is in constant need of professional and trained men and women that can bring safety and security to local communities around the country. As you think about this, consider the following four careers that teach individuals basic self-defense and endurance.

Law Enforcement Officer

To keep our communities safe, it is important to have law enforcement officers who are self-confident, physically fit, and able to combat the evil forces that lurk among us. A police officer is supposed to be defender of all that is right within society, but unfortunately, that doesn’t always happen. But nonetheless, proper training still keeps good cops safe. It is important to have self-defense and endurance skills in order to stay safe on the job as well.

Correctional Officer

A correctional officer is tasked with helping protect society from criminals that have already been found guilty. It can be a dangerous environment at times, so prison guards certainly need to be able to defend themselves. It is also important to have the endurance necessary to see the job through to the end of the day.

Security Guard

With more and more businesses need round the clock security, guards play an important role. Not only to keep the premises and the surrounding area safe, they function as a hedge of protection for the individuals that visit the building during working hours. Some companies, like Trident Security, know that because of this, security guards need to be trained in self-defense in order to keep themselves safe in a variety of situation. They also need to be fit because of the demands of the job on a daily basis.

Muay Thai Instructor

Muay Thai is a traditional martial art that is growing popularity throughout the West. Muay Thai instructors must know how to defend themselves, because this is exactly what they will be teaching their students. In addition, the career itself is highly rewarding. Where else can you get paid to stay fit? This sports requires a great deal of endurance. If you have what it takes, you will have a great career opportunity at hand. These are just four of the many rewarding careers that one can enter and learn self-defense and endurance skills at the same time. These sure beat sitting at a desk all day, and all of them put you out there with members of society. This is also a great way to stay in shape and remain healthy as well.

About the Author: Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook: @RachelleWilber

DIY Solar Oven Prototype 1

Click here to view the original post.

DIY Solar Oven Prototype 1 Cooking is an everyday part of survival unless you’re happy to crouch in the dark eating straight from a cold can of beans. Collecting firewood isn’t too hard – but in a long term survival situation, you’ll have to travel farther and farther to find the fuel you need, especially …

Continue reading »

The post DIY Solar Oven Prototype 1 appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Introducing “Free at Last”, a Memoir by Glenn W. Martin

Click here to view the original post.

                  

     Christians aren’t immune to fear or to depression.   On a survivalists forum, I think most of us know this.

                          The following book is the story of Glenn W. Martin who overcomes both issues.

https://www.amazon.com/Free-at-Last-Glenn-Martin/dp/1498498779/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1491918315&sr=8-1&keywords=Free+at+Last%3A+++Glenn+W+Martin

           This is a quick and inspiring read with true wisdom that is all too easily forgotten during our journeys here on Earth.

Stinging Nettles: The Delicious Spring Edible ‘Weed’ That Is Easily Tamed

Click here to view the original post.
Stinging Nettles: The Delicious Spring Edible ‘Weed’ That Is Easily Tamed

Image source: Pixabay.com

Stinging nettles are a common forest plant found in Northern regions around the globe. They prefer rich soil near the edges of streams, lakes, springs and other sources of cool, clean water. Although they can be a nuisance for any person tromping through the woods in shorts, stinging nettles are an incredibly versatile and important wild edible.

Most people in our society no longer view nettles as a plant of value, but for early homesteaders and Native f of the nettle was used for treating joint pain and inflammation. Clearly, stinging nettle is a plant with multiple purposes.

So how does one find, harvest and utilize nettles? First, it is important to properly identify this plant in the wild. Nettles are characterized by the following features:

  • Nettles grow in dense clusters or groves near water and begin to emerge shortly after snowmelt in the spring.
  • Young nettle leaves have a heart-shaped appearance and may exhibit a purplish tint.
  • Leaves are opposing in orientation along the stem, and range between two and five inches in length, with serrated edges and a pointed tip.
  • Veins of the nettle leaves are indented.
  • Nettles have small, glassy hairs on the underside of their leaves and along their stems.
  • At maturity, nettles can be more than five-feet tall.

Remember to collect nettles only from pristine environments, away from roads or any source of pollution and contamination. The tastiest portion of stinging nettles is the new leaves at the growing tip. Whenever possible, harvest nettles during the early part of the spring after they have first emerged from the soil. Look for plants that have eight leaves or less.

Fast, All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effects!

Stinging Nettles: The Delicious Spring Edible ‘Weed’ That Is Easily Tamed

Image source: Pixabay.com

It is OK to harvest leaves from older plants, but they won’t be as tender or as sweet. To harvest nettles, it is best to wear a pair of gloves and a long-sleeved shirt. While holding the topmost leaf, clip the stem just below the first whorl of leaves, either with scissors or garden clippers. The stems tend to be fibrous. Avoid cutting too much stem material. In the case of more mature plants, you will want to strip the leaves away from the stem altogether. Nettles can be stored loosely in a plastic bag in the fridge for several days before use. To preserve the quality of the nettles, do not rinse until just prior to processing.

The sting of the nettle plant comes from a combination of formic acid, histamine and several other chemical compounds that the plant uses as a defense mechanism against browsing herbivores. The modified hairs on the underside of the leaves and along the stem are used to inject this stinging solution into the skin. Nettles will lose their ability to sting when they are properly prepared.

When you are ready to eat your nettles, blanch them in hot water for five minutes and drain. (The blanching water makes a great tea or can be used a base for a vegetable stock, so don’t throw it out). The nettles now have lost their “sting” and can be used in place of spinach for most recipes, including lasagna or pasta sauce. Use stinging nettles in place of basil for pesto (freeze any extra in small glass jars) or as the base for a creamy spring soup. If you have acccidentally over-harvested, try drying your extra stinging nettles in a food dehydrator. The dried nettles make an excellent tea and can be crumbled and used as a flavoring herb for soups and sauces during the winter months.

Regardless of how you use them, stinging nettles are sure to become a household favorite. Their sweet flavor practically screams “springtime.” As a homesteader, I can no longer imagine life without them as part of our pantry.

Do you harvest and eat nettles? Share your nettles tips in the section below:

hydrogen peroxide report

Stinging Nettles: The Delicious Spring Edible ‘Weed’ That Is Easily Tamed

Stinging Nettles: The Delicious Spring Edible ‘Weed’ That Is Easily Tamed

Image source: Pixabay.com

Stinging nettles are a common forest plant found in Northern regions around the globe. They prefer rich soil near the edges of streams, lakes, springs and other sources of cool, clean water. Although they can be a nuisance for any person tromping through the woods in shorts, stinging nettles are an incredibly versatile and important wild edible.

Most people in our society no longer view nettles as a plant of value, but for early homesteaders and Native f of the nettle was used for treating joint pain and inflammation. Clearly, stinging nettle is a plant with multiple purposes.

So how does one find, harvest and utilize nettles? First, it is important to properly identify this plant in the wild. Nettles are characterized by the following features:

  • Nettles grow in dense clusters or groves near water and begin to emerge shortly after snowmelt in the spring.
  • Young nettle leaves have a heart-shaped appearance and may exhibit a purplish tint.
  • Leaves are opposing in orientation along the stem, and range between two and five inches in length, with serrated edges and a pointed tip.
  • Veins of the nettle leaves are indented.
  • Nettles have small, glassy hairs on the underside of their leaves and along their stems.
  • At maturity, nettles can be more than five-feet tall.

Remember to collect nettles only from pristine environments, away from roads or any source of pollution and contamination. The tastiest portion of stinging nettles is the new leaves at the growing tip. Whenever possible, harvest nettles during the early part of the spring after they have first emerged from the soil. Look for plants that have eight leaves or less.

Fast, All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effects!

Stinging Nettles: The Delicious Spring Edible ‘Weed’ That Is Easily Tamed

Image source: Pixabay.com

It is OK to harvest leaves from older plants, but they won’t be as tender or as sweet. To harvest nettles, it is best to wear a pair of gloves and a long-sleeved shirt. While holding the topmost leaf, clip the stem just below the first whorl of leaves, either with scissors or garden clippers. The stems tend to be fibrous. Avoid cutting too much stem material. In the case of more mature plants, you will want to strip the leaves away from the stem altogether. Nettles can be stored loosely in a plastic bag in the fridge for several days before use. To preserve the quality of the nettles, do not rinse until just prior to processing.

The sting of the nettle plant comes from a combination of formic acid, histamine and several other chemical compounds that the plant uses as a defense mechanism against browsing herbivores. The modified hairs on the underside of the leaves and along the stem are used to inject this stinging solution into the skin. Nettles will lose their ability to sting when they are properly prepared.

When you are ready to eat your nettles, blanch them in hot water for five minutes and drain. (The blanching water makes a great tea or can be used a base for a vegetable stock, so don’t throw it out). The nettles now have lost their “sting” and can be used in place of spinach for most recipes, including lasagna or pasta sauce. Use stinging nettles in place of basil for pesto (freeze any extra in small glass jars) or as the base for a creamy spring soup. If you have acccidentally over-harvested, try drying your extra stinging nettles in a food dehydrator. The dried nettles make an excellent tea and can be crumbled and used as a flavoring herb for soups and sauces during the winter months.

Regardless of how you use them, stinging nettles are sure to become a household favorite. Their sweet flavor practically screams “springtime.” As a homesteader, I can no longer imagine life without them as part of our pantry.

Do you harvest and eat nettles? Share your nettles tips in the section below:

hydrogen peroxide report

How To Make a Powerful Marigold Extract to Keep in Your Medicine Cabinet (with pictures)

Click here to view the original post.

Beautiful to look at in full bloom, the sunny orange calendula – also known as marigold – has a wealth of herbal uses that are worth learning about. With both

The post How To Make a Powerful Marigold Extract to Keep in Your Medicine Cabinet (with pictures) appeared first on Ask a Prepper.

3 Mouth Watering Deviled Eggs Recipes – Which One Is Your Favorite?

Click here to view the original post.

Are you looking for the Best Deviled Eggs recipes? Check out our three favorite ways to make deviled eggs so that your whole family is satisfied. Although there are several ways to make deviled eggs, we have included the ones

The post 3 Mouth Watering Deviled Eggs Recipes – Which One Is Your Favorite? appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

How To Grow Tomatoes For Survival

Click here to view the original post.

If I were told that I could only grow one vegetable (err…technically fruit, but that’s irrelevant) in my garden, I would pick tomatoes. Why? Because they’re delicious, nutritious, easy to grow anywhere, and you can use them in so many ways that you’d likely never get sick of them. You almost have to grow tomatoes for survival if you want your garden to be complete.

Just a single cup of tomatoes provides about half of your RDA of Vitamin C (move over orange juice), 25% of your RDA of Vitamin A, some Vitamin K just for kicks, and minerals including iron, potassium, folic acid, Lycopene and calcium. Plus, tomatoes have been linked to cancer prevention. Not too shabby for a little red, yellow, green, purple, orange, black, or pink fruit/vegetable, is it? Oh and did I mention that they come in an array of colors?

But which ones should you grow? How long do they take? Do they have particular needs? How much space do you need? There’s definitely a bit more to growing quality tomatoes than just grabbing a pack of seeds at the dollar store, but throughout the following paragraphs, you’re going to learn enough to get you started.

Different Types of Tomatoes

Many people grow several different varieties of tomatoes because there are so many uses for them. Just like anything else, most tomatoes are better for one purpose than another. For instance, if you want to grow tomatoes for juice and for eating raw, you’ll likely want two different types of tomatoes.

Of course, there are definitely good all-around tomatoes, but variety is most certainly to spice of life. And since there’s very little difference in planting and growing, why not grow different ones best suited to your individual needs?

Here are some of the reasons you may want to grow tomatoes:

  • Slicing, or eating tomatoes
  • Cherry tomatoes for salads
  • Plum tomatoes for eating or cooking
  • Juice tomatoes
  • Sauce tomatoes
  • Whole canned tomatoes
  • Tomatoes for chutneys.

Now, think about it. If you want to slice a nice, meaty tomato to put on your burger, you want plenty of “meat,” right? But if you want to can whole tomatoes, you’ll want something a bit smaller, and with a different consistency. And of course, if you want a little tomato for a salad, you need yet another type.

That’s the beauty of tomatoes; there are hundreds of options. All you have to do is find the ones you like best!

Learn from our ancestors the old lessons of growing and preserving your own food for harsh times. 

Types of Seeds

There are four main types of seeds out there: GMO, hybrid, heirloom, and open pollination.

GMO

These seeds have been genetically modified at the DNA level in a lab. They’re meant to make the seed better in some form or another. However, because the plant has been altered at the genetic level, you may find it difficult to get the next generation of seeds to grow, or to produce tomatoes that are the same as the ones in the first generation.

Hybrid

These are often mistaken for GMO, but they’re vastly different. They’re a naturally-occurring plant that occurs when one variety pollinates with another. Think of the hybrid as a family – a mother and dad get married and have a child that shares their traits – hopefully the best of each parent.

Hybrids have no problem growing but may not be consistent from one generation of seeds to another. First generation plants and fruit tend to be more consistent in size and shape and are often more disease resistant than heirlooms, but you don’t know what you’re going to get next year.

Open-Pollinated

These plants are the result of plants that are grown close together pollinating each other in a natural manner. You’ll have some genetic variability because of this, and when the seed is saved, those traits are passed onto the next generation. Open-pollination tomatoes are often regionally unique and have unusual shapes, colors and flavors.

These are the seeds that most farmers count on, because they’re reliable. You can save the seeds with a high degree of confidence that they’ll grow next year.

Heirlooms

The queen of seeds. Heirloom tomatoes come from seeds that have been carefully preserved for generations – usually 50 years or more. They’re carefully tended so that the traits are consistent from one generation to another. The one trait that heirlooms have is that the fruit can vary greatly in size and shape even on the same plant. That’s not always the case, and it’s not really a bad thing – just something to make note of when you’re growing them.

Heirlooms grow consistently from one year to the next, so you can save your seeds and have the same exact plant next year.

So What Seeds are Best?

Many people grow hybrids and love them; for that matter, I have too. But if I’m saving seeds, it’s the ones from my hybrids and open-pollinated ones because I know that they’ll grow and I know what I’ll get. 

Growing Conditions

This is yet another trait that I love about tomatoes – no matter where you live, there’s a variety that will grow for you. Well, almost. If you live in an area that has no warm weather to speak of, or an extremely short (less than 50 day) growing cycle, your choices are limited unless you want to grow them inside, or in a greenhouse.

Altitude affects every single aspect of growing – temperature, soil conditions, precipitation, and humidity. In high-altitude climates, you often have short growing seasons, soil that’s either rocky and alkaline or shaded and acidic, too much rain, not enough rain, and a ton of wildlife that’s just waiting for you to grow them some delicious food.

But don’t despair, you can grow great tomatoes just about anywhere you want as long as you’re willing to put in the effort.

What do Tomatoes Need to Grow?

I read a story about a couple who invested all of their summer into a tomato crop only to yield a single fruit. They’d gone out of town one weekend and forgotten to tell their friends to water them, and that’s what did it.

Now of course, that’s a tall tale, but it’s not far off. Tomatoes need a consistent amount of water, especially when the fruit is ripening. But if you water them too much during this period, they’ll be washed out and flavorless.

So if your tomato could pick its ideal situation (and it can because if you don’t listen, it won’t grow) what would it be? There are some variances in their needs, such as length of growing seasons, but in general, the necessary components to successfully growing tomatoes are:

  • Temperature – tomatoes need an average of 3-4 months or warm, fairly dry weather to grow and produce well. In order to “set” fruit – a gardening term that means that your plant will produce fruit after flowering and pollination. Generally, they need nighttime temperatures of 55-75 degrees F for this to happen. They won’t develop the proper color if night time temps are above 85, and most will quit growing if nighttime temps are over 95 degrees. Now, there are tomatoes that thrive in hot weather, so if this is your situation, do some research and find them. Otherwise, you’re wasting your time.
  • Sunlight – Your plants need at least 6 and preferably 8 hours of sunshine per day. If you live somewhere temperate, 8 is great. If you live in the sweltering south, then 6 with a nice shady afternoon will be appreciated.
  • Consistent Watering – This part is SUPER important. You want your soil to be moist but not wet. Too much will kill the plant, too little will stop the fruit from growing, or will give it a poor texture and flavor if it does grow.
  • Proper, regular feeding – Tomatoes like nitrogen in the soil, so prepare the soil with ripe compost and a scoop of aged manure in the bottom of the hole when you plant it. Another trick is to add some Epsom salt to the soil monthly.

You can do this via just sprinkling a couple teaspoons around the plant, or by mixing a couple of tablespoons in a gallon of water and watering your plants with it. Be careful though, because too much nitrogen will give you a beautiful plant but will delay ripening. Add nitrogen when the top leaves turn yellow and the stem turns purple.

  • Loose soil that drains well – honestly, they prefer this but will grow in nearly any type of soil as long as you provide the proper nutrients. If you have plants that harvest early, sandy loamy soil is best. Plants that bear fruit late like heavier loamy clay. They also like slightly acidic soil with a pH somewhere between 6 and 7.
  • Take Care of the Roots and Leaves – tomatoes are a good plant to start inside because if you live in most zones, you want your plants to be 8-10 weeks old when you set them out 2 weeks or so after the last frost. It’s important that you wait this long because if you get an “oops” freeze, your plants are done.

You also need to protect them from wind that can break them and try to keep the vines off of the ground to help protect them from mold and bugs. Bugs love tomatoes, so be proactive in your insect prevention and check the leaves, top and underside, regularly.

Planting Your Tomatoes

Ok, not that we have that set aside, let’s talk about how to grow your plants. This is the exciting part – well, one of them anyway!

It’s best to prep your soil a week or two in advance by turning in some aged manure and compost. A bit of Epsom salt may help too, if your soil is low in nitrogen. Rest easy – though salt will kill your soil, Epsom salt isn’t actually sodium – it’s actually magnesium and sulfur. The magnesium helps your plant absorb nitrogen.

Some people just dig the hole for the plant and plop a trowel full of compost/manure in the bottom. This may be OK, but make sure that both are well-aged so that you don’t burn up your plants. I’d recommend mixing it into the soil.

If you started your plants from seeds, they should be at least 8 weeks old now, and you should harden them off for a week or so before you plan to plant them out doors. This just means that you’ll start putting them out for a couple of hours per day, protecting them at first from the sun and wind, then gradually increasing their time spent outside so that it’s not such a shock when you actually transplant them.

Now, let’s plant. You can plant them in your garden, or tomatoes make excellent container plants. 5-gallon buckets work great.

Dig a hole with your trowel about 6-8 inches deep. Remember that your soil should be loose. Pull off the bottom few leaves  of the plant, then put it in the ground so that the root ball is buried and the remaining leaves are above the surface of the ground.

Plant them about 2 feet apart.

Water well to help reduce shock to its roots.

Stake or cage immediately. This doesn’t seem like a big deal now, but trust me – in a few weeks when they’re growing like gangbusters, you won’t find it nearly so easy as you do right now.

Water your plants well for the first few days to help prevent shock and help it to acclimate. Water consistently throughout the season so that your soil stays at about the same saturation. In some growing conditions, you may be able to get away with watering once a week, but 2 or 3 times is better. They’ll need about 2 inches per week.

Just a tip here – using homemade mulch is a great idea because it helps hold moisture in AND it helps fertilize at the same time. You can put the mulch down when you plant or you can wait a few weeks to do it. Don’t forget about liquid manure compost, either.

Keeping a steady fertilization schedule is good, too, Follow the tips above about that.

When your plants begin to vine and you get them staked, it’s a good idea to pinch off sucker leaves – those leaves that don’t lead to more vine but only exist to suck the moisture from your plant.

Wait for your bumper crop of tomatoes to appear!

Video first seen on Rogers Gardens

Preservation Methods

Now comes the fun part. The best way that I like to preserve my tomatoes is in between two slices of bread – oh wait, it doesn’t last long like that! Seriously though, there are a number of ways that you can preserve your tomatoes. Each way ends up using a canning method, but there are many different ways that you can prepare them for preservation including sun-drying and adding to olive oil, or dehydrating.

Juicing and Sauce

I can’t even tell you how many tomatoes I’ve mashed through a sieve with a wooden  pestle to make juice! All you need to do is cut your tomatoes into quarters and toss them into a saucepan. Bring them to a boil for 5 minutes to soften them up and get the skins all loose. The juice will start separating out.

After they’ve simmered for that five minutes, turn off the heat and pour some of them over into your sieve or food mill (which is over a pot or bowl, of course) to separate the juice from the skins and seeds. Mash them through and pour the juice back into a pan and bring to boiling again for another 5 minutes, then can.

You should add a tablespoon of lemon juice to each pint just to boost the acidity enough to preserve it. I also add in a teaspoon of salt per quart (1/2 tsp. per pint).

Water bath can as usual or 35 minute for pints and 40 minutes for quarts. If you’re pressure canning, it’s 15 minutes for pints and 20 for quarts.

Note that your juice may “clarify”, or separate so that the bottom is dark red with the tomato pulp in it and the top is almost clear. This is perfectly normal – just shake it up before you use it.

If you want to make sauce instead of juice, it’s simply a matter of cooking it longer so that the water evaporates and the juice thickens. You can make plain tomato sauce if you want, but this is a great time to jazz it up by adding seasonings such as garlic, oregano, rosemary, etc. Think spaghetti, pizza, taco sauce, etc.

Whole, Crushed or Diced

Blanch your tomatoes for just a couple of seconds – that is, dip them in boiling water for 10 seconds then toss them into an ice bath. An old Italian guy (because nobody knew more about tomatoes than this guy) taught me that if you slice a small ‘x’ somewhere on the bottom of the tomato, it makes it easier to peel. The skin will fall right off and you can proceed to the next step.

Once you get the skins off, cut away any bad parts or green sections. If you’re canning them whole, stuff them into the jars. If you’re halving, quartering, dicing, or crushing them first, do it now. And add them to the jars and top with water so that you leave 1/2 inch headroom, at least. Add lemon juice and salt, seal, and can.

Paste

The process of making tomato paste is similar to making the juice except you cook it WAY down into a super thick sauce, then add olive oil and salt and bake it in a 200-degree oven, spread evenly in  pan, until it’s the thickness of tomato paste.

Chutney, Salsa, Etc.

This is possibly the best part! Make your favorite salsas and chutneys with tomatoes, onions, garlic, herbs, and other spices and can them up so that you have some of this deliciousness year round!

As you can see, there’s a lot that goes into growing tomatoes, but there are so many different ways that you can use them that it barely qualifies as work. It’s like growing an entire winter’s worth of possibilities all with just a few plants.

Study what kind of tomatoes you want to grow and get started! What are some of your favorite tomatoes? Do you have a recipe or an idea you’d like to share?

Discover how our forefathers produced their own food during harsh times! Click the banner below for more!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

References:

http://leitesculinaria.com/87323/recipes-homemade-tomato-paste-conserva-di-pomodori.html

How To Grow Tomatoes For Survival

If I were told that I could only grow one vegetable (err…technically fruit, but that’s irrelevant) in my garden, I would pick tomatoes. Why? Because they’re delicious, nutritious, easy to grow anywhere, and you can use them in so many ways that you’d likely never get sick of them. You almost have to grow tomatoes for survival if you want your garden to be complete.

Just a single cup of tomatoes provides about half of your RDA of Vitamin C (move over orange juice), 25% of your RDA of Vitamin A, some Vitamin K just for kicks, and minerals including iron, potassium, folic acid, Lycopene and calcium. Plus, tomatoes have been linked to cancer prevention. Not too shabby for a little red, yellow, green, purple, orange, black, or pink fruit/vegetable, is it? Oh and did I mention that they come in an array of colors?

But which ones should you grow? How long do they take? Do they have particular needs? How much space do you need? There’s definitely a bit more to growing quality tomatoes than just grabbing a pack of seeds at the dollar store, but throughout the following paragraphs, you’re going to learn enough to get you started.

Different Types of Tomatoes

Many people grow several different varieties of tomatoes because there are so many uses for them. Just like anything else, most tomatoes are better for one purpose than another. For instance, if you want to grow tomatoes for juice and for eating raw, you’ll likely want two different types of tomatoes.

Of course, there are definitely good all-around tomatoes, but variety is most certainly to spice of life. And since there’s very little difference in planting and growing, why not grow different ones best suited to your individual needs?

Here are some of the reasons you may want to grow tomatoes:

  • Slicing, or eating tomatoes
  • Cherry tomatoes for salads
  • Plum tomatoes for eating or cooking
  • Juice tomatoes
  • Sauce tomatoes
  • Whole canned tomatoes
  • Tomatoes for chutneys.

Now, think about it. If you want to slice a nice, meaty tomato to put on your burger, you want plenty of “meat,” right? But if you want to can whole tomatoes, you’ll want something a bit smaller, and with a different consistency. And of course, if you want a little tomato for a salad, you need yet another type.

That’s the beauty of tomatoes; there are hundreds of options. All you have to do is find the ones you like best!

Learn from our ancestors the old lessons of growing and preserving your own food for harsh times. 

Types of Seeds

There are four main types of seeds out there: GMO, hybrid, heirloom, and open pollination.

GMO

These seeds have been genetically modified at the DNA level in a lab. They’re meant to make the seed better in some form or another. However, because the plant has been altered at the genetic level, you may find it difficult to get the next generation of seeds to grow, or to produce tomatoes that are the same as the ones in the first generation.

Hybrid

These are often mistaken for GMO, but they’re vastly different. They’re a naturally-occurring plant that occurs when one variety pollinates with another. Think of the hybrid as a family – a mother and dad get married and have a child that shares their traits – hopefully the best of each parent.

Hybrids have no problem growing but may not be consistent from one generation of seeds to another. First generation plants and fruit tend to be more consistent in size and shape and are often more disease resistant than heirlooms, but you don’t know what you’re going to get next year.

Open-Pollinated

These plants are the result of plants that are grown close together pollinating each other in a natural manner. You’ll have some genetic variability because of this, and when the seed is saved, those traits are passed onto the next generation. Open-pollination tomatoes are often regionally unique and have unusual shapes, colors and flavors.

These are the seeds that most farmers count on, because they’re reliable. You can save the seeds with a high degree of confidence that they’ll grow next year.

Heirlooms

The queen of seeds. Heirloom tomatoes come from seeds that have been carefully preserved for generations – usually 50 years or more. They’re carefully tended so that the traits are consistent from one generation to another. The one trait that heirlooms have is that the fruit can vary greatly in size and shape even on the same plant. That’s not always the case, and it’s not really a bad thing – just something to make note of when you’re growing them.

Heirlooms grow consistently from one year to the next, so you can save your seeds and have the same exact plant next year.

So What Seeds are Best?

Many people grow hybrids and love them; for that matter, I have too. But if I’m saving seeds, it’s the ones from my hybrids and open-pollinated ones because I know that they’ll grow and I know what I’ll get. 

Growing Conditions

This is yet another trait that I love about tomatoes – no matter where you live, there’s a variety that will grow for you. Well, almost. If you live in an area that has no warm weather to speak of, or an extremely short (less than 50 day) growing cycle, your choices are limited unless you want to grow them inside, or in a greenhouse.

Altitude affects every single aspect of growing – temperature, soil conditions, precipitation, and humidity. In high-altitude climates, you often have short growing seasons, soil that’s either rocky and alkaline or shaded and acidic, too much rain, not enough rain, and a ton of wildlife that’s just waiting for you to grow them some delicious food.

But don’t despair, you can grow great tomatoes just about anywhere you want as long as you’re willing to put in the effort.

What do Tomatoes Need to Grow?

I read a story about a couple who invested all of their summer into a tomato crop only to yield a single fruit. They’d gone out of town one weekend and forgotten to tell their friends to water them, and that’s what did it.

Now of course, that’s a tall tale, but it’s not far off. Tomatoes need a consistent amount of water, especially when the fruit is ripening. But if you water them too much during this period, they’ll be washed out and flavorless.

So if your tomato could pick its ideal situation (and it can because if you don’t listen, it won’t grow) what would it be? There are some variances in their needs, such as length of growing seasons, but in general, the necessary components to successfully growing tomatoes are:

  • Temperature – tomatoes need an average of 3-4 months or warm, fairly dry weather to grow and produce well. In order to “set” fruit – a gardening term that means that your plant will produce fruit after flowering and pollination. Generally, they need nighttime temperatures of 55-75 degrees F for this to happen. They won’t develop the proper color if night time temps are above 85, and most will quit growing if nighttime temps are over 95 degrees. Now, there are tomatoes that thrive in hot weather, so if this is your situation, do some research and find them. Otherwise, you’re wasting your time.
  • Sunlight – Your plants need at least 6 and preferably 8 hours of sunshine per day. If you live somewhere temperate, 8 is great. If you live in the sweltering south, then 6 with a nice shady afternoon will be appreciated.
  • Consistent Watering – This part is SUPER important. You want your soil to be moist but not wet. Too much will kill the plant, too little will stop the fruit from growing, or will give it a poor texture and flavor if it does grow.
  • Proper, regular feeding – Tomatoes like nitrogen in the soil, so prepare the soil with ripe compost and a scoop of aged manure in the bottom of the hole when you plant it. Another trick is to add some Epsom salt to the soil monthly.

You can do this via just sprinkling a couple teaspoons around the plant, or by mixing a couple of tablespoons in a gallon of water and watering your plants with it. Be careful though, because too much nitrogen will give you a beautiful plant but will delay ripening. Add nitrogen when the top leaves turn yellow and the stem turns purple.

  • Loose soil that drains well – honestly, they prefer this but will grow in nearly any type of soil as long as you provide the proper nutrients. If you have plants that harvest early, sandy loamy soil is best. Plants that bear fruit late like heavier loamy clay. They also like slightly acidic soil with a pH somewhere between 6 and 7.
  • Take Care of the Roots and Leaves – tomatoes are a good plant to start inside because if you live in most zones, you want your plants to be 8-10 weeks old when you set them out 2 weeks or so after the last frost. It’s important that you wait this long because if you get an “oops” freeze, your plants are done.

You also need to protect them from wind that can break them and try to keep the vines off of the ground to help protect them from mold and bugs. Bugs love tomatoes, so be proactive in your insect prevention and check the leaves, top and underside, regularly.

Planting Your Tomatoes

Ok, not that we have that set aside, let’s talk about how to grow your plants. This is the exciting part – well, one of them anyway!

It’s best to prep your soil a week or two in advance by turning in some aged manure and compost. A bit of Epsom salt may help too, if your soil is low in nitrogen. Rest easy – though salt will kill your soil, Epsom salt isn’t actually sodium – it’s actually magnesium and sulfur. The magnesium helps your plant absorb nitrogen.

Some people just dig the hole for the plant and plop a trowel full of compost/manure in the bottom. This may be OK, but make sure that both are well-aged so that you don’t burn up your plants. I’d recommend mixing it into the soil.

If you started your plants from seeds, they should be at least 8 weeks old now, and you should harden them off for a week or so before you plan to plant them out doors. This just means that you’ll start putting them out for a couple of hours per day, protecting them at first from the sun and wind, then gradually increasing their time spent outside so that it’s not such a shock when you actually transplant them.

Now, let’s plant. You can plant them in your garden, or tomatoes make excellent container plants. 5-gallon buckets work great.

Dig a hole with your trowel about 6-8 inches deep. Remember that your soil should be loose. Pull off the bottom few leaves  of the plant, then put it in the ground so that the root ball is buried and the remaining leaves are above the surface of the ground.

Plant them about 2 feet apart.

Water well to help reduce shock to its roots.

Stake or cage immediately. This doesn’t seem like a big deal now, but trust me – in a few weeks when they’re growing like gangbusters, you won’t find it nearly so easy as you do right now.

Water your plants well for the first few days to help prevent shock and help it to acclimate. Water consistently throughout the season so that your soil stays at about the same saturation. In some growing conditions, you may be able to get away with watering once a week, but 2 or 3 times is better. They’ll need about 2 inches per week.

Just a tip here – using homemade mulch is a great idea because it helps hold moisture in AND it helps fertilize at the same time. You can put the mulch down when you plant or you can wait a few weeks to do it. Don’t forget about liquid manure compost, either.

Keeping a steady fertilization schedule is good, too, Follow the tips above about that.

When your plants begin to vine and you get them staked, it’s a good idea to pinch off sucker leaves – those leaves that don’t lead to more vine but only exist to suck the moisture from your plant.

Wait for your bumper crop of tomatoes to appear!

Video first seen on Rogers Gardens

Preservation Methods

Now comes the fun part. The best way that I like to preserve my tomatoes is in between two slices of bread – oh wait, it doesn’t last long like that! Seriously though, there are a number of ways that you can preserve your tomatoes. Each way ends up using a canning method, but there are many different ways that you can prepare them for preservation including sun-drying and adding to olive oil, or dehydrating.

Juicing and Sauce

I can’t even tell you how many tomatoes I’ve mashed through a sieve with a wooden  pestle to make juice! All you need to do is cut your tomatoes into quarters and toss them into a saucepan. Bring them to a boil for 5 minutes to soften them up and get the skins all loose. The juice will start separating out.

After they’ve simmered for that five minutes, turn off the heat and pour some of them over into your sieve or food mill (which is over a pot or bowl, of course) to separate the juice from the skins and seeds. Mash them through and pour the juice back into a pan and bring to boiling again for another 5 minutes, then can.

You should add a tablespoon of lemon juice to each pint just to boost the acidity enough to preserve it. I also add in a teaspoon of salt per quart (1/2 tsp. per pint).

Water bath can as usual or 35 minute for pints and 40 minutes for quarts. If you’re pressure canning, it’s 15 minutes for pints and 20 for quarts.

Note that your juice may “clarify”, or separate so that the bottom is dark red with the tomato pulp in it and the top is almost clear. This is perfectly normal – just shake it up before you use it.

If you want to make sauce instead of juice, it’s simply a matter of cooking it longer so that the water evaporates and the juice thickens. You can make plain tomato sauce if you want, but this is a great time to jazz it up by adding seasonings such as garlic, oregano, rosemary, etc. Think spaghetti, pizza, taco sauce, etc.

Whole, Crushed or Diced

Blanch your tomatoes for just a couple of seconds – that is, dip them in boiling water for 10 seconds then toss them into an ice bath. An old Italian guy (because nobody knew more about tomatoes than this guy) taught me that if you slice a small ‘x’ somewhere on the bottom of the tomato, it makes it easier to peel. The skin will fall right off and you can proceed to the next step.

Once you get the skins off, cut away any bad parts or green sections. If you’re canning them whole, stuff them into the jars. If you’re halving, quartering, dicing, or crushing them first, do it now. And add them to the jars and top with water so that you leave 1/2 inch headroom, at least. Add lemon juice and salt, seal, and can.

Paste

The process of making tomato paste is similar to making the juice except you cook it WAY down into a super thick sauce, then add olive oil and salt and bake it in a 200-degree oven, spread evenly in  pan, until it’s the thickness of tomato paste.

Chutney, Salsa, Etc.

This is possibly the best part! Make your favorite salsas and chutneys with tomatoes, onions, garlic, herbs, and other spices and can them up so that you have some of this deliciousness year round!

As you can see, there’s a lot that goes into growing tomatoes, but there are so many different ways that you can use them that it barely qualifies as work. It’s like growing an entire winter’s worth of possibilities all with just a few plants.

Study what kind of tomatoes you want to grow and get started! What are some of your favorite tomatoes? Do you have a recipe or an idea you’d like to share?

Discover how our forefathers produced their own food during harsh times! Click the banner below for more!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

References:

http://leitesculinaria.com/87323/recipes-homemade-tomato-paste-conserva-di-pomodori.html

Wilderness Safety Tips for Women

Click here to view the original post.

Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editor’s Note: This post is another entry in the Prepper Writing Contest from Julie. If you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly win a $300 Amazon Gift Card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.


In today’s world, when a calamity knocks, people would go after one another to offer help and support each other all the way. However, sometimes, tragedies bring out the worst out of people. Some of these scheming calamities seem to target defenseless victims like the aging, the disabled and of course, women.

Most of the times men escape death because they know how to fight and to protect themselves. Their physical weight and height come in handy in most times too.

A lot of times, women are referred to as the fragile and weak ones. Favorably, many self-defense tips and approaches can trim that disadvantage and grant women the ability to shield themselves and those that they are obliged to protect, for example, their children.

Physically and Emotionally Fit

Women need to be physically and emotionally fit at all times. For example, if they have gone camping, should any danger arise, like a sign of an intruder from afar, they need to be ready to jump into action. They will need to run, really fast, to protect themselves from danger or to simply go and get help. Sometimes, the threat may not always be represented as a person. Other tragedies may be manifested in natural disasters like an avalanche, a storm or a tree falling.

Below are some of the wilderness safety tips women can put in place to be safe. Although sometimes all one may need is a survival boot knife, other regimens may be more helpful. Some of the tips revolve around things women may have been doing before, in preparation, not while faced with danger.

1. Exercise

It is important to keep fit. Otherwise, how will you jump into action if you cannot run? Exercising at least five times a week may be helpful. Other activities may also involve lifting weights or moving a log. These training tips are advisable because strength is vital in getting help.

Another idea to get in shape to be ready to defend yourself while out camping is rock climbing. This is especially easy since you do not need to go to the forest to become good at rock climbing. While the best practice would be the natural setting, today, rock climbing can be done at malls or even at the comfort of your home. Makeshift rock-climbing walls may not give the exact situation, but they prepare you for what’s on the outside for when you do go rock climbing or are faced with a situation in which you need such skills.

The good thing about exercising for survival and fitness is that one does not to be a member of a professional gym or hire an expert trainer to show you the ropes. All it takes is a simple regimen to keep fit, be it running, jogging, breathing exercises, and so on.

2. Survival Course

As much as you may be ready and willing to go out in the wilderness and enjoy the fresh air, the risk you are running is as real as a snake bite or a fractured knee. Many people may not be willing to try it out, but survival and defense classes are becoming more popular by the day.

The courses are short and have more to do with practical situations than the theory. What’s more? They are offered by professionals who may be retired Marines, medical practitioners or survival experts.

3. First Aid and Quick Response

Many courses will train you on how to avoid being in harm’s way. However, in the case of disaster, what else could you do to survive? There are a number of quite basic First Aid tips that women should have in hand to be better placed to save their lives. They are such as knowing how to stop a nosebleed, treat a snake bite or improvise and stabilize a fractured bone.

4. No Giving Up

The main thing the trainers and those who have survived tragedies in the wilderness will tell you is that you need to keep a positive attitude throughout the process. The positive attitude will help you stay focused during training and in the face of disaster. So many people have talked about going for hours, sometimes days, without water, fresh air or warmth. In the case of an avalanche, it is important to keep in mind that rescue is on the way and you just need to hold on.

5. The Mind Game

A danger is not always presented in the form of a person, but when it does, it is time to play smart, rather than showcase your mastery of the Kung Fu skills. Naturally, men are more muscular than women, and if they are your attacker, then it is time to play smart. Mind games such as playing defenseless and trying to understand your attacker’s psychology may save you more than a high kick or a blow to the face will. It is, therefore, important to keep in mind where you are, and who may be out to attack you. Some of the questions you need to ask yourself include:

This information will be vital especially if you are going camping in a different region, away from home. Read news and crime journals and reports about the general security of the area. Such information may be readily available on the internet. Reading about a new area gives Intel on what to expect, or not to expect.

In the same vein, know your surroundings. You should have contact details of a nearby hospital or sheriff’s office. This will be substantial even if the danger is not presented in the form of an attacker. In the case of a storm and the cabin is struck by lightning, perhaps reaching the sheriff’s office for assistance in the event of accidents may be essential.

6. Gun and Ammunition

Being fit may get you out of a situation, but being smart may save you faster and in a better way. Women, and indeed everyone else, need to be familiar with the gun and security laws governing their state or country. If you are going to be in a place that may put you at risk of being attacked, it only makes sense to have protection.

Most people keep guns in their houses or on them, but this is subject to the law and the permits required. If all the legislation boxes have been checked, then it’s time to learn how to load the gun, and of course, fire. Know what gun you are most comfortable using and if you need to spend some little time at the range to perfect your aim, then, by all means, do so.

Conclusion

All in all, security is key, not just for the women, but for everyone who is going to spend some time out of the comfort and safety of their home. Whether survival classes or keeping fit, always be on the lookout for what harm may come your way and how best to stay safe.

About the Author: Julie is the founder of Outdoorzer, where she and her associates blog about camping, hiking, RVs and surviving in the woods. Outdoorzer is a website for those who love the fresh air outdoors – It’s the best gift Mother Nature gives us!

The post Wilderness Safety Tips for Women appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

9 Steps to Finding Local Disasters

Click here to view the original post.
9 Steps to Finding Local Disaster Information for your area of the USA | PreparednessMama

Do you know what to prepare for? I used to live in the Pacific Northwest, where there is a real chance of major earthquakes. Most residents are aware of it and smart ones will, at the minimum, have an earthquake kit under their bed. Then I moved to Texas and needed to learn to prepare […]

The post 9 Steps to Finding Local Disasters appeared first on PreparednessMama.

Survival Books You Will Need In Hard Copies

Click here to view the original post.

I recommend these survival books you will need in hard copies, not the e-book versions. If we lose power, and we will, we want a hard copy of certain books. I had a reader ask me to remind all of us to get hard copies of survival books. Now, as I’ve mentioned before I will not be hiking up into the mountains to flee my neighborhood. There again, if my house is flattened from an earthquake or flood, I will have to evacuate. I only buy hard copies of books that I need today, or possibly next year for knowledge to help me and my neighborhood get through just about any disaster, including an EMP. If you haven’t read Ted Koppel’s book as outlined below, I highly recommend it. I was actually interviewed and recorded for my thoughts about living without electricity. Although my thoughts were not included in the book it was a compliment to me to be asked for my ideas.

So let’s get started with some of the survival books I suggest you get. The word survival may sound a little strong, but let’s just say we may need some tools to get us all through rough times, and we will have rough times at some point in our lives if we haven’t already. My attitude has always been “buy right the first time”. Please keep in mind that some of these books are a bit pricey, but you get what you pay for in knowledge that is so beneficial.

Survival Books:

  1. I was honored to be asked to write this book by Page Street Publishing, it is family friendly and you can have your children and grandchildren read it. When I was asked to write the book, I mentioned I did not want to talk about weapons in my book. Period. If you are wondering if I have a weapon, yes I do. Mark and I both have our concealed weapons permits, and we both know how to shoot. Mark more than me. Weapons are a personal topic. I will leave it at that.Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation
  2. I have very little skills in the medical field, so I use this book all the time. Remember, if we lose power you will not be able to “Google” a question you are wondering about, just giving you the heads-up here. This book is user-friendly and has just about everything I have ever needed to look up as far as medical information. The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way
  3. I wish I could get more people to read this book. I bought the hard copy and I could only get one friend to read it. If you want to know the truth about our country’s power grid and how sadly it is unprotected against terrorist attacks and how it would be virtually impossible to repair, let alone replace, you need to read this book. Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath We will need far more than candles, my friends.
  4. This is my bible for essential oils. The FDA will not let us say much about essential oils because they have shut down websites for saying too much. First of all, I do not believe they cure anything, but they rock for other things. You can buy a pocket size book, or the larger one with tons of information, which is what I did. I actually purchased both. I have one in the car, one in my first aid kits, and one in the living room. Essential Oils Pocket Reference WOW, the larger one is so expensive now. When I bought it I choked over the $90.00 price. This book is packed with knowledge but is extremely costly. Essential Oils Desk Reference 6th Edition (6th Edition) (1905-07-21) [Spiral-bound] I have seen the prices of food storage and emergency preparedness items skyrocket over the last few years. Check out thrift stores whenever possible for books and equipment.
  5. Lisa Bedford from The Survival Mom is a friend of mine and she was actually one of the first preppers to write a book, as far I know. Survival Mom: How to Prepare Your Family for Everyday Disasters and Worst-Case Scenarios
  6. Bernie Carr is a friend of mine and I have all of her books, this one is great for kids: Jake and Miller’s Big Adventure: A Prepper’s Book for Kids and this is great one: The Prepper’s Pocket Guide: 101 Easy Things You Can Do to Ready Your Home for a Disaster
  7. I read this book and I was emotional the entire time reading about the truth of what happened at Memorial Hospital after Hurricane Katrina. Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital I REALLY want to put this book on my list because this book tells what happened at one of the main hospitals AFTER Hurricane Katrina. Please read and be prepared to take care of yourself and your family. These poor nurses and doctors, what they had to go through…………..and the patients. God bless all the families involved in that tragedy.

I’m sure there are other survival books, but these are my favorite ones and aren’t necessarily Doomsday type books. We need the knowledge before a disaster or unforeseen emergency hits our neighborhood. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless all of us.

American Red Cross

The post Survival Books You Will Need In Hard Copies appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Why You Should Avoid These Five Dangerous Over the Counter Meds

Click here to view the original post.

Most people assume that over the counter drugs are very safe. After all, why would they be available for sale without a prescription if they weren’t safe? And for the most part they’re right. With the exception of a few people who use them recreationally, are allergic, or are more susceptible to the side effects, these drugs are safe.

For ordinary consumers however, serious problems arise when these drugs are taken for long periods of time; often in an attempt to treat chronic conditions. Given their accessibility they may seem safe for long-term use, but these drugs are anything but, and there’s plenty of evidence to prove it. The drugs below in particular, are among the most dangerous over the counter medications.

Ibuprofen

Over the past few years multiple studies have raised the alarm over ibuprofen (more commonly known as Advil) and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are often used to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It turns out that this class of drugs may cause serious heart conditions. The latest study to suggest this comes from Denmark and was recently published in the European Heart Journal. After following 29,000 people over the course of nine years, the study found that people who take ibuprofen have a 31% higher chance of suffering cardiac arrest.

Benadryl

Diphenhydramine (aka Benadryl) and other anticholinergic drugs are very effective at reducing cold and seasonal allergy symptoms. Unfortunately the drug also reduces a chemical in your brain called acetylcholine, which helps your memory and learning ability. And that’s why it may increase your chances of developing dementia.

A study by the University of Washington’s School of Pharmacy followed 3,500 seniors over the course of 10 years, and found that 800 of them developed dementia. When the researchers dug deeper, they discovered that people who take anticholinergic drugs on a regular basis for three years or more, had a 54% higher risk of developing dementia.

Acetaminophen

Acetaminophen is widely considered to be the world’s most popular pain reliever, and there are millions of people who rely on it for chronic health issues. Unfortunately the drug has been causally linked to a lot of its own health problems. Multiple studies have suggested that taking this drug over a long period of time may cause a heightened risk of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, kidney, and heart problems.

Perhaps what’s more freaky about this drug, is not what it may due to your body, but what it may due to your mind. Recent studies have found that the drug can reduce your ability to empathize with others.

Dextromethorphan

Though it’s an effective sleep aid and cough suppressant, it doesn’t take long to gain a tolerance for dextromethorphan, which is commonly used in Robitussin, NyQuil, and Delsym. And for people with chronic sleep problems, it’s very easy to become addicted to this drug. When used as instructed and for short periods of time, it isn’t very dangerous. Over long periods of time, it can cause liver damage and multiple mental problems.

Aspirin

Aspirin is another non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug similar to ibuprofen. And like ibuprofen, it’s another drug that doctors often tell patients to take every day when it can alleviate conditions that are more dangerous than the side effects of the drug. However, those side effects shouldn’t be underestimated. Taking aspirin every day can vastly increase your risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and ulcers. Though some aspirin brands have an enteric coating that is advertised as being “safer,” it doesn’t actually reduce your risk of gaining ulcers. In fact, it can reduce the benefits of this drug, as well as its pain relieving effects.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Backpacking: Why Preppers Should All Do It

Click here to view the original post.

Backpacking is often thought of as this out of reach, extreme sport that only people in top physical condition undertake.  That’s just not the case.  Backpacking is as much a skill builder as it is an activity for the adventurous.  And the best part is that anyone can do it.  It can be as simple

Backpacking: Why Preppers Should All Do It

Backpacking is often thought of as this out of reach, extreme sport that only people in top physical condition undertake.  That’s just not the case.  Backpacking is as much a skill builder as it is an activity for the adventurous.  And the best part is that anyone can do it.  It can be as simple

Best Animals to Hunt During SHTF

Click here to view the original post.

Best Animals to Hunt During SHTF Host: Highlander “Survival & Tech Preps “ Audio in player below! As with most topics we have a lot of what if’s? Food storage with preppers is a big deal and we think we have enough. We prepare for so long the amount we think we’ll need, but alas … Continue reading Best Animals to Hunt During SHTF

The post Best Animals to Hunt During SHTF appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.