How To Fulfill Your Homesteading Dreams By … Renting?

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How To Fulfill Your Homesteading Dreams By ... Renting?

Image source: Wikimedia

Have you always dreamed of homesteading or living off the grid, but can’t do so since you don’t own any land?

There’s good news: There’s a variety of ways you can start homesteading without necessarily owning acreage.

After my family and I made the leap from city to country several gyears back, we rented a small property in a rural town that allowed us to plant vegetables and raise small livestock. We did this for several years before purchasing land of our own, enabling us to transition from urban to rural in a gradual and deliberate way.

Why Rent?

The benefits of leasing over purchasing land are numerous: you shell out minimal expense, start farming without long-term commitment, and have an option to leave the property – and the farming lifestyle — if you decide it’s not for you. Call it an on-the-job training or a trial period. Leasing gives you a chance to hone your skills and test the land or area around you. Meanwhile, you’re able to gauge just how much space, structures, plants and animals you’ll need when you start homesteading on your own future property.

And because the place isn’t your own, you won’t feel obliged to do home improvement projects unless it’s totally needed, or you can negotiate a deduction from the following month’s rent. Instead, you can save those much-needed funds to raise capital for your own future farm.

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Renting could be that important and helpful “middle step” between leaving the city, a full-time job and all the urban pursuits, and settling into your desired country lifestyle – for good.

Why Farmers Lease

Image source: Pixabay.com

Image source: Pixabay.com

There are different reasons landowners may want to lease their properties, big or small, productive or not. Some may be economic factors, others for personal reasons. With the average age of farmers at 57, there’s a substantial number of old-generation farmers looking to retire or slow down. They may opt to downsize their operations, partner with young farmers, or lease out a portion of their land to aspiring homesteaders.

Here’s where you enter the picture. If you’re a beginning farmer, you can learn the ropes by maintaining somebody else’s farm or starting a small one on rented land.

Here’s How:

1. Plan your budget. Set limits when estimating the price and size of land you want to rent. Be realistic about your needs but allow some wiggle room to make improvements. Remember, you’ll need to be able to manage the property and provide any necessary add-ons, such as chicken coops, a hoop house, fencing, etc.

2. Search for land. Ask the folks at the farmer’s market, feed store, 4-H Club or farm-to-table organizations if they know of any farms being let out in your area or region. Don’t forget to check out your state’s agricultural extension office for listings. Online, there’s a host of farm-link websites that connect landholders with gardeners, new farmers and ranchers looking to rent land. These sites list available farms and forest lands for rent per state, region and all across the country. Many already have existing barns, pasture and water source. Some websites even allow land seekers to post an ad outlining their desired farm features – electricity, fencing, outbuildings, trees, access to water, land that hasn’t been sprayed for a few years, etc. And still other websites have a “matching service,” offering to facilitate meet-ups, negotiations and agreements. Check out the following:

BeginningFarmers.com

YoungFarmers.com

LandStewardshipProject.org

FarmLandInfo.org

TheLandConnection.org

SharedEarth.com

FarmFlip.com

RentThisLand.com

3. Explore creative solutions. Don’t limit yourself to the standard cash-rent setup. There’s a variety of ways to do farming or homesteading other than self-sufficiency; you can also get into profitable ventures that could benefit both you and your landlord. There’s crop- or livestock-sharing, which allows you to split half of the income you make, in cash or kind.

Urban market gardener Curtis Stone does this, earning six figures a year by growing high-value, fast-growing vegetables in just half an acre he leases in British Columbia, Canada. He simply rents neighbors’ lawns, yards and idle properties in the suburbs, and pays his landlords $20-30 worth of crops each week.

Another possible arrangement is a lease-to-own, which works especially well with older farmers looking to downsize or retire within the next few years. If you’re a young farmer, look into partnership agreements. These pair young farmers with established ones nearing retirement.

4. Formalize. After you and your future landlord have agreed on the details of your land use, finalize everything on paper. Review and evaluate your agreement periodically and adjust wherever needed or desired.

5. Start slow. Work on a garden size and number of animals that you and the property can handle. If you’re building additional structures that your landlord won’t pay for, make sure they’re the collapsible and portable kind. Container gardens, rainwater barrels and electric fences are examples of such removable fixtures.

6. Small space? Go micro. If you end up renting a suburban property whose owner will allow you to do backyard homesteading, wonderful! Go ahead and use whatever available space you find to grow food. Just remember to be a good neighbor. Ask next-door residents if they wouldn’t mind if you kept some hens or a couple of pygmy goats. As goodwill, offer them a number of eggs or a bottle of milk each week, once you start producing consistently.

 

“The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets” — Every Homesteader Needs A Copy!

Even if you’re renting an apartment or a high-rise condo in the city, you can still dip your toes into homesteading. Grow salad greens and medicinal herbs on your balcony. Learn to can and make your own jams and pickles. Bake bread from scratch. Make your own soap and cleaning products. There’s 101 ways to begin your journey toward homesteading and self-sufficiency. You don’t really need to own land to do so.

What advice would you add for homesteading while renting? Share your tips in the section below:

Bust Inflation With A Low-Cost, High-Production Garden. Read More Here.

GROW: What Toxins Are Hiding in Your Home… Making You Sick? (Video 2)

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Is your shampoo killing you?

How about your carpet?

Most people would be shocked to learn of the number of common household items that are making them sick … or worse.

That’s why my second chapter-turned-video of Grow: All True Wealth Comes From the Ground explores the toxins that are all around us…

…and what we can do to avoid them!

Click PLAY to watch the video now:

In this video, you’ll learn:

  • The 2 Physical Causes of ALL Disease and Illness
  • EVERYDAY Ways Toxins Are Getting Into Your Body
  • Why the USDA and FDA Are Turning a Blind Eye to the Contamination of Our Commercial Food Supply
  • More Than a Dozen Steps You Can Take to Help PREVENT Toxicity in Your Home and Body

After you watch the video, I would SO appreciate it if you would leave me a comment to let me know your experiences with toxicity.

Have toxins made you sick?

How do you keep toxins out of your home and body?

Thank you again for taking the time to watch this video!

Your experiences and the wisdom you have gleaned from them are so valuable—and very well might end up in Grow: All True Wealth Comes From the Ground!

(If you missed them, watch the FIRST VIDEO and SECOND VIDEO in the series here (#1) and here (#2).

The post GROW: What Toxins Are Hiding in Your Home… Making You Sick? (Video 2) appeared first on The Grow Network.

View Ranger Mobile Phone Navigation App

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For about a year now, I’ve been using View Ranger Navigation on my Galaxy phone. And while there are no shortages of navigation apps out there, This app just really called out to me with some of it’s features.

Available for both android and apple, this app is free for download. One of the key points I liked about this app, unlike others, is I didn’t have to set up an account to use it. Of course to really enjoy all of the features registration is needed. But the key features are all available without registration.

The post View Ranger Mobile Phone Navigation App appeared first on outdoor self reliance.

Prepping is as Important Now as It Was Eight Years Ago

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We can look at it this way, sometimes the only way to rid a house of pests is to tear it down and start over. This means chaos for a while, unrest, inconvenience, or come up with your own way of describing what may be coming, but the bottom line is, it usually gets worse […]

The post Prepping is as Important Now as It Was Eight Years Ago appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

Americans Need Thermal Evasion Suits

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Americans Need Thermal Evasion Suits Some time back there was technology introduced that would protect the wearer from the thermal imagery of drones above. This thermal wear was in the media for a brief period and then seemed to disappear shortly after. I was surprised to find that only a few companies in the world …

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The post Americans Need Thermal Evasion Suits appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Vehicular Terrorist Attack

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Vehicular Terrorist Attack Could you ever have imagined a time when we would be concerning ourselves with the threat of vehicular terrorists attacks. The fact is our nation and western nations around the world have been so inundated with people who hate the beauty of western society that terrorism happens at anytime, anyplace and by …

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Vehicular Terrorist Attack

Vehicular Terrorist Attack Could you ever have imagined a time when we would be concerning ourselves with the threat of vehicular terrorists attacks. The fact is our nation and western nations around the world have been so inundated with people who hate the beauty of western society that terrorism happens at anytime, anyplace and by …

Continue reading »

The post Vehicular Terrorist Attack appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Available Northeast Georgia Off Grid Cabin on Twenty-Nine Acres

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Turn key, off grid cabin on 29 acres

NE Georgia

(The following is the work product of Sarah, and was found on Survival Realty.com. Always verify all information before entering into Contracts to purchase real estate.  I thought this may interest some of you here. I will keep this post up even after it is sold so that some of you may get ideas as to what is occasionally available in different parts of the country.)

 

175,000  29 acres  Sarah 

This property includes a turnkey cabin with solar power, septic system, deep well & cistern (both on DC voltage pumps). There is a 500-gal propane tank that is an additional power source. Cabin has front and rear porches, 16’ arched ceilings and is set back on a hill, ¼ mile from the frontage road. Cabin can’t be seen until you drive right up to it. The 29 wooded acres provide ample deer, squirrel and turkey hunting opportunities, in addition to a year-round creek on two sides of the property. Good cell reception in spite of remote location. Elbert County, GA.

Conceal Carry the ScotteVest

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Conceal Carry the ScotteVest Some inventions are made for preppers and the creators don’t even know it. This product showed up on the hit television show Shark Tank but I never knew about it until this article. The ScotteVest is basically an Every Day Carriers dream you can carry food, water, phones, tablets, sunglasses, cameras, …

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The post Conceal Carry the ScotteVest appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

How to Make Real Bugout Plans

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How to Make Real Bugout Plans There is always room for a nice bug out article. The bugout has been adulterated by over saturation and over simplification. It almost seems like a vacation when I read some articles and watch videos about the bugout. The truth is, when you decide to leave the protection of …

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The post How to Make Real Bugout Plans appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

17 Futuristic Weapons You’ve Got to See to Believe

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17 Futuristic Weapons You’ve Got to See to Believe With all the stresses and struggles of daily life and the concern over world ending situations, sometimes its just nice to sit down and look at GUNS! This article is offering up profiles and pictures of 17 weapons that have the look and feel of the …

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The post 17 Futuristic Weapons You’ve Got to See to Believe appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

The Military Phonetic Alphabet Guide

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The Military Phonetic Alphabet Guide Have you ever had trouble talking with someone in a loud setting or over a bad cellphone connection? Even spelling out what you are trying to say can be misinterpreted. The problem with understanding people in those situations is that many words and letters sound the same. A phonetic alphabet …

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The post The Military Phonetic Alphabet Guide appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

North Korea warns ‘nuclear war could break out at any moment’ Reports say US Deploying Two More Aircraft Carriers

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According to the South Korean news outlet Yonhap News, two additional U.S. Aircraft carriers, the USS Ronald Reagan and USS Nimitz, have been deployed to join the USS Carl Vinson, which is currently heading towards the Korean Peninsula. […]

The post North Korea warns ‘nuclear war could break out at any moment’ Reports say US Deploying Two More Aircraft Carriers appeared first on Off Grid Survival – Wilderness & Urban Survival Skills.

99 Places To Learn Survival – Ultimate Prepper Schools List (link)

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Following is an exhaustive list of prepper and survival schools… a good 99 schools by my count, in fact. Many school are local so be sure to look for a course near you… there are even courses listed if you live outside the continental U.S. They cover a wide range of survival skills, though most … Continue reading “99 Places To Learn Survival – Ultimate Prepper Schools List (link)”

Patriot(s, s’,’s) Day.. or is it?

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There’s only a handful of holidays I get worked up over…Independence Day, my birthday, Valentine’s Day, Paratus, and one or two others. And then there’s Patriot’s Day…the moveable feast of the political right.

496e0b948c70c08529eb04cf32e01901

Maybe someone really said this. Maybe not. But the sentiment certainly seems apropos.

First, there’s a bit of ambiguity about the name..is it Patriot’s Day, Patriots Day, or Patriots’ Day? I go with Patriot’s Day. You can figure out which punctuation rings your (liberty) bell. It most certainly is notPatriot Day‘ which is, I think, a holiday in poor taste since  we already have a holiday with that name and ‘re-using’ it is patently disrespectful to the original holiday.

Then there’s the date. To me, Patriot’s Day is April 19. Why? Because that’s when the shooting started. The notion of making it the third Monday of April, regardless of date, for the purpose of creating a three day weekend is abhorrent to me. You make a holiday to remember and act upon a historical event. You don’t make it for the sake of getting a three-day weekend. *

Folks are calling today Patriot’s Day but I’m going to be a stickler….orthodox, if you will…and say that Patriot’s Day is April 19. Period.

* = Having said that, yes, Paratus is a moveable holiday. BUT..Paratus was designed from the get-go to be held on a Friday so you could have a weekend to play with your Paratus gifts. I do not find this inconsistent with my attitude about re-arranging historical holidays to fit modern demands for three-day weekends.

 

4 Things You Must Eat To Avoid Malnutrition

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Nutrition is a topic that doesn’t get much attention in the prepper community, but it should. Let’s say you’re living through a long-term disaster and every day you’re eating rice, gravy, pasta, sauce, and canned soup. You’ll certainly be getting enough calories, but what about vitamins and minerals? Without a well-rounded diet, you will slowly […]

The post 4 Things You Must Eat To Avoid Malnutrition appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

4 Things You Must Eat To Avoid Malnutrition

Nutrition is a topic that doesn’t get much attention in the prepper community, but it should. Let’s say you’re living through a long-term disaster and every day you’re eating rice, gravy, pasta, sauce, and canned soup. You’ll certainly be getting enough calories, but what about vitamins and minerals? Without a well-rounded diet, you will slowly […]

The post 4 Things You Must Eat To Avoid Malnutrition appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

4 Things You Must Eat To Avoid Malnutrition

Nutrition is a topic that doesn’t get much attention in the prepper community, but it should. Let’s say you’re living through a long-term disaster and every day you’re eating rice, gravy, pasta, sauce, and canned soup. You’ll certainly be getting enough calories, but what about vitamins and minerals? Without a well-rounded diet, you will slowly […]

The post 4 Things You Must Eat To Avoid Malnutrition appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Bring on the Sizzle This Summer 8 New Hot Peppers for 2017

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The post Bring on the Sizzle This Summer 8 New Hot Peppers for 2017 is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Some people escape the summer heat by going to the beach, splashing in a pool, or just hiding inside. Not gardeners. The hotter, the better, especially when it comes to growing our delectable hot peppers. When other plants are withering in the heat, our pepper plants are soaking it all in and rewarding us with […]

The post Bring on the Sizzle This Summer 8 New Hot Peppers for 2017 is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Survival Life Article – Sunjack 14W Portable Solar Charger

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The first article I wrote for Survival Life was a review of the Sunjack 14w Portable Solar Charger. Everybody should have multiple power backup sources for their battery-powered devices (i.e., cell phones) in case of an extended power outage. If you live in an area that gets a lot of sunlight, a solar battery charger […]

The post Survival Life Article – Sunjack 14W Portable Solar Charger appeared first on Smart Suburban Survival.

How To Build A Raised Bed Garden

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Raised bed gardening has become a very popular method of gardening in recent years. Their design offers many advantages that make them attractive for gardeners of all ages. These include: Raised bed gardens offer an effective way to raise vegetables intensively in a small space. Raised beds are designed to minimize foot traffic on the…

The post How To Build A Raised Bed Garden appeared first on The Weekend Prepper.

Home Security 101: Last Ditch Plans Are Not Enough – What to Do Instead

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Home Security 101: Last Ditch Plans Are Not Enough – What to Do Instead

Last month I wrote about my own experiences with home invasion and how the whole deal played out (spoiler alert: Good Guy 1 – Bad Guy 0), but I wanted to write some more on the topic with a focus on home security and the reality of intruder deterrents. There’s no one-stop solution to protecting your home. From… Read More

This is just the start of the post Home Security 101: Last Ditch Plans Are Not Enough – What to Do Instead. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


Home Security 101: Last Ditch Plans Are Not Enough – What to Do Instead, written by Thomas Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

Survival Gear Review: The SOG Banner USA Made Knife

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1_featured_SOG_Banner_Knife_assist_folder_blade_profile

1_SOG_Banner_Knife_assist_folder_folded_in_hand_grip_billboardSOG knives in general need no introduction, but there are three new players in the SOG folder lineup that do deserve some special attention. All three are solid black. All three lean heavily towards the tactical side. All three use springs to deploy the blade. And all three are made in America. There is a lone fixed blade in the American made SOG line and it is an outstanding knife named the Pillar and featured here.

By Doc Montana, a Contributing Author to SHTFBlog and SurvivalCache.com

Of the three American made SOG folders, the Banner is the only assisted opening knife, while the Tac Ops and the Strat Ops are both auto opening at the push of a button. The SOG Banner requires a nudge to fire the blade to attention, but after  quarter-inch of movement, the blade fires out of the grip with force and determination all the way to it’s positive lock in the fully open position.

Full Assistance

2_SOG_Banner_Knife_assist_folder_pivot_S35VNMany assisted opening folding knives have a spring mechanism in the grips that launches the blade from the handle but once the initial impulse is over, it is pure momentum that carries the blade the rest of the way. In fact some assists are more like a baseball bat whacking the ball. The punch is short and half-hearted leaving the blade to its own for more than half its journey. With the Banner, the mainspring is around the blade pivot point so there is a near-uniform amount of deployment force on the blade to the very end of its rotation.

Read Also: Let’s Talk Knives: 12 Things You Should Know

To wander in the weeds a little more, SOG calls this feature it’s SAT or SOG Assisted Technology. SOG describes it as a, “balance of opposing high-tension coil springs.” What this means in real life is that the blade only has two natural positions; fully seated in the grip and fully deployed. There is no in-between. Even when fully deployed, the blade remains under tension. The SOG SAT is a solid deployment mechanism that has proven itself more than enough times in other SOG blades including the famous SOG Flash.

Comparing the SOG Banner to the Zero Tolerance 0770CF I reviewed here, the ZT spring applies force to the blade for only one-half of its intended journey while my Benchmade assists are spring loaded to about three-fourths of their rotation. What this all translates to in terms of knife-feel at deployment is the SOG Banner doesn’t just have a satisfying click as the blade rolls to a stop. Instead the SOG Banner’s blade slams home more like the bolt on an AR15 or the slide on a Glock. There is absolutely no ambiguity about where the blade is on the deployment spectrum.

The SOG Banner has a pair of beautifully machined flat-black anodized aluminum scales with non-skeletonized stainless steel inserts. In another break from traditional conformity, the SOG Banner’s inserts appear to be screwed to the scales from inside the knife, and then the scales are screwed together with three torx bolts on the rear, and with the oversized pivot covers on the frontend of the grip. It’s almost as if the SOG Banner was built from the inside out. Perhaps it has to do with the dual-spring action of the knife, but the design is a welcome change from convention. And don’t worry, SOG hasn’t forgotten that the user may want to adjust the play in the blade so a T8 Torx driver will make any desired adjustments in the pivot. But like all auto and semi auto knives, do not disassemble them without eye protection and full knowledge that you will have to send in a bag of whatever parts you can find back to the company for service since there are often special knife-specific tools used in the assembly and reassembly of the knives as well as intimate knowledge of how they all go together and in what order.

Running the Numbers

4_SOG_Banner_Knife_assist_folder_overall_onrockAll that aluminium and steel gives the SOG Banner a weight that SOG lists as between 4.5 and 4.6 ounces, but my scale says is actually 4.370 ounces. Not that anyone could tell the difference. Regardless of the weight, the SOG Banner has an open-spine design meaning you can look right through the grip. This design avoids the pocket lint scoop shape that collects all manner of debris into the blade shell. And should detritus find its way into the handle, the open action gives plenty of cleaning access. Additionally, the external strength of the handle does not require a standoff in the middle of the spine. A standoff is the fancy name for those little internal pillars that give support and structure to the grips. Instead the spine standoff in the SOG Banner is far back in the open spine.

The overall length of the SOG Banner is seven and three-quarters inches from blade tip to outside curve of the pocket clip. The usable blade length is about three inches, and the overall closed length is four-and-three-quarters inches, again to the far end of the pocket clip.

5_SOG_Banner_Knife_assist_folded_MOLLEThe average thickness of the handle is about three-eighths of an inch making this as svelte as the ZT in carbon fiber. Adding to the low-profile pocket carry stature of the SOG Banner is a deep-carry pocket clip. In fact, the catch loop at the far end of the pocket clip is a full eighth-inch beyond the nearest handle scale meaning not just the bulk of the knife rides below the pocket line, but the entire SOG Banner can disappear into the pocket while still securely hooked onto the fabric seam. Pocket clip depth varies, but many knives including Benchmade can leave up to half an inch of knife above the pocket clip. While having the knife ride high can speed deployment, it also makes it more noticeable, and even a little top heavy allowing for unintentional extraction from the pocket whether by active drift or inverted momentum (also known as falling down).

Full Clip

6_SOG_Banner_Knife_assist_folder_pocket_clipAlso unlike most other blade makers, SOG has chosen a more complex reversible pocket clip design for the Banner that actually bolts on the clip to the inside of the knife rather than to the outside of a scale the same way a flagpole is bolted onto the side of a building. While certainly making the engineering of the knife more complex, the payback is substantial. So not only does the pocket clip lower the knife deeper, but it also takes itself out of the thickness equation leaving absolutely nothing between the knife handle and the inside of the pocket. Further, the SOG’s SOG logo is a prominent metal stencil machined into the clip providing just the right amount of texture on the clip to aid in retention as time and deployments smooth out the clip. But, of course, that same SOG logo announces to the world that you have a SOG in your pocket.

The anodized aluminum handle scales are smooth but not slippery. I own a handful of aluminum scaled knives and like to joke that the manufacturers should have applied a coat of teflon to really make the handle slick. I can see the need for a slick housing when the knife will spend almost all of its waking hours deep in the smooth lines of a gentleman’s slacks, but the SOG Banner is no gentleman and certainly won’t be happy in a pair of office trousers. I’d guess blue denim and Carhartt cotton canvas are about as soft a pocket life as this particular SOG Banner will ever have in my world.

A lanyard hole is on the spine-side of the grips base, but it emerges half under the pocket clip. As far as I can tell, the SOG Banner will run well with either the pocket clip or a lanyard, but not necessarily both.

Maximum Lockup

The locking mechanism is single round button on the left side of the frame just above the pivot. The single button on the left is a for a right-handed thumb activation. So while the assist feature is activated from either right or left thumb-stud on the blade spine, the unlocking is natural in the right hand and a touch awkward in the left hand using the index finger to compress the button.

3_SOG_Banner_Knife_assist_folder_lock_button_lockOn the knife’s spine directly above the locking button is a secondary locking slider that will keep the blade from deploying. It will not keep the blade from retracting like many other lock locks do. This lock lock moves out of the lock position when the blade is being closed. But if the lock lock is activated while the blade is closed, the entire system is on hold until the lock slider is pushed forward. And like a gun safety, there is a red indicator painted on the slider giving a visual sign which way the lever is positioned. Red means unlocked.

Check Out: Tree Bark as an Emergency Food

One minor irritation I have with the lock slider is that it is a thin metal nub with three aggressive jimps for traction. However, due to the thinness of the metal, it is much easier and safer to manipulate with a fingernail rather than rubbing precious thumb skin over it. Add the fact that the switch rises a thirty-second of an inch above the spine proper, you will notice the lever under your thumb during normal blade use.

Bladewerk

7_SOG_Banner_Knife_assist_folder_thumbstudThe blade on the SOG Banner is a lightly drop pointed and lightly reverse curved razor sharp slicer. A minor unsharpened swedge or false edge rides the top of the blade two-thirds of the way back to the handle. The blade had no thumb ramp to speak of, but does have some aggressive jimping just beyond the handle. The aggressiveness in not in size, but in sharpness and amount. The jimps are almost like mini saw teeth rather than ridges or notches.

The blade is a hair over one-sixteenth of an inch thick which is a fairly common size. But with the flat-black CeraKote finish, you could say that black is slimming because the blade looks thin. The flat grind gives plenty of wide open featureless space on the blade adding to the blackness, and it’s not until you reach the final business side of the edge that any shiny metal is exposed with nothing but a millimeter of secondary bevel reflecting light.

The mild reverse curve of the blade provides more cutting edge and workpiece focusing compared to a straight or convex belly. Which is exactly why reverse curves are used. They also come in handy when fighting by maintaining more contact with meat and bone during the slice. Yes, ouch.

The tip of the blade is a paper-thin surgical instrument that would have no trouble puncturing any softer material or getting the attention of anyone needing some encouragement to focus. However, the tip would not last long if used as a prybar or screwdriver, two common blade tip uses that really should be at the very top of your Knife Do-Nots.

8_SOG_Banner_Knife_assist_folder_rope_cuttingAll this blade goodness is made with a supersteel named CPM S35VN. In addition to all the bigger, better, and badder qualities of the supersteel, it is an American made product of exceptional performance. According to Crucible Industries, the steel’s maker, S35VN was designed to improve one of my favorite steels, the S30V by substituting niobium carbides for some of the vanadium carbides creating a tougher steel yet one that is easier to machine and polish. If all this chemical rebalancing and letter/number steel names makes your head spin, then just remember that like ammo performance, optics technology, cell phones, and flashlight LEDs, knives might look like their ancestors, but that’s pretty much where the similarities begin and end.

The blade is not designed for woodworking although the handle is exceedingly comfortable in almost all positions. Except for the locking slider on the spine, the smooth handle slabs and melted corners make the SOG Banner a joy to hold. The flat grind is a good choice for food prep, wood shaving, and general use. Plus it is one of the easier edges to sharpen especially in the field with minimal tools. Like nothing but a rock.

The single index finger groove in the handle profile has a stout forward lean providing added slip protection for when this knife is wet or your hands are cold. Aluminium is an excellent conductor of hot and cold so if using this outdoors in freezing weather with bare hands, you will notice its. Additionally the density of the grips with its steel and aluminum shells will hold the cold longer than more gentlemanly pocket knives. But in my freezer tests, the assist mechanism worked the same even when the knife was below zero.

The SOG Banner retails for $254 and street prices will of course be less. But it and its auto siblings are running with the other American big boys now so expect to pay for American made quality and American made performance.

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Introduction to Gunsmithing – Part 2

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Written by John Hertig on The Prepper Journal.

In the previous article, we discussed what gunsmithing is, and saw that it had three components, tools, knowledge and skills.  We started out by looking at some of the universal basic tools of gunsmithing.  In part two, after some final thoughts on tools, we’ll look at knowledge and skills needed in gunsmithing.

Other Tool Considerations

In most cases, a firearm will come with everything securely fastened in place.  If you remove a screw which was “Loc-Tited” in place, you should have a little tube of Loctite on hand to allow you to refasten it.  If a part is “staked” in place (surrounding metal is “mushed” into the part), don’t remove it unless you know what you are doing and have the appropriate staking tool.

A set of magnifying glasses or an Optivisor can help you see small details better, and safety glasses will ensure you can keep seeing anything.  If lighting at your work station will be a problem, a small, bright “headlight” would be in order.   I find the Bushnell headlamps from Sams Club to be small, light, very useful and dirt cheap.

So far we have discussed a good beginning set of general tools for testing, basic maintenance, disassembly and reassembly.  If you get good quality tools and shop wisely, you should be able to get started for well under $400 (not including headspace gauges) and probably under $200 if you go with medium quality.  As to “specialty” tools for each firearm you intend to work on, the trick is to have the ones you need and not waste money on ones for tasks or firearms which are not in your current plans.

If you are going to start changing things while you are inside the firearm, the general tool list gets bigger (and more expensive too).  Here is a gunsmith tool set recommended by AGI, one of the better “distance” gunsmith schools, for a “professional” gunsmith.  The video on the page has more information about the recommended tools than does the printed list and is interesting to watch.

All of the tools they include are “general purpose” tools, so their set does not include any specialized tools for particular models or classes of firearms, which is completely understandable.  They don’t have a clue what firearms you will work on or what procedures you will do.  I think the $2000 estimate mentioned is quite low if you get good quality tools (some of the ones they show look like they could have come from a “bargain bin”), and if you add specialized tools, the total tends to really zoom upwards.  In case you were wondering what the top end training package which includes all these tools as well as all the training runs, it is $15,000.  But unless you are becoming a “professional” (when there are tax deductions and professional discounts available), you don’t need all these tools or education to begin with.  Get the basics, and add the other items as you need them.

Some of the tools you can get from common tool sources, or Amazon or eBay.  For some of the more esoteric ones you will probably have to go to a gunsmith tool supplier.  Brownells used to be the standard for gunsmith tools, and they are still around today, although the ratings of some of their tools seem to indicate the quality of some items may have declined.  I really don’t know of another “go to” place for specialty tools, although many of the standard tools and a few specialty tools are available from online firearms stores such as Midway or Optics Planet, or my new favorite, Primary Arms.  Let your fingers do the walking through the internet.

It is a good idea to have a specific container and location for your gunsmithing tools.  If you mix them in with your “regular” tools, you will tend to use them for non-gunsmithing tasks, and they can get scattered or worn out early.  If your set is fairly small, a portable tool case or pouch may do.  For a medium-sized set, a multi-drawer toolbox or two is just the ticket.  I used a four drawer toolbox for assembly, disassembly, lubrication, adjustment and measuring tools and supplies, and a three drawer one with tools and supplies for making modifications, which worked out perfectly for my needs and still could be carried in one trip.  For a large or professional set, you want a room or part of a room, with workbench, power tool stands, peg board and tool drawer systems.

Knowledge

This one is tricky.  For convenience, we divide this into “general” and “specific”.  General knowledge is the “basics”; including types of firearms and how each type works (or is supposed to work), basic tools and their usage, “universal” disassembly, reassembly and minor modifications.  This will be covered in a good gunsmithing curriculum, or you can get a good handle on this from books, internet articles and online videos.

Gunsmithing the AR-15, The Bench Manual

“Specific” knowledge is knowledge some of which you don’t need – until you do.  For instance, details of a specific model firearm you don’t have any immediate plans to work on or a specific procedure which you don’t currently plan to perform.  Since it is somewhat impractical to learn it all (and remember it 10 years later when you finally need it), generally this is best covered (or relearned) by reference books (paper or online) which you refer to as needed.  If you plan to specialize (use some specific knowledge a lot), then learning that subset of specific knowledge would seem the only practical methodology.  In this case, you may be able to get it from self-study, or you may be better served going to classes in that area of study.

For classes in gunsmithing, there are a number of possibilities.  If you have a local gunsmithing school or junior college/trade school/specialty school which offers courses, that may be a viable option.  It will be expensive and probably take up to two years for a degree, although a “certificate” may be a shorter time option.  If you don’t have live classes locally, then generally attending classes “away” is not practical, since not only are there the tuition costs, but lodging and other expenses.  Not to mention existing and temporary employment.  In the “old days”, they had mail order courses, which have been replaced with online training and DVD based training.  If you can keep engaged, some can provide INFORMATION as well as or even better than local “live” classes (you can repeat something as many times as you need), but there are some severe weaknesses.  Many of these don’t have a method for you to get questions answered, and none provide guided “hands-on” experience.

As a point for comparison, AGI’s basic “108 hour” video course is about $5000.  On the other hand, Phoenix State University claims their online training is “the best and quickest and cheapest”, at $99 for the basic certification, $149 for the intermediate one and $199 for the top one.  I’ve always heard that “if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is not true”, and that seems to be the case with PSU, based on the huge number of similar complaints (them not providing what was promised and using delaying tactics until the grace period for a refund has expired) I found about them.  A legitimate online course seems to run about $1500.

The instructions which come with specialized tools you buy is “knowledge”.  As a hint, store them in a good location.  When I dusted off my set, I found that I had forgotten not only how to use some of the specialized tools, but even what they were for.  If the instructions had not been in one of the drawers of the toolbox, I might still be trying to figure a couple of them out.

Skills

“Skill” is the difference between “knowing how to do something” and “being able to do it”.  If you have a fair amount of mechanical experience, you might be able to become competent at many gunsmithing skills fairly quickly through trial and error.  If you are not mechanically-minded, you will likely need to be shown how to do something, and then practice it.  The best place for this is gunsmith classes which have guided “laboratory” sessions.  If you have a school locally, at a reasonable price, you are lucky.  Otherwise, online or video classes may be able to show you what to do, but you won’t be able to do it until you have done it, and that may take someone who has done it before watching over your shoulder or even guiding your hands.  You may be able to find a local gunsmith who will work with you; perhaps even set up an apprentice relationship.

The other option is just to try things on your own.  Here’s a hint:  the first time you try something, don’t try it on an expensive firearm or critical firearm part…  In fact, go to gun shows and get the cheapest beaters you can find, even non-working or partial ones, to practice on.  To learn skills, videos are often better than written descriptions; being set up in front of the TV screen is about as close as you can get to a live expert present.

To be clear, there is no “distance” course which can provide you skills.  The best ones can guide you in attaining the skills on your own.

Parts

A functioning firearm generally has all the parts it needs included.  But parts break or wear out.  And if you take the firearm apart, small parts can get lost.  Sometimes stock parts are sub-standard, such as the MIM (Metal Injection Molded) extractor in modern Remington 870s replacing the machined part in older production.  Many aftermarket companies put out parts which are easier to use, more accurate, more durable or just cooler looking.  Improving the functionality of a firearm, such as replacing the safety with an extended version, is often wise.  For disaster planning, having some spares for firearm parts which are at risk of breaking or loss is wise.  Things like a firing pin, extractor, and springs and pins seem a good choice, and usually are not terribly costly.  Some sources even have gathered together a set of parts in an “Oops Kit”.

Gunsmithing, Why Bother?

You may have noticed that I am suggesting that you spend money on tools and possibly education, and perhaps worse, a significant amount of time.  Presumably you are already spending money on getting survival supplies and time learning survival skills; I’m not saying this is MORE important than any other skill or equipment.  But if you plan on relying on firearms in a crisis situation, you had better be able to keep them working, and if one happens to stop working (or if you come across one which is not working), get it working again.  It might even save you money in the long run if you don’t have to always go running to an expensive gunsmith when a firearm needs repair or modifications for optimal utility.  It can be a source of extra income or an alternate career.  Even if you can’t see gunsmithing as a worthwhile part of your personal survival plans, remember that gunsmithing will be a “primitive profession” which will have a lot of value in bartering in a post apocalypse world.

The post Introduction to Gunsmithing – Part 2 appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

DIY Projects: 4 Ways To Build An Alcohol Stove

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If you’re an outdoor enthusiast or just well versed in the fine arts of prepping, I bet you already know about alcohol stoves, either DIY or commercially available ones. The thing is, if you’re looking for the lightest, cheapest and most reliable stove possible, the alcohol stove is the one for you.

There are plenty of companies out there who manufacture and sell alcohol stoves, but the good news is that you can build your own for next to nothing while using basic tools and skills.

There are a few myths and lies out there about DIY alcohol stoves. For example, some say that they don’t really work and they’re not reliable. Yes, they actually do work in real life, just ask old school hikers or your local bum.

Alcohol Stove – Myths Debunked

An alcohol stove is not suited for just any situation, as it has obvious limitations.  For example, a small DIY alcohol stove is not the ideal tool for melting large amounts of snow or for cooking food for a family of ten.

A homemade, lightweight and compact alcohol stove makes for the perfect companion while camping, hiking or backpacking solo. Thousands of outdoor enthusiasts have been using them regularly for decades now with zero complaints, so yes, alcohol stoves do work admirably in their niche.

Another myth about alcohol stoves is that they’re not reliable. Very fake news folks. A well-built alcohol stove will last you forever, as it has no moving parts, i.e. it’s that kind of “Russian design”, simple and sturdy. Also there are no filters to get clogged and so on and so forth.

The most common type of DIY project is a soda-can alcohol stove; the point is, even if it “breaks”, you can build another one on the spot with readily available materials (back to that in a jiffy), so the reliability issue is pure nonsense.

Some say that alcohol stoves are dangerous. Again, very fake news, considering that playing with fire is always dangerous, hence in that regard all stoves are “dangerous” if you’re not paying attention.

The problem with alcohol stoves is that if you knock them over while cooking, the fuel inside can easily spill.

Just remember a few simple rules while cooking with these bad boys and you’ll be fine: don’t cook on flammable surfaces, keep flammable materials away from your lit stove, always keep a bottle of water nearby when cooking (or a fire extinguisher, whatever), be careful when cooking during the day as the alcohol flame is almost invisible (don’t get burned), avoid cooking in windy weather as it makes controlling the flame difficult, don’t add fuel if your stove is already burning, never cook inside your tent, and avoid using your alcohol stove in enclosed areas which lack proper ventilation (think carbon monoxide poisoning).

Also, never leave the burning stove unattended and, after using it, let it to cool down for 10 minutes before handling  it.

Another thing about DIY alcohol stoves is that they have a bad rep for crushing easily. That’s somewhat true, considering that they’re often built using soda cans, which are basically thin sheets of aluminum.

Even the ones manufactured from (tougher) tin cans can get crushed if you step on them, but that’s a feature, not a bug! I am only kidding; however, the simple solution to the issue is not to step on them. Store them inside a hard sided box/container like your cook pot when you’re not using’em.

Finally, there’s another myth about alcohol stoves not working at high altitudes and/or in low temperatures. I can tell you from firsthand experience that a DIY alcohol stove works just fine at 6,000 feet above sea level, so for all practical purposes, assuming that you’re not climbing Everest using DIY alcohol stoves, you’ll be just fine.

The thing is, given the fact that the oxygen content in the atmosphere decreases with altitude,  an alcohol stove (or any other open-flame type of stove) will not be as efficient at 5000 feet as it is at sea level, but then again, that holds true for any type of fire.

Also, I’ve used soda can stoves in temperatures as low as 15 degrees Fahrenheit and without noticing a degrading in terms of performance. Just to give you a picture about how efficient these babies are, I’ve read that the Finnish and Swedish army uses alcohol stoves all year round, and it gets pretty cold out there in northern Europe (think -10 Fahrenheit winters).

ENERGY SAVING PLAN – Find out how you can save energy following two simple steps! 

How to DIY an Alcohol Stove

Now with the misconceptions taken care of, let’s concentrate on the DIY part.

Why DIY instead of buying one? Well, first, it’s lots of fun doing things on your own, especially if you’re into prepping. Secondly, you’ll save money in the process and third, you may end up caught in a hairy situation someday with no hardware store around, so you’ll be forced to improvise your own gear.

And yes, a DIY alcohol stove can be improvised with ease almost anywhere in the world, provided you have the fuel available. The simplest alcohol stove can be built using nothing more than 2 empty cans of soda, a nail for puncturing holes, a razor blade, a penny and a thumbtack. Yes indeed, it’s that simple folks.

As per the fuel, you can buy large amounts of (at least 70%) methanol/methyl alcohol/rubbing alcohol at any hardware store for a few pennies.

Alcohol Stove Comparison

If you’re the picky type of person, take a look at this alcohol stove comparison and make up your own mind about what type of “design” you want to concentrate on.

Video first seen on ITS Tactical / Imminent Threat Solutions

The Beverage Can Stove

The easiest DIY project is the beverage can stove. There are other ideas, usually more complicated, but the beverage can stove is the hikers all-time favorite. Its beauty is its simplicity, like a Swiss watch, if you know what I mean.

In the first step, you’ll have to cut the bases of the 2 cans approximately 1.5 inches from the bottoms.

Next, drill the burner holes in the top can, including the fuel drainage hole, then there’s the cutting of the top can. The base of the bottom should be filled with a material that will soak up the alcohol (acts like a wick); for example, fine sand or even more fancy stuff, like perlite (a siliceous rock, easy to find at gardening centers).

In the next step, you’ll fit the 2 parts of the stove together; just take a look at the next video tutorial and you’ll see about the fine details.

Video first seen on IntenseAngler.

Just remember to prime the stove before use, i.e. you’ll have to pour a tsp. of fuel in the dimple of the stove (on top) and light it up. In this way, you’ll heat the fuel inside, which will evaporate, and your oven will magically start working.

Here’s another video about how to make a soda can/beer can stove, which compares 2 types of designs.

Video first seen on Andrew W

The Tornado Wick Jet Alcohol Stove

Here’s a Tornado Wick Jet Alcohol Stove, a fancy DIY project by all means and a more elaborate one, which is more of an exercise in cool design and mad skills.

Video first seen on tetkoba’s Alcohol Stove Addict

The Tin Can Stove

An alternative to this relatively flimsy (yet very easy to DIY) beverage can stove is the tin can stove. This baby is not made of aluminum but from tin, which makes it more stable, hence more difficult to knock over.

Also it’s stronger and less prone to accidental crushing. Finally, steel retains heat better than aluminum.  Soup/baked bean cans are made of tin for example.

The problem with this type of DIY alcohol stove is that tin is harder to cut/process than aluminum.

Here’s an idea (this guy doesn’t use tin cans but that’s not the point) and you’ll see what type of tools are required for processing stronger tin.

Video first seen on Nick Van Leuven

The Cream Box Stove

Video first seen on Mr. Llega

Here’s an idea for an alcohol stove improvised from a Nivea cream box (made of tin) and it makes for the best of both worlds, i.e. it’s not aluminum made (it’s stronger) and it doesn’t require too much effort to build it (all you have to do is to drill a few holes).

If you have any question or comments, feel free to speak your mind in the dedicated section below. Good luck, have fun!

This article has been written by Chris Black for Survivopedia. 

Resurrection and Rebirth

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     You might notice something different about my blog today… the Holy Spirit has been showing me that it is time to be my authentic self and reveal my real name.  Back when I began writing this blog in December of 2011 (it’s hard to imagine that it’s been that long ago!) I was writing from a different spiritual perspective.  Although I have always written for God, then my focus was on the experiences of this world and how my faith in God affected my interpretation of my worldview. Therefore, at the time, I thought it best to write under a pen name that invoked my self-proclaimed purpose [to awaken the sleeping masses and “ring the bell”] to get their attention. After all, who would be drawn to read a blog by a no-name woman, with no credibility. Thus, I came up with a name that described what I was trying to accomplish, and Belle Ringer was born.
    Now, more than five years later, my focus is on the spiritual realm, the Kingdom of Heaven on earth, and my higher calling to be a true Child of God.  What happens in this world is secondary; although it still very much influences how I serve my God and fellow man — I am in this world to reflect the image of Christ and to continue His works; but I am not of this world. It is time to speak in truth and genuineness… and therefore, time to be my real self … Pam Kohler.  Granted, to the world my name still holds no credibility.  But to my God, who has known me since before the foundation of the world, it is who I honestly am; and I am not ashamed to proclaim Him to this world, using my legal name.

     But I also wanted to honor all the people who have trusted me and my husband, Mark — people who have come to us in their true identities as hurting souls; people with spirits so low and tormented that we were often their last hope of getting free.  Make no mistake — these people came to us not because they thought we could save them; but because somehow they knew our faith could support them until they could find Jesus on their own.  And we always made it clear that it is Jesus and the Holy Spirit who do the redemptive work — not us!
     We are no different than anyone else. We have our own stories of sin-filled lives and emotional traumas. We still have to fight to keep from believing the lies that the Father of Lies would like to dump on us.  But God took us from our ordinary, worldly lives into an extraordinary spiritual relationship with Him, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit.  It has been a step-by-step process of seeing Them unpeeled like an onion; layer after layer bringing us into newfound freedoms from the bondage of the devil. And it is work that needs to be done in the lives of everyone Jesus created.
     It is rewarding work, yet at times exhaustive. We have seen people rise from the depths of torment to live new, resurrected lives of joy in the Lord.  We have also seen people slide back into torment when they don’t take responsibility for keeping their freedom.  We have seen Unsaved people grab hold of Jesus, weep at the presence of the Holy Spirit, and soar like an eagle with their newfound faith.  At the same time, it has been our experience that lifelong Christians are the toughest ones to let Jesus heal their inner wounds.  The years of Church doctrine, man-made traditions, and flawed theology must all be broken down before the Saved are willing to let their spirits meet with Jesus. And we have, sadly, lost a young man who loved Jesus so deeply, accepted Jesus’s forgiveness, yet could not forgive himself because he believed the devil’s lie that he was unworthy of the Lord’s sacrifice for him. We just ran out of time to help him. That day, Jesus wept, and so did we.
     The Enemy may think he scored a victory, and that we will be convinced that we are waging a losing [spiritual] war — that we can’t get to enough people to introduce them to the healing power of Jesus — that the numbers of hurting souls are too great, and the scales are balanced in his favor.  But it is in honor of that young man, who trusted us enough to reveal his true self and allow us to help him pour out his pain to Jesus, that we will continue to battle the Darkness until our last breath.
     Because with every one of the people God has brought into our lives, we know without a doubt that Satan is real and spiritual attacks are genuine.  Whether you are Saved, Unsaved, or Ambivalent you are a target of the roaring lion who is looking for someone to devour.  But you only have to receive Jesus, the Son of the Living God, into your heart, believing that His death on the Cross paid for your sins, and you can have the hope of a resurrected life, just as He was resurrected to sit on the right hand of the throne of God.  There is no sin that cannot be covered by His blood!
     So, it is with extreme humbleness that I offer my authentic self to you, the readers, and I thank you for sticking by someone whom you did not really know through all these years.  I pledge to you that I will continue to reveal the Truth as my Lord and the Holy Spirit reveal it to me, and that I will always be here for those who need a listening ear and a willing heart. The [Spiritual] Harvest is plentiful, and the Lord can count on me and my husband to be faithful workers in the field of souls … right to the very end.  God Bless You All!

Colossians 1:29    “For in this I also labor and fight with the help of the Power that is given to me”. (Aramaic Bible in Plain English)

31 Drought Tolerant Plants & Trees for Your Survival Garden

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by Jordan

This past summer much of the U.S. suffered prolonged droughts. In many areas wells ran dry and towns implemented water use limits. Farmers, gardeners, and homesteaders watched as their crops wilted and died. While this was devastating for any commercial growers, everyone else simply made a few more trips to the local grocery store. Unfortunately after TEOTWAWKI that won’t be an option. You’ll have to rely primarily on your garden and food storage.

Even if you’re plan is to bug in in an area that has never before experienced droughts you should still consider it a possibility. With our changing climate droughts can happen where you’d least expect them, just as many New England residents discovered this summer.

Obviously there are general garden practices you can use to keep your garden moist. Don’t leave bare soil, always use mulch or a cover crop. Collect rainwater and install a grey-water system. Create swales and terraces to prevent run off. However no matter what you do if you don’t have enough water and you’re growing moisture loving crops they will inevitably fail. Selecting at least a few crops from the list below can help you survive a drought even during a SHTF scenario.

Prickly Pear

This cactus is a hardy native of parts of North and South America. It’s not only drought tolerant but also very cold hardy for a cactus and can be grown as far north as Canada. Plus both its pads and fruit are edible and there are spineless varieties available.

Loquats

They’re a small citrus like fruit tree that once established needs very little care or water. Their fruits are also small but flavorful. They can only be grown outdoors in areas where winter temperatures don’t fall below 30°F.

Hazelnuts

As many California farmers know getting a good crop of nuts from trees like almonds without a lot of water can be difficult. Thankfully hazelnuts which grow on a small tree or shrub are relatively drought resistant, perfect for a SHTF scenario.

Flint & Dent Corn

These types of corn were grown by Native Americans in many hot climates including South America and the South Western U.S. Just like the Native Americans did, you can make your corn crop extra drought resistant by growing a vining plant like winter squash beneath the corn to help shade the soil. They’re an excellent staple crop for preppers concerned about the possibility of drought.

Burdock

Burdock grows wild in many places but adding it to your garden and caring for it will allow it to grow larger roots. Burdock roots, fruits, seeds, and leaves are all used as herbal remedies for a wide variety of ailments. The roots are also often added to Asian dishes like stir fry or pickled for winter food storage.

Seaberries

Though a relatively uncommon plant, seaberry is a favorite among many permaculture experts. It both drought and cold hardy and its fruit is high in vitamins A,C,K and E as well as saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and minerals.

Goji Berries

If you’re a fan of health food stores you’re probably familiar with the goji berry. They’re believed by many to be a “superfruit” and are high in many vitamins and minerals. Once established they do well with very little water making them ideal for drought situations.

Purslane

Don’t let purslane’s reputation as an annoying weed get to you. It’s actually a great plant that was grown and eaten by the Native Americans. You can simply save seed from a wild plant or just let it grow in your garden. However for larger more succulent plants there are cultivated varieties available.

Pomegranates

This tree only grows in the south but if you can grow it you definitely should. It does well in hot, dry conditions and has little pest problems. If you really want a pomegranate and live in the north there are also varieties that tolerate being grown in pots.

Grapes

Some grapes are drought resistant while others like plentiful water. Look for varieties that are native to the Mediterranean.

Fava Beans

Fava beans need moisture but they will grow in such cold temperatures that they can be grown in the fall, winter, or spring when rainfall is less of an issue in many places.

Jujubes

Also called red or Korean date, the jujubes are small red fruits that grow on small tree native to Southern Asia. Along with being tasty and drought tolerant jujubes are thought to help with several ailments such as poor circulation, bone problems, and sleep issues.

Tomatillos

Cultivated by the Aztecs, these guys are super easy to grow. They don’t mind little water and aren’t heavy feeders like tomatoes. Try them fried or in salsa verde.

Rosemary

A tasty herb and powerful medicinal, rosemary is native to the Mediterranean and will tolerate dry, hot conditions. As an added bonus it can be harvested year round in many areas.

Kale

While kale is probably best known for its cold hardiness it will also survive with little moisture. Plus you can grow it in early spring or in the fall when there’s typically more precipitation and dry gardens aren’t as big of a problem.

Sage

Sage needs hardly any water and is essential for good biscuits and gravy! It’s also a hardy perennial and is often used for spiritual and medicinal purposes like digestive problems, memory loss, and depression.

Amaranth

Amaranth is ancient grain that the Aztecs cultivated thousands of years ago. It grows like a weed and thrives in a hot, dry climate. When it’s young you can harvest and eat the greens or you can let the plant mature and harvest the grains.

Chickpeas

Chickpeas are nitrogen fixing, legumes and are heat loving, drought tolerant plants. They’re full of protein and easy to grow, perfect for your survival garden.

Jerusalem Artichokes

This sunflower relative can grow almost anywhere and offers filling tubers for your survival garden. It grows so well though that it can take over gardens so be sure to keep it contained.

Sorghum

Not many people grow sorghum any more but it’s an excellent choice for a survival garden. Its canes can be harvested early and pressed for sap to make molasses or it can be allowed to mature and used as a grain.

Asparagus

When you initially plant asparagus it will require watering but once established it’s very hardy. It will also live for years allowing you continued harvests of one of the earliest spring vegetables.

Rhubarb

Just like asparagus, rhubarb requires plenty of water to get going but will then thrive for years and years with little care. Though it’s not a fruit it’s probably the closest you’ll get to fresh fruit really early in the spring and it’s full of vitamin C. Note that you only consume the stalk as the leaves are poisonous. Some people make natural pesticides from the leaves.

Early Tomato Varieties

Many early tomato varieties, especially cherry tomatoes will mature before the hottest and driest part of summer and can do well with less moisture.

Swiss Chard

Another hardy green like kale, swiss chard tolerates both cold and hot, dry weather. It can be harvested as a “cut and come again” green or let to grow really big as it doesn’t bolt quickly like lettuce does and is still edible even if it does go to seed.

Asian Greens

There’s many varieties of Asian greens available like mizuna and tat soi. Much like kale they’re loved for their cold tolerance and can be grown in seasons with cooler, wetter weather. Their small size also means that they require less moisture.

Dry Beans

Dry beans are an excellent survival plant. They’re nitrogen fixing and full of protein. Pole bean varieties like Cherokee Trail of Tears or Hidatsa Shield Figure that can be grown in combination with a shade crop like squash are ideal for dry climates.

Globe Artichokes

You may picture globe artichokes as a southern crop but there are varieties they can actually be grown as an annual in cooler climates. Either way they require little water and are a tasty addition to your garden.

Gourds

They may not seem like a great meal but gourds are actually a really cool survival plant. Since they were cultivated gourds like the birdhouse or bottle variety have been used to store food and carry water. Gourds for holding liquids are typically coated on the inside with beeswax first. Plus they’ll grow with minimal water and care.

Early/Small Pepper Varieties

Much like tomatoes, the early and smallest pepper varieties require little watering because they finish before the hottest days of summer.

Ground Cherries

Ground cherries are not true cherries instead grow similarly to tomatillos. They even have a paper husk and are equally drought tolerant. However they taste more like cherries than tomatillos and are excellent eaten fresh or in pies and other desserts.

Squashes

Many varieties of both winter and summer squash do well with little water. Vining varieties have the added benefit of shading the soil for themselves and other tall plants.

When you’re planning a survival garden you’re trying to plan for an unpredictable future. You have to prepare the best you can for as many possibilities you can. No matter where you live water shortages are a possibility. Whether there’s such bad droughts you have little water to spare or getting water to your garden is a huge amount of work having plants that will thrive in low moisture conditions can save your life.

What SHTF garden problems have you planned for?

Don’t Forget to Include this Essential Ingredient in Your Food Storage

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com Besides basic things like food and water, we take for granted many other items we use on a daily basis such as toilet paper, soap, toothpaste, trash bags, clothing, etc.  One item that came to mind is salt.  I decided we need to store more salt:  it is inexpensive and plentiful now, but if we were to run out, we would really miss it.  For hundreds of years, salt was not readily available […]

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Lightning Facts and Fiction

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Thunderstorm cloud, central Kansas   Observing the lightning within a thunderstorm, especially a severe thunderstorm is an awesome site to behold. A few nights ago while staying in central Kansas I had the opportunity to view several simultaneous severe thunderstorms which were producing stunning lightning in a continuous non-stop light show. I observed the enormous […]

Using Tech In Your Doomstead After TSHTF

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1_featured_tech_keyboard

1_computer_tshtfIs there a place for modern technology after TSHTF?  Some would argue that there isn’t, but I believe that modern tech offers significant advantages over those that don’t have it.  If you have a way to make electricity after the grid goes down and you have some high tech gizmos in your back pocket, you’ll be in a better position to survive and thrive because of it.  Before we go any further those of you who know me are going to say, “Holy cow!  Jarhead is saying use tech!” because most of you know how I feel about people’s reliance on GPS, smart phones, and other electronic gadgets.  Let me qualify this article by saying that I’m not a Luddite.  I happen to love technology because it gives us instant access to all the information in the world in the palm of your hand.  (Most of us watch cute kitten videos instead of reading Plato’s Republic though).  Having a piece of technology in your possession can sharply increase your odds of surviving or allow you to do something you might not be able to do without it, such as navigate through a city or see what’s over that hill without actually having to climb up and take a look.  However, it’s always a good idea to make sure you have a backup for your systems and a backup of a backup for your important systems.  For example:  you should know how to read a map and compass or do math in case your GPS or spreadsheet doesn’t work.  But this article is about how to use technology as a force magnifier, so let’s get to it.

By Jarhead Survivor, a Contributing Author of SurvivalCache and SHTFBlog

Electronics are only as good as the grid of course, but if you have a solar array set up, windmill, or other way of naturally producing electricity you can still benefit from having some electronic devices around.  More on this later.

Potential Uses of Technology

3_network-cable-ethernet-computer-159304If communication is cut off  from the outside, you can still manage an internal network that would allow you to share information in your group.  If you can set up a network using TCP/IP (which stand for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol and is basically a way for computers to communicate), which most people do these days using a router inside your home, then you can have several devices talking to each other.  I won’t get into a networking class, but having your devices able to communicate with each other is a powerful tool.

Check Out: Weaponized Nanotechnology is a Huge Threat to Humanity

By the way – TCP/IP was developed by DARPA as a way for computers to communicate after a disaster such as a nuclear war.

Some things a computer would be good for is tracking crop schedules, how much food you have on hand, creating a database for parts such as nuts, bolts and the million other things that make up a compound, and you could keep track of the events in your compound for easy retrieval.

PDF’s (Printable Document Format’s) are great for storing and retrieving information.  You can have books on a million topics, but instead of a library the size of Nebraska you can keep everything on one hard drive for instant retrieval.  You might want to have the more important topics in book format as a backup, but you can never have too many books to reference!

Training videos are another option.  You can take videos with your phone on how to do certain things in your compound such as stand guard duty, change a tire, cook a meal, shoot a bow and arrow, clean a gun, etc, and make them available to members of your community.

If you have surveillance equipment it can be run from your laptops.  Small security webcams today use small amounts of electricity and it might be worthwhile to have a few cameras watching the front and back gates to let you know if there are unfriendly’s in the area.

Then there’s the entertainment factor to consider.  We New-Age Homo-sapiens love to be entertained and today that’s delivered through the phone in our pocket or via a tablet or laptop.  If you have movies downloaded to your laptop, tablet, or phone you don’t need to have an Internet connection in order watch it.  This does take up space on your storage, so choose your movies wisely!

If you wanted to get fancy and had the know-how you could always set up a server (you could use a laptop for this) that would stream media from inside the Doomstead.

Computers

2_laptopA laptop can have several uses.  As mentioned earlier you can use it to manage your inventory.  If you’re in a large compound or Doomstead, you’ll need some way to efficiently manage your materiel.  Sure, you could do it by hand and I encourage you to have a paper backup, but you can’t beat a search query on a database for finding whatever it is you’re looking for.

I would recommend laptops over desktops because they have less electrical overhead.  A desktop PC needs a monitor in addition to the CPU, which also consumes electricity.  Laptops also have internal batteries, so if the power goes out unexpectedly it will stay on and you won’t lose any data. The idea is to keep your energy usage at a minimum.

Tablets

1_tabletThe advantage of a tablet is that you can get some of the same functionality as a laptop with less electricity consumption.  Here’s an article from PC World a few years ago comparing laptop and tablets (RAM, Display, Storage, Battery Life, etc.)  Everything else aside if you’re looking at it from strictly a power consumption standpoint the tablet is probably your best option.

Related: Surefire Firepak Review

I won’t get into the technical details here because my experience is most people don’t care what kind of RAM a device has.  What matters is how much RAM it has and in the computing world more is better.  If you have an old laptop at home the one single best thing you can probably do to speed it up is to add more RAM to it.

Smartphones

At the low end of the power consumption scale is the smartphone.  Smaller screens, less processing power, but still handy even if you lose your cell connection.  Why?  Because your smartphone is essentially a small tablet when you strip away it’s cell phone capabilities.  You can run different apps on it and it uses less electricity.

Communications

A short wave radio could allow you to communicate long distances if have one.  During a crisis this might be an invaluable to find out what’s happening in the world. A good set of Walkie Talkies would be good for local communications.  An example would be an OP outside the camp communicating with a command center.

Energy

5_solar-panel-array-power-plant-electricity-power-159160As your ability to make electricity decreases so do the options for the electronics you’ll be able to run.  If you’re in a well set up doomsday bunker with generators and enough fuel to run for two years, you’ll be ok for awhile.  If you’re in a smaller community with just solar and/or wind and a battery bank to store the electricity you’ll want to be more conservative with your energy expenditure.

If you’re in a tipi (or tent) with a small solar panel and a deep cycle battery (this is basically my set up) then charging a tablet or cell phone would be pretty easy as long as the sun shines.  In this case you might want to build a solar energy generator.  The battery is relatively heavy, but once you have it in place it works great.  Or you could Make your own USB solar charger if you’ve just got a cell phone you want to keep charged.

None of this really matters if the SHTF event is some kind of Carrington Event or other EMP event like a nuclear war of course. If that’s the case, I hope you have suitable plans for light, cooking, acquiring water, self protection and all the other things we talk about on this blog.

Conclusion

If you have the ability to create electricity in your bug-out/bug-in location having a set of well thought technology devices on-hand could allow you to do things others can’t (like communicate long distance) giving you an edge over others.  The devices will be dependent on the amount of electricity you can generate, so keep that in mind during your planning phase.

What other uses are there for technology after TSHTF?  I’ve only scratched the surface here, so shout out your ideas below. Questions?  Comments?  Sound off below!

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10 Selfless Acts Amid Terrible Tragedies That Will Blow Your Mind

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Preppers aren’t exactly known for having much faith in humanity. If they did, they probably wouldn’t become preppers in the first place. They know how people behave when the chips are down. They know how quickly civilized people can turn into vicious animals when they haven’t eaten for a few days. So they stock up on the weapons they think will protect them from these animals, and the food they need to keep themselves from turning into animals themselves.

Of course, they’re not crazy for trying to be prepared. We turn on the news or check our social media feeds every night, and what do we see? A cavalcade of horror. Terrorist attacks, mob violence, selfishness, ignorance, and flippant threats of war. What would really be crazy, is to see all of that on a daily basis and not want to be prepared.

However, there’s a flip-side to these behaviors that everyone, prepper or not, needs to understand. On the one hand; yes, we’re an incredibly violent and cruel species that is capable of mind-boggling horrors when we’re trying to survive. Hell, some of the things we do when we aren’t desperate are still nightmare inducing. But what most people forget is that in our darkest moments, we’re capable of immeasurable acts of compassion and altruism.


That’s the unique duality of our species; and it’s a duality that totally separates us from every other creature on this planet. When we’re bad, we’re worse than any animal. That’s why we prep. But at our best, people are capable of awe-inspiring acts of kindness. Your average individual human is capable of more mercy and selflessness than the members of most entire species put together.


10 Acts of Human Kindness to Restore Your Faith in Humanity

And in case you’ve forgotten that fact, I have a few reminders for you. Below are ten examples of people who were utterly selfless in the midst of terrible tragedies and disasters.

Ken Bellau

Image courtesy of People.com

Hurricane Katrina still haunts the people of New Orleans. To this day much of the city is still in ruins, and by most estimates, between 1,200 and 1,800 people died after the levees broke. However, the death toll might have been significantly higher if not for the efforts of one man.

Ken Bellau is a 10th generation New Orleans resident who took it upon himself to rescue his stranded neighbors. He arrived in the city from an overseas trip just after the storm hit. After commandeering an abandoned fishing boat, he spent three weeks searching for people and pets, and giving them rides to higher ground. For much of this ordeal Ken was working alone. Aside from the typical hazards that you’d expect someone to deal with in these circumstances, he faced threats from criminals who wanted to take his boat, and dodged bullets from suspicious residents who thought he was a looter.

Eventually Ken made contact with the National Guard. Between his boat and his knowledge of the area, he proved to be a valuable asset for the Guards’ relief effort, and went on numerous rescue missions with them. It’s estimated that his efforts helped save at least 400 people.

Reverend Bennie Newton

Over the past couple of years there have been many notable riots in the United States, but they all pale in comparison to the 1992 Rodney King riots in Los Angeles. It’s estimated that between April and May of 1992, 55 people were killed in these riots, and over 2,000 were injured. It was so bad that order wasn’t restored until the Marines and the National Guard showed up.

Amid that chaos, was a young Guatemalan immigrant and self-employed construction worker by the name of Fidel Lopez. On April 29th, he was pulled out of his truck by several rioters, who proceeded to beat him to within an inch of his life. Once unconscious, the thugs attempted to slice off one of his ears, spray painted his torso and genitals black, and doused him in gasoline.

What happened next was unexpected to say the least. A priest by the name of Reverend Newton arrived on the scene after hearing about some of the violence being carried out in the area. He waded through the violent mob and shielded Lopez. Clad in a priest’s garb and carrying a bible in one hand, he shouted to the crowd “kill him, and you’ll have to kill me, too!” Surprisingly, the mob backed off. The reverend carried Lopez to his truck, and drove him to the hospital.

The Canadian Town of Gander

9/11 is a moment in history that every American vividly remembers. We remember the planes exploding, the desperate office workers plunging to their deaths, the towers falling, and the dust caked pedestrians fleeing for their lives. Unfortunately, what we don’t remember is the boundless hospitality of one small Canadian town in Newfoundland.

After the attack, all civilian air traffic over the United States and Canada was ordered to be grounded. 38 planes carrying nearly 7,000 people from around the world were forced to land at the airport outside of Gander, a town of 10,000 people. Obviously, a town of that size didn’t have nearly enough hotel rooms to house all of those people.

So the people of Gander and other nearby towns simply opened their doors to these complete strangers and housed them. The locals ignored the advice of the police, who feared that some of the stranded passengers could be terrorists. Nearly every church, school, and restaurant pitched in by housing or feeding them, often free of charge. Local bus drivers ended a strike to help drive these strangers around, and pharmacies in the town provided medication, also free of charge. This went on for four days until the airspace was reopened, and everyone went home with fond memories of Canadian hospitality.

Liviu Librescu

Liviu Librescu was a 76-year-old Romanian-American scientist, aeronautical engineer, and professor at Virginia Tech, and he was no stranger to the horrors that his fellow humans were capable of. That’s because he was a Jew who had survived the Holocaust as a child. In his final moments, he came face to face with evil one last time, and didn’t hesitate to sacrifice himself for the lives of everyone around him.

On April 16th, 2007, a student of Virginia Tech by the name of Seung-Hui Cho entered the campus with two pistols and opened fire, eventually killing 33 people. When he arrived at Librescu’s classroom, the professor and two other students named Zach Petkewicz and Derek O’Dell, blocked the doors so that the gunman couldn’t get in. This gave all but one of his students enough time to flee the classroom through a nearby window, before Cho shot and killed them.

Hugh Thompson

The Vietnam War is widely considered to be the darkest chapter in American military history, and by far its darkest moment was the My Lai massacre. On March 16th, 1968, US soldiers with the 23rd Infantry Division, 11th brigade, massacred between 347 and 504 unarmed civilians in South Vietnam. If you can believe it, the massacre could have been far worse if it wasn’t halted by one man.

Hugh Thompson was an Army helicopter pilot who realized what was happening early on in the massacre, after a seeing several dead civilians from the air during a reconnaissance mission. He landed his helicopter twice to investigate the dead, before realizing that it was American soldiers who were responsible for the killings. After failing to talk sense into a commander who had ordered the massacre, he spent the rest of the day directing and evacuating civilians away from the carnage, and at one point even threatened to open fire on US soldiers who were about to kill several civilians. After evacuating a wounded child, he reported the incident to his superiors, who ordered troops on the ground to stop the killings.

For his efforts, Thompson was shunned by his peers in the military for many years. In 1969 he was called to testify in Congress about the incident, and was chastised by Congressmen with the House Armed Services Committee, who felt that he should have been court martialed for threatening to open fire on American troops. It wouldn’t be until 30 years later that he was awarded a medal for his part in ending the massacre.

Father Thomas Byles

The sinking of the Titanic is a testament to that fact that in previous generations, altruism was a far more common trait. As the ship went down, hundreds of men insisted on staying aboard, and letting as many women and children as possible get on the few remaining life boats. It would be difficult to single out any of the heroic souls that went down with that ship.

But if you had to, a good choice would be Father Thomas Byles. The Catholic priest was on his way to New York to preside over his brother’s wedding when the Titanic struck an iceberg. As the crowds of desperate passengers swelled toward the lifeboats, he refused several invitations to leave the ship. Instead he helped other passengers find lifeboats, and stayed on board with a hundred trapped individuals. He prayed with them, heard their confessions, and gave them their last rites until the ship finally sank. His body was never recovered. Byles has since been recommended for sainthood by the Catholic Church.

The Choctaw Nation

The Cork Statue that pays tribute to the Choctaw Tribe’s generosity during the Irish Famine.

The Irish famine was one of the most devastating disasters of the 19th century. Within seven years, a million people starved to death and another million emigrated. Millions more would flee the country in the decades that followed. To give you an idea of how devastating it was, the population of Ireland still hasn’t recovered from the famine.

Amid this tragedy, countless organizations in the United States collected donations and sent them to Ireland to help alleviate the crisis. But perhaps none were as impressive as the $170 that was raised by members of the Choctaw tribe of Native Americans, and sent to a famine relief organization. That may not sound like much, but adjusted for inflation it amounts to thousands of dollars.

Still, why was their donation so impressive? At the time, the Choctaw tribe were living in a reservation in Oklahoma. 16 years earlier in 1830, they had been forced from their homes and sent on the trail of tears. Half of the 21,000 Choctaws who embarked on the journey died. It’s safe to say that by 1847 they probably weren’t in much better shape financially speaking, and yet they still felt compelled to raise what little funds they had for the relief effort. That’s because they felt an affinity for the Irish, who like the Choctaw, had also enduring starvation, as well as cultural suppression by their government. The Choctaw relief effort has since been commemorated on multiple occasions in Ireland.

The Institute of Plant Industry

Image source https://cdn.rbth.com

Don’t let the innocuous title fool you. If nothing you read before was able to restore your faith in humanity, this story will.

The Institute of Plant Industry was a Soviet research center, and was once the largest seed bank on Earth. It was home to nearly 400,000 seeds and other plant samples that had been painstakingly collected from around the world. The mission of the institute, was to develop new plant strains that would alleviate hunger worldwide.

Unfortunately, the institute was located in the city of Leningrad during World War Two. In case you’re not familiar with what occurred there, what happened to Leningrad during the war was downright apocalyptic. For nearly two and half years the city was blockaded by a German siege, which led to the deaths of 1.5 million civilians and soldiers. The siege of Leningrad has been called the most destructive event to ever occur in a modern city, and the most deadly siege in human history. The city became a hell on earth, where starvation and predatory cannibalism were rampant.

So what do you think a dozen scientists holed up in that research center would do? I can tell you what normal, sane people would do. They’d probably give up their scientific mission, and begin consuming the treasure trove of edible seeds that were stored there. Certainly there were enough seeds to keep them fed for at least a few months, if not the entire duration of the siege.

Instead, the scientists refused to eat their samples. They guarded the seeds throughout the siege and kept their seed bank a secret, knowing what would happen if any of the starving residents of the city found out about the institute. They watched over the seed bank in shifts, usually two or more at a time to ensure that no scientist was left alone with the seeds, and secretly smuggled samples out of the city. It’s believed that none of the samples were tampered with by the scientists. In the end, nine of the them starved to death while surrounded by perfectly edible food, in an effort to alleviate world hunger for future generations.

Takeshi Miura and Miki Endo

Image courtesy of rt.com

These days, when most people hear about the Fukushima disaster, they tend to think about the TEPCO nuclear power plant that was destroyed by the tsunami. To this day the news still periodically reports on the situation at the power plant. However, most people outside of Japan have forgotten about the impressive heroics that were displayed by ordinary Japanese citizens before the plant melted down.

Of those heroes were Takeshi Miura and Miki Endo, two city workers who stuck to their posts as the tsunami approached. They were working in a multi-story disaster preparedness building, and were responsible for warning civilians and directing them to higher ground through a public broadcasting system. They knew that the tsunami was going to be taller than the office they resided in, on the second floor of the building. But as it neared they stayed on that floor rather than fleeing to the roof, so that they could give one last announcement to the city.

Unfortunately that final message kept them from reaching higher ground in time. The tsunami washed out the second floor of the building, killing them both. Their bodies have never been found.

Lieutenant Friedrich Lengfeld

After being inundated with movies, documentaries, and video games about World War Two for generations, Americans have developed a very black and white view of the soldiers who fought for Nazi Germany. We tend to think that everyone who fought for Germany was a goose stepping monster, and forget that their military was staffed by millions of ordinary people who were either brainwashed or coerced into fighting. We forget that so many of them were just regular human beings, not caricatures.

One of those soldiers was 23-year-old Lt. Friedrich Lengfeld, a Wehrmacht company commander who took part in one of those most heartbreaking acts of altruism during the war. Lengfeld was responsible for defending a heavily fortified position during the Battle of Hürtgen Forest. In early November of 1944, his unit had suffered heavy casualties while fighting multiple American attacks. His company was depleted, and suffering from both the elements and malnutrition.

On November 10th, the Americans attacked and retreated once again, but this time they accidentally left someone behind. One of their soldiers was injured after straying into a nearby minefield. As he cried out for help, Lengfeld ordered his troops not to open fire on any Americans who came back to retrieve their comrade. Hours passed with no relief in sight. He couldn’t take the weakening cries of help any longer, so Lengfeld decided to conduct his own rescue mission with the help of several medics.

He walked through the minefield on what he thought was a safe path, but accidentally triggered an anti-personal mine that ripped through his legs. He later died at a first aid station. The fate and identity of the American soldier has never been uncovered. However, the sacrifice and humanity of Lengfeld was honored with a memorial constructed in the Hürtgen Forest by American veterans in 1994.

A Civilization Worth Saving

Frankly, it’s a shame that the ugliness of our species receives so much more attention than our acts of mercy, compassion, and sacrifice. It’s easy for people to assume that when disaster strikes, society will immediately turn into a free for all, where everyone acts in their own self-interest at the expense of everyone else. The truth of the matter, is that for every selfish person in the world who will murder and steal to get by for another day, there is always someone else who won’t hesitate to sacrifice everything for a complete stranger. It’s important to remember that, and there’s a very good reason why.

You know this civilization that we (justifiably) fear may collapse one day? If not for our inherent altruism we wouldn’t have a civilization worth worrying about to begin with. It’s our desire for everyone to succeed and prosper that binds society, and keeps it from sinking into the depths of chaos. So the next time you think the world is turning upside down and evil is running rampant, try to remember these selfless people I just described. And more importantly, try to be more like them. It’s the only thing standing between our most virtuous acts, and our most wicked impulses.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

2017 Suburban Steader Update – Week 15

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Spring has sprung on the Suburban Steader Homestead!  The weather has turned to the warmer weather and the gardens are starting to grow!  There was so much that happened this week that I need to get into it right now! This Week’s Milestones Back On Track! After what seems like weeks and weeks of complaining,

Survival Fishing: How To Catch A Fish Without A Fishing Pole

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If you happen to get stranded near a river, creek, pond or any water body with fish, and you have at least a day before help arrives, then you’ve got to make good with the materials around you to stay alive and kicking. Chances are you may have no fishing gear with you. But if … Read more…

The post Survival Fishing: How To Catch A Fish Without A Fishing Pole was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.