Frugal noodle

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frugal

Let’s use our frugal noodle to come up with some frugal ideas. For me personally, I’ve grown up frugally, I didn’t know or even understand it when I was younger, I just knew we didn’t throw things away until they were used up, worn out and even then it was probably saved for parts. We didn’t call a repairman when things broke, my dad fixed it, we didn’t go out to eat, my mother cooked, and she cooked from scratch. For us, it was just a way of life, we didn’t have the money to pay someone else to do the things we could do for ourselves. I suspect that even if we had been wealthier, my family would have still been the same way, frugal.

Being frugal is about saving money, but it’s also a mindset, here are some of the ways to be frugal, I suspect it will remind you of your grandparents 🙂

1. Save jars. Frugal people never throw away good glass (or even plastic) jars or containers, especially if they have a good lid and a wide mouth. When we moved off grid, I remember bringing out a few boxes of empty jars.

2. Buttons, did you grow up with a button jar? I did. Every button was saved, even if it was just one button, they are infinitely useful. If you have a shirt that is going into the trash, be sure to cut off all the buttons and save them.

3. Fabric, even small fabric scraps are handy, from patching things to quilts, fabric scraps are very handy to have around. I even save the legs of jeans I cut off for shorts.

4. Newspaper, it has so many uses after it’s been read, from wrapping gifts, crafts, cleaning glass, filler in boxes for moving or shipping…

5. Bread ties, this so reminds me of my dad, we had this junk drawer (don’t laugh, you have one too), it was full of straightened bread ties, they are great for tying other things together.

6.
Rubber bands, this was one of the other things in the junk drawer, all sorts of rubber bands, they are so useful, and if nothing else, you can make a rubber band ball to keep you amused. Of course, rubber bands have a limited life, especially out here where we live, it’s so dry that the rubber becomes brittle, so they have to be used quickly…

7. Hardware, drawer pulls, hinges, screws, nails, anything that you could take off of anything that would be tossed in the trash, again this was stored and found in that junk drawer, or perhaps in a small glass jar.

8. String, I have fond memories of this piece of wood with a long length of string wrapped around it, it belonged to my dad, he would dole out a length of string to use for what he was working on, but he didn’t cut it, it was often one of his projects where he would need a straight level line, then he would carefully wrap the string back onto the piece of wood. Occasionally he would have to cut a piece to use in something, it was always done with care so as to not use too much. Other string, if quality string and long enough, it would be wrapped up and saved.

9. Food scraps, when cutting up vegetables, carrots, onions and the such, the bits that are cut off can be frozen, when you get enough, you can make a very tasty stock, either a vegetable stock, or used with meat trimmings to make meat stock. You can also compost what’s left over to enrich your garden.

10.
Time, it’s the one thing that can’t really be saved and yet it can, it can’t be put up for later, you can’t make more of it, you can waste it, but understand it’s a most precious and valuable commodity, once gone, once it has passed by, you can’t get it back, so make the most of the time you have each day, it’s not a matter of getting more done, but make the things you do during the day meaningful things.

What about you? What do you do that is frugal? What would you like to do that is more frugal? Let me know below in the comments.

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Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (4/15/17)

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Here are the top 7 articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks.  But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 4/9/17 – 4/15/17

Peace,
Todd

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Survival: City Life Versus Country Life

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In a previous article we talked about living in a city and how, because of your location, you may be the target of an attack. A target simply because of the population density, or in some cases, you may be a target because of critical infrastructure, or your city may be having a symbolic celebration, […]

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Another SHTF Reality From Selco

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Reposted from MDSA Selco gives us some reality about a typical “Tacticool” SHTF day. Reality is a bitch, and being able to trade is an important survival skill. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Ordinary Day’ March 28, 2017 by Selco   A lot of people wonder what an ‘ordinary day’ was like during the SHTF. I was thinking on this […]

4 Times In 4 Days: Russian Warplanes Buzz U.S. Coast Again

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4 Times In 4 Days: Russian Warplanes Buzz U.S. Coast Again

IL-38

 

WASHINGTON — Russian warplanes were detected flying near the U.S. coast for four straight days this week in what one American defense official called a “strategic messaging.”

Three of the incidents off Alaska’s coast involved TU-95s, which are strategic bombers and missile platforms capable of carrying nuclear weapons.

“This kind of cat-and-mouse stuff has been going on for a while now,” former State Department official Howard Stoffer told CNN.

Stoffer said he thinks Russian President Vladimir Putin “is trying to put the U.S. on notice that the Russians are everywhere and are back to expanding the limits of expanding their military power.”

Crazy Gadget Can Jump-Start Your Car — And Charge Your Smartphone!

On April 17, U.S. F-22 fighter jets intercepted two TU-95s 100 miles from Kodiak Island.

On April 18, a U.S. E-3 surveillance plane was scrambled because of another sighting of TU-95s 41 miles off the Alaskan coast.

On April 19, two IL-38 maritime patrol planes were seen.

On April 20, another flight by two TU-95s was reported. It was escorted by U.S. F-22s and Canadian CF-18s

The Russian planes never entered U.S. airspace, but the situation is dangerous because of the possibility of shots or missiles being accidentally fired.

“No one wants to go to war with the Russians, but let me double down on another concept: The Russians really don’t want to go to war with us,” retired Air Force General and former CIA and NSA Director Michael Hayden told CNN. “They are by far the weaker power.”

The Russian Defense Ministry released a statement saying that “all such missions are carried out in strict compliance with international regulations and with respect to national borders.”

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How to Survive in the Desert: Learn the Essentials

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The desert- an unforgiving landscape environment filled with dangers present at all times. This is the final resting place of unprepared souls, with their bleached bones perfectly preserved by the hot sun and the hungry vultures.

Think you can survive out in the desert? It’s definitely a beautiful place, yes, but the hot of the sun and the cold of the night will catch the unprepared. Lack of working knowledge about how the environment works, lack of skills and the lack of adequate desert survival equipment will make short work of you in a hurry.

So how does one survive out in the desert? It’s not what you’d expect. Be prepared for a wholly unique environment where the standard survival rules do not apply. Here in the desert, there are different rules you should follow.

Let’s get started.

Quick Navigation

    A. Plan Trip, Know Area
    B. Prepare Your Vehicle
    C. Desert Survival Kit
    D. Obtaining & Rationing Water
    E. Finding Food
    F. Sun Protection
    G. Staying Warm at Night
    H. Mental Fitness & Spiritual Conditioning
    I. Wildlife Threats
    J. Getting Rescued

A. Plan The Trip, Know The Area

Preparation is still the key element to survival success, and the desert is no different. If you’ll be in the desert, whether just passing by to get to the original destination or planning to stay for days of backpacking, you’ll do well to pack and prepare a few essential items. We’ll be using the Rule of 3s as a guide. Our bodies can only survive for 3 days without water.

The hot desert and the humid environment accelerate the dehydration process. Even breathing under the searing noon sun will cause you to lose fluids. To compensate, you’ll need at the very least a gallon of drinkable water for each person. Two gallons is optimal. Keep in mind that you can create fire and make shelter, but out in the desert, you cannot make or find water.

Before leaving, you should inform someone you fully trust where you are going. This practice should be done anytime you’re heading out in the wild. It’s a sound survival tip. It’s not expensive, and it only takes a few minutes of your time.

Set aside 10 to 15 minutes and speak with a close friend or a family member in person or over the phone. Have them write down where exactly it is you’re going, and when you’re expected to be back. Resist the urge to change itineraries and stay on your planned route.

So what happens when your car breaks down in the middle of the vast desert, or that you’re days out in the desert, with little to no hope for rescue? Your trusted person will start to worry why you’re not back yet. He or she will then inform the local authorities, and they will send out a search and rescue party. Plus, they will know where exactly to look.

Also, take some time to read other people’s work about the desert area you’ll be visiting. Their past experience will help future travelers what to expect.

 

B. Prepare Your Vehicle

The general rule about being stuck in the desert with your vehicle is to never, ever leave it. The only exception to this golden desert survival rule is when you are 100% sure that there’s a nearby civilization. This is the only time you may abandon your vehicle to get to civilization and increase your chances of survival. Wait until the extreme heat passes and head out in the morning, the late afternoon or in the early night. The sun can play tricks with your vision and you could get lost further out.

Why would you need to stick to your vehicle? It’s an instant survival camp. Your vehicle will prove to be very useful because it contains a lot of survival equipment. Plus, it’s readily visible under a helicopter search.

You can use the following vehicle equipment under a survival situation:

1) Hood. A raised hood is a universally accepted sign that you are in trouble and that you need vehicular help.

2) Fuel. It can get you places and can double as a medium for making fire, which is extremely helpful when out in the freezing temperatures at night. Take care to use gas as it is very volatile.

3) Battery. It can charge your survival equipment and create sparks to make fire.

4) Oil. It can burn during the day or during the night and create thick, black smoke for signaling purposes. Rescuers will be able to see it from miles around.

5) Mirrors. Take them out of the vehicle and use it to signal passing vehicles when you’re stuck out in the desert.

6) Roof. Doubles as an instant shelter from the hot sun. Stay under the roof during peak daylight hours. Remember to open the windows and the doors to let air and heat pass by.

7) Horn. Make noise to attract the attention of nearby travelers. The horn can be used if you want to save your breath calling out for help.

Don’t panic when you’re facing a survival situation. Stop, think and plan for what you’re going to do. Don’t leave you vehicle as it could be very useful later. If you really must leave your vehicle, make sure to leave a helpful note inside the car or on the windshield. Information such as where you’re headed increases your chances of being found and rescued.

Do a full-body inspection of your vehicle the day before you leave for your desert adventure. Check the tire pressure, the electrical system and see if the fluids are all topped up. Create your desert survival equipment and put it in the trunk. Do a drive test before heading out to your destination. What you don’t want is your car breaking down in the middle of the desert just because you forgot to check the oil or the batteries. Visit your local auto shop and make sure everything is in tip-top shape.

 

C. How To Prepare Your Desert Survival Kit

What would survival be if not for the quintessential survival kit and equipment? Never leave home without it. Survivalists should have their everyday carry kit with them and in the vehicle at all times. It’s one of the golden rules for preparedness. If going on foot, make sure to put the everyday survival gear into a backpack. If you’re bringing in a vehicle, don’t forget to your everyday gear in the back.

You’ll thank the stars that you remembered to pack your everyday carry kit when the desert decides to throw in a monkey wrench to your desert adventure. If you think that it’d be a waste of precious space and weight to bring your everyday survival carry with you, you’d be wrong. It’s infinitely better to bring it and not have to use it than not bring it and suddenly need it. While most survival scenarios can be potentially avoided, some cannot and these are the times you’ll appreciate the fact that you brought your everyday survival bag with you.

Here are the best survival equipment you can pack in your everyday survival bag:

1) Water. You’ll need multiple ways on storing and making water. Instant water and small water purification devices are always welcome.

2) Signaling Devices. Bring your smart phone and a means to charge it. Pack in compact, powerful flashlights, signal mirrors, glo-sticks, lightsticks, chem lights or signal flares. Space is at a premium, so if you can get an all-in-one device, i.e, a flashlight that can charge your smart phone, the better.

3) Directional Equipment. GPS devices, a good compass and a topographical map of the desert area.

4) Protection. This can be interpreted in many ways. Protection starts with what you’re wearing. Out in the desert you’ll need the proper dress attire. Cover the essential body parts from the hot searing reach of the sun and the burning air. You’ll need sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat. If you can, bring a reflective tarp or blanket, and items that could help you create a makeshift shelter when needed.

5) First Aid Kit. All everyday carry bags will need first aid equipment.

6) Fire. Ferrocerium rods, magnesium blocks and good old lighters should be brought in your survival pack. Fire can do many helpful things. It can be used as a signaling device and keep you warm during the night. It can be used to purify water and help you mentally focus.

D. Obtaining Water and Rationing Water

Keeping cool is one of the most important things you’ll need to keep track when you’re trying to survive in the desert. Does it stand that you’ll have to find sources of water in the desert no matter what?

The simple answer is no. You could be defeated in your search to find drinkable water under the hot scorching sun. The effort alone will make you lose essential water and cause dehydration. Dehydration out in the desert is a bad thing.

Let’s think about this in a logical manner. Use this formula as a measuring stick:

 

1) Water In Minus Water Out

Water In is the amount of water you consume. Water Out is the amount of water eliminated by sweating and peeing. Dehydration occurs when your water in/water out balance gets out of whack. Dehydration is the leading cause of death out in the desert. You’ll do well to keep your dehydration under check using any of the two things- finding and drinking potable water, which increases Water In, or mitigating your Water Out.

Believe it or not, you can ration the amount of sweat that’s coming out of your body. Stay out of the sun’s reach and go to a protective shade. Limit strenuous activity during noontime and be more active in the night. These will all greatly increase your chances of finding help and surviving out in the desert.

Keep your skin temp strictly down to under 92 degrees Fahrenheit to avoid losing water. Put your sleeping bag or a cover into a bush to create an instant shade and to allow for cooling breezes. Don’t sit directly on the hot sand. If you must, tear out the seats of your new truck.

 

2) Creating Your Own Solar Water Still

Do yourself a favor and pack in a few sheets of sturdy plastic on your desert survival kit or the back of your vehicle as you head out to the desert. It only takes up a few space, and yet it can create one of the most important things you need to survive- the solar water still. A solar water still is a device that can be used to collect water and moisture from the environment.

Solar stills are a godsend in a desert survival situation. By themselves, they simulate a small, portable greenhouse which does several things. First, the heat enters the plastic barrier. It gets trapped and could not get out easily. The heat in the plastic forces the soil’s moisture to vaporize. A humid atmosphere is formed under the plastic barrier. Temperature invariably drops as the sun goes down, from which the moisture from the air comes up and forms on the plastic. The condensed water forms and drops in the small container you placed in the center.

 

Here’s how you can create a basic solar still:

Step 1. Dig out a round hole. Make it several feet deep and a few feet wide.

Step 2. Put in a collection pit in the center of the dug hole using a plastic sheet.

Step 3. Stretch out the plastic sheet across the dug hole.

Step 4. Get some rocks that will hold the sheets in place. The setup should be that the sheet is off the ground, tapering to a drop as it approaches the middle of the dug hole. An easy way to make this happen is to put in a medium-sized rock in the middle of the plastic sheet. The rocks on the perimeter of the sheet should hold everything in place.

Step 5. Wait for the plastic sheet to start accumulating precious water. You’ll see condensation, and then a few drops will start to appear. The moisture will gather together and form in the plastic sheet’s center.

The condensed water will form when night comes on, and you’ll have drops of potable water collected in the middle of the solar still.

 

3) Obtaining Water From The Desert Environment

Do an ocular inspection for the most obvious signs of water. Get to higher ground- climb to a huge rock outcropping or a tall dune, and start to look for reflections off the sand. Under the sun and in the sand, water will shine like precious diamonds. If you have a pair of good binoculars with you, the better. You’ll have increased range and more accurate sightings. If you’re lucky, you’ll find other useful and/or helpful things aside from locating water sources.

The presence of animals usually indicate a potable water source. Bring your sight over to the skies above and search for birds. The fact that doves and pigeons won’t be able to survive without water will be especially useful here. Be on the lookout for small bees as well- they are just about 1km from nearby sources of water. Listen for the buzzing sound and keep your eyes sharp!

Plants and other vegetation need water to survive. If you see a smattering of grass or cacti in an area, then chances are there’ll be water to drink. A tree root can contain water if there was reported rain recently. Try to brush up on different desert vegetation, as they contain useful information on how far the water source is below the ground.

Check for telltale signs of dried up lakes and rivers. The searing desert heat will evaporate the water from the surface, but water under the surface will continue to stay and be available. The beds should fill up as soon as there’s an occurrence of rain. If you spot one, dig a bit and you’ll find water.

Plant dew is also a reliable source of water out in the desert. Just before the sun sets out in the morning, dew forms on plants and on cacti. You can use this to your advantage by waking up early, then squeezing out a few precious drops. Put over a cloth overnight and drink the dew in the morning.

Here’s a few movie myths that we need to dispel. Sure, you can drink water out of cacti, but you will have to know which ones are good for you and which ones aren’t. Many cacti species are extremely toxic. Ingesting its fruits and drinking the juice that comes out of it can cause diarrhea. Diarrhea accelerates the dehydration process, bringing you much closer to your doom. So if you’re not sure, don’t drink the cactus water.

 

E. Finding Food

Going hungry can be a health hazard in normal situations, but in desert survival scenarios it can prove to be beneficial. Why? Food is further down the line when it comes to a survival checklist of things. Water is higher up in the checklist. Therefore, not eating anything for as long as you can helps because you’ll need extra water in order to digest your food.

The key is in moderation. Eat just so that you’ll have your energy. Refrain from eating up to fullness. If your water supply is running dangerously low, then it may be better to hold off that hunger for as long as you can. You can live for far longer without food than you can live without drinking water.

Natural instincts mistakenly tell us that we could die of starvation more than dying of thirst, but do your best to think otherwise. The facts are real- a person can survive 3 weeks without food via an internal mechanism of feeding off your fats, and then your muscle fibers. That same person can die of thirst in about 2 or 3 days at most.

 

F. Finding and Making Sun Protection

Finding and making shelter from the sun is one of the best things you can do to ensure desert survival. It keeps your body temperature well-regulated. During noontime, it’s best to stop what you’re doing and find shelter from the burning sun by staying cool in the shade. Get much-needed rest and conserve both energy and water this way. You’ll need them when the sun goes down. During the night, it’s best to find food, water, travel and build a solar still.

Natural shelters include hanging cliffs and large rocks. They block out direct sunlight and heat. You may be tempted to remove your clothing under these circumstances, but it would be best not to. The added layer of cloth keeps you from losing too much water via perspiration. It will also stave off the direct rays of the sun, keeping you off sunburn.

There will be a chance that you’ll have to face a dust storm as you’re traveling the desert environment. You can create a makeshift bandanabandana for covering your mouth and keep off the stinging sand from entering your lungs. Here’s where a vehicle can prove useful. If you are in the midst of a dust storm, then simply go inside the vehicle and ride it out. If not, then you should find low-lying outcrops and large boulders and take shelter in them. Create the largest shield you can find and stay under.

 

G. Staying Warm at Night

Think it’s all about the desert heat that will get an individual trapped out in the desert environment? Think again. The cold is just as deadly. Temperature drops to almost freezing out in desert nights, so you’ll need adequate protective clothing. Clothes and blanketsblankets made from wool or mylar are your best bet. They will keep you adequately warm at night. A Mylar sheet or a woolen blanket will be your best friend.

Fire is also one of the things you’ll need to stay alive at night. If you are caught unawares with just a tank top and shorts, it can prove to be the difference between life and death. Pack in fire creation tools in your desert survival backpack and in your everyday carry bag. Gain the skills and knowledge on how to make fire using your natural surroundings. Keep your skills sharp with constant practice. The bow and drill is particularly useful and should be thoroughly learned.

The best time to light a fire is during the night. Deserts can get very cold in at nighttime. The cold can bring about deadly effects such as hypothermia. This is probably the most surprising thing about the desert. Yes, you can get hypothermia out in the desert! Now that you know, you should take the proper steps to ensure this doesn’t happen to you.

Fire can also protect you in more ways than one. Deserts are home to vicious animals out to get food. Predators such as bobcats, coyotes and mountain lions can be scared away using a live brand. Make sure to put in multiple fire starters in your backpack and in your vehicle. Electrical lighters, waterproof matches and fire strikers are all good firestarting equipment.

 

H. Maintaining Your Emotions, Mental Fitness and Spiritual Condition

If there’s anything you’ve learned in survival classes, it’s that you should keep a cool, calm and rational head at all times. In other words, don’t panic! Going berserk will only lead to bad things that could endanger your chances of survival. Stop and think. Assume that there’s always a way to get out of the survival scenario that you’re in. Sure, it’s scary to see nothing but sand for miles and miles and no way to call for help, but don’t let that make you give up.

Use the basic elements to survive. Fire can be used to signal help, keep warm during the coldest desert nights and scare off the dangerous animals that go prowling about. Fire can also be a means of psychological comfort. Our ancestors have it used for ages. People feel safer when near warmth and fire sources. Large animals will think twice before approaching a campfire.

It helps to keep a good mindset and a wary expectation when surviving in the desert. Always expect the unexpected. Control the urge to panic. Always use your brain. Conserve precious energy and water as long as possible. Don’t think of the desert as your enemy.

 

I. Negotiating Wildlife Threats

It may seem devoid of plants and wildlife out there, but the desert is actually home to many dangerous and poisonous things. You’ll experience flash floods(!), dust storms, scorpions and venomous snakes, centipedes, spiders and Africanized bees. There’s also the mountain lions, the coyote bobcats and of course, the rattlesnakes.

You can prepare for these wildlife threats by carefully choosing where you rest. Spend some time scouting out the resting location and check for telltale signs of animals living nearby. You may have a high supply of water and a means to survive for the next few days, but one bite out of a rattlesnake can bring an untimely end in a hurry. Check for sidewinders as well.

Scorpion stings are possible but they are rare. This can be avoided simply by doing a quick inspection of where you’re sitting in order to avoid a surprise attack from a scorpion that could be as terrified as you are.

You may be surprised to see flash floods written down in a desert survival article, but it’s definitely possible and really dangerous if you’re caught unprepared. The desert floor is hard and dry from lack of rain. When a storm comes, the soil won’t soak it in instantly; instead, it will run and collect and turn into a deluge. The downpour and all that water may prove to be a blessing but you wouldn’t want to be swept away into a huge sharp rock cliff. The sheer volume of water can also drown you in seconds. Flash floods too can be avoided by being careful on where you rest. When setting down, you should avoid lake beds, ditches and dry channels. Any low-lying environment can fill up when the storm clouds come. Avoid traveling in slot canyons if you can.

 

J. Getting Rescued

Get your signal tools ready for when you see signs of vehicles, copters and rescue parties. These cues must be different from nature sounds to increase your chances of being found.

The humble signaling mirror is especially useful during the day. You can use a metal knife blade as an alternative. These will work as daylight flashlights that can notify passing airplanes and helicopters. The resulting reflection can be seen for miles all around. Take the time to learn how to use them. Prepare to use them and don’t wait for the emergency situation to come to you. If you’re in a pinch, break off your vehicle’s side mirror and use that for signaling purposes.

A rescue team will be able to see fire from long distances in the flat desert environment. You can also set up perpetual distress signals by placing a pile of rocks into a triangular or a V-shape. If you have a way to create thick, black bellowing smoke, do so. Drain the oil from your vehicle and burn it. Take out your spare tire and puncture it. Remove the valve core to prevent unnecessary explosions and hurting those around you. Setting up a burning oil crate is a very effective signaling tool that people can see for miles around.

Use flares at night and only when you see a rescue plane or a helicopter. It can also be used in a pinch to start a fire at night. Audible signals should be let off in groups of 3. A long blast may sound like a plaintive wail of a hawk, but 3 short whistle blasts are a distinct cry for help. Remember to pack in whistles in your desert survival bag or everyday carry bag. It can bring manual search parties ever closer to your location, and can

How to Survive in the Dessert

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The desert- an unforgiving landscape environment filled with dangers present at all times. This is the final resting place of unprepared souls, with their bleached bones perfectly preserved by the hot sun and the hungry vultures.

Think you can survive out in the desert? It’s definitely a beautiful place, yes, but the hot of the sun and the cold of the night will catch the unprepared. Lack of working knowledge about how the environment works, lack of skills and the lack of adequate desert survival equipment will make short work of you in a hurry.

So how does one survive out in the desert? It’s not what you’d expect. Be prepared for a wholly unique environment where the standard survival rules do not apply. Here in the desert, there are different rules you should follow.

Let’s get started.

Quick Navigation

    A. Plan Trip, Know Area
    B. Prepare Your Vehicle
    C. Desert Survival Kit
    D. Obtaining & Rationing Water
    E. Finding Food
    F. Sun Protection
    G. Staying Warm at Night
    H. Mental Fitness & Spiritual Conditioning
    I. Wildlife Threats
    J. Getting Rescued

A. Plan The Trip, Know The Area

Preparation is still the key element to survival success, and the desert is no different. If you’ll be in the desert, whether just passing by to get to the original destination or planning to stay for days of backpacking, you’ll do well to pack and prepare a few essential items. We’ll be using the Rule of 3s as a guide. Our bodies can only survive for 3 days without water.

The hot desert and the humid environment accelerate the dehydration process. Even breathing under the searing noon sun will cause you to lose fluids. To compensate, you’ll need at the very least a gallon of drinkable water for each person. Two gallon is optimal. Keep in mind that you can create fire and make shelter, but out in the desert, you cannot make or find water.

Before leaving, you should inform someone you fully trust where you are going. This practice should be done anytime you’re heading out in the wild. It’s a sound survival tip. It’s not expensive, and it only takes a few minutes of your time.

Set aside 10 to 15 minutes and speak with a close friend or a family member in person or over the phone. Have them write down where exactly it is you’re going, and when you’re expected to be back. Resist the urge to change itineraries and stay on your planned route.

So what happens when your car breaks down in the middle of the vast desert, or that you’re days out in the desert, with little to no hope for rescue? Your trusted person will start to worry why you’re not back yet. He or she will then inform the local authorities, and they will send out a search and rescue party. Plus, they will know where exactly to look.

Also, take some time to read other people’s work about the desert area you’ll be visiting. Their past experience will help future travelers what to expect.

 

B. Prepare Your Vehicle

The general rule about being stuck in the desert with your vehicle is to never, ever leave it. The only exception to this golden desert survival rule is when you are 100% sure that there’s a nearby civilization. This is the only time you may abandon your vehicle to get to civilization and increase your chances of survival. Wait until the extreme heat passes and head out in the morning, the late afternoon or in the early night. The sun can play tricks with your vision and you could get lost further out.

Why would you need to stick to your vehicle? It’s an instant survival camp. Your vehicle will prove to be very useful because it contains a lot of survival equipment. Plus, it’s readily visible under a helicopter search.

You can use the following vehicle equipment under a survival situation:

1) Hood. A raised hood is a universally accepted sign that you are in trouble and that you need vehicular help.

2) Fuel. It can get you places and can double as a medium for making fire, which is extremely helpful when out in the freezing temperatures at night. Take care to use gas as it is very volatile.

3) Battery. It can charge your survival equipment and create sparks to make fire.

4) Oil. It can burn during the day or during the night and create thick, black smoke for signaling purposes. Rescuers will be able to see it from miles around.

5) Mirrors. Take them out of the vehicle and use it to signal passing vehicles when you’re stuck out in the desert.

6) Roof. Doubles as an instant shelter from the hot sun. Stay under the roof during peak daylight hours. Remember to open the windows and the doors to let air and heat pass by.

7) Horn. Make noise to attract the attention of nearby travelers. The horn can be used if you want to save your breath calling out for help.

 Don’t panic when you’re facing a survival situation. Stop, think and plan for what you’re going to do. Don’t leave you vehicle as it could be very useful later. If you really must leave your vehicle, make sure to leave a helpful note inside the car or on the windshield. Information such as where you’re headed increases your chances of being found and rescued.

Do a full-body inspection of your vehicle the day before you leave for your desert adventure. Check the tire pressure, the electrical system and see if the fluids are all topped up. Create your desert survival equipment and put it in the trunk. Do a drive test before heading out to your destination. What you don’t want is your car breaking down in the middle of the desert just because you forgot to check the oil or the batteries. Visit your local auto shop and make sure everything is in tip-top shape.

 

C. How To Prepare Your Desert Survival Kit

What would survival be if not for the quintessential survival kit and equipment? Never leave home without it. Survivalists should have their everyday carry kit with them and in the vehicle at all times. It’s one of the golden rules for preparedness. If going on foot, make sure to put the everyday survival gear into a backpack. If you’re bringing in a vehicle, don’t forget to your everyday gear in the back.

You’ll thank the stars that you remembered to pack your everyday carry kit when the desert decides to throw in a monkey wrench to your desert adventure. If you think that it’d be a waste of precious space and weight to bring your everyday survival carry with you, you’d be wrong. It’s infinitely better to bring it and not have to use it than not bring it and suddenly need it. While most survival scenarios can be potentially avoided, some cannot and these are the times you’ll appreciate the fact that you brought your everyday survival bag with you.

Here are the best survival equipment you can pack in your everyday survival bag:

1) Water. You’ll need multiple ways on storing and making water. Instant water and small water purification devices are always welcome.

2) Signaling Devices. Bring your smart phone and a means to charge it. Pack in compact, powerful flashlights, signal mirrors, glo-sticks, lightsticks, chem lights or signal flares. Space is at a premium, so if you can get an all-in-one device, i.e, a flashlight that can charge your smart phone, the better.

3) Directional Equipment. GPS devices, a good compass and a topographical map of the desert area.

4) Protection. This can be interpreted in many ways. Protection starts with what you’re wearing. Out in the desert you’ll need the proper dress attire. Cover the essential body parts from the hot searing reach of the sun and the burning air. You’ll need sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat. If you can, bring a reflective tarp or blanket, and items that could help you create a makeshift shelter when needed.

5) First Aid Kit. All everyday carry bags will need first aid equipment.

6) Fire. Ferrocerium rods, magnesium blocks and good old lighters should be brought in your survival pack. Fire can do many helpful things. It can be used as a signaling device and keep you warm during the night. It can be used to purify water and help you mentally focus.

D. Obtaining Water and Rationing Water

Keeping cool is one of the most important things you’ll need to keep track when you’re trying to survive in the desert. Does it stand that you’ll have to find sources of water in the desert no matter what?

The simple answer is no. You could be defeated in your search to find drinkable water under the hot scorching sun. The effort alone will make you lose essential water and cause dehydration. Dehydration out in the desert is a bad thing.

Let’s think about this in a logical manner. Use this formula as a measuring stick:

 

1) Water In Minus Water Out

Water In is the amount of water you consume. Water Out is the amount of water eliminated by sweating and peeing. Dehydration occurs when your water in/water out balance gets out of whack. Dehydration is the leading cause of death out in the desert. You’ll do well to keep your dehydration under check using any of the two things- finding and drinking potable water, which increases Water In, or mitigating your Water Out.

Believe it or not, you can ration the amount of sweat that’s coming out of your body. Stay out of the sun’s reach and go to a protective shade. Limit strenuous activity during noontime and be more active in the night. These will all greatly increase your chances of finding help and surviving out in the desert.

Keep your skin temp strictly down to under 92 degrees Fahrenheit to avoid losing water. Put your sleeping bag or a cover into a bush to create an instant shade and to allow for cooling breezes. Don’t sit directly on the hot sand. If you must, tear out the seats of your new truck.

 

2) Creating Your Own Solar Water Still

Do yourself a favor and pack in a few sheets of sturdy plastic on your desert survival kit or the back of your vehicle as you head out to the desert. It only takes up a few space, and yet it can create one of the most important things you need to survive- the solar water still. A solar water still is a device that can be used to collect water and moisture from the environment.

Solar stills are a godsend in a desert survival situation. By themselves, they simulate a small, portable greenhouse which does several things. First, the heat enters the plastic barrier. It gets trapped and could not get out easily. The heat in the plastic forces the soil’s moisture to vaporize. A humid atmosphere is formed under the plastic barrier. Temperature invariably drops as the sun goes down, from which the moisture from the air comes up and forms on the plastic. The condensed water forms and drops in the small container you placed in the center.

 

Here’s how you can create a basic solar still:

Step 1. Dig out a round hole. Make it several feet deep and a few feet wide.

Step 2. Put in a collection pit in the center of the dug hole using a plastic sheet.

Step 3. Stretch out the plastic sheet across the dug hole.

Step 4. Get some rocks that will hold the sheets in place. The setup should be that the sheet is off the ground, tapering to a drop as it approaches the middle of the dug hole. An easy way to make this happen is to put in a medium-sized rock in the middle of the plastic sheet. The rocks on the perimeter of the sheet should hold everything in place.

Step 5. Wait for the plastic sheet to start accumulating precious water. You’ll see condensation, and then a few drops will start to appear. The moisture will gather together and form in the plastic sheet’s center.

The condensed water will form when night comes on, and you’ll have drops of potable water collected in the middle of the solar still.

 

3) Obtaining Water From The Desert Environment

Do an ocular inspection for the most obvious signs of water. Get to higher ground- climb to a huge rock outcropping or a tall dune, and start to look for reflections off the sand. Under the sun and in the sand, water will shine like precious diamonds. If you have a pair of good binoculars with you, the better. You’ll have increased range and more accurate sightings. If you’re lucky, you’ll find other useful and/or helpful things aside from locating water sources.

The presence of animals usually indicate a potable water source. Bring your sight over to the skies above and search for birds. The fact that doves and pigeons won’t be able to survive without water will be especially useful here. Be on the lookout for small bees as well- they are just about 1km from nearby sources of water. Listen for the buzzing sound and keep your eyes sharp!

Plants and other vegetation need water to survive. If you see a smattering of grass or cacti in an area, then chances are there’ll be water to drink. A tree root can contain water if there was reported rain recently. Try to brush up on different desert vegetation, as they contain useful information on how far the water source is below the ground.

Check for telltale signs of dried up lakes and rivers. The searing desert heat will evaporate the water from the surface, but water under the surface will continue to stay and be available. The beds should fill up as soon as there’s an occurrence of rain. If you spot one, dig a bit and you’ll find water.

Plant dew is also a reliable source of water out in the desert. Just before the sun sets out in the morning, dew forms on plants and on cacti. You can use this to your advantage by waking up early, then squeezing out a few precious drops. Put over a cloth overnight and drink the dew in the morning.

Here’s a few movie myths that we need to dispel. Sure, you can drink water out of cacti, but you will have to know which ones are good for you and which ones aren’t. Many cacti species are extremely toxic. Ingesting its fruits and drinking the juice that comes out of it can cause diarrhea. Diarrhea accelerates the dehydration process, bringing you much closer to your doom. So if you’re not sure, don’t drink the cactus water.

 

E. Finding Food

Going hungry can be a health hazard in normal situations, but in desert survival scenarios it can prove to be beneficial. Why? Food is further down the line when it comes to a survival checklist of things. Water is higher up in the checklist. Therefore, not eating anything for as long as you can helps because you’ll need extra water in order to digest your food.

The key is in moderation. Eat just so that you’ll have your energy. Refrain from eating up to fullness. If your water supply is running dangerously low, then it may be better to hold off that hunger for as long as you can. You can live for far longer without food than you can live without drinking water.

Natural instincts mistakenly tell us that we could die of starvation more than dying of thirst, but do your best to think otherwise. The facts are real- a person can survive 3 weeks without food via an internal mechanism of feeding off your fats, and then your muscle fibers. That same person can die of thirst in about 2 or 3 days at most.

 

F. Finding and Making Sun Protection

Finding and making shelter from the sun is one of the best things you can do to ensure desert survival. It keeps your body temperature well-regulated. During noontime, it’s best to stop what you’re doing and find shelter from the burning sun by staying cool in the shade. Get much-needed rest and conserve both energy and water this way. You’ll need them when the sun goes down. During the night, it’s best to find food, water, travel and build a solar still.

Natural shelters include hanging cliffs and large rocks. They block out direct sunlight and heat. You may be tempted to remove your clothing under these circumstances, but it would be best not to. The added layer of cloth keeps you from losing too much water via perspiration. It will also stave off the direct rays of the sun, keeping you off sunburn.

There will be a chance that you’ll have to face a dust storm as you’re traveling the desert environment. You can create a makeshift bandana for covering your mouth and keep off the stinging sand from entering your lungs. Here’s where a vehicle can prove useful. If you are in the midst of a dust storm, then simply go inside the vehicle and ride it out. If not, then you should find low-lying outcrops and large boulders and take shelter in them. Create the largest shield you can find and stay under.

 

G. Staying Warm at Night

Think it’s all about the desert heat that will get an individual trapped out in the desert environment? Think again. The cold is just as deadly. Temperature drops to almost freezing out in desert nights, so you’ll need adequate protective clothing. Clothes and blankets made from wool are your best bet. They will keep you adequately warm at night. A Mylar sheet or a woolen blanket will be your best friend.

Fire is also one of the things you’ll need to stay alive at night. If you are caught unawares with just a tank top and shorts, it can prove to be the difference between life and death. Pack in fire creation tools in your desert survival backpack and in your everyday carry bag. Gain the skills and knowledge on how to make fire using your natural surroundings. Keep your skills sharp with constant practice. The bow and drill is particularly useful and should be thoroughly learned.

The best time to light a fire is during the night. Deserts can get very cold in at nighttime. The cold can bring about deadly effects such as hypothermia. This is probably the most surprising thing about the desert. Yes, you can get hypothermia out in the desert! Now that you know, you should take the proper steps to ensure this doesn’t happen to you.

Fire can also protect you in more ways than one. Deserts are home to vicious animals out to get food. Predators such as bobcats, coyotes and mountain lions can be scared away using a live brand. Make sure to put in multiple fire starters in your backpack and in your vehicle. Electrical lighters, waterproof matches and fire strikers are all good firestarting equipment.

 

H. Maintaining Your Emotions, Mental Fitness and Spiritual Condition

If there’s anything you’ve learned in survival classes, it’s that you should keep a cool, calm and rational head at all times. In other words, don’t panic! Going berserk will only lead to bad things that could endanger your chances of survival. Stop and think. Assume that there’s always a way to get out of the survival scenario that you’re in. Sure, it’s scary to see nothing but sand for miles and miles and no way to call for help, but don’t let that make you give up.

Use the basic elements to survive. Fire can be used to signal help, keep warm during the coldest desert nights and scare off the dangerous animals that go prowling about. Fire can also be a means of psychological comfort. Our ancestors have it used for ages. People feel safer when near warmth and fire sources. Large animals will think twice before approaching a campfire.

It helps to keep a good mindset and a wary expectation when surviving in the desert. Always expect the unexpected. Control the urge to panic. Always use your brain. Conserve precious energy and water as long as possible. Don’t think of the desert as your enemy.

 

I. Negotiating Wildlife Threats

It may seem devoid of plants and wildlife out there, but the desert is actually home to many dangerous and poisonous things. You’ll experience flash floods(!), dust storms, scorpions and venomous snakes, centipedes, spiders and Africanized bees. There’s also the mountain lions, the coyote bobcats and of course, the rattlesnakes.

You can prepare for these wildlife threats by carefully choosing where you rest. Spend some time scouting out the resting location and check for telltale signs of animals living nearby. You may have a high supply of water and a means to survive for the next few days, but one bite out of a rattlesnake can bring an untimely end in a hurry. Check for sidewinders as well.

Scorpion stings are possible but they are rare. This can be avoided simply by doing a quick inspection of where you’re sitting in order to avoid a surprise attack from a scorpion that could be as terrified as you are.

You may be surprised to see flash floods written down in a desert survival article, but it’s definitely possible and really dangerous if you’re caught unprepared. The desert floor is hard and dry from lack of rain. When a storm comes, the soil won’t soak it in instantly; instead, it will run and collect and turn into a deluge. The downpour and all that water may prove to be a blessing but you wouldn’t want to be swept away into a huge sharp rock cliff. The sheer volume of water can also drown you in seconds. Flash floods too can be avoided by being careful on where you rest. When setting down, you should avoid lake beds, ditches and dry channels. Any low-lying environment can fill up when the storm clouds come. Avoid traveling in slot canyons if you can.

 

J. Getting Rescued

Get your signal tools ready for when you see signs of vehicles, copters and rescue parties. These cues must be different from nature sounds to increase your chances of being found.

The humble signaling mirror is especially useful during the day. You can use a metal knife blade as an alternative. These will work as daylight flashlights that can notify passing airplanes and helicopters. The resulting reflection can be seen for miles all around. Take the time to learn how to use them. Prepare to use them and don’t wait for the emergency situation to come to you. If you’re in a pinch, break off your vehicle’s side mirror and use that for signaling purposes.

A rescue team will be able to see fire from long distances in the flat desert environment. You can also set up perpetual distress signals by placing a pile of rocks into a triangular or a V-shape. If you have a way to create thick, black bellowing smoke, do so. Drain the oil from your vehicle and burn it. Take out your spare tire and puncture it. Remove the valve core to prevent unnecessary explosions and hurting those around you. Setting up a burning oil crate is a very effective signaling tool that people can see for miles around.

Use flares at night and only when you see a rescue plane or a helicopter. It can also be used in a pinch to start a fire at night. Audible signals should be let off in groups of 3. A long blast may sound like a plaintive wail of a hawk, but 3 short whistle blasts are a distinct cry for help. Remember to pack in whistles in your desert survival bag or everyday carry bag. It can bring manual search parties ever closer to your location, and can

A Moose Was On The Loose In An Unlikely Area …

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A Moose Was On The Loose In An Unlikely Area …

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Commuting can be tough. People have to deal with a lot of challenges, from heavy traffic to road construction to rude drivers to inclement weather. But not everyone has experienced having to sit in stopped traffic on a bridge waiting for a moose to get out of the way.

However, that was recently the case in the small coastal city of Belfast, Maine. Morning commuters encountered a moose on the Veteran’s Memorial Bridge, a main thoroughfare known as the “big bridge.” The local police department posted a photo of the animal on its Facebook page and warned followers that they “may experience heavy moose traffic on the … bridge this morning.” [1]

Comments were mostly positive, expressing tolerant amusement and a touch of “only in Maine!” pride. Several media outlets in the state picked up the story, as well, with the photo of the moose gracing the online pages of television stations and newspapers across the state.[2]

The Secret To Keeping Kids Happy In The Car …

Despite the fact that wildlife sightings are fairly common in most areas of Maine, it is a little less ordinary for one to stop traffic on a tall highway bridge within city limits. The bridge, which spans the estuary of the Passagassawakeag River — some locals just call it “The Passy” for short — usually provides a straight shot from one side of the city to the other with relative ease.  But a moose in the mix changes things.

The moose was reported to be a young animal, perhaps due to its lack of antlers or smaller size, but drivers took care and steered clear, nonetheless.

According to the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, the state is home to an estimated 76,000 moose, the highest moose population of any state in the contiguous United States.[3] In a state with a human population of just 1.33 million, this works out to an average of one moose per 17.5 people. Perhaps it is little wonder, then, that one of the large mammals eventually showed up on the big bridge in Belfast.

What type of wildlife stop traffic or endanger roads in your area? Share your stories in the section below:

[1] https://www.facebook.com/74867262879/photos/a.77411687879.78006.74867262879/10154751740457880/?type=3&theater

[2] http://www.centralmaine.com/2017/04/19/moose-slows-morning-commute-in-belfast/

[3] http://www.maine.gov/ifw/wildlife/species/mammals/moose.html

 

Navigation, Family Practices for Security, Experience, and Fun

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Navigation, Family Practices for Security, Experience, and Fun

What if you had that one essential prepper/survival related item with you at all times that not only gave you security and peace of mind but was also family friendly, educational, entertaining, and fun? We all practice self-reliance in one form or another to some extent in various degrees. For many of us it can become mundane and the important reasons that got us started forgotten about. We become complaisant and lose interest more often than not because it does not include others, or we simply get bored.

 Outdoor activities are something I enjoy more than anything, especially with family. However, getting the family on board with an idea I may have can be akin to pulling teeth. The wife is usually fine, ready for a break from the house but not always excited. The kids generally want to run off with their friends or play video games. Now that I’ve found something that sparks their interest it’s all about what we will be doing next weekend? Where will we be going or can Jason and his brother come with us?

Besides my own interest in being outdoors it actually took three items to get everyone else’s attention in the family and make me pretty popular, a map, a compass, and a book. The latter I bought for myself but soon realized I had a little gold mine to share with the family. The book is titled “Prepper’s Survival Navigation” and can be found on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Indie Bound, Books-a-Million by searching the title and author, Walter Glen Martin. The book may even be in your local book store.

You can’t have one without the other. You’re going to find that after you get the book you are going to want a compass and topographical map. Both the compass and the maps can generally found at a sporting goods store. The maps are also available in most book stores, forest service or State offices, or google on line through several places. A good compass will generally cost around $20.00.

Now it’s not just about learning to read a compass and a map, which I thought I already knew. The book goes into great detail about declination, shadows and stars, distance, landmarks, pace count, dead reckoning, traveling in low visibility with a navigator and point person. The book also covers survival when the unexpected may happen. Medical emergency, fire craft, emergency signaling, winter/cold survival, and building shelters.

Once you have the tools the fun will begin. The kids are eager to learn navigation and have a lot of fun while doing it. It’s a great confidence builder. We get to go to different places we may have avoided before because we were not familiar with the area and for the fear of getting lost. For me, I find peace of mind knowing that in this day and age with so much uncertainty going on around us that in time of disaster or when my kids are out by themselves they have the skills to survive and find their way home.

Find Preppers Survival Navigation on Amazon HERE! 

The post Navigation, Family Practices for Security, Experience, and Fun appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Join me in southern New Hampshire, US

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I’m looking to purchase land in southern New Hampshire, United States soon (Currently I live in Rhode Island), and am looking for a few other like minded individuals to help me in this task. I have a specific idea of what I am looking to accomplish, and am very open minded to including the ideas and goals of others.

My initial goal is to homestead and be self sufficient in life, being able to wake up and fall asleep with the sun, eliminating the day to day hassle of our consumer culture, which never really resonated with me. I am a blacksmith and a welder as well and enjoy working with my hands. I am not an expert in farming/gardening but I bring a fair amount of knowledge there as well as a little in keeping chickens and bee keeping. I would ideally look for people who have skills to compliment mine but am open to anyone with passion and desire.

My long term goal is to grow enough food where we are able to help low income families by providing low cost organic food to there. Growing up with only my mother and two siblings food was not abundant and while my mom made sure we never went hungry, that would often mean less diversity in our meals. I wish to do my part in ensuring families can have the ability to add healthy ingredients to their diets.

Those are my goals and my current ability levels more or less, I’m currently reading books and volunteering on farms to increase my knowledge. I would like to hear back and meet up with anyone interested in southern New Hampshire. My E-Mail address is leon.couturieriii@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

The post Join me in southern New Hampshire, US appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Heartleaf Philodendron Care – Growing The Sweetheart Plant

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The post Heartleaf Philodendron Care – Growing The Sweetheart Plant is by
hp4u and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

We gardeners are a very romantic group. You’ll find this quite evident when you examine certain plant names, like the philodendron for example.Its name literally means “love tree” in Greek. And that goes double for the most common variety of that group, the heartleaf philodendron or sweetheart plant. I sometimes imagine my own heart to […]

The post Heartleaf Philodendron Care – Growing The Sweetheart Plant is by
hp4u and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Plant Your Tomatoes This Way To Get A Bumper Crop

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Plant Your Tomatoes This Way To Get A Bumper Crop I NEED my veggies, my burger is not complete without a layer of tomatoes, a blanket of lettuce, a few peppered pickles, and onions to taste. You give me a bare burger and I’ll give it back. However, I will admit…I HATE shopping for vegetables. I don’t know where they were grown, what they were grown in, when they were picked, and by whom. Plus the expense, I get why people are so quick to bypass vegetables when they can get double or triple the amount of junk food or

The post Plant Your Tomatoes This Way To Get A Bumper Crop appeared first on Mental Scoop.

Forget An Inverter, Use These For Most Efficient DC Power Conversion (video)

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These buck and boost converters he’s talking about might be a great investment considering they’re relatively inexpensive, especially if you’re needing to power low-voltage DC powered devices. And considering that you’d be running your DC equipment as efficiently as possible (because you wouldn’t be using an inverter to convert battery power to AC and then … Continue reading “Forget An Inverter, Use These For Most Efficient DC Power Conversion (video)”

Tensions Rise: China On ‘High Alert’; North Korea Warns Of Preemptive Strike On U.S.

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Tensions Rise: China On ‘High Alert’; North Korea Warns Of Preemptive Strike On U.S.

Tensions on the Korean peninsula continued to escalates this week, as North Korea warned it was considering striking the United States even if the U.S. doesn’t attack first.

“In the case of our super-mighty preemptive strike being launched, it will completely and immediately wipe out not only U.S. imperialists’ invasion forces in South Korea and its surrounding areas but the U.S. mainland and reduce them to ashes,” The Rodong Sinmun, an official state paper, warned.

The statement came merely hours after U.S. Vice President Mike Pence said that an “era of strategic patience” with North Korea was over and the same week that U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the United States would not continue the same strategy from the past.

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“We’re reviewing all the status of North Korea, both in terms of state sponsorship of terrorism as well as the other ways in which we can bring pressure on the regime in Pyongyang to re-engage with us, but re-engage with us on a different footing than past talks have been held,” Tillerson said.

Meanwhile, China’s military has placed its bombers “on high alert” and is prepared to respond to any military activity in North Korea, a U.S. defense official told CNN. The goal likely is to “reduce the time to react to a North Korea contingency,” the official said

China has two concerns: 1) refugees from North Korea fleeing across the border to China, and, 2) North Korea collapsing and reunifying with South Korea.

In 2015, 83 percent of North Korea’s exports and 85 percent of its imports involved China.

It isn’t known how many nuclear weapons North Korea, a very reclusive nation, has. The U.S.-Korea Institute said in a 2016 report that North Korea possesses “enough fissile material to build anywhere from six to about 30 nuclear weapons.” China in 2015 said North Korea has 20 nuclear weapons, and a U.S. Congressional report said between six and 10.

What do you believe the Trump administration’s strategy toward North Korea should be? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Video: Sulfa Drugs in Survival

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Add medicines to your medical kit

Without antibiotics in your medical kit, there will be deaths in survival scenarios that could have been prevented. Using certain veterinary equivalents may be an answer as to how to obtain them. This video discusses the family of antibiotics known as “Sulfonamides”: How they work, What they’re good for, How to use them wisely, and more. Remember that antibiotics aren’t candy, and should be used only when absolutely necessary. We’re in the midst of an epidemic of antibiotic resistance in this country (mostly due to their use in livestock!). Companion video to a recent article.

 

To watch the video, click below:

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

 

Joe and Amy Alton

JoeAmyLabcoatSMALL300x300

The Altons

Hey, get supplies for your medical kit, plus a copy of the latest edition of The Survival Medicine Handbook (also available at amazon), at Nurse Amy’s store on this website!

 

(slider image for this article courtesy of pixabay.com)

Leatherman Signal Wilderness Survival EDC Multi-Tool Review

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Leatherman Signal Wilderness Survival EDC Multi-Tool Review

When the Leatherman Signal was announced, it was billed the ideal preparedness tool to have if you ever find yourself stranded. The literature even uses the example of being stuck at base camp and thus having to rely on this badboy alone – a tall order for what is on paper a folding pair of pliers… Read More

This is just the start of the post Leatherman Signal Wilderness Survival EDC Multi-Tool Review. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


Leatherman Signal Wilderness Survival EDC Multi-Tool Review, written by Thomas Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

What It Takes To Have A Survival Mindset

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Your mind can be the most powerful survival tool that you have at your disposal when used properly. A survival mindset will help you survive even when you have no tools, equipment, or other supplies.

Some refer to this as a will to live but a survival mindset is much more than just this single factor. Read the following article to find out!

You will need to overcome fear and panic, deal with boredom and high levels of physical and mental stress, be mentally flexible and ready to adapt no matter what is thrown at you, learn to be a predator instead of prey, recognize danger instantly, and have a can do attitude that will keep you going no matter how bad things get.

  • Practice dissociation when you perform long sets of exercises that involve monotonous repetition, such as sit ups, push, ups, and other simple exercises that can be grueling over the long haul. Try to do 100 sit ups in a single setting, and when you start to get uncomfortable use dissociation to focus your mind elsewhere while your body continues to push on. This will help you train for dealing with fear and panic when these negative responses occur.
  • Try sitting in cold water for as long as possible. Cold water is uncomfortable and it can cause your mind to try and cave if you let it. After a few minutes all you want to do is get out and get warm. Instead of giving in to this impulse stay in the water as long as possible and try to refocus or distance your mind from the physical cold sensations. Over time you should notice that your time keeps increasing as your dissociation skills improve.
  • When you experience fear or panic try to focus on people who depend on you instead of these emotions, whether this is your family, your team, or your co-workers. These people are relying on you to keep going and not give up, and this can be the mental focus that you need to push fear and panic responses into the background or keep fighting to overcome any obstacles in the way of survival.
  • Find your happy place. This is a place in your mind which causes you to experience positive emotions and releases pent up stress that we all carry around. Your own happy place could be a beach, your childhood home, a favorite event, or even Buckingham Palace if that is a place or event that makes you feel happy and at peace.
  • Step outside of your comfort zone and set goals that challenge you in new ways. When you put yourself in uncomfortable or unfamiliar situations you will experience some of the stress reactions that survival will entail. This gives you an opportunity to learn how to deal with these reactions in a positive way before your life depends on it, and experience first hand what fear, panic, and other stress responses feel like.
  • Counter negative thoughts with positive ones. Fear, panic, and other negative emotions can lead to negative thoughts, and these can become contagious. When you have a negative thought immediately replace it with something positive instead.
  • Use visualization and guided imagery in order to practice for a real life survival scenario. If you go over situations in your mind in full detail then you will be better prepared when they play out in real life and less likely to react out of fear and panic. Your brain defines reality, and research studies have shown that there was little difference between real life situations and realistic visualizations of the same scenario.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Are You Flexible Enough?

In order to survive any type of situation you will need mental flexibility, and you must be able to adapt to changing situations and circumstances. If you can not do this then you will perish fairly soon after society collapses.

There will be different situations that must be handled in different ways, with a range of new and complex problems popping up that will need to be addressed and solved in order to stay alive.

When you have mental flexibility you are like a willow compared to a large old oak tree in a strong wind. The oak may break from the strength of the wind but the willow will just bend and
will not break.

Mental flexibility allows you to bend so that you do not break, to adapt so that you do not become extinct. When you are mentally flexible you will be able to:

  • See your current situation from a variety of different perspectives.
  • Adapt to change when your first plan is no longer possible or the situation and circumstances change.
  • Learn from your mistakes and do better in the future.
  • Use creative and innovative ways to solve problems when traditional solutions do not apply.
  • Willingly take risks when this is necessary.
  • Tolerate the uncertainty that comes with any chaotic situation.

When things turn sideways and there is no rhyme or reason anymore you need to understand and accept that there is no safe place, and that the government is not going to swoop in and save you. It is up to you.

Holding out an unrealistic hope that there is a safe place or that others will take care of you will cause you to perish. Crowded areas and military outposts, if these even exist, will be fraught with danger and could become high interest targets.

No matter where you are or where you go in any type of chaotic situation where your life is on the line safety is just an illusion while everything is out of control, and feeling safe causes you to let your guard down. This makes you vulnerable and could leave you open to attack or lower your defenses so that you could be victimized in another way.

Don’t become a victim or put your survival at risk with a false sense of security.

Attitude Raises You Up and Breaks You Down to Pieces

Attribute even the most grueling physical training and truckloads of supplies will not be enough when things go sideways and the civilized society that we know doesn’t exist anymore. Negativity will quickly wear you down and harm your mental health.

The will to survive and a degree of stubbornness is just one part of the survival attitude that will get you through almost anything. You also need to be realistic about your situation while still maintaining some hope for the future, something that can be difficult to do in this type of setting and circumstances.

Mental toughness allows you to keep going even when it seems like all is lost, and looking at the positive aspects of any situation will help you avoid dwelling on the negatives,

Recognize negative emotions and thought patterns when these occur, and address them immediately before they can take hold and grow.

Replace each negative thought or emotion with one that is more positive. If you think “I can’t do this” then flip the script and tell yourself “I can do this, I am strong, and I will be a survivor.”

Don’t let guilt or anger get the best of you. It is easy to blame yourself or to get angry when the world seems to turn upside down or it seems like everything has gone haywire, but these negative emotions have no place in your mental toolbox and they need to be banished as soon as they start.

Keep telling yourself that you are not to blame, and that getting angry will not help you but it could work against you and keep you from surviving. Remember that things happen, and we all have a bad day or experience unpleasant situations.

Keep a positive mental outlook on any situation and you are more likely to stay alive. One way you can do this is to imagine a bad situation, and then try to find a silver lining.

Even the worst catastrophic events will have something positive that can be associated with them, and you need to look for the bright ray of light in even the darkest situations and most dire circumstances.

A survival mindset is key if you want to stay alive in any life or death situation, whether this is a zombie apocalypse, a natural disaster, or government gone wrong.

Work on yourself to get yours!

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This article has been written by John Gilmore for Survivopedia. 

The Loss Of Faith In This Generation

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     Those of us, who are of a certain age, remember the famous statement by Ronald Reagan: Freedom is a fragile thing and is never more than one generation away from extinction… The same can be said of Faith, which is its own kind of freedom, wouldn’t you say?  And while I do not agree with Christian Apologist Ken Ham on his “Young Earth Creationist” theory, I am in full agreement with what he wrote on his website, Answers in Genesis.  Mr. Ham said, “Every generation has the same decision to make: Will I serve the God of the Bible or a false god? The “god of this world” may shift his seductions slightly from generation to generation, but the basic challenge is always the same. So, Christians must be ever vigilant. Every newborn must be taught the truth from scratch or else that soul could be completely lost. While statistics indicate that churches and Christian homes are failing to reach kids, God has given us all the resources we need to turn the tide!”     

     Sadly, I believe this generation of young adults is on the verge of succumbing to a most clever seduction of the Enemy.  Dr. R. Albert Mohler Jr., who serves as president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, supports this theory by explaining, “When Christian Smith and his fellow researchers with the National Study of Youth and Religion at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill took a close look at the religious beliefs held by American teenagers, they found that the faith held and described by most adolescents came down to something the researchers identified as Moralistic Therapeutic Deism.”  

     Exactly what are the foundations of such a belief system?  1) A god exists who created and ordered the world and watches over human life on earth.  2) God wants people to be good, nice, and fair to each other, as taught in the Bible and by most world religions.  3) The central goal of life is to be happy and to feel good about one’s self.  4) God does not need to be particularly involved in one’s life except when God is needed to resolve a problem.  5) Good people go to heaven when they die.
     As you can see, this is a belief system based on the premise that “the self” is primary, and God is an appendage to the lives we live.  He’s there, but only when we need Him; like a “Medicine Cabinet God”.  And you can see touches of Gnosticism in these beliefs too: the goal is to be happy, and pleased with yourself; Faith is subjective (personal, individual, emotional, instinctive, intuitive); there is no recognition of God’s superiority or Jesus’s sacrifice for our sins — all we have to do is “be Good”. 
      In other words, this is very close to the same lies and seduction that Satan offered Adam and Even in the Garden: That the Word (Bible) is not reliable (allowing for doubt and distortion); That God doesn’t have our best interests in mind, (if I follow His rules, I won’t have any fun in this life!); and That your sin isn’t all that bad (God knows I’m a good person overall and that’s what counts).  In essence, our latest generation is believing the lie that Satan told Eve:  Be your own God!
      After conducting more than 3,000 interviews with American adolescents, the University of North Carolina researchers reported that, when it came to the most crucial questions of faith and beliefs, many adolescents responded with a shrug and “whatever.” As the researchers explained, “For most teens [and I would surmise young adults], nobody has to do anything in life, including anything to do with religion. ‘Whatever’ is just fine, if that’s what a person wants.”

     It’s abundantly obvious — most Millennials can tell you more details than you want to know about the lives of favorite musicians and television/movie stars, or about what it takes to get into a good college, but most are not very clear on who Moses and Jesus were.  And with this conclusion, it is equally obvious that our culture has not followed God’s commandment to “train up” the next generation.  He says it over and over in the Bible … when God miraculously enabled Joshua to lead the people through the Jordan River, the first thing He told Joshua to do was to take twelve stones from the riverbed to build a memorial. But what was the memorial for? God wanted Joshua to explain, “When your children ask their fathers in time to come, saying, ‘What are these stones?’ then you shall let your children know . . . the Lord your God dried up the waters of the Jordan before you until you had crossed over . . . that all the peoples of the earth may know the hand of the Lord, that it is mighty, that you may fear the Lord your God forever” (Joshua 4:21–24).  The stones were to remind the parents to make sure they taught the next generation about the true God. They were instructed to pass on the knowledge and fear of God to their children.

     But, as a nation and a culture, I’m afraid we have failed to do this.  When we took God, the Bible, and prayer out of our public schools, [and failed to establish them in our homes], we are left with generations of kids who have no foundational knowledge of God and His Word, and once in college and living on their own, they are likely to abandon Him altogether.  What’s even more sad to me is that both these kids and their parents have not been taught apologetics ((how to give a reasoned defense of the Christian faith) in their homes or churches, so they don’t believe it themselves and certainly can’t defend it to others. 
     In effect, this theory of Moralistic Therapeutic Deism boils down to a couple of ideas … It’s all about individualism (let’s not be judgmental, and everything is relative to the individual); and just “being nice” is central to living a good and happy life and being a good, moral person. That means being nice, kind, pleasant, respectful, responsible, at work on self-improvement, taking care of one’s health, and doing one’s best to be successful.  Just like Satan taught:  Be your own god!
     As the researchers explained, “This is not a religion of repentance from sin, of keeping the Sabbath, of living as a servant of sovereign divinity, of steadfastly saying one’s prayers, of faithfully observing high holy days, of building character through suffering, of basking in God’s love and grace, of spending oneself in gratitude and love for the cause of social justice, et cetera. Rather, what appears to be the actual dominant religion among U.S. [young adults] is centrally about feeling good, happy, secure, at peace. It is about attaining subjective well-being, being able to resolve problems, and getting along amiably with other people.”
     But that’s not what God commanded us to teach the next generation!  In Deuteronomy 6:6-7, He tells us, “These words which I command you today shall be in your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, when you walk by the way, when you lie down, and when you rise up.” Instead, we have allowed ourselves to be seduced by Satan:  Don’t listen to God! He just wants it to be all about Him!  I’m offering you an easier, more pleasant faith that is way more tolerant and undemanding. Instead of doctrines of Trinity, holiness, sin, grace, justification, sanctification, church, and heaven and hell, I am offering you a life on this earth [now] centered on happiness, niceness, and an earned heavenly reward (but that’s later, you don’t have to worry about it now). 

    By now, it should be obvious that Moralistic Therapeutic Deism is a faith in “self”, not Faith in God.  We tend to treat spiritual problems with a medicinal treatment plan.  Sin, and the Wrath and Justice of God, are terms that don’t fit in well with our modern language and goal of self-actualization (the realization or fulfillment of one’s talents and potentialities). 

     So how do we reach a generation that is falling away from Faith in Jehovah God, as well as a nation that largely considers itself Christian, yet has very little knowledge or experience in Biblical Christianity?  It is apparent that we need to return to the directives God has given us in His Word… We must be earnest and persistent in teaching our children what the Bible says about God, so that they know WHAT they believe, WHY they believe it, and HOW to defend the Faith against the attacks of today’s secular culture.  Then we have a generation that can proclaim the Gospel of the Kingdom of God with AUTHORITY, because they believe by Whose Authority it stands.  
     They must be taught what “Faith in Christ” means… to know what it means to “Be Saved” and to “Walk with God”, and all from a Biblical perspective, using God’s own words!  We must answer their hard questions about sin in our culture and what happens when you die without knowing Jesus as your Savior.  We cannot give them more tolerant and permissive answers.  They must be taught Truth as God presents it in His Word — not what the popular opinion is.  Once they accept the Bible as true, and the Authority of the One who inspired it to be written, then the world, with all its challenges, will begin to make sense to them. They need to see the reality of sin, and know God’s Grace and Mercy, as well as His Judgment.  
     Once this generation knows [and believes] the Gospel Message that Christ died for us, was buried, and rose again with a promise of salvation to all those who have faith in Him, they will know that the power of that Gospel to save sinners rests on the authority of God’s Word.  They will then need to be encouraged to boldly proclaim that Gospel to a lost world — something that we have failed to do for several generations, and our society and nation are suffering for it.  But it is not too late!  We must replace the religion of Moralistic Therapeutic Deism with a genuine Faith in Jesus Christ by committing to instructing our children and grandchildren as God, the Father commanded us.  If we plant the seeds of the knowledge and authority of God through His Word, our Father and the Holy Spirit will be faithful to water them. It may take only one generation to lose Faith, but we can begin today to raise up the next one in Truth and Commitment to God and for the salvation of the world.  With God and His Word instructing us and them, how can we fail?
Judges 2:10-12  All that generation also were gathered to their fathers; and there arose another generation after them who did not know the Lord, nor yet the work which He had done for Israel.  Then the sons of Israel did evil in the sight of the Lord and served the Baals, and they forsook the Lord, the God of their fathers, who had brought them out of the land of Egypt, and followed other gods from among the gods of the peoples who were around them, and bowed themselves down to them; thus they provoked the Lord to anger.  
 

How to Deal With Laundry in Survival or Primitive Situations

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Sanitation is an important aspect of survival and this topic is poorly covered in most survival books. When it comes to dealing with dirty laundry, many people rely on their washing machines to clean their clothes. They can live without these modern appliances and only few of them remember how our ancestors cleaned their laundry. … Read more…

The post How to Deal With Laundry in Survival or Primitive Situations was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Survival Life Article – Z-Blade

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I’ve been using PFI’s Z-Blade for several years now and have found them to be VERY handy. Not long ago I decided to write a review on this helpful tool over at Survival Life so hop on over there and give it a look. It is a great tool to have on-hand around the house […]

The post Survival Life Article – Z-Blade appeared first on Smart Suburban Survival.

Why You Need To Meet Your Neighbors

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My post today is explaining why you need to meet your neighbors. Of course, if you have lived in the same house for 30 years, you probably know almost everyone on the street. Where I live is mostly renters, so the people move in and out all the time. It’s a bit more difficult to get to know the ones that rent only 60 days, or even six months. I do have about 30% of the people on my street that actually own their homes. I live in a neighborhood where about 50% of the people are under 60 years old and about 50% are over the age of 60. It’s quite common to hear at least one or two ambulances every other month in my subdivision.

This is the reason why I feel very strongly about writing this post today. This last weekend was spring break and Easter. Well, Mark and I had company here and we heard the sirens very close to our home. Mark walked down the street to see if he could help in any way. He saw an ambulance drive away from a friend’s home. I’m sure because of “privacy issues” the fireman standing next to the firetruck would not confirm Mark’s question as to who was in the ambulance. The front door was open at the home and Mark rang the doorbell to see if her daughter was still there. The daughter is older and has some very critical medical issues so Mark asked her “was that your mom in the ambulance?” She nodded and said, “just call her”. Well, our friend in the ambulance did not answer her phone. Mark started trying to call people in the neighborhood who knew her extended family members’ phone numbers.

Keep in mind it’s the day before Easter and most people were out of town. All we needed was a phone number to contact her relatives to help with her daughter and let them know the ambulance left with our friend. It took Mark about an hour to get a relative’s phone number. Mark called a few people who then headed to the main hospital we have here in town. Luckily, she was okay, but was in really bad pain and the emergency room took very good care of her. The people who went to the hospital were able to bring her home after she was treated.

Meet Your Neighbors:

Here’s the deal why you need to meet your neighbors, we need contact information. Now, some people are very private and would never give you any information. I remember one day I looked in my mailbox and there was an envelope with a different address, that obviously had some credit cards enclosed. I walked down about four houses and knocked on the door. Well, I’ve never met these people and they must not want to meet anyone on the street. They had a huge sign on the door that says something like “We have our own religion, We don’t need anything, We don’t want to buy anything, and We love Jesus”. Well, I was hoping to give the credit cards to them personally but I put them in their mailbox. I get it.  I won’t be asking them to come to my “Contact Information” party, complete with bagels and cream cheese.

I am going to go knock on a few front doors and see if I can get a few to come to my party to share names and phone numbers in case of an emergency. Mark has two great friends, Craig and Craig in the neighborhood and I’m filling out a form for them to have in case of an emergency. I’m filling out a form for our best friends, Brent and Kathleen to have in case they need to get in touch with family members for any reason, emergency or whatever. I hope I can get a few people to come to my “Contact Information” party and this way we can all help each other when needed.

This picture below is a partial copy of the document, and here is the PRINTABLE: FSM Emergency Contact Info

meet your neighbors

I also have a shortened version I call my Emergency Contact Information PRINTABLE: Emergency Contact Information

Emergency Contact Information

Name:

  1. Email:
  2. Home phone number:
  3. Cell phone number:
  4. People to contact with information indicated above

Name:

  1. Email:
  2. Home phone number:
  3. Cell phone number:
  4. People to contact with information indicated above

 

Just think how much easier it would be for everyone if we could contact family members or friends of our neighbors after a disaster, or an unforeseen emergency if we had emails, phone numbers, etc. Of course, I’m hoping we have electricity or the internet in order to do this, I understand we may not at some time or another. Block parties would be awesome as well. This is why you need to meet your neighbors. I need to meet all of my neighbors. May God bless you and your neighbors to get together and share emergency contact information.

My favorite things:

Neenah Exact Index Card Stock, 8.5 x 11 Inch, 90 lb, White, 250 Sheets (40311)

Avery 74102 Top loading non-glare poly sheet protectors, heavy, 100 per box

Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

The post Why You Need To Meet Your Neighbors appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Vitamin Supplements Guide List

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Preppers will store up a supply of food, but have they considered the nutritional balance of the foods they’ve stored versus what the body needs? Vitamins are necessary for our general nutrition and good health. Although they do not directly contribute to energy or body-building materials, they are important to form complex chemical compounds that […]

How to make survival candles with soy wax

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Compared to regular paraffin candles, soy candles might not seem all that different at first glance. A candle’s a candle, right? The similarities between paraffin candles and soy candles are only surface-deep. There are many reasons why these vegetable oil-derived candles are much better than regular ones. Because they’re made from soybeans, they’re natural and completely renewable. Soy candles also burn longer and cleaner than paraffin ones, producing less black soot once they’ve finished burning. They’re non-toxic as well, unlike paraffin candles which have been shown to release carcinogenic chemicals when melted.

Picture it: you’re enjoying a nice night at home when the power suddenly goes out. You stumble through the darkness to get your box of emergency candles. You light them up them up and wait for the power to come back on. The candles burn quickly and leave soot behind. These store-bought candles will do in a pinch but they could be better. You could do better…and you can by making your own soy candles.

You don’t need anything super fancy to make your own soy candles. You just need a few materials and time. You would need:

  • Soy wax flakes
  • Containers (Canning jars, normal glasses, and even tin cans will do)
  • Tabs and wicks (If you don’t have access to these, rolled cotton is a good alternative)
  • Double boiler or two pots
  • Optional: wooden spoon
  • Optional: scented oils (We recommend lemon and lavender)
  • Optional: Aluminum foil

The steps

  1. Prepare everything beforehand. Melted wax solidifies quickly, so you’ll want to make sure that you’ve have your jars or cans ready. Place your wicks and tabs inside their containers.
  2. Place your double-boiler on the stove. If all you only have two different pots, fill the larger pot with water a third of the way and then insert the smaller pot inside the larger one. Turn on the heat, bring your double boiler (or pots) to a boil, and then add the soy wax flakes.
  3. Wait for your soy wax flakes to completely melt. You can stir the melting wax with a wooden spoon to speed up the process. If you want scented candles, this is the time to add the scented oils. Remove the pot from the stove and then stir in your scented oils. For every pound of melted wax, use one ounce of essential oils.
  4. Once the soy wax flakes have fully melted, pour them into their containers. Don’t fill the containers up all the way toprevent the wax from spilling out. Leave a one-inch margin between the rim of the container and the wax. If you used rolled cotton wool, be sure to add them after you’ve poured in the wax to prevent the steam from making them soggy. Use aluminum foil to center the cotton wool inside their containers.
  5. Cool down your soy candles and wait for them to harden. It’s best to let them sit overnight at room temperature to prevent the soy candles from cracking.

That’s all it takes to make your own soy candles. These are great to have for around your home because they’ll burn for hours at a time. If you’re planning on making soy candles for camping, it’s best to use aluminum cans and keep them unscented for safety purposes. Otherwise, you’re free to make and use them as you wish.

Source : naturalnews.com

                 RELATED ARTICLES : 

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SHTF Dental Care: These Are the Supplies You Need To Survive a Post-Collapse Dental Emergency

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As far as preppers are concerned, the majority of you guys and gals have already probably stored up about a half a pallet of toothbrushes and toothpaste for shtf dental emergencies.  Yes?  No?  Well, in any event we’re going to cover some field-expedient methods to clean up the teeth.  The reason for this is that it’s hard enough in a normal environment to keep those teeth cleaned and healthy.  In a grid down collapse, there will be no dentist and there are going to be a lot of problems that will affect the teeth and gums, so the more you know about oral hygiene now, the better.

Firstly, it is in your best interest to pick up the reference guide entitled, Where There is No Dentist,” by Murray Dickson.  It will be money well-spent, as it covers all of the different procedures to follow for abscesses, tooth extraction, and other “niceties” of oral care when you will not find a dentist, as the title suggests.  A manual such as this is just what your preparedness library needs.

Alternatives to Toothpaste

That being mentioned, what about things such as toothpaste and floss?  Well, many of your aromatic mints can be crushed up and used as toothpaste, such as spearmint and peppermint.  Follow this up with baking soda, and you’ll find a good clean set of teeth after brushing.  Charcoal powder is also an excellent dental cleanser, as well, a strong salt water solution will also be of use.  Cloves, in particular are good for swollen or abscessed gums, and clove oil itself can be used as a topical analgesic with excellent results and can easily be made.


To Make Clove Oil: Dried cloves can also be chopped up to be placed in a jar with 50% ethyl alcohol.  Make sure you cover over the pile of chopped cloves by about ¼ inch.  Tightly close the jar, and shake it vigorously several hundred times a day, once in the morning and once at night.


Keep the clove mixture in a cool, dark place, and after two weeks, you’ll have your solution.  Cloves contain eugenol, which is both an anesthetic and an antimicrobial.  Don’t drink it.  Use it as an oral rinse: a more effective one than most supermarket-brand mouthwashes.  It can also help to prevent and to aid with swollen gums.

Keep this rule in mind: The main causes for tooth problems are poor nutrition and then poor hygiene. 

This does pose a problem, and there are certain foods that can do a number on your teeth. This will be a challenge for you to be able to find not just food, but healthy and nutritious food after a collapse.  Vitamin C is necessary to prevent scurvy, a disease of the gums that eventually leads to tooth loss if unchecked.  Protein deficiencies are also a big problem that can cause teeth to loosen and gums to rot.  Clean water is very important, not just for the care of the teeth, but also to prevent any microorganisms from entering an already unhealthy oral cavity post SHTF.  Boil the water for at least 3 to 5 minutes after you have strained and filtered it in every way that you can.

How to Make Your Own Toothbrushes and Floss

Toothbrushes can be fashioned out of sticks with the diameter of a pencil.  Notch the ends and then hammer the end, spreading out the wood and softening it somewhat.  With these you’ll have to be a little more careful, as there not your “Oral-B” store-bought toothbrushes.  Floss can be made from cotton or nylon thread that you can wax beforehand to strengthen it somewhat.  Just take the start of your thread and press your thumb on top of it, crushing/pressing it into the wax, and then just pull the thread through.  Do this several times to give it a light wax coating that smooths out the thread through the teeth and strengthens the fibers.

Above all else, make sure you have some post-collapse dental supplies. Anything that you can pick up before the disaster is a plus, and you may wish to practice with several of these techniques to find out which are the best for you personally.  The reason is that everyone’s mouth is different, and genetically many are predisposed to having either teeth without a long lifespan or other problems.  As well, have an understanding of how to mitigate dental pain should something arise in a disaster. Prior to taking any actions here, consult with your friendly, certified, government-approved dentist for his or her friendly approval.  Take care of those teeth, and stock up on stuff you need…before the SHTF.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

SHTF Dental Care: These Are the Supplies You Need To Survive a Post-Collapse Dental Emergency

As far as preppers are concerned, the majority of you guys and gals have already probably stored up about a half a pallet of toothbrushes and toothpaste for shtf dental emergencies.  Yes?  No?  Well, in any event we’re going to cover some field-expedient methods to clean up the teeth.  The reason for this is that it’s hard enough in a normal environment to keep those teeth cleaned and healthy.  In a grid down collapse, there will be no dentist and there are going to be a lot of problems that will affect the teeth and gums, so the more you know about oral hygiene now, the better.

Firstly, it is in your best interest to pick up the reference guide entitled, Where There is No Dentist,” by Murray Dickson.  It will be money well-spent, as it covers all of the different procedures to follow for abscesses, tooth extraction, and other “niceties” of oral care when you will not find a dentist, as the title suggests.  A manual such as this is just what your preparedness library needs.

Alternatives to Toothpaste

That being mentioned, what about things such as toothpaste and floss?  Well, many of your aromatic mints can be crushed up and used as toothpaste, such as spearmint and peppermint.  Follow this up with baking soda, and you’ll find a good clean set of teeth after brushing.  Charcoal powder is also an excellent dental cleanser, as well, a strong salt water solution will also be of use.  Cloves, in particular are good for swollen or abscessed gums, and clove oil itself can be used as a topical analgesic with excellent results and can easily be made.


To Make Clove Oil: Dried cloves can also be chopped up to be placed in a jar with 50% ethyl alcohol.  Make sure you cover over the pile of chopped cloves by about ¼ inch.  Tightly close the jar, and shake it vigorously several hundred times a day, once in the morning and once at night.


Keep the clove mixture in a cool, dark place, and after two weeks, you’ll have your solution.  Cloves contain eugenol, which is both an anesthetic and an antimicrobial.  Don’t drink it.  Use it as an oral rinse: a more effective one than most supermarket-brand mouthwashes.  It can also help to prevent and to aid with swollen gums.

Keep this rule in mind: The main causes for tooth problems are poor nutrition and then poor hygiene. 

This does pose a problem, and there are certain foods that can do a number on your teeth. This will be a challenge for you to be able to find not just food, but healthy and nutritious food after a collapse.  Vitamin C is necessary to prevent scurvy, a disease of the gums that eventually leads to tooth loss if unchecked.  Protein deficiencies are also a big problem that can cause teeth to loosen and gums to rot.  Clean water is very important, not just for the care of the teeth, but also to prevent any microorganisms from entering an already unhealthy oral cavity post SHTF.  Boil the water for at least 3 to 5 minutes after you have strained and filtered it in every way that you can.

How to Make Your Own Toothbrushes and Floss

Toothbrushes can be fashioned out of sticks with the diameter of a pencil.  Notch the ends and then hammer the end, spreading out the wood and softening it somewhat.  With these you’ll have to be a little more careful, as there not your “Oral-B” store-bought toothbrushes.  Floss can be made from cotton or nylon thread that you can wax beforehand to strengthen it somewhat.  Just take the start of your thread and press your thumb on top of it, crushing/pressing it into the wax, and then just pull the thread through.  Do this several times to give it a light wax coating that smooths out the thread through the teeth and strengthens the fibers.

Above all else, make sure you have some post-collapse dental supplies. Anything that you can pick up before the disaster is a plus, and you may wish to practice with several of these techniques to find out which are the best for you personally.  The reason is that everyone’s mouth is different, and genetically many are predisposed to having either teeth without a long lifespan or other problems.  As well, have an understanding of how to mitigate dental pain should something arise in a disaster. Prior to taking any actions here, consult with your friendly, certified, government-approved dentist for his or her friendly approval.  Take care of those teeth, and stock up on stuff you need…before the SHTF.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Taking Aim at Concealed Carry!

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Taking Aim at Concealed Carry Bob Hawkins “The APN Report“ Audio in player below! No topic seems to draw more fire (sic) from both sides of an issue than the right to keep arms. When it comes to opinionated debate, any discussion involving personal defense can be counted on to be full of passion, since … Continue reading Taking Aim at Concealed Carry!

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