Why Busyness Is A Cancer To The Soul

Click here to view the original post.
Why Busyness Is A Cancer To The Soul

Image source: Pixabay.com

As you begin reading this, you likely are doing what most people do with an article: You are looking for the headings, bullet points, and bolded words. Why? Because — if we’re honest — we are far too busy and believe we don’t have time to read

The average American worker engages in more than 40 hours of work each week outside the home. What’s more, we are getting less sleep than our grandparents — about two hours less each day. And, if you have kids, you have even more reasons to be busy.

The Bible records a well-known story about busyness. It reminds us that this problem is an age-old one — but one that we can confront and control to the glory of God and the betterment of our families, churches and individual lives.

Now as they went on their way, Jesus entered a village. And a woman named Martha welcomed him into her house. And she had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet and listened to his teaching.  But Martha was distracted with much serving. And she went up to him and said, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to serve alone? Tell her then to help me.” But the Lord answered her, “Martha, Martha, you are anxious and troubled about many things, but one thing is necessary. Mary has chosen the good portion, which will not be taken away from her.” (Luke 10:38-42)

This account isn’t just detailing for us two personality types (Martha – “type-A” and Mary – “happy-go-lucky”). Clearly, God doesn’t favor Mary’s personality. He created all sorts of personalities to advance His kingdom. Neither is the point of this story to “just be with Jesus” and hang out with Him.

Heirloom Audio: Christian Heroes For Christian Kids

So, what is Jesus saying? In short, He’s saying that those who believe themselves to be competent for the task have the hardest time following His will for their lives. Let’s look at two aspects of this and then apply it, practically.

First, we have grown up believing that busyness equals successful faithfulness. “The early bird gets the word,” we are told. And, “no time to waste!” We like to be busy because that makes us feel special and important. We say to God, “Whew, Lord, I am tired! Look at me! I am burned out … for You!”

Why Busyness Is A Cancer To The Soul

Image source: Pixabay.com

Second, notice that Martha is driven by fear — “you are anxious” (v. 41). We all feel the pressure: “If I don’t do this right, what will people think of me? Well, we can’t have anyone over for dinner because our house is a mess! How can we serve Christ and share Jesus if our kids’ rooms aren’t picked up and there is toothpaste in the sink!”

Truthfully, though, we can’t please everyone, we need to deny our pride of perfectionism, and we don’t have anything to prove.

What does this look like, practically?

  1. Sleep like someone whose God is actually alive. There’s so much wrong in the world. How do I sleep at night? Sleep well in the knowledge that all your sins are forgiven and God has declared you to be righteous in Christ. Sleep well because God loves you as much as He loves Jesus. Sleep well because God is in control. It is not your jam-packed schedule or the idol of busyness that shows you are godly. God is glorified when we actually sleep!
  2. Stop worrying about tomorrow. Isn’t this what Jesus warned about in Matthew 6:34? After all, do you really believe in the free, total sovereignty of God? Our worry about tomorrow ruins today. We don’t have enough knowledge to fix tomorrow, but God does — cast your cares on Him. Jesus will be there tomorrow (and today … and forever), sufficient for everything you need!
  3. Give yourself some schedule-breathing room! Jesus slept while a storm raged (Mark 4:38) and withdrew by Himself to pray (Luke 5:16). Even the brash and bold Peter took a nap and rested from work (Acts 10)! When your smartphone calendar is packed to the max, you can’t even deal with the very things God calls you to do on a regular basis (evangelize, pray, etc.).
  4. Take a Sabbath rest. Yes, Jesus is our Sabbath rest (Hebrews 3:7-4:11). But, since the moral law continues (the Ten Commandments), we are commanded to take a break and rest. If the Jews, who were farmers and herders by trade, could rest — even if it grated against all they knew – then we can do it, too. They did and their crops produced fruit. And our souls will produce spiritual fruit when we take time to rest and recoup spiritually before our triune God — one day a week! The Sabbath teachings in the Bible show us that God wants us to be unproductive at times. Rejuvenated. Refreshed.

The less time I spend communing with Jesus, the quicker I get irritated with people. Go figure! The more quality time I spend with Jesus, the less likely I am to be fragile or rigid, on any given day.

And let’s remember — the real problem with our busyness is that it keeps us from true fellowship with our loving Lord. Jesus told Mary that she chose the “good thing.” And so should we!

Coolio ‘preparing to live off the grid’

Click here to view the original post.
Coolio at the Great GoogaMooga Festival

Where do old rappers go to die?

American Rapper Coolio has told a newspaper he is preparing for a social collapse and plans to end his days off grid.  “I’ve acquired knowledge of people and the world — knowledge that will help me survive in any given situation” he told the SundayTimes. ” I can track stuff. I can fix a car. I can build a house. I could build a wind turbine if I wanted to.

“I’m preparing to live off the grid, without electricity, air conditioning and heat. You could say it’s preparation for an apocalypse or a natural disaster. The poles are shifting and I’m not optimistic about the future,” he said.

Coolio,  best known for his hit single Gangsta’s Paradise, would like to get rid of the entire tax system — and believes tax is illegal under the US constitution.  “If I was in charge, I’d get rid of tax completely. I’d get rid of money too. I’d go back to the barter system. In my opinion, and according to the constitution of my country, tax is illegal.”

The Grammy award-winner, who says he is not on good terms with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), believes investing in people, gold and diamonds is the best way to save for his retirement. He admits, though, that he has an expensive shoe habit and buys a pair “at least once a week” — sometimes for as much as $1,000 [£785].

He does not personally own any property – “Property can be taken away from you by “eminent domain” [the right of the government to seize your property]. That can happen to anyone in America. I’m going to put all my money in people, gold and diamonds.

 “As for gold and diamonds, that’s something you are always going to be able to use to get food and water. I’m thinking ahead to the time when a bottle of water is going to cost $10. Hopefully, I won’t live that long, but I think that time will come.

Back when he was starting, said Coolio “to make ends meet, I hustled. I sold things: drugs, shoes, jewellery, whatever I could get my hands on. The name of my first album was It Takes a Thief, you know? I’ve been around the block a few times. It made me determined — determined to not live like that for the rest of my life. I got mad at myself. I told myself: “You should be doing better. You’re smart enough — you should be Steve Jobs [the founder of Apple] or someone like that. Get off your ass and go get some money.

“I had to sleep in my car. Sometimes I didn’t have enough money to pay the rent and would get thrown out of where I was living. Other times, I went hungry. I was fortunate in that I had good friends around me who would spot me a $20 bill if I asked them to.

“My mother, Jackie Mae, was a gangster. She took money with her pistol and her knife. She was never a hooker but when it came to money, she believed: “[Get it] by any means necessary.”

“But we were all born dying anyway. I’m not scared to die. I’ve had a fulfilling life. When my time comes, I’m going to leave with a smile on my face . . . or a grimace at the bullet that killed me.

“I support the Jarez Music Foundation. Jarez is a young musician in Vegas, and he has a music foundation which is trying to put musical instruments back in schools. I’ll work and perform for his foundation for free, and I mentor some of the kids.”

Born Artis Leon Ivey Jr, Coolio’s big hit was released in 1995 and featured on the soundtrack of the film Dangerous Minds, starring Michelle Pfeiffer. It became one of the most successful rap songs of all time, reaching No 1 in the charts in the UK, America and 14 other countries. He has released eight studio albums.

This autumn Coolio joins the I Love the 90s tour, playing dates in the UK between September 29 and October 7 alongside other acts who had big hits in that decade, such as Vanilla Ice and Salt-N-Pepa.

The post Coolio ‘preparing to live off the grid’ appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Darwin couple rescued from WA desert. What To Carry With You When Going Bush.

Click here to view the original post.
The Darwin couple were saved from WA’s Gibson Desert. Picture: AAP


Things/Items to carry with you at all times when going bush: (1) A good winch, preferably a hand operated winch. (2) A post hole shovel. This shovel can be used to dig yourself out by creating ramps from the bog. It can also be used to bury your spare wheel to use as an anchor for winching your vehicle out of the bog. (3) Plenty of drinking water. You can survive for up to 3 weeks without food if you are fit, but you can only survive 3 days without water. Hotter conditions and exertion will shorten the time you can survive without water. (4) Food. (5) A 4 litre container of engine oil. (6) Extra fuel. (7) A good medical kit. (8) Tool kit. (9) Wool blankets. My Father always carried a wool rug in his car. This was a carry-over from the days when our cars had no heaters. It is however still relevant, because deserts can get cold at night, and if it is winter it can get cold wherever you are in Australia. (10) A good tyre pump. We have an electric one. If purchasing an electric pump, make sure you get a good one. This is a classic case of “you get what you pay for”! (11) A “snap-strap”. Just in case someone else comes along and is able to pull you out. (12) A high lift jack. We call them “wallaby jacks”.

Trapping Food When You’re On The Go

Click here to view the original post.

Re-posted from MDSA Over the years I’ve had a number of people ask me what I suggested for trapping in an “On the move, supplies on my back” survival scenario. My usual suggestions are snares if you are travelling very light (example, in the smock kit), and at least four 110 Conibears body hold traps […]

Sunday Prepper Bible Study-The Plum Line

Click here to view the original post.

 

And the brethren immediately sent away Paul and Silas by night unto Berea: who coming thither went into the synagogue of the Jews. These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.

Acts 17:10-11

Christianity isn’t a to-do list. Neither is it a to-don’t list. It’s a relationship with the Messiah, Jesus Christ. But, like all relationships, it requires effort on your part. So, you go to church every Sunday. That’s great. In fact, Hebrews 10 specifically tells us to make a priority out of meeting with other believers. Being part of the Body of Christ, the Church, is an important part of your relationship with Jesus. And so is reading the Word.

In today’s verse, we see the Jews in Berea eagerly listening to Paul and Silas as they share the good news of salvation. But the Berean Jews don’t stop there. The Bereans fact check everything Paul and Silas have said about Jesus by holding it up against the prophecies of the Messiah written in the Hebrew scriptures.

Likewise, it’s fantastic to go to church, meet together with other believers, and hear an uplifting sermon. But, was the sermon you just heard biblical? Do you have a plum line to hold up against Pastor Joe’s message this morning, or is your pastor your highest authority? We have to remember that the coming of Christ did away with the old covenant, and with it, went the priesthood.

Revelation 1:6 says Jesus has made us kings and priests unto God. So, you have the same title as Pastor Joe. It’s a level playing field. The flip side of that is that while you have the same authority as Pastor Joe, you also have the same responsibility. No longer can we say, “All that Bible stuff is Pastor Joe’s job.” It’s your job to know the Bible inside and out. You don’t need any fancy commentaries nor a degree from the seminary, although some may feel called to such things*. You just need the discipline to get up and study the Bible for yourself daily. Pray that God will open your eyes and give you understanding. There’s no better commentary on the Bible than the Bible itself, and there’s no better teacher than God. Quoting from Isaiah, Jesus said in John 6, “And they shall be all taught of God.”

Once you’ve developed the discipline of daily Bible reading, you’ll be like the Berean Jews who were able to uphold what they’d been told by Paul and Silas against the truth of God’s Holy Word.

*As a caveat against commentaries and seminaries, if you feel God is calling you to such things, I implore you to spend a couple of years reading and studying the Bible on your own first, so you’ll be able to discern between the wheat and the chaff in that arena. Many well-intended Christians have been led astray by bad doctrine and unbiblical teachings from commentaries and seminaries to which they dedicated much time and energy, in hopes of pleasing God.

Jesus said, “what does it profit a man if he gains the whole world yet loses his own soul?” Prepper translation: “What good will it do you to survive the coming economic collapse, nuclear war, or even a zombie apocalypse if you don’t know you will go to heaven when you die.” A recent study found that 10 out of 10 people die! On that day we will meet our Maker. It only makes sense to be prepared for that day. Click here to learn more about knowing GOD.

Have a blessed day and happy prepping!

Mark

The post Sunday Prepper Bible Study-The Plum Line appeared first on Prepper Recon.

North Korea threatens Australia with nuclear strike!

Click here to view the original post.
Soldiers march across Kim Il Sung Square during a military parade on Saturday, April 15, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea to celebrate the 105th birth anniversary of Kim Il Sung. Photo: AAP

Harder Homes & Gardens – Volume I: Harry Bennett’s castle and cabins

Click here to view the original post.

Sure anyone can build a home out of concrete to keep the zombies at bay. What really throws you into Omega Man territory are the little personal touches that give the homeowner the advantage and gives the bad guys a Very Bad Day. One such fellow was Harry Bennett.

Bennett was a longtime high-level employee at Ford in Michigan. He had absolutely no background in engineering, automobiles, business, or finance. What he did have experience in, however, was boxing, guns, slavish devotion to Ford, and moral flexibility. Hired on a handshake from Ford himself, Bennett put together the Ford Service Division….a division of Ford that did absolutely nothing to fix cars but did everything to fix union problems. Mr. Bennett, for all intents and purposes, was Ford’s top union-busting goon. Given the green light to build what was essentially a private army, Bennett employed “football players, boxers, wrestlers and even Detroit river gang members as Service Department employees”.

fLpV4

Harry Bennett conducting a business meeting with union representatives in his usual style.

With a history of fights, brawls, and machine gun exchanges with union organizers, Mr. Bennett, as you might well imagine, made some enemies. To keep himself whole and intact, Bennett built himself a ‘castle’ in Ypsilanti, MI. He also built a weekend cabin, also out of concrete, with features similar to what he did at his castle.

Here’s a video tour of the castle as it stands today:

Gun ports? Yes. Trick staircases? Absolutely. Hidden tunnels? Naturally? Tunnels patrolled by fearsome jungle cats? Of course! Bennett spared no effort, or aggregate, to build structures he thought would keep him safe. (Yet, he still managed to get shot in his own living room.)

His weekend cottage was similarly designed with staircases with steps of random height to trip pursuers, escape tunnels to a dock and getaway boat, airfield, pillboxes on the roof, a moat with sharpened stakes, and a bridge over said moat rigged with dynamite. Bennett was full Burt Gummer before his time. The lodge, like the castle, still stands today and is owned by the Boy Scouts of America. Here’s a fascinating photo gallery of a tour that shows off the many hardened features.

Bennett’s buildings had quite a few features that we would find highly desirable for our own needs. I am most impressed by the stairs with steps of differing heights. This plays on an observed oddity:

Bennett would as the story goes, practice running up and down the uneven stairs so he’d have an advantage over pursuers who would, presumably, go tumbling down the stairs as they encountered the uneven steps. It’s little details like that that separate the good from the great.

If you read all the links above, you’ll see Bennett had the usual assortment of hidden stairwells, secret gun compartments, false bookshelves, and other gimmicks we come to expect. He’s also the only person I’ve read about, in somewhat modern times, who actually incorporated a moat into his bunker plans. (Being ready to dynamite the bridge over the moat on a moments notice? Thats a baller touch.)

So there you have it, a brawling union-buster from the Prohibition-era could show us a trick or two when it comes to building our fortified homes. Note that it’s dang near 80-some-odd years later and those concrete homes are still standing and still in good enough repair to be occupied. Here to stay, built to last.

 

Procrastination: A Recipe For Disaster

Click here to view the original post.

Procrastination: A Recipe For Disaster It’s the killer of motivation and success in all avenues of life. Procrastination is a nice comfortable void that millions of Americans fall into. There is such potential in the freedom loving America but it all gets ruined by the lack of inspiration and procrastination. That makes this article about …

Continue reading »

The post Procrastination: A Recipe For Disaster appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

8 Ways To Fertilize Your Garden With Household Items

Click here to view the original post.
8 Ways To Fertilize Your Garden With Household Items

Image source: Pixabay.com

Self-sufficient gardeners avoid the use of pre-packaged fertilizers and soil from the store. But chances are you have plenty of items in your house that can be used to fertilize your garden, saving you money and time – and giving your vegetables a healthy boost.

Let’s take a look:

1. Coffee grounds. Do you start the day with an overflowing cup of coffee? Those dried coffee grounds add nitrogen, potassium and magnesium to your garden — all vital nutrients for the growth of your plants. Just remember that coffee grounds can change the pH of your soil, possibly affecting plants that need a delicate balance.

2. Tea bags. If you aren’t a coffee drinker, tea bags have a very similar effect on the soil as coffee grounds. Remove the tea grounds from the bags and allow them to dry before application. Many gardeners notice tea grounds are particularly beneficial around tomatoes.

Need Non-GMO Seeds? Get The Best Deals Here!

3. Egg shells. Your chickens can contribute to more than just breakfast. Egg shells are a fantastic calcium source.

After breakfast, wash out the shells and let them dry. Break the shells into smaller pieces and put them in the ground when planting tomatoes. You also can add them around the base of already-planted tomatoes. Tomatoes require more calcium than other plants.

4. Fish scraps. Early Pilgrims had trouble growing crops when they arrived in North America, mostly because of nutrient-lacking soil. The Indians who came to their aid, including the famous Squanto, taught the Pilgrims a trick – burying fish with the seeds. You don’t need to plant multiple fish inside of your garden, but using the scraps can help.

If you have an aquarium, don’t dump the water down the drain. Use this water to hydrate your garden beds and potted plants. The fish waste provides vitamins to the plants without any extra steps for you! If you filet a fish, save the bones and scraps. Some gardeners like to puree them with water and milk, creating a strong fertilizing mixture. You could bury scraps, as well.

8 Ways To Fertilize Your Garden With Household Items

Image source: Pixabay.com

6. Wood ash: Those who have a wood stove or fireplace have a free source of fertilizer, adding potassium and calcium carbonate to the soil. Remember never to use the ash if you added anything else! Ash is an easy way to increase your soil pH, so don’t use it if your soil is alkaline. Ash also can keep slugs away from your plants.

7. Bananas. Do you have kids who eat bananas like candy? Don’t toss those peels! Putting them in your compost pile is a good first step. You also can put them right into your garden to give the soil a quick potassium boost. Peels degrade fairly quickly, and they don’t produce a nasty odor. A benefit of using banana peels is that they repel pests!

8. Grass clippings. Free makes everything better, and you likely have an unending source of grass clippings. Yard waste is the perfect organic matter to add to your garden. Add them to your garden to work as mulch. Every time you mow and rake, continue to add more. As it decomposes into the soil, grass clippings release nitrogen.

Powdered milk. Do you have powdered milk in your cabinet that is past expiration? Don’t throw it away! You can mix one part milk into four parts water. (You also can use expired milk in your fridge for this.) Milk is a fantastic source of calcium for more than just humans! It also contains proteins, vitamin B, and sugars that improve the overall health of the plant. Plants that are failing to grow to their full potential can benefit from a boost in calcium. Milk also helps with blossom end root, commonly ailing squash, tomatoes and pepper plants.

What would you add to our list? Share your gardening tips in the section below:  

The Cutting of the Hazelnuts

Click here to view the original post.

When we moved in here we had a large front yard and large back yard and slowly over the years both yards have gotten increasingly overgrown. Some of it is just because we live in the woods and the woods grow but a lot of it has been things I have planted. Sometimes plants are cheap and you think it is a great idea and you think you will use them and you never do. And sometimes you just don’t know how big those plants will get. It never occurred to me that hazelnuts could grow this big!

 I planted them by the driveway and every year now we have to trim the driveway side back so there is room for both mine and Michelle’s cars. Even worse….sadly…we never really used the hazelnuts. They are small. Too small for any nutcrackers so you have to use a hammer and most of the time you crush the meat. Just getting them all cleaned of their shells is a ridiculously slow job and I could deal with us never using them if at least the wildlife used them but there has never been a squirrel or anything else collecting nuts from the two bushes.
So I mentioned to Phil that maybe we should cut them down and open up the yard some and he jumped right on that idea and said it would make the yard a whole lot easier to cut the grass and he would do that next.
We have two pairs of “loppers” and started cutting but I am sick today….some sort of sore throat, ache all over, dizzy, fever off and on…sickness, and I just couldn’t get my bush cut and Phil had to come finish it up.
I told Phil it would be a great place to plant my two rose bushes I bought a couple weeks ago and he just rolled his eyes at me. 😀

Nothing left but the brush to take off now.

The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have!

Click here to view the original post.

The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have! Hunting is not just all about having high-end weapons and other equipment, but it is also about overcoming the harsh and most inconvenient environment. Thus, to be an effective hunter, you should be prepared for whatever is ahead of your hunting venture. You should take note of these … Continue reading The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have!

The post The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Should your handgun have a manual safety?

Click here to view the original post.

US Army details new modular handgun based on Sig Sauer P320 | IHS Jane ...

US military new gun, the Sig P320

Fernando,

Your video showing the victims who went for guns that did not have a round in the chamber tells us that they most likely had pistols that did not have mechanical safeties, or if they did have safeties they did not have them engaged.

Either way, they probably thought that keeping the chamber empty was a way to keep the gun from being discharged accidentally by themselves or others who might pick it up.

We have exchanged notes before about the desirability or the undesirability of mechanical safeties on pistols.

While adherents of the no-safety guns make various arguments in defense of their position, a couple of points can be made.

I can send you many articles on many accidental shootings with guns that just “went off” and shot somebody.  These guns were fired by toddlers who somehow got their hands on them (gun owners’ neglect) all the way up to “highly trained” people such as law enforcement officers.  (Interesting that these articles don’t ever disclose the model of pistol involved—wonder if they are worried about legal liabilities.)

But since toddlers probably don’t know how to disengage a manual safety, and competent adults would not deliberately disengage a safety in an unsafe setting, we might conclude that these shootings overwhelmingly are with pistols that do not have a manual safety.

A few months ago, one of the popular gun magazines had an article by a lady firearms trainer who swore that she would never have a pistol with a safety, saying “That is just something else to fumble with” if she had to use her gun.  Strange—you would think that a professional would be trained to the point where there would be no “fumbling.”

Certainly, a gun with a round in the chamber and a manual safety engaged would have been better than the “rack and then shoot” scenarios in your video.

Larry

.

Hello Larry,

That’s a good point but you have to keep in mind two words: police and military.

For concealed carry I can tell you one thing; Go with a Glock. Round chambered, no safety.

Your child should NOT take hold of your gun, a safety does not make you a good parent, it does not compensate for lack of training either.

Now for a cop that may lose his gun in a struggle with a suspect, a soldier that may lose his gun in a fight, maybe when handling prisoners, these can be reasons for a safety. I do remember though a cop that had a negligent discharge with his Beretta 92, a gun that has a safety. Safeties do not in any way compensate for improper gun handling. But when it comes to losing the gun to someone that may use it against you (and lack the training to quickly disengage the safety) it may save a life.  Maybe that’s why they required it for their new issued handgun, the Sig Sauer P320.  I bet special forces will stick to their Glocks though, and so should you. A well trained operator, civilian or military, will take the most advantage of a gun without manual safety and a chambered round.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

April 2017 EDC Pocket Dump

Click here to view the original post.
April 2017 EDC Pocket Dump

Back to multi-tool + small knife combo. Technically I also have a Swiss Army Knife, but that’s more of a back up, don’t actually use it. Same with the True Utility Key Tool. Everyday Carry Item Breakdown Multi-Tool True Utility MultiPlier Mini Flashlight NiteCore Tube Keychain Multi-Tool Wenger-Made Buck Branded Swiss Army Knife Similar to: Victorinox… Read More

This is just the start of the post April 2017 EDC Pocket Dump. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


April 2017 EDC Pocket Dump, written by Thomas Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

Prepping for Our Furry Friends – Stuff for Spot

Click here to view the original post.

Written by R. Ann Parris on The Prepper Journal.

For a lot of us, companion animals are as much family as the people we don’t really want to see even on the holidays. For some of us, they are working partners, part of our mental well-being, and our therapy all rolled into one. While most of our companion animals are going to be cats and dogs, there are also birds, pigs, goats and even horses that fit the bill of a pet as opposed to solely being livestock. Livestock or pets, we took responsibility for a feeling creature’s life, and we owe it to them to take care of them.

That means adding to the long lists of things we need to do, buy and plan for should our worlds fall apart on either a small-scale or a large-scale.

I’ll mostly focus on the cats and dogs, but a lot will apply to anything, from ferrets to pot-bellied pigs.

Water for Mr. Whiskers

Just like people need food and water, so do our animals. Ferret to bunny, pony to puppy, if the animals dehydrate, we’re in a world of hurt.

Water is going to really be a biggie should the world or nation ever collapse. Try to monitor the water use in winter and in summer, or in high-activity seasons, so we keep at least a week or so on hand for them (ideally more).

With animals, we also have to remember that a lot of them pant. Whether it’s a stress action or cooling action, panting will dry them out and we’ll need to allot extra water for them.

It may be possible to do sub-cutaneous fluids for even very small livestock if it becomes necessary, but ideally, it’s not necessary. In an emergency, we’ll have to monitor our animals just like we do small children and seniors.

Bathing animals may take an even lower priority, but in that case, we may need to come up with a smell and-or pest plan.

Commercially Available Long-Storage Foods

Food might be simple, or it might be more complicated.

There are “normal” commercially available freeze-dried pet foods. There is no way I’d buy them. I’d be totally broke and then my beloved fur-balls would be in a shelter anyway.

There are long-term storage foods available in buckets. The Ready Store sells one, and  MayDay makes another. One of the wholesale bulk warehouse stores sells a bucket of food for cats or dogs as well.

I consider them about on par with Ol’ Roy, on top of being expensive. I do have a couple of buckets of cat food (I really think they came from Costco) but I have every intention of using a Pearson Square to make it part of the protein component and it’s mostly there for helping to clean their teeth.

MRE Depot sells doggy biscuit treats and at one point sold those “quart” #2.5 cans of dog and cat food. However, MRE Depot tends to … think very highly of their products, and I have dogs who consider those single-serving cans.

Plus, again, this is not Blue Buffalo or Nutrish level dining here.

Therefore, I tend to avoid the commercial long-storage options. I either repackage, or I create “normal” food storage for my furry friends.

Repacking for Rufus & Rex

I pack Milky Bones and Alpo squares in mylar and oxygen absorbers, and in canning jars with oxygen absorbers. I keep in several bags of food that get rotated, even with the oil-rancidity risks of our hot Southern summers. (Wowser article that I ignore)

I have tried to repackage bagged pet food in Mylar with oxygen absorbers, but it tends to barely extend the life by 2-4 months – which is not overly worth it to me. In cooler climates, with fewer or smaller animals, it might be worth it to be able to open smaller increments.

Stocking Up for Socks & Spot

I could just buy cans of cat and dog food, but we rarely feed it. That means whole stacks of flats end up donated on a regular basis as it comes time to rotate, and the deductible barely dents replacement costs every year.

While I don’t mind giving some extra love to unwanted shelter animals, I need to be able to take care of mine.

Years ago when imported foods started making animals sick, I started making homemade food. There are a million and five recipes available, with the best options very home and animal-specific.

We had incredible results from it. The older dogs perked up, leaned down, tightened up, and played more. Periodic tummy sensitivities and Gassy Gus went away almost overnight. Attention, retention, and stamina went through the roof.

I no longer make all of our pet feed, but I do still make a portion of it and I tend to make extras of certain foods to add to the scraps our animals get.

For us, a casserole or soup worked best. I make up enormous kettles in one go, freeze a portion, and pull out three days’ worth at a time to defrost. It’s then as easy as scooping.

For an emergency, it won’t be quiet that easy, since I won’t have fridge and freezer space for the pets’ foods, but I will still be making them basically human foods.

Storage Foods for Pets

Powdered Eggs make up the backbone of the protein and fats that are stored for the dogs and cats. Commercially, they’re available as whole eggs or scrambled egg mix. They can also be dehydrated at home if inclined.

Oatmeal, barley, brown rice & white rice are my go-to feeds for the dogs, both in daily life and in the stored foods. The oatmeal especially is cheap, fast, and easy. The grains make for a decent calorie base and belly filler for dogs and rodents.

Potatoes are stocked for both the cats and the dogs, home-dehydrated as well as commercial buckets and #10 cans of slices, dices and grated shreds. I even can baked potato skins, although the cats won’t touch those. They’re full of good nutrients for the dogs.

Apples, Carrots & Sweet Potatoes are present for the cats and dogs, with the dogs a little heavier than the cats on the apples and sweet potatoes or sweet African yams. Again, I can dehydrate them at home, or buy them in affordable bulk to repackage or already set in cans and buckets. The veggies give the animals much-needed vitamins, just as they do us.

Peas are no longer part of my animal-diet plan. Some dogs handle them, some don’t. There are enough other options, I tend to just skip them now, but for years I included them.

Berries are fine for cats and dogs most of the time, but they tend to be expensive and human favorites so with the exception of copiously producing cranberry-equivalent bushes, I don’t allot many to the animals. Cats and dogs are less likely to eat the bitter berries than birds or ferrets.

Greens are dehydrated, purchased dehydrated, and grown in tin soup cans, small Dollar Tree cubes and planters, and outside. They’re also foraged wild. While the animals may not be super wild about them, and the greens should represent a smaller proportion of feed than even something like apples or carrots, they are another one that is stacked-legit with nutrients – especially the nutrients we’ll find lacking in lean animals and winter.

Boiled with something meaty or flat-fried or baked-and-chipped eggs, our cats, dogs, rats, and ferrets will dive on greens just as fast as they will a chunk of salmon jerky or broth from meat trimmings.

Milk gets stored as a calcium source and calorie boost. My animals handle whey milk and soy milk without any problems, so I can buy whatever’s cheapest at the time. Previous animals have handled raw milk and goat milk even if pasteurized was off the table.

Most long-storage milk is fat-free, so I have to be aware and get their fats in from something else.

When’s lunch?

Fish is a major part of my dogs’ and cats’ long-term food storage plan. For a few dollars a year, I can spend days in the sun collecting dozens and hundreds of pounds of feed for them. Skins and some of the organs we don’t even want help boost proteins and oils for the animals.

Especially important with cats, pressure canning or drying fish for storage creates something I can open or soak-and-simmer to create an enticing scent. If cats can’t smell food, they won’t eat.

Without a fishing license or with prohibitive keeper restrictions, tuna in oil and then tuna in water (which will last longer) can make somewhat less-expensive food-flavoring options. There are places that sell cod, shrimp, and salmon, but it tends to be freeze-dried and pretty pricey.

Repacking well-dried jerky-like treats to extend the storage life might be another option to consider to induce kitties to eat.

Peanut Butter Powder is also in my storage for the animals, but it’s there mainly to make them homemade doggy “biscotti” biscuits that will give them something to gnaw and help keep their teeth in better shape.

Wheat & corn are in my storage, but not for my animals. A lot of dogs and cats don’t actually process much corn, and some are sensitive to wheat. With potatoes, rice, and oats inexpensive and compact, I can easily avoid having wheat and corn be their base calories.

Transitioning Foods

Pets or people, we’ll want to plan transitions between foods – almost always. While some animals don’t need it, even transitions between types of kibble or canned foods should be done slowly.

You replace 1/10 to 1/4 the feed for 2-5 days, then another 1/10 or 1/4. If an emergency requires it, you can go ahead and skip to 50-50 blends or 70-30 new-old blends.

My preference is to have dry food as a finisher or by itself at least several times weekly, because it really is better on their teeth. When we transition to smokes and raw bones, we use a step process as well.

It’s my personal belief that because my animals do get scraps and leftovers, and do get trimmings and bones stewed for them, their guts stay ready to process more foods. Skipping a meal or a few days of their usual feeds doesn’t bother my animals’ stomachs at all.

Just like people, animals vary widely, so consult a vet and add those transitions slowly.

Goodies for Evac Kits

Red Cross and FEMA sites are happy to list out supplies to consider for our animals. Whether we’re evac’ing alone, with a cat, or with a trailer of six crated dogs, two goats and three horses, there are some goodies we might want to add to make everybody more comfortable, both during the trip and after.

  • Portable, battery-operated fans (blow into crates)
  • Misting systems/bottles
  • Umbrellas, portable pavilions (shade, rain coverage)
  • Animal entertainment
  • Spare towels
  • Tarps
  • Treats (even hooved livestock like treats, such as applesauce or sweet pellets)
  • Hoods
  • Fly screen/fly hoods/mesh, and-or tiki torches or various Off fan types (flies and mosquitoes are bears)
  • Pool mattresses (elevated bedding)
  • Nail trimmers & file (to save the air mattresses)
  • Garbage bags, kitty litter, shovels (waste cleanup)

Medications

Remember that cats, especially, can’t take a lot of human or dog medications. Those need to be sourced and stocked separately. There are, however, a lot of overlaps between species, fish to humans, pigs to dogs.

We have to research any meds our animals are on or can be anticipated to be on, just like with humans. Contraindication can delay recovery and set animals back if we combine the wrong things, or push them at the wrong intervals. Just like human meds, we’ll want to stock up on prescriptions and OTC drugs our animals have used in the past, or that we can anticipated them needing in the future.

Flea and tick preventatives, dewormers, heartworm preventative, mange washes, lice and flea dips, and ear cleaners are just a few of the things we might consider stocking up on.

Prepping for Furry Friends

There’s a lot to think about with our family disaster plans, big and small. Figuring out how we’re going to take care of our critters – pets or livestock or working animals – just adds to the headache. The moisture content in animal feeds and the expense of some types of feeds can make it seem impossible at first, but with some twitches, we can use standard, inexpensive storage foods to keep the animals fat and happy. There are also things like a water plan and sport umbrellas or mesh screens that will not only make us and animals happier, they can help reduce diseases, illness and heat stroke. It takes a little forethought, be we can absolutely prepare to keep our animals in personal crises or nation-altering events.

The post Prepping for Our Furry Friends – Stuff for Spot appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2017-4-22)

Click here to view the original post.

Mountains in Utah off I-15 after the sprawl of Salt Lake City   This weekly post is an open-forum (any topic) to voice your thoughts, opinions, or questions for others. Lets hear about what you’ve been doing this week for preparedness, or perhaps what you have done to convert your ‘fiat’ (paper) currency into tangible […]

Prep Blog Review: How To Stay Healthy When SHTF

Click here to view the original post.

No one knows what the future is going to throw at us, but one thing is for sure: we need to stay prepared. Next to shelter, water, food and hygiene, medical supplies are the most important in a survival situation, when we lose all the luxuries of modern medical facilities. Without the proper medical supplies, wounds and diseases that are normally not considered life threatening, can become the real threat.

I’ve gathered five articles on this topic for this week’s Prep Blog Review. If you have any questions or tips, address them in the comment section below.

1. 11 First Aid Supplies You Can’t Have Too Much Of

“Next to food, water, and shelter, nothing is more important in a survival situation than medical supplies.

Without the right supplies, diseases and injuries that would normally be completely treatable could be a death sentence.

Unfortunately, many first aid supplies such as medication and bandages are not reusable, meaning you will want to have ample stocks of these crucial items.

In preparing for the worst, here are the top 11 first aid supplies you should have in abundance.”

Read more on Urban Survival Site.

2. 5 Natural Items to Put in Your Emergency Kit Today

“When the SHTF and a medical situation does occur simultaneously, things can go to absolute turmoil very quickly.

Most medical situations that will arise during this time may not be considered life threatening, but can quickly become one if not appropriately treated.

For instance, a simple cut that makes contact with tainted water (a very typical scenario following floods and hurricanes) can quickly become infected.

That said, as preppers we need to prepare for medical emergencies and not only learn basic first aid, but also know how to use natural alternatives to care for the wounds themselves.”

Read more on Ready Nutrition.

3. Coping with Life-Threatening Allergies in a Post-SHTF World

“We have lived in our home for nearly a decade and I love it. I truly love my yard, but the feeling is not mutual. My yard is trying to kill me. After a lifetime of thinking of myself as allergy free, I have been proven wrong. As it turns out, oak trees, along with other things, cause me to have an extreme allergic reaction.

Care to guess where I live? Yes, in the middle of 150 acres of forest.

I had no idea that this could be a life-ending allergy for me. Huge portions of this country have primarily hickory and oak forests.  I would need to drive at least twelve hours to be somewhere that doesn’t have oak trees.

If you or someone in your family struggles with seasonal allergies, first, go to an allergist to find out what they are.

In a truly catastrophic event, it is critical that you know the type of environment you can live in.”

Read more on The Survival Mom.

4. How to Prepare Dialysis Patients for Emergencies: Five Easy Steps

“If you are on dialysis, emergency situations are especially worrisome.

Perhaps even life threatening.

Although dialysis technology has progressed dramatically from when my grandfather was on it and afraid to lose his spot, we are still not at that point where portable/travel dialysis units are common. That time is coming but it is not quite here yet.

Therefore it is critical for those on dialysis and their families to develop an emergency plan to ensure proper medical treatment of the condition.

This five step guide will give you the information you need to create a robust plan for your family.”

Read more on The Weekend Prepper.

5. Setting Up A Survival Sick Room

“In normal times, we have the luxury of modern medical facilities that can isolate a sick patient from healthy people. In a survival scenario, however, most organized medical care will no longer exist, placing the average citizen into the position of medic for his/her family or community.

Although we may be thrown back to the 19th century medically by a disaster, we have the benefit of knowing about infections and hygiene.

The knowledge of how contagious diseases are spread and how to sterilize supplies give us a major advantage over medical personnel of bygone eras.”

Read more on Doom and Bloom.

This article has been written by Drew Stratton for Survivopedia.

Survival Life Article – Streamlight Nano Light

Click here to view the original post.

I’ve owned a Streamlight Nano for a couple of years now and have found it to be a useful backup light. It has gone with me on several overseas trips and has come in handy a few times when I needed illumination. You can read my review of this useful little LED unit over at […]

The post Survival Life Article – Streamlight Nano Light appeared first on Smart Suburban Survival.

8 Sustainable Changes You Can Make That Will Have a Positive Impact on Earth

Click here to view the original post.

It’s a cold, hard fact that Earth’s once plentiful resources are drying up. Climate change, food and water shortages, pollution, deforestation, agriculture changes are all being caused by the wasteful nature of humans. These impacts have directly altered the Earth’s surface faster than the natural process. We are at a tipping point.

One small act can have a far-reaching impact and it all starts with a single step.

Here are some interesting facts to put things into perspective.

  • An average of 230 million tons of trash that is thrown away each year in the United States, and many do not realize that the trash they are throwing away can be reused.
  • Commercial food sources have become corrupted with genetically modified foods, hormones/antibiotics, pesticides and neurotoxins.
  • On average, one household uses 350 gallons of water.
  • Running tap water for two minutes is equal to 3-5 gallons of water.
  • America uses about 15 times more energy per person than the typical developing country.
  • In the United States, more than 40 percent of municipal solid waste is paper — about 71.8 tons a year.
  • Some 4 to 5 trillion plastic bags—including large trash bags, thick shopping bags,and thin grocery bags—were produced globally in 2002. Roughly 80 percent of those bags were used in North America and Western Europe. Every year, Americans reportedly throw away 100 billion plastic grocery bags. (Worldwatch Institute)

The way we live directly impacts our environment and, let’s be honest, humans are very wasteful in regards to using up precious resources. We must begin doing our part to prolong tho negative effects we have on this planet. Earth Day is the perfect time to reflect upon what we can do to live more in tune our planet. In the past, we have suggested ways to make more earth-friendly choices such as recycling, not using chemical cleansers and re-purposing items, but it’s time to take another step forward and begin to live in a more sustainable nature.

8 Sustainable Changes You Can Make That Will Have a Positive Impact on Earth

  1. Buy localFarmers markets are a great way to buy locally and teach your family about sustainability. It is estimated that the average American meal travels about 1,500 miles to get from farm to plate. Our dependency on far away food sources leaves a region vulnerable to supply disruptions, and removes any real accountability of producer to consumer. As well, nutritional value can quickly decline as time passes after harvest. Finding local food sources can circumvent this impending issue and, because locally grown produce is freshest, it is more nutritionally complete. As well, join an organic food co-op to get more good food for less. It’s a great way to start to dip your toes into the self-sovereign movement that is sweeping the US.
  2. Cut the crap out of your diet – GMO and chemically enhanced food is no way to keep your family healthy. This is a big change to make, but will enhance your health in the long run. The easiest way to cut out foods that are full of hormones, antibiotics or considered gmo is to buy organic. A study recently noted that eating organic foods is more healthy than conventional foods. found that organics contain 18 to 69 percent higher concentrations of antioxidants. This means that an organic consumer will ingest the antioxidant equivalent of approximately two extra produce portions every day, without altering food intake. In your new diet, you should also steer clear of artificially colored or flavored food, non-organic milk and meat sources. As well, corn and soy are almost always GMO. Foods containing neurotoxins like MSG, fluoride, or aspartame (along with other artificial sweeteners) should be avoided. By switching to organic and natural foods you are letting all the commercial food sources out there that you object to chemicals being put in your foods. Think of it as a silent protest – and when they can’t get you to buy their product, they’ll take notice and make necessary changes.
  3. Support the bees – Our basic way of life is largely dependent on those little buzzing bees busily collecting food. Bees have been in sharp decline in North America and in parts of Europe over the last several years. Many believe multiple factors are to blame for colony collapses, a few being chemical-based fertilizers, climate change and invasive parasites that attack the hive. This is causing massive amounts of damage to insect-dependent agriculture. As a result, food shortages are on the rise and many experts are quickly trying to find ways to help the bees. Another way to support thriving bees is to follow in the footsteps of Oslo and help create a “bee highway” or feeding stations in urban areas to help feed the bees. “The idea is to create a route through the city with enough feeding stations for the bumblebees all the way,” Tonje Waaktaar Gamst of the Oslo Garden Society told local paper Osloby. ”Enough food will also help the bumblebees withstand man-made environmental stress better.”
  4. Start a garden – America was founded upon an agrarian lifestyle, and farmers were the driving force behind America. Currently, people are trying to find ways to move back to farming in order to grow their own food, to be more self-sufficient and less dependent on the government. In fact, by growing your own food, you cut down on trips to the grocery, thus cutting down on gasoline, carbon emissions and save some money in the process. As well, a lot of attention on yardfarming in suburbia has started becoming very popular in many parts of the United States. Yardfarmers converts unsustainable suburban developments, urban food deserts, or other neglected land into sustainable, more resilient opportunities for people while building community. How great would it be if the yardfarming movement popped up in your neck of the woods? If you can’t wait for the yardfarms, start a community garden. Community gardens encourage an urban community’s food security, allowing people to grow their own food. They bring urban gardeners closer in touch with the source of their food, and break down social isolation by encouraging community interaction.
  5. Sustainable landscaping – 60% of a person’s household water usage goes toward lawn and garden maintenance. During times of drought, our lawn and landscaping can become a bottomless pit where we are throwing away money to keep grass alive. Rather than spending exorbitant amounts of money to maintain landscaping, think outside of the box and choose a more sustainable form of landscaping. As well, consider growing native plants in your area. This will cut down on water usage and encourage native wildlife, insects, etc. to hang out in your yard.
  6. Only use organic fertilizers when gardening – Despite what some corporations want you to believe, chemicals are not good for plants. The application of glyphosate around the world has increased 15 fold since these Roundup Ready crops were first introduced in the 1990s. Roundup Ready crops have created a problem in agriculture that is similar to the problems caused by antibiotics, whose overuse has bred highly resistant strains of superbugs. The overuse of glyphosate has bred superweeds, which are resistant to the pesticide. And the more resistant they become, the more pesticides that farmers have to apply. It’s an endless cycle that farmers have no idea how to break out of. Composting organic material for the soil is a healthier alternative. With composting, you are utilizing aerobic and anaerobic decomposition processes to break down the compostable material and invite beneficial organisms to assist in the process. The end result is a full spectrum soil conditioner that has many benefits.
  • Compost contains macro and micronutrients often absent in synthetic fertilizers.
  • Compost releases nutrients slowly—over months or years, unlike synthetic fertilizers
  • Compost enriched soil retains fertilizers better. Less fertilizer runs off to pollute waterways.
  • Compost buffers the soil, neutralizing both acid & alkaline soils, bringing pH levels to the optimum range for nutrient availability to plants.
  • A compost tea can also be used as a foliar spray on the plant or poured into the soil.
  1. Some natural fertilizers can be found in your garbage and can be composted and turned into natural garden amendments. Banana peels, egg shells, coffee grounds are great for the garden! You can feed the soil with some of these soil amenders, as well: earthworm castingsphosphatepowdered oyster shell, and green sand.

7. Water conservation – Did you know that if a household started conserving water, you can reduce your in-home water use by 35%? This means the average household, which uses 130,000 gallons per year, could save 44,000 gallons of water per year. Learning ways to practice the art of conserving water now, will help you make the most of your water sources. Here are 22 ways to start!

8. Use less packaging – We are all guilty of using zip-loc bags and throwing them away after each use. It’s so wasteful! Luckily, there are lots of alternatives available to us. Some favorites are these paper sandwich baggies or this re-useable velcro sandwich bag. Both will reduce that dreaded carbon footprint. As well, purchasing re-usable lunch containers like these eco-friendly stainless steel containers are great alternatives to plastic. There are some foods like potatoes and oranges that come in their own mesh packaging and knowing how to reuse packaging can simplify your life. In addition, purchase grocery bags that can be reused. This will cut down on having an excess of plastic bags.

Find Alternative Uses For Some of Your Trash

Some of the trash we collect can serve other purposes, and changing your mindset is also an essential sustainability skill. Learning the art of using what you have around you to live is the core of being self-reliant – and what many of us are trying to achieve. Here are 50 of the most common items thrown away and ways you can reuse them. Creativity and resourcefulness can go a long way if we need to rely on what we have around us.

Whether you want to believe it or not, our current way of living is not sustainable. We over consume are wasteful and there is a better, more sustainable way to life. We can’t keep going on like this and if each of us where to make some minor changes to how we live, the earth would already be a better place to live. Let’s make Earth a better place!

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Review: How to Filter Water With a Lifestraw Mission + Giveaway

Click here to view the original post.

How to Filter Water LifeStraw Mission | Backdoor Survival

We need water for drinking, cooking, bathing, cleaning, and overall hygiene. Without good water, we will suffer and could even die. That said, a struggle for many is not how to source water but rather how to make bad water good. After all, the last thing we want to find a source of water, use it, and end up married to the toilet god or worse.

Over the years, I have learned to trust Lifestraw products for their ease of use and portability.Learn how and why the LifeStraw Mission is the perfect water purifier for those times when portability, affordability, and ease of use are important.

Learn how and why the LifeStraw Mission is the perfect water purifier for those times when portability, affordability, and ease of use are important. Plus enter the giveaway to win one for free.

The post Review: How to Filter Water With a Lifestraw Mission + Giveaway by Gaye Levy first appeared on Backdoor Survival.

5 Hand-Operated Kitchen Tools You’ll Need If The Grid Goes Down

Click here to view the original post.

 

5 Hand-Operated Kitchen Tools You’ll Need If The Grid Goes Down

Image source: Hinge Vintage Hardware

I’m a big fan of kitchen gadgets, having bought just about everything that has come out in the past 40 years: food processors, bread machines, rice cookers, even special margarita blenders!

You know what I have discovered lately? Most of these items were used a few times, and then covered and put away in a cupboard.

Some of my favorite kitchen items are simple, manual items that have been used for at least 100 years. When we consider that our electrical grid could be compromised at any time, it might be a good idea to have a few of these hand-operated items on standby.

Let’s examine five you may want to stash away.

1. Coffee percolators

My father never got the hang of those electric coffee pots or coffee makers. He believed that they were a waste of money and that coffee tasted “funny” when made in the expensive coffee maker one of my brothers bought him. Until he was placed in a nursing home, he used the same old-fashioned coffee percolator that he and my mother had received as a wedding present. Of course, you can use a French press, as well, but there’s a certain appeal to listening to that old percolator on the stove.

2. Egg beaters

You can still buy these today, but unfortunately, many of them now have plastic gears. Shop around, however, and you can find old-fashioned metal gears. You might pay more, but it will be worth it. While hand-driven egg beaters won’t handle heavy work or anything that needs super-fast mixing speeds (such as whipped cream), they will do the job for just about anything else, including cake mixes and, of course, eggs!

3. Stove top toaster

5 Hand-Operated Kitchen Tools You’ll Need If The Grid Goes DownYou can find these in the camping section of most general department stores. These cost less than $5 and they really do a terrific job. Depending on the size, you can toast two to four slices of bread or bagels in the same amount of time as your electric toaster.

4. Pastry cutter

If you like to bake, you might be familiar with this one. Most of us have become accustomed to our food processors, but once you try one of these to cut butter or shortening for baking, you will wonder why you waste so much time cleaning your food processor when you can simply use a pastry cutter. Best part is that these use no electricity!

5. Potato masher

Although the name implies that this only works for potatoes, let me tell you from experience: You can use this handy little tool for more recipes than you can shake a stick at! Mashed potatoes, yes, but beans (think refried beans!) and cauliflower, too. Anyone who likes to make jam will find one of these invaluable if you have no electricity to run your food processor. I’ve used both plastic ones and metal ones. While the plastic ones are lightweight and I’ve never had a problem, I have an old-fashioned metal one with the old wooden handle that I found at a second-hand store, just in case!

Of course, there are many other hand tools that didn’t make the list, including can openers, pressure canners, apple peelers, and manual meat grinders, to name a few.

What are your favorite hand-operated kitchen tools?