Native America Survival Secrets: How They Cooked Without Metal

Click here to view the original post.

No Matches, No Metal, No Problem! How The Native Americans Cooked

If you are anything like me, then you are fascinated with how native people lived before the Europeans came to the “new world.” I find immense satisfaction in doing things on my own, without the benefit of modern technology.

I’m not knocking modern life. It certainly has its appeal! I’ve washed clothes by hand (exhausting), skinned animals and tanned hides (also exhausting), and made huge batches of soap with animal fat and wood ashes (more complicated than it sounds). One thing that has always perplexed me, however, is exactly how did the native people of this land make fire and cook without metal or matches?

In this article, we are going to take a look at how they did it and how you can, too, if the need should ever arise.

Making Fire the Old-Fashioned Way

Perhaps the first thing that comes to your mind is Tom Hanks in the movie Castaway, right? I can relate! When I first tried to rub two sticks together to make a fire, I had huge blisters and no fire. Thank goodness I had brought some matches with me!

So did the native people actually rub two sticks together? You bet they did! This is an old tried-and-true method that really does work, and isn’t that hard, if you have a little practice beforehand. In the same manner that Tom Hanks used, they would find one stick about 12 or 18 inches in length and break off the end, at about a 45-degree angle. Now, taking another stick only a few inches in length and placing it on the ground, they would make a small indentation, using a bone or rock most likely, and put the pointed end of the longer stick into the indentation of the small stick. The longer stick was placed between the palms and whirled back and forth, creating friction. The wood dust created by the friction would start to smoke. A piece of dry, light stuff was applied and then blown on to create fire.

This Cool-To-The-Touch Lantern Provides 100,000 Hours Of Emergency Backup Lighting

This method must have caused plenty of blisters, however, so it was also very common among nomadic tribes to carry hot coals in the hollowed-out horn of a buffalo or moose antler to carry to the next campsite. Fires could then be started again from the hot coal.

Other tribes discovered that by striking two types of stones together, such as pyrites or chert, they would produce sparks. These sparks could ignite dry, light material fairly quickly. Later, Europeans brought flint and steel, which often was carried by native American people, but before that, it was usually stones made of pyrite and/or flint.

No Matches, No Metal, No Problem! How The Native Americans CookedTo avoid blisters, other tribes invented what is typically called a bowdrill. This uses a bow, very much like the kind used for hunting, with the exception being that the sinew was loose. In the same manner as mentioned above, the person would put one stick on top of another stick, but rather than use your hands to manipulate the vertical stick, the “string” of the bow was wrapped around it. One hand is placed on top of the vertical stick, while the other hand pulls the bow back and forth. This creates a great deal of heat and friction and has been known to start a fire in less than two minutes.

If making fire by any of these methods interests you, then I would suggest that you practice beforehand. I made the assumption it would be fairly easy, and it is — but only after a few hours of practice.

No Pot? No Problem!

Well, at least for the native people it was not a problem to cook without metal pots or pans! For modern man, not as easy.

Depending on which tribe we are talking about, there were more ways to cook food than you can shake a stick at — with sticks being the most obvious choice. This is perhaps the easiest and least labor-intensive method that every camper learns pretty quickly. Put your meat on a stick and put it over the fire. However, there were plenty of other ways to cook food sans the ever-ready stick.

Ash cooking is still used in many places, even today. Fish, frog legs, even potatoes, can be wrapped in leaves and placed near or under hot ashes and coals. This is quick and effective, even if it means you might get a bit of ash on your food. Ashes actually don’t taste too bad!

Cooking in pits also was another popular method, especially if you wanted to cook a great deal of food at one time. Pits were dug into the earth, and then lined with an animal hide, fur removed, inside of the hide facing up. The food was placed in the hide, then covered with another hide or leaves. Hot coals were put inside the hole, and then covered again, usually with twigs and leaves.

Get The Essential Secrets Of The Top Survivalists In The World!

No Matches, No Metal, No Problem! How The Native Americans CookedNative people were well-known for their soups. How did they manage this without a metal pot? Similar to the pit method, a hole was dug in the ground and a piece of hide was used to line the hole. Water and food was put into the pit, where a fire was going nearby. Clean rocks were heated in the fire, and then dropped into the water. You would be surprised how quickly the water will reach a boil in this manner!

Tribes that lived near the sea were known to use large conch shells as pots to cook food. Southern tribes, such as the Navajo and Hopi, used clay pots, while others simply put flat rocks right next to a fire and let the food cook directly on the rock.

Last, but certainly not least, is a trick my father taught me. Small game that weighs about 2 pounds (1 kilo) or less can be easily roasted using a leather thong. My father would take the leather lace out of his boots, dunk them in water, and then tie one end of each lace to the meat. He would then make a stake out of a branch that made a “Y.” Putting one stake on each side of the fire, he would tie a lace to one of the stakes, and with the other lace, he would tie it to another small stick, with the stake being used as a support. The loose stick was then twisted around and around, so that the meat was on a manual type of rotisserie. He told me that his father taught him this skill and I must admit that it was pretty spectacular! Our meat was always perfectly done on all sides!

Try some of the above cooking methods on your next camping trip! You just might surprise yourself at all the ways you can make a fire and cook without modern utensils.

What fire-making or cooking tips would you add? Share your advice in the section below:

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.

Native America Survival Secrets: How They Cooked Without Metal

No Matches, No Metal, No Problem! How The Native Americans Cooked

If you are anything like me, then you are fascinated with how native people lived before the Europeans came to the “new world.” I find immense satisfaction in doing things on my own, without the benefit of modern technology.

I’m not knocking modern life. It certainly has its appeal! I’ve washed clothes by hand (exhausting), skinned animals and tanned hides (also exhausting), and made huge batches of soap with animal fat and wood ashes (more complicated than it sounds). One thing that has always perplexed me, however, is exactly how did the native people of this land make fire and cook without metal or matches?

In this article, we are going to take a look at how they did it and how you can, too, if the need should ever arise.

Making Fire the Old-Fashioned Way

Perhaps the first thing that comes to your mind is Tom Hanks in the movie Castaway, right? I can relate! When I first tried to rub two sticks together to make a fire, I had huge blisters and no fire. Thank goodness I had brought some matches with me!

So did the native people actually rub two sticks together? You bet they did! This is an old tried-and-true method that really does work, and isn’t that hard, if you have a little practice beforehand. In the same manner that Tom Hanks used, they would find one stick about 12 or 18 inches in length and break off the end, at about a 45-degree angle. Now, taking another stick only a few inches in length and placing it on the ground, they would make a small indentation, using a bone or rock most likely, and put the pointed end of the longer stick into the indentation of the small stick. The longer stick was placed between the palms and whirled back and forth, creating friction. The wood dust created by the friction would start to smoke. A piece of dry, light stuff was applied and then blown on to create fire.

This Cool-To-The-Touch Lantern Provides 100,000 Hours Of Emergency Backup Lighting

This method must have caused plenty of blisters, however, so it was also very common among nomadic tribes to carry hot coals in the hollowed-out horn of a buffalo or moose antler to carry to the next campsite. Fires could then be started again from the hot coal.

Other tribes discovered that by striking two types of stones together, such as pyrites or chert, they would produce sparks. These sparks could ignite dry, light material fairly quickly. Later, Europeans brought flint and steel, which often was carried by native American people, but before that, it was usually stones made of pyrite and/or flint.

No Matches, No Metal, No Problem! How The Native Americans CookedTo avoid blisters, other tribes invented what is typically called a bowdrill. This uses a bow, very much like the kind used for hunting, with the exception being that the sinew was loose. In the same manner as mentioned above, the person would put one stick on top of another stick, but rather than use your hands to manipulate the vertical stick, the “string” of the bow was wrapped around it. One hand is placed on top of the vertical stick, while the other hand pulls the bow back and forth. This creates a great deal of heat and friction and has been known to start a fire in less than two minutes.

If making fire by any of these methods interests you, then I would suggest that you practice beforehand. I made the assumption it would be fairly easy, and it is — but only after a few hours of practice.

No Pot? No Problem!

Well, at least for the native people it was not a problem to cook without metal pots or pans! For modern man, not as easy.

Depending on which tribe we are talking about, there were more ways to cook food than you can shake a stick at — with sticks being the most obvious choice. This is perhaps the easiest and least labor-intensive method that every camper learns pretty quickly. Put your meat on a stick and put it over the fire. However, there were plenty of other ways to cook food sans the ever-ready stick.

Ash cooking is still used in many places, even today. Fish, frog legs, even potatoes, can be wrapped in leaves and placed near or under hot ashes and coals. This is quick and effective, even if it means you might get a bit of ash on your food. Ashes actually don’t taste too bad!

Cooking in pits also was another popular method, especially if you wanted to cook a great deal of food at one time. Pits were dug into the earth, and then lined with an animal hide, fur removed, inside of the hide facing up. The food was placed in the hide, then covered with another hide or leaves. Hot coals were put inside the hole, and then covered again, usually with twigs and leaves.

Get The Essential Secrets Of The Top Survivalists In The World!

No Matches, No Metal, No Problem! How The Native Americans CookedNative people were well-known for their soups. How did they manage this without a metal pot? Similar to the pit method, a hole was dug in the ground and a piece of hide was used to line the hole. Water and food was put into the pit, where a fire was going nearby. Clean rocks were heated in the fire, and then dropped into the water. You would be surprised how quickly the water will reach a boil in this manner!

Tribes that lived near the sea were known to use large conch shells as pots to cook food. Southern tribes, such as the Navajo and Hopi, used clay pots, while others simply put flat rocks right next to a fire and let the food cook directly on the rock.

Last, but certainly not least, is a trick my father taught me. Small game that weighs about 2 pounds (1 kilo) or less can be easily roasted using a leather thong. My father would take the leather lace out of his boots, dunk them in water, and then tie one end of each lace to the meat. He would then make a stake out of a branch that made a “Y.” Putting one stake on each side of the fire, he would tie a lace to one of the stakes, and with the other lace, he would tie it to another small stick, with the stake being used as a support. The loose stick was then twisted around and around, so that the meat was on a manual type of rotisserie. He told me that his father taught him this skill and I must admit that it was pretty spectacular! Our meat was always perfectly done on all sides!

Try some of the above cooking methods on your next camping trip! You just might surprise yourself at all the ways you can make a fire and cook without modern utensils.

What fire-making or cooking tips would you add? Share your advice in the section below:

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.

Native America Survival Secrets: How They Cooked Without Metal

No Matches, No Metal, No Problem! How The Native Americans Cooked

If you are anything like me, then you are fascinated with how native people lived before the Europeans came to the “new world.” I find immense satisfaction in doing things on my own, without the benefit of modern technology.

I’m not knocking modern life. It certainly has its appeal! I’ve washed clothes by hand (exhausting), skinned animals and tanned hides (also exhausting), and made huge batches of soap with animal fat and wood ashes (more complicated than it sounds). One thing that has always perplexed me, however, is exactly how did the native people of this land make fire and cook without metal or matches?

In this article, we are going to take a look at how they did it and how you can, too, if the need should ever arise.

Making Fire the Old-Fashioned Way

Perhaps the first thing that comes to your mind is Tom Hanks in the movie Castaway, right? I can relate! When I first tried to rub two sticks together to make a fire, I had huge blisters and no fire. Thank goodness I had brought some matches with me!

So did the native people actually rub two sticks together? You bet they did! This is an old tried-and-true method that really does work, and isn’t that hard, if you have a little practice beforehand. In the same manner that Tom Hanks used, they would find one stick about 12 or 18 inches in length and break off the end, at about a 45-degree angle. Now, taking another stick only a few inches in length and placing it on the ground, they would make a small indentation, using a bone or rock most likely, and put the pointed end of the longer stick into the indentation of the small stick. The longer stick was placed between the palms and whirled back and forth, creating friction. The wood dust created by the friction would start to smoke. A piece of dry, light stuff was applied and then blown on to create fire.

This Cool-To-The-Touch Lantern Provides 100,000 Hours Of Emergency Backup Lighting

This method must have caused plenty of blisters, however, so it was also very common among nomadic tribes to carry hot coals in the hollowed-out horn of a buffalo or moose antler to carry to the next campsite. Fires could then be started again from the hot coal.

Other tribes discovered that by striking two types of stones together, such as pyrites or chert, they would produce sparks. These sparks could ignite dry, light material fairly quickly. Later, Europeans brought flint and steel, which often was carried by native American people, but before that, it was usually stones made of pyrite and/or flint.

No Matches, No Metal, No Problem! How The Native Americans CookedTo avoid blisters, other tribes invented what is typically called a bowdrill. This uses a bow, very much like the kind used for hunting, with the exception being that the sinew was loose. In the same manner as mentioned above, the person would put one stick on top of another stick, but rather than use your hands to manipulate the vertical stick, the “string” of the bow was wrapped around it. One hand is placed on top of the vertical stick, while the other hand pulls the bow back and forth. This creates a great deal of heat and friction and has been known to start a fire in less than two minutes.

If making fire by any of these methods interests you, then I would suggest that you practice beforehand. I made the assumption it would be fairly easy, and it is — but only after a few hours of practice.

No Pot? No Problem!

Well, at least for the native people it was not a problem to cook without metal pots or pans! For modern man, not as easy.

Depending on which tribe we are talking about, there were more ways to cook food than you can shake a stick at — with sticks being the most obvious choice. This is perhaps the easiest and least labor-intensive method that every camper learns pretty quickly. Put your meat on a stick and put it over the fire. However, there were plenty of other ways to cook food sans the ever-ready stick.

Ash cooking is still used in many places, even today. Fish, frog legs, even potatoes, can be wrapped in leaves and placed near or under hot ashes and coals. This is quick and effective, even if it means you might get a bit of ash on your food. Ashes actually don’t taste too bad!

Cooking in pits also was another popular method, especially if you wanted to cook a great deal of food at one time. Pits were dug into the earth, and then lined with an animal hide, fur removed, inside of the hide facing up. The food was placed in the hide, then covered with another hide or leaves. Hot coals were put inside the hole, and then covered again, usually with twigs and leaves.

Get The Essential Secrets Of The Top Survivalists In The World!

No Matches, No Metal, No Problem! How The Native Americans CookedNative people were well-known for their soups. How did they manage this without a metal pot? Similar to the pit method, a hole was dug in the ground and a piece of hide was used to line the hole. Water and food was put into the pit, where a fire was going nearby. Clean rocks were heated in the fire, and then dropped into the water. You would be surprised how quickly the water will reach a boil in this manner!

Tribes that lived near the sea were known to use large conch shells as pots to cook food. Southern tribes, such as the Navajo and Hopi, used clay pots, while others simply put flat rocks right next to a fire and let the food cook directly on the rock.

Last, but certainly not least, is a trick my father taught me. Small game that weighs about 2 pounds (1 kilo) or less can be easily roasted using a leather thong. My father would take the leather lace out of his boots, dunk them in water, and then tie one end of each lace to the meat. He would then make a stake out of a branch that made a “Y.” Putting one stake on each side of the fire, he would tie a lace to one of the stakes, and with the other lace, he would tie it to another small stick, with the stake being used as a support. The loose stick was then twisted around and around, so that the meat was on a manual type of rotisserie. He told me that his father taught him this skill and I must admit that it was pretty spectacular! Our meat was always perfectly done on all sides!

Try some of the above cooking methods on your next camping trip! You just might surprise yourself at all the ways you can make a fire and cook without modern utensils.

What fire-making or cooking tips would you add? Share your advice in the section below:

Learn How To ‘Live Off The Land’ With Just Your Gun. Read More Here.

Ugh morning glory. 3 Sisters beds are done!

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I got most of my chores done today.  The big bed got weeded and a quick roto-till to loosen the soil for planting.  Mom got the actual plants in the garden,  Four sweet peppers, two types of egg plant and two types of cukes.  Mom’s tall peppers she started back in March wilted a bit in the heat and transplant shock.  Mom gave the peppers a good drink of water and we added the canvas tarps to keep off the direct sun and the peppers perked up after an hour or two.  These light weight canvas painter tarps are great for protecting plants from a light frost or the heat of the sun, relatively inexpensive and great multi-taskers.  SW Idaho has cooler weather coming in this weekend so we are going to keep “hardening” the melons, tomatoes and some of the smaller plants and plant on Monday.

I had a bit more work than I anticipated in the 3 sisters raised beds.  Morning glory was bad even with the layers of mulch I added last fall. I used a garden rake to grab the weeds and pull aside the mulch. I dug up as much of the weeds as possible but these beds will need to be monitored and weeded often this year.  I have to say the soil was looking much better after adding the wood mulch for the last two years.  Not perfect so I added some garden soil and compost to augment the soil I tilled up for the raised beds.  Using both my dirt and augmenting with bought garden soil seems to make make darn good vegetable garden soil.  I don’t block off my raised garden beds from the ground because after one or two years I have not seen much difference in weed growth.  I do see a big difference in veggie production when I include my dirt in the garden soil mix.  I’m feeling positive the 3 ft. x 3 ft. garden bed is going to be easy to work with as far as weeding the beds are concerned. Especially since I left plenty of room for my garden cart and to walk around the beds. I have learned it is a lot easier to weed and work many small garden beds compared to caring for one large bed.    Once I pull the mulch into place between the 3 sisters bed and do some cleanup I will post up some pics.

My back yard grass patch is still a bit spotty but where the grass is growing it has been growing great!  Last year I laid out sod and it did okay but I think my soil prep was not great and the type of grass did not do well with a sun and shade mix.  To correct the problem I’m going with a sun and shade mix that is drought tolerant and made for the local area. I’m adding compost and reseeding the grass this spring to try and fill in the patchy areas.  I have reduced the part of my backyard that is dedicated to lawn because a good lawn takes a lot of work and resources but I also want some lawn around as it is cool in the summer and my little dogs love rolling around and playing in the grass.

I’m lucky, I have no CC&Rs where I live so I can have mulch pathways, a front yard garden with edibles.  I can experiment with the alley way beds and learn how to kill out weeds naturally, without using roundup that kills everything including the soil.  I have had better luck killing weeds by using mulch and augmenting the soil rather than resorting to “Chemical” warfare” against Mama nature.  I’m not sure it is actually slower as last summer Mom and I dug up “goat heads” /puncture vine and I added wood ash, a killer mulch made of walnut leaves and a layer of wood mulch.  For plants I have added Sunchokes and a few sedum plants to provide ground cover.  Mom cleaned up the weeds, some thistle, “Cheat” grass and some Fox tails among others but NO! Goat heads at all were dug up.  Not a bad result in just one growing season.

Going Off Grid? Here’s What To Do About Water: “Solution With Minimal Effort”

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There’s no denying that water is among your most critical assets.

But going off grid, you won’t find it automatically ready and on tap unless you’ve set up one kind of system or another.

In the most obvious of ways, you cannot survive without water – but did you think ahead about where to get it, and how to store and transport it?

Especially if you are just starting out with your off grid home or survival shelter, securing potable water for your most basic needs may be very difficult.

Water is quite heavy, and hence, any large containers will be very difficult to carry or transport if you don’t think ahead.

This couple addressed their solutions to dealing with water while living off grid in their RV for the first year:

At the time of posting this video, we’ve been living in an RV on our land for just over four months. We arrived on our property in September of 2015 and had to get to work quickly to prepare for winter. This entailed installing our septic system, getting our travel trailer protected from the elements, and finding a way to keep things from freezing as we don’t have access to power and don’t run our generator non-stop. Getting to our land and getting situated wasn’t cheap…

Needless to say, we weren’t eager to drop thousands of dollars on a well at this point in the game. We did, however, come up with a solution that works for us with minimal efforts.

We know lots of you have your own ideas on alternative solutions such as IBC tanks, cisterns, water barrels, etc. We thought through many of these things and in the blog post, covered why we didn’t use each one.

During their first year, hauling water back to their site from a water station where they filled up at 25 cents a gallon seemed to be the best, and most affordable solution.

With about 100 gallons a week to be comfortable (for two people), they cut back on extra showers and running water, and figured out how to get by. They hauled it in these very workable 6 gallon containers – the most they could comfortably carrying without feeling unnecessary strain.

Back at their RV, they set them up on a shelf one at a time, and used gravity to feed the water through a few simple tubes into their plumbing supply – and stored the others close enough to the wood stove to keep them from icing when the weather was freezing.

It isn’t glamorous or sophisticated, but this couple sees the value in simplicity.

Down the road, they will likely think about drilling a well or establishing other long-term water solutions.

Many off grid homes have successfully utilized rainwater collection for all of their water needs. It just depends upon your resources and innovation to harvest and filter it for use.

 

Source : www.shtfplan.com

 

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Everything You Need to Know About Buying, Owning & Storing Gold & Silver

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Everything You Need to Know About Buying, Owning & Storing Gold & Silver Owning gold and silver can be a little frustrating at times. Especially if you don’t quiet understand the fluctuations in the market. Sometimes the value goes up and sometimes it goes down. Then, sometimes it goes down a lot. That’s when people …

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Babies in TEOTWAWKI – How to Prep Now!

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Babies in TEOTWAWKI – How to Prep Now!  There is nothing more incredible than the sheer helplessness of a baby. They are completely helpless at birth and frankly up until two they are pretty much the same. Even in todays world children in that age range are at a great risk. If the world were …

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Hitting the Road: Essential Apps for Your Next Road Trip

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Hitting the Road: Essential Apps for Your Next Road Trip I have told you before that I am a huge proponent of apps and their use in a survival scenario. Now, that doesn’t mean I am going to bet the whole thing on black but I will be prepared to take advantage of the techno …

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Buenos Aires more expensive than New York, London and Paris

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Anonymous Anonymous said…

 

Hey Derrick, I’m a North American who’s been living in Buenos Aires for 5 years now, and I’ve stayed for exactly the reasons you mentioned. I won’t lie, the last year has been rough with insane inflation, but even now, I have a nice apartment to myself in Capital and get by on a fraction of $5000 USD/month (no offense Fernando, don’t mean to contradict you — also, I’m pretty frugal). My burn rate is about $1500/month, and I live quite comfortably. I’d say go for it. Good luck getting your residency though — they hate us yanquis in Migrations! If you have any questions, feel free to drop me a mail at jeroextran (at) hotmail (dot) com. Best of luck! Chris

 

Oh don’t worry. If I was single, lived in a small place, sure. The thing is, Argentina is expensive, especially Buenos Aires.

If you find an affordable place to live, go frugal as you say then sure. But if you need a bigger place for a family, if you want maybe a house in a safe, upper class neighbourhood, rather than an apartment, you want to have a car, have good medical care and send your kids to a good school (which therefore needs to be private, 500 to 1000 USD each for a good one) then the price is very different.

Groceries, food, toiletries and electronics in Buenos Aires are significantly more expensive than New York, London and Paris.

Buenos Aires un 8% más caro que Nueva York, un 24% más que en París, un 63% más que en Londres y un 68% más que en Madrid.

I buy Argentine products in Spain, made in Argentina, such as yerba matte and cookies, that are sold cheaper in Spain than in Argentina where they are made. Makes no sense? Of course it doesn’t. Its not just the terrible inflation, but also the speculation. The same company that is happy enough selling abroad at 10 knows it can get away with charging 15 locally and they do so. Why? Simple. The European Union bargains a good price and gets it, while locally in Argentina no one protects the consumer and they get robbed, plain and simple. There’s no explanation, no logic for most products available to be cheaper in Spain than in Argentina which not only is the country in which its is made, it happens to be at the other end of the world.

Oh, and don’t worry about Migrations. Its not that they hate you, all public sector workers in Argentina hate life in general and are awful at their job. Its not personal.

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

The U.S. Govt’s Top-Secret Space Plane Just Returned From Orbit. What Was It Doing?

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The U.S. Govt’s Top-Secret Space Plane Just Returned From Orbit. What Was It Doing?

Image source: USAF

America’s most mysterious spacecraft, the X-37B Space Plane, just completed a two-year secret mission that might have involved orbital weapons tests – although details remain sketchy.

The U.S. Air Force X-37B landed at Cape Canaveral on May 6 after spending a record 718 days in space.

Nobody knows what was in the X-37B or what it was doing in orbit, Space.com reported. The mission was classified, so there has been some speculation it was testing a weapon, such as a satellite disabler, or testing new spy satellite technology.

The Air Force’s 45th Space Wing, which operates the X-37B, denies those rumors but admitted the mission did involve new technologies.

Get Backup Electrical Power In A Convenient, Portable Briefcase!

“Technologies being tested in the program include advanced guidance, navigation and control; thermal-protection systems; avionics; high-temperature structures and seals; conformal, reusable insulation, lightweight electromechanical flight systems; and autonomous orbital flight, re-entry and landing,” an Air Force spokeswoman, Captain AnnMarie Annicelli, told Space.com.

“Also, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), and the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office (AFRCO) are investigating an experimental propulsion system,” Annicelli added.

The 45th Space Wing is the Air Force unit that tests missile technology for the Pentagon.

Some experts speculate the X-37B was testing new sensor technology for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) – the agency that operates America’s spy satellites. Others say the mission is a cover for testing weapons in space.

The X-37B is a miniature robotic version of the Space Shuttle and was built by Boeing. Like the shuttle, the X-37B is launched into orbit by a rocket but it lands on a runway like a plane.

The Air Force has at least two X-37Bs that are used for research in orbit. It was first tested in April 2010 and has been on at least three missions since.

What do you think the X-37B is doing? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Paracord Zipper Pull

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Paracord Zipper Pull Paracord has made its way into many avenues of my life. I am sure you can say the same of yours. This paracord zipper pull is so much more than what it appears to be. When we are talking about fixing a zipper its a great little tool. What this article teaches …

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How To Be A Successful Homesteader

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 How To Be A Successful Homesteader Any article with that broad of title has to have at least a few great sentiments. When I started into this article I wasn’t sure if it would be a paint by numbers style article or something else. In my head I was envisioning a step by step breakdown …

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U.S. Auto Sales Plunge Dramatically As The Consumer Debt Bubble Continues To Collapse

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U.S. Auto Sales Plunge Dramatically As The Consumer Debt Bubble Continues To Collapse Its not easy to write even a decent article about the economics of our very complicated economy. This article takes a look at car loans and the $199 trillion dollar debt bubble that has been built of these subprime car loans. Have …

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Are You Really Prepared for the Real World?

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Written by R. Ann Parris on The Prepper Journal.

I happen to cruise the same prepper forum as this child’s father . He’s all the time popping up with updates of what he’s ordered in or purchased on the “What Did You Prep Today” thread – parts for his expanding power system, tons of first-aid supplies, another hunting blind, potassium iodide and more gas masks, more MOPP suits, replacing his fifth wheel with a pop-up camper, endless survival books.

He’s not really doing anything hundreds if not thousands aren’t. He’s worried about a game-changing Z-event – doesn’t matter what it is. His wife somewhat supports him, and ignores chunks of the rest. When the power goes out, he flips some switches and keeps them going. When his son first got sick, he identified some gaps in their preps – namely, ways to control nausea and ways to combat low oxygen in patients.

Then the real world kicked the door in, and so did the “uh oh”.

The amount that was not covered by their insurance was a sucker punch, on top of lost wages and normal bills, and the additional expenditures for traveling and staying with an in-hospital patient.

That kind of thing happens. All the time.

It’s the kind of thing in between our normal, everyday life and an actual major disaster that just doesn’t get prepared for all that often.

The World We Live In

We live in a highly unpredictable world. You’d think, as “preppers”, we’d accept that, and prepare for it.

We commonly don’t though.

We prepare for the worst case and a short-term storm or a flat tire, and with frightening regularity, we skip the vast number of things that can happen in between. In some or many cases, we live paycheck to paycheck or via debt to get our supplies for that worst and that storm, without actually being able to readily and more easily weather life’s mid-range crises.

Most of us don’t have to practice much actual triage in our daily lives. Man, am I grateful not to be in those fields, or living in a world that does require it. At some point in the future, we may have to make those hard calls, or watch people fade away from us, helpless to do anything at all because resources just don’t exist.

Right now, though, it’s unlikely that we’re going to watch our children, spouses, or parents slowly fade away in bed without getting them every medical advantage we can beg, steal and borrow against, and then waiting for the bills to roll in. So we need to get ready for them.

Our “bunker” (really, it’s food and hygiene supplies), our generator and fuel supplies, and our cached medical supplies may help us defray our living expenses while we shovel out of a financial hole, whatever the cause of that hole. For those starting out and with less than three, six or twelve months of really well-rounded supplies, however, it may be a minuscule fraction of the $8K the prepper above is trying to raise.

In other cases, such as vehicle or roof repairs, we may need that money now and find ourselves maxing out cards or taking out a loan – in some cases, a personal loan with a higher interest rate than a vehicle loan – which then leaves us even more vulnerable.

The Things That Go Wrong

Predicting just how much a common, no-frills surgery or dental procedure is going to end up costing out of pocket is a little bit like throwing darts blindfolded, even with major insurance coverage. It’s one of the many flaws in our healthcare system, and it can lead to some painful surprises, just as it did for the family above with their unexpected and uncommon situation.

There are minor disasters like a leak that means an out-of-this-world water bill, discovering that bees now inhabit 85% of an outer wall, and vet bills.

There are somewhat less-minor disasters such as cut hours or other loss of wages, or injury or circumstances that limit how much we can hunt or garden or forage and thus require making that up out of pocket.

Seasonal trends in the greater financial world can mean our income and costs can vary greatly. Some types of self-employment come in ebbs and flows that are hard to predict. Workers comp and unemployment are fractions of what regular wages are in some cases.

Can you take the hit on water, repair, and field losses from a broken irrigation line?

 

Then there are the disasters like farm-ag insurance that doesn’t actually cover our loss of stock to a dog or illness, or weather conditions leading to feed and hay prices going through the roof.

There are heart-breakers like loss of spouse – either divorce or death or debilitating injury that leave a big gap between former wages and real-work “income” and their social security disability.

All kinds of things go wrong, all the time.

Armageddon-ELE and a snowstorm are only the extreme ends of the spectrum. There’s a lot of middle ground we need to cover if we want to call ourselves prepared.

We need a plan for things in between a night spent in the cold because our kayak went downriver without us, and our plan to batten down the hatches of the bunker, board our ark, or shoulder our bag and go eat bugs and roots in the forest.

So what do we do about it? Especially those just starting out, or who have hit that ugly hump where they thought they were prepared, then discovered the world of sustainability and self-reliance that entails even more purchases and education?

We do have options. We have one more hurdle to leap first, though.

Stuff is the same as cash

Most preppers agree Ammo would be highly valuable in a SHTF Event.

I hate to see the belief that firearms and ammo, and our hardware like generators, are going to bail us out.

I’ve seen the theory that firearms hold value well. Depending on how you define value, maybe. Depending on how long you can wait, they also might hold more value. Run a test, though.

There are books, just like for vehicles, that define value of firearms based on a percent of their condition. That’s the top dollar somebody’s going to pay, unless you can find a sympathy buy, nostalgia buy, or somebody willing to pay for specialty etching.

Most of the time, if you need cash relatively quickly, you’re not going to get that top dollar, even if you did accurately gauge whether your shotgun, revolver, and rifle are at 75% or at 85%. You’re going to a gun store or a pawn store.

In some cases, they’ll take a percentage of the price you want and stick it on a shelf to see if it sells, but you won’t get paid until it does. If you have other money forthcoming, there’s the pawn option – which lets you buy it back for basically what they gave you upfront, but with a time limit.

Most of the time, you’re going to take a hard hit on that best-case value. See, that’s the most they’re going to be able to get. So off the top, they’re going to cut the price by the overhead – the costs of running and manning a storefront and-or internet presence.

There are definitely guns out there that are investments. Man, how many of us wish we’d snagged a few more of those K98’s, 91/30’s, or those .22LR German training pistols while they were under $100, now that they’re sitting at $200+?

Those are the exception.

Your bog standard 870-500, AR, and Glock, even purchased used, is not going to return the same money it was purchased for. In some cases, it’s not going to return 2/3 and may only hit half what it cost.

The same for ammo, unless you’re in the middle of a shortage. Especially if you’re looking to offload fast, chances are good you’re going to get less than 75% what you paid.

Sometimes hardware like chainsaws and generators, reloading presses, and tow-behind attachments will fetch decent returns back, but if you purchased new and are selling used, or if you need to sell fast, you may be in for a nasty surprise there, too. Same goes for selling off some of those canning, long-storage food, and equine supplies.

Please, don’t take my word for it, or anybody else’s.

Pretend you’re there, with a sick kid and $8K you can’t cover, out of space on credit cards and unable to wait 7-14 days for a loan. Haul some of the examples in to a shop. Call around.

Better to find out now than later.

Fire insurance may or may not cover outbuildings like barns and sheds, and their contents to include livestock, let alone feeding & getting livestock out of the cold afterward.

 

Getting Right

A lot of the middle-ground disasters revolve around finances, either losing our income or having to shell out. It’s not fun and in many cases, income is one of the fixed facts of our lives. There are a few things we can do to help build resilience, though.

Insurance: Go over your policies – all of them. Flood coverage is almost always separate. Wildfire and house-fire coverage can vary wildly. Don’t play the odds on health coverage for big disasters and cancer treatments; plan for that disaster, too. Make sure you check on things like preexisting conditions, such as diabetes or world travel that may make you an exception to coverage.

The biggest is to make sure insurance actually covers your losses.

Make sure life insurance and disability coverage actually covers your mortgage, or rent for enough time for your family to get up on its feet. Make sure vehicle coverage and theft coverage actually pays for the gear inside the vehicle, too.

In some/many cases, firearms are severely limited in coverage without additional or separate policies, and so are precious metals.

We can increase our deductibles to lower our monthly bills, but to do so, we need to make sure we actually have the deductibles on hand to pay out – all of them, in case a tree falls across all the vehicles and a roof, and then there’s a house fire while we’re staying in a hotel/campground.

That’s where honest self-assessment comes into play. If we’re not going to keep that payout on hand, we need to stick to the lower deductibles and just pay the higher monthly rates.

Have an emergency credit card with zero balance.

Emergency Credit Card: Have a card with nothing on it, enough to cover those insurance deductibles above and for that hotel room and the unexpected expenses that crop up. Cash is great, and I endorse keeping plenty on hand, but insurance doesn’t cover or severely limits paper money replacement and it’s bulky. If it can get tucked somewhere accessible in the middle of the night that won’t be affected by the “it” crisis facing the family, go for it, but keep a card handy, too.

Companies like to send cards to even people with bad credit and no jobs. If you’re not actually using it until a disaster occurs, the obnoxious interest rate doesn’t matter. But again, that’s about individual willpower.

Stop Spending: That can be harder than it sounds for some people. “It’s only” and “it’s on sale” and the eye-catchers at stores can wind up adding a fair bit to totals. Lack of organization and counts means I’ve seen people with six or seven of the same thing that doesn’t actually wear out all that often or 47 cheap flashlights, which is money that could have been spent far differently or tucked in a jar for a rainy day.

If impulse purchases are a problem write on the inside of your dominant hand “do I need this – how much of an hourly wage equivalent is this?”. Framing things into that last question has actually helped others, really and truly. Is that $8 fast-food combo or gadget really worth an hour or a half-hour of your daily income?

To combat internet impulse buys, take the card information off your accounts after every purchase, and make it a habit to keep cards in another room from computers. Stick the same question on those cards or on a slip in the wallet.

Cut Expenses: Every situation is different. Chances are good though, that most of us have something we can cut.

Whether it’s $90/year for Amazon Prime for our TV and movies, $8/month for Hulu, and whatever internet costs versus a cable package, gong to VoIP instead of a landline (you can plug in a phone to dial 911 even without phone service), or really deciding if we need those smart phones – or the major carrier contracts instead of reloadables, electronics are a main source.

Tally up what we spend and where, every penny; from the candy added to carts to the brand clothes and shoes, those $1 coffees instead of a thermos and lunches/snacks out instead of packing them. Consider what we cook, and what we could save by cooking differently.

Where we shop, and how much we spend on a DIY project (to include cooking) versus waiting or just buying something, are big contributors to what we spend.

We may also seriously consider downsizing if we rent, assessing the vehicle we drive for its maintenance and fuel costs versus something more economical, or getting out of a house that’s a money suck.

Communicate Goals: When it comes to the expenses and to the spending mentioned above, we’re going to have to talk to our families in many cases, and that’s going to be a headache, because what we prioritize is different.

You have to leave in at least some of the sanity savers, and it’s going to have to be transparently balanced, especially if you’re the only or the primary prepper. Cutting data, internet, subscriptions, and TV while you still buy a tacticool hatchet-prybar-tent stake and 500 rounds of ammo is likely to go down like ground glass.

In fact, forget the word “prepper” and all the world of gear and goodies while you’re working the financials. Every bank, credit union and investment agency is going to have mail-outs they’re happy to send you about budgeting and financial security. Get them. Print the example prepper’s story. Sit down with the goal to simply get out of a rut or become more financially stable.

Stay calm, stay open, be understanding, be non-aggressive, and walk in with some ideas but also asking about their solutions, too, and willing to compromise.

Write out the anticipated costs – roofs, tires, replacement appliances, vet bills, medical and dental bills, vehicles, graduation and college, annual shopping binges (holidays, back-to-school, vacations/trips, garden supplies). Come up with a “now” plan, and 1-2, 5, and 10-year plans and goals.

Involve everybody, and remember that their priorities are as prized to them as yours are to you, and what’s “obvious” is not going to be so for everyone else.

Piggy Bank vs. Zero-Balance: There’s going to always be a balancing act between paying off debt and sticking money in a kitty for another time. It’s another one that’s going to be deeply personal and individual. Have some money available, instead of immediately dumping every penny against a debt. Build up or keep enough on hand to go ahead and pay deductibles and for the credit cards that get so many people in trouble.

Just as we slowly build up food storage a few days, then a week, then a month, then 3 months, build financial backups that prevent late fees or huge interest rates.

Once we have it, pick the things that cost us the most (highest interest) and-or that we can eliminate pretty quickly, and focus on those.

 

House floods – It does not take Katrina or Sandy to rack up tens of thousands of dollars in un-covered damages.

Preparing for the Middle Ground

Our food storage and some of our other prepping supplies absolutely helps with some of those disasters, lessening our expenditures, but it can take some time for the savings to equal what we really need to pay out, and sometimes we need to pay that now. Too, if our supplies are things we will not actually use while the rest of the world is chugging around like normal (beans and rice 5-7x a week, scrubbing board, NBC or surgical suite) they’re not going to help us dig out of a hole.

The only thing less-sexy and less-interesting than getting right financially is going to be making up those disks and binders of our important information. Do it anyway. Make a chart or a graduated pie graph that can be colored in, weekly or monthly, so that we have a nice, physical tangible and can look at something to see what we’ve accomplished. It’ll help keep us on track.

Getting on track and staying on track financially is probably harder than any other aspect of preparedness. Try. There’s a lot that goes wrong in our world that does not involve ARs, survival gardens, INCH-BO bags, and making our own charcoal.

The post Are You Really Prepared for the Real World? appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Article – 23-year-old hiker found in Montana after surviving nearly 1 week without food

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A 23-year-old woman from Illinois has been found safe nearly one week after she went missing on a hike in Montana.

Madeline Connelly left for a hike in the Great Bear Wilderness on May 4, planning to spend a night camping with her dog, Mogi, ABC affiliate KTMF in Missoula, Montana reported. Local officials launched a search and rescue effort after she didn’t return.

Connelly was located around 11 a.m. on Wednesday by search and rescue crews about five miles from her car, the Flathead County Sheriff’s Office said in a press release. She was “uninjured” but “tired and hungry” when she was found, police sad.

In an interview with KTMF broadcast on Facebook Live Wednesday, Connelly said she couldn’t believe that she and Mogi were able to get out of the wilderness, where she spent seven days in “treacherous weather.”

The last several days have been far from treacherous weather, but….

Connelly didn’t have a tent or any supplies, she said, and slept under trees for protection from the elements. She was only wearing overalls, a T-shirt and a sweater with a hood.

Where to start??

Dude(tte), it’s Montana…if you’re going to go hiking, take a damn bag of gear.

Technically not a stranding, but thats the tag Im gonna go with.

6 Guns to Buy Before a Gun Ban or Civil Unrest

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Guns are an issue. They have always been an issue and they will always be an issue. There is always someone out there with the great utopian idea that if we simply take away all the guns we will eliminate all the crime. This idea has been proven to fail for many reasons. And yet […]

The post 6 Guns to Buy Before a Gun Ban or Civil Unrest appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

How To Find The Best Knife Sharpener

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The single tool in a cook’s arsenal that will have the biggest effect on their performance is their chef’s knife.  A good knife is required for consistent top level cooking, but this doesn’t mean that only professional chefs need a good knife.  The difference between a dull and sharp knife is absolutely massive and cannot…

The post How To Find The Best Knife Sharpener appeared first on The Weekend Prepper.

Study: Expired EpiPens Still Effective

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Study: Expired EpiPens Still Effective

EpiPen and EpiPen Jr.

An expiration date is defined as the last day that a medicine is warranted to be safe and effective when stored properly. I’ve written for years that this date is often arbitrarily determined, and that the idea all medicines somehow “spoil” very soon after their expiration dates is incorrect.

I’m not alone in this opinion: A new study now reports that an important medical product that prevents deaths from severe allergic reactions (also called”Anaphylaxis“) can still be used effectively years after the expiration date on the package.

The California Poison Control System in San Diego tested 40 unused, expired Epipens and found that all (yes, all) of them retained at least 80% active epinephrine, the main ingredient.  This was true even for Epipens that closed in on the four-year expired mark. The least potent device was found to be at 81 percent 30 months past its expiration date. Most were at 90% or above.

Epipens are expensive items that are sometimes in short supply. F. Lee Cantrell, lead researcher of the California study, concludes that those unable to replace the product should hold onto it for use past the expiration date.

“There’s still a dose that would be therapeutic in there…” Cantrell also said: “if an expired EpiPen is all that I have, I would use it.” He suggests that it might be appropriate for the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and Mylan, the company that distributes Epipen, to consider adjusting the expiration dates. Currently, the drug”expires” 12-18 months from the date of manufacture.

Of course, in normal times, the recommendation is to replace expired EpiPens. This new information, however, if of use to those who cannot afford to replace Epipen often and, also, to those in the preparedness community who store medical items in case of disaster.

The recommendation given by the California Poison Control System is a rare departure from standard conventional medical wisdom, which states that drugs should be disposed of as soon as they become expired. However, even the Department of Defense has determined that many medicines are 100% effective and safe to use even if expired. This data can be found in the July 2006 issue of the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

many drugs remain potent after expiration

The “Shelf Life Extension Program” (SLEP), which initially evaluated 122 drugs commonly stored for use in peacetime disasters, determined that most drugs in pill or capsule form were therapeutically effective for 2 to 10 years beyond the written expiration date. This led to the government issuing “emergency use authorizations” for various expired medicines when a shortage occurred. One example is the antiviral drug Tamiflu: During the 2009 Swine Flu epidemic, existing supplies of Tamiflu were authorized for use up to five years after the expiration date.

Drugs in liquid form did not fare as well in SLEP studies, which makes the Epipen (which uses a liquid solution of epinephrine) data so interesting. Granted, 100% potency would have been better, but 80-90% would still have a beneficial effect on an allergic reaction.

Given the 2016 Mylan scandal where the company increased the price from about $100 per two-pack to $600, an extended shelf life would be welcome news. (Mylan recently released a “generic” version for $300 per two-pack).

It should be noted that potency of a drug is affected by storage conditions. Most medicines should be stored in dry, cool, dark conditions. Allowing Epipens to be exposed to high heat or freezing could adversely affect effectiveness.

Many physicians are greeting the study’s findings skeptically, but I consider it more evidence that expiration dates are sometimes artificially determined, and that those storing medications for use in disaster settings might get more longevity out of their supply than expected. Get fresh medicine if available, but think twice before throwing out your last Epipen. Sometimes, something is better than nothing.

Joe Alton, MD

Dr. Alton:

Find out more about expired drugs, anaphylactic shock, and 150 other medical topics in austere settings with the 700 page Third Edition of The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way, available at Amazon. (Be aware that the Second Edition can still be found there; be sure to get the latest edition or just order from store.doomandbloom.net.

17 Facts About Emergency Preparedness

 

  1. Roughly 5,000 earthquakes are recorded in Canada every year.
  2. Canada gets more tornadoes than any other country except the U.S., averaging about 50 tornadoes per year.
  3. The worldwide cost of natural disasters has skyrocketed from $2 billion in the 1980s, to $27 billion over the past decade.
  4. Canada’s first billion dollar disaster, the Saguenay flood of 1996, triggered a surge of water, rocks, trees and mud that forced 12,000 residents to evacuate their homes.
  5. Some hailstones are the size of peas while others can be as big as baseballs.
  6. Approximately 85% of Canadians agree that having an emergency kit is important in ensuring their and their family’s safety, yet only 40% have prepared or bought an emergency kit. Complete yours online at www.GetPrepared.ca.
  7. In 2011, flooding in Manitoba and Saskatchewan featured the highest water levels and flows in modern history. Over 11,000 residents were displaced from their homes.
  8. Ice, branches or power lines can continue to break and fall for several hours after the end of an ice storm.
  9. The deadliest heat wave in Canadian history produced temperatures exceeding 44ºC in Manitoba and Ontario in 1936. Rail lines and bridge girders twisted, sidewalks buckled, crops wilted and fruit baked on trees.
  10. In 2007, the Prairies experienced 410 severe weather events including tornadoes, heavy rain, wind and hail, nearly double the yearly average of 221 events.
  11. The coldest temperature reached in North America was –63ºC, recorded in 1947 in Snag, Yukon.
  12. The largest landslide in Canada involved 185 million m3 of material and created a 40m deep scar that covered the size of 80 city blocks in 1894 at Saint-Alban, Quebec.
  13. Hurricanes are bigger and cause more widespread damage than tornadoes (a very large system can be up to 1,000 kilometres wide).
  14. One of the most destructive and disruptive storms in Canadian history was the 1998 ice storm in Eastern Canada causing hardship for 4 million people and costing $3 billion. Power outages lasted for up to 4 weeks.
  15. The June 23, 2010 earthquake in Val-des-Bois, Quebec produced the strongest shaking ever experienced in Ottawa and was felt as far away as Kentucky in the United States.
  16. Using non-voice communication technology like text messaging, email, or social media instead of telephones takes up less bandwidth and helps reduce network congestion after an emergency.
  17. At the end of October 2012, Hurricane Sandy devastated parts of the Caribbean and the northeast of the North American continent. When the hurricane made landfall in the United States it blended with a continental cold front forming a storm described as the “Monsterstorm” by the media.

Is Everything You’ve Heard About The Apocalypse Wrong?

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Kim Jon Un

More than 20 years after the “Left Behind” books sparked a major interest in end-times theology, another end-times series is being released – but it’s nothing like those earlier books.

The series by author Brian Godawa is called “Chronicles of the Apocalypse,” with the first book, “Tyrant: Rise of the Beast,” detailing a scene set in A.D. 64 in which Roman Emperor Nero seeks to track down a secret Christian document that undermines the Roman empire and predicts the end of the world.

This new story has many modern-day parallels.

It’s the latest biblical fantasy book by Godawa, whose earlier “Chronicles of the Nephilim” series was wildly popular.

Brian tells us:

  • Why he sees modern-day parallels between the times of Emperor Nero, who persecuted Christians, and events of today.
  • How the theology behind “Chronicles of the Apocalypse” differs from the “Left Behind” books.
  • Why Christians should not be afraid of reading biblical fantasy books – and how such books can encourage them.

Finally, Brian tells us how his interpretation of the book of Revelation differs from the more popular “Left Behind” interpretation.

We learned a lot about Scripture and the apocalypse during our discussion with Brian, and we know you will, too!

What Makes for a Great Hiking Boot?

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Choosing the best hiking boots is essential for your hiking experience. You want to stay comfortable, safe and dry while you are exploring new trails and spending time in the wilderness. In order to find the most appropriate hiking boots, you must first consider when and where you are planning to hike, the terrain, the weather, the distance as well as the weight of your backpack. Also, getting a proper fit and the break in time are other key factors to keep in mind when shopping for hiking boots.

First of all, choose between the various types of hiking boots available, including: trail shoes, light or backpacking hiking boots or heavy duty boots for mountaineering.

  • Hiking shoes are the lightest options. They have good traction and provide moderate support and cushioning. Suitable for shorter trails, good weather, a mild terrain with slight elevation, these shoes can be worn as casual wear as well.

  • The light hiking boots are also pretty lightweight but provide more support than the trail shoes. They are suitable for good terrains and moderate elevation. Great for good weather, these boots can dry quickly and are breathable. No break in time is needed for the light hiking boots.

  • Backpacking boots or hiking boots are heavier and more durable. They are usually made of waterproof full grain leather, and provide reliable support on rougher terrains and when carrying heavy backpacks. They are good for snow and bad weather as well as for rougher terrains. Durable and cushioned, these boots have good traction and will keep your feet dry and warm.

  • Last but not least, mountaineering boots are the most durable, heavy duty option of them all. They provide maximum ankle protection. Their thick and stiff soles are superb for very difficult terrains and for big elevations and climbing. Waterproof and insulated, they are an excellent option if you are planning on doing winter hiking. They are heavy and stiff and are not the best choice for day hikes in normal conditions and terrains.

    Offering maximum support and foot protection, mountaineering boots are extremely durable and provide the best ankle protection. These boots have thick, stiff soles designed for difficult mountain topography and significant elevation gain. Most boots in this category are waterproof, and some include insulation to protect feet in cold, windy and wet conditions. If you don’t know what to look for in the top winter boots, check this article by My Bootprint. Many mountaineering boots are compatible with crampons, which makes them suitable for traversing ice and snowpack. Although these boots are excellent for mountaineering, they are probably overkill for most day hikes.

    The soles of your hiking boots are also very important. First of all, look at the construction of the hiking boot – are the soles stitched or are they cemented to the upper and the midsole. The boots which have a Goodyear welt construction have the strongest and most durable construction and can be resoled. The cement construction wears quicker but is a cheaper option. The outsole must provide sufficient traction and be made of a durable material. Real gum rubber soles are an excellent choice due to the fact that they are durable, provide superb traction and are semitransparent, brown or white.

    With all types of hiking footwear, durability and foot protection is always a high priority. Remember, hiking shoes are not travel shoes. For this reason, hiking footwear is crafted of more rugged materials than casual shoes. The tougher the construction, the more break-in time will be required.

    Another factor to consider when buying hiking boots is the material of the upper. You can choose between full grain leather, split grain leather, nylon and suede. The fist type, the full grain leather boots are the most durable and weather resistant of them all. They are also usually the most expensive ones. They do need break in time, so you must make sure they are properly broken in before wearing them when going hiking.

    The other three types of materials are lighter and moderately durable. They are often paired with mesh materials to provide breathability. They are great for casual hiking. They usually require little or no break in time.

    You will need to choose the height of your hiking boots too. Taller hiking boots provide more support and are more suitable for rougher terrains and heavy backpacks. Hiking shoes and mid cut boots are more suitable for shorter trails and easy to moderate terrain. The high cut boots provide superior support and cover the ankles. They need the longest break in time, but are the best choice for difficult and steep trails.

    One last thing: boots are rarely comfortable right out of the box. Don’t forget to break in your new boots to avoid the pain and discomfort.

    So, already you should have a pretty good idea what to look for in a good hiking boot. Now get your new boots on and happy hiking!

The post What Makes for a Great Hiking Boot? appeared first on American Preppers Network.

What Makes for a Great Hiking Boot?

Choosing the best hiking boots is essential for your hiking experience. You want to stay comfortable, safe and dry while you are exploring new trails and spending time in the wilderness. In order to find the most appropriate hiking boots, you must first consider when and where you are planning to hike, the terrain, the weather, the distance as well as the weight of your backpack. Also, getting a proper fit and the break in time are other key factors to keep in mind when shopping for hiking boots.

First of all, choose between the various types of hiking boots available, including: trail shoes, light or backpacking hiking boots or heavy duty boots for mountaineering.

  • Hiking shoes are the lightest options. They have good traction and provide moderate support and cushioning. Suitable for shorter trails, good weather, a mild terrain with slight elevation, these shoes can be worn as casual wear as well.

  • The light hiking boots are also pretty lightweight but provide more support than the trail shoes. They are suitable for good terrains and moderate elevation. Great for good weather, these boots can dry quickly and are breathable. No break in time is needed for the light hiking boots.

  • Backpacking boots or hiking boots are heavier and more durable. They are usually made of waterproof full grain leather, and provide reliable support on rougher terrains and when carrying heavy backpacks. They are good for snow and bad weather as well as for rougher terrains. Durable and cushioned, these boots have good traction and will keep your feet dry and warm.

  • Last but not least, mountaineering boots are the most durable, heavy duty option of them all. They provide maximum ankle protection. Their thick and stiff soles are superb for very difficult terrains and for big elevations and climbing. Waterproof and insulated, they are an excellent option if you are planning on doing winter hiking. They are heavy and stiff and are not the best choice for day hikes in normal conditions and terrains.

    Offering maximum support and foot protection, mountaineering boots are extremely durable and provide the best ankle protection. These boots have thick, stiff soles designed for difficult mountain topography and significant elevation gain. Most boots in this category are waterproof, and some include insulation to protect feet in cold, windy and wet conditions. If you don’t know what to look for in the top winter boots, check this article by My Bootprint. Many mountaineering boots are compatible with crampons, which makes them suitable for traversing ice and snowpack. Although these boots are excellent for mountaineering, they are probably overkill for most day hikes.

    The soles of your hiking boots are also very important. First of all, look at the construction of the hiking boot – are the soles stitched or are they cemented to the upper and the midsole. The boots which have a Goodyear welt construction have the strongest and most durable construction and can be resoled. The cement construction wears quicker but is a cheaper option. The outsole must provide sufficient traction and be made of a durable material. Real gum rubber soles are an excellent choice due to the fact that they are durable, provide superb traction and are semitransparent, brown or white.

    With all types of hiking footwear, durability and foot protection is always a high priority. Remember, hiking shoes are not travel shoes. For this reason, hiking footwear is crafted of more rugged materials than casual shoes. The tougher the construction, the more break-in time will be required.

    Another factor to consider when buying hiking boots is the material of the upper. You can choose between full grain leather, split grain leather, nylon and suede. The fist type, the full grain leather boots are the most durable and weather resistant of them all. They are also usually the most expensive ones. They do need break in time, so you must make sure they are properly broken in before wearing them when going hiking.

    The other three types of materials are lighter and moderately durable. They are often paired with mesh materials to provide breathability. They are great for casual hiking. They usually require little or no break in time.

    You will need to choose the height of your hiking boots too. Taller hiking boots provide more support and are more suitable for rougher terrains and heavy backpacks. Hiking shoes and mid cut boots are more suitable for shorter trails and easy to moderate terrain. The high cut boots provide superior support and cover the ankles. They need the longest break in time, but are the best choice for difficult and steep trails.

    One last thing: boots are rarely comfortable right out of the box. Don’t forget to break in your new boots to avoid the pain and discomfort.

    So, already you should have a pretty good idea what to look for in a good hiking boot. Now get your new boots on and happy hiking!

The post What Makes for a Great Hiking Boot? appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Gender Roles On The Homestead: What’s The Right Way To Do It?

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Gender Roles On The Homestead: What’s The Right Way To Do It?

Is it women’s work, or is it men’s work? From the outside looking in, it might be easy to assume that gender roles are frequently assigned to homestead tasks. It makes sense that people might think that, because homesteading requires a lot of specialized skills that many modern American occupations and lifestyles do not. And Hollywood has not helped dispel that image—I mean, who ever saw John Wayne baking cookies, right?

A lot of people picture the heavy lifting and icky stuff as male-only jobs, and the kitchen chores done by exclusively females. And on some homesteads, that is the case. But on many 21st-century homesteads—and I daresay on many homesteads in past centuries, as well—the question of who does what is more about skills, timing and necessity than anything else.

There is no wrong answer to the question of gender roles on the homestead. I’ve encountered couples and families who divide up work around the home and farm according to strict gender lines, and it works well for them. The men and boys work in the fields and forest and accomplish all things mechanical and dirty, while the women and girls keep food on the table and the home tidy and the children tended.

Other homesteads are anything but traditional. Many women work outside the home, providing financial security and access to health insurance with regular off-homestead jobs, and many men stay home to take care of kids, wash dishes, tend baby chicks, tend the garden, mow the lawn, and do errands. This system works great, too.

The Next Generation In Solar Backup Generators Is Finally Here!

Most homesteads nowadays, however, seem to be an amalgamation of both traditional and non-traditional in most ways, not the least of which is who does what when it comes to chores and projects.

It is not uncommon to find a setup where she bakes bread and milks goats and drives the tractor and plucks chickens, while he goes to the kids’ baseball games and fixes the TV antenna and splits firewood and cans tomatoes. At my house, I’m in charge of livestock and my husband focuses on the vegetable garden. Some market gardeners I once met divide things up this way:  she grows crops in one field using a tractor, and he manages another field using draft horses. An elderly neighbor who spent a lifetime homesteading with her husband told me that she often put in long days in her youth—she would work at her off-farm job all day, come home and fix supper, and head out to the fields to help with the haying until dark—but never resented it because he, too, was carrying a heavy load and working long hours.

Gender Roles On The Homestead: What’s The Right Way To Do It?

Image source: Pixabay.com

All people, both men and women, have particular challenges that make it harder for them to tackle certain tasks that others can do with relative ease. They might lack the upper body strength needed for driving cedar fenceposts into the ground or have a phobia about snakes that makes them anxious about working in areas of snake habitat or have seasonal allergies that keep them away from certain plants.

Everyone has definite strengths, as well. They may have a special way with animals that makes them easier to manage, or have a knack for keeping engines running, or be tall enough to throw hay bales into the loft without a ladder, or so skilled at cooking that they can create a delicious meal out of anything.

Weird Gadget Can Jump-Start Your Car — And Charge Your Smartphone!

It makes sense for the person who can do the task more easily to do it whenever possible, letting jobs fall naturally into the hands of the one most likely to do them best. Sometimes people are equally capable and it comes down to preference. There are jobs that some of us really hate doing, and others that we don’t mind or even enjoy. My husband rarely asks me to take on tasks that I hate if he doesn’t mind doing them and has the time, and I afford the same consideration for his preferences, as well.

Timing matters, too. Not unlike most households, homesteaders often divide up chores according to who is available to do so at the time it needs to be done. One parent does evening chores while the other helps with the 4-H project, the person whose route home from work is closest to the feed store picks up grain on the way by, and everyone takes turns sitting up all night with a pregnant animal headed for a difficult delivery.

Timing is important not only in day-to-day operations but also seasonally. The partner who stays out of the kitchen for most of the year might spend the harvest season knee-deep in pressure canners and blanch pots, and the one who prefers to work indoors might have little choice but to make an exception during certain conditions.

Skills and routine timing aside, real life on a homestead means that sometimes stuff happens when it happens, and whoever is available is the person who is responsible for it. The sick mare, the broken gate, the predator in the chicken house, the sourdough starter needing to be stirred, the beans needing more water as they bake, or the dog getting porcupine quills in its nose—the person whose watch it is at the time is the person who has to take care of it.

Many homesteaders work more or less together on projects. For my husband and me, the most rewarding part of what we do is the privilege of doing it side-by-side as much as we can. Rather than spend a day on the homestead on opposite ends of the homestead, we often join forces for everything from firewood-processing to cooking to barn cleanouts.

The answer to the question of gender workload division on the homestead is that there is no one right answer. In relationships where tradition is paramount, it is likely that division of labor might reflect that philosophy. Other couples and families might do things very differently. It all works toward a successful homesteading venture, especially if skill, timing, necessity and the joy of spending time together are all taken into account.

Do you agree or disagree? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Gender Roles On The Homestead: What’s The Right Way To Do It?

Gender Roles On The Homestead: What’s The Right Way To Do It?

Is it women’s work, or is it men’s work? From the outside looking in, it might be easy to assume that gender roles are frequently assigned to homestead tasks. It makes sense that people might think that, because homesteading requires a lot of specialized skills that many modern American occupations and lifestyles do not. And Hollywood has not helped dispel that image—I mean, who ever saw John Wayne baking cookies, right?

A lot of people picture the heavy lifting and icky stuff as male-only jobs, and the kitchen chores done by exclusively females. And on some homesteads, that is the case. But on many 21st-century homesteads—and I daresay on many homesteads in past centuries, as well—the question of who does what is more about skills, timing and necessity than anything else.

There is no wrong answer to the question of gender roles on the homestead. I’ve encountered couples and families who divide up work around the home and farm according to strict gender lines, and it works well for them. The men and boys work in the fields and forest and accomplish all things mechanical and dirty, while the women and girls keep food on the table and the home tidy and the children tended.

Other homesteads are anything but traditional. Many women work outside the home, providing financial security and access to health insurance with regular off-homestead jobs, and many men stay home to take care of kids, wash dishes, tend baby chicks, tend the garden, mow the lawn, and do errands. This system works great, too.

The Next Generation In Solar Backup Generators Is Finally Here!

Most homesteads nowadays, however, seem to be an amalgamation of both traditional and non-traditional in most ways, not the least of which is who does what when it comes to chores and projects.

It is not uncommon to find a setup where she bakes bread and milks goats and drives the tractor and plucks chickens, while he goes to the kids’ baseball games and fixes the TV antenna and splits firewood and cans tomatoes. At my house, I’m in charge of livestock and my husband focuses on the vegetable garden. Some market gardeners I once met divide things up this way:  she grows crops in one field using a tractor, and he manages another field using draft horses. An elderly neighbor who spent a lifetime homesteading with her husband told me that she often put in long days in her youth—she would work at her off-farm job all day, come home and fix supper, and head out to the fields to help with the haying until dark—but never resented it because he, too, was carrying a heavy load and working long hours.

Gender Roles On The Homestead: What’s The Right Way To Do It?

Image source: Pixabay.com

All people, both men and women, have particular challenges that make it harder for them to tackle certain tasks that others can do with relative ease. They might lack the upper body strength needed for driving cedar fenceposts into the ground or have a phobia about snakes that makes them anxious about working in areas of snake habitat or have seasonal allergies that keep them away from certain plants.

Everyone has definite strengths, as well. They may have a special way with animals that makes them easier to manage, or have a knack for keeping engines running, or be tall enough to throw hay bales into the loft without a ladder, or so skilled at cooking that they can create a delicious meal out of anything.

Weird Gadget Can Jump-Start Your Car — And Charge Your Smartphone!

It makes sense for the person who can do the task more easily to do it whenever possible, letting jobs fall naturally into the hands of the one most likely to do them best. Sometimes people are equally capable and it comes down to preference. There are jobs that some of us really hate doing, and others that we don’t mind or even enjoy. My husband rarely asks me to take on tasks that I hate if he doesn’t mind doing them and has the time, and I afford the same consideration for his preferences, as well.

Timing matters, too. Not unlike most households, homesteaders often divide up chores according to who is available to do so at the time it needs to be done. One parent does evening chores while the other helps with the 4-H project, the person whose route home from work is closest to the feed store picks up grain on the way by, and everyone takes turns sitting up all night with a pregnant animal headed for a difficult delivery.

Timing is important not only in day-to-day operations but also seasonally. The partner who stays out of the kitchen for most of the year might spend the harvest season knee-deep in pressure canners and blanch pots, and the one who prefers to work indoors might have little choice but to make an exception during certain conditions.

Skills and routine timing aside, real life on a homestead means that sometimes stuff happens when it happens, and whoever is available is the person who is responsible for it. The sick mare, the broken gate, the predator in the chicken house, the sourdough starter needing to be stirred, the beans needing more water as they bake, or the dog getting porcupine quills in its nose—the person whose watch it is at the time is the person who has to take care of it.

Many homesteaders work more or less together on projects. For my husband and me, the most rewarding part of what we do is the privilege of doing it side-by-side as much as we can. Rather than spend a day on the homestead on opposite ends of the homestead, we often join forces for everything from firewood-processing to cooking to barn cleanouts.

The answer to the question of gender workload division on the homestead is that there is no one right answer. In relationships where tradition is paramount, it is likely that division of labor might reflect that philosophy. Other couples and families might do things very differently. It all works toward a successful homesteading venture, especially if skill, timing, necessity and the joy of spending time together are all taken into account.

Do you agree or disagree? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Gender Roles On The Homestead: What’s The Right Way To Do It?

Gender Roles On The Homestead: What’s The Right Way To Do It?

Is it women’s work, or is it men’s work? From the outside looking in, it might be easy to assume that gender roles are frequently assigned to homestead tasks. It makes sense that people might think that, because homesteading requires a lot of specialized skills that many modern American occupations and lifestyles do not. And Hollywood has not helped dispel that image—I mean, who ever saw John Wayne baking cookies, right?

A lot of people picture the heavy lifting and icky stuff as male-only jobs, and the kitchen chores done by exclusively females. And on some homesteads, that is the case. But on many 21st-century homesteads—and I daresay on many homesteads in past centuries, as well—the question of who does what is more about skills, timing and necessity than anything else.

There is no wrong answer to the question of gender roles on the homestead. I’ve encountered couples and families who divide up work around the home and farm according to strict gender lines, and it works well for them. The men and boys work in the fields and forest and accomplish all things mechanical and dirty, while the women and girls keep food on the table and the home tidy and the children tended.

Other homesteads are anything but traditional. Many women work outside the home, providing financial security and access to health insurance with regular off-homestead jobs, and many men stay home to take care of kids, wash dishes, tend baby chicks, tend the garden, mow the lawn, and do errands. This system works great, too.

The Next Generation In Solar Backup Generators Is Finally Here!

Most homesteads nowadays, however, seem to be an amalgamation of both traditional and non-traditional in most ways, not the least of which is who does what when it comes to chores and projects.

It is not uncommon to find a setup where she bakes bread and milks goats and drives the tractor and plucks chickens, while he goes to the kids’ baseball games and fixes the TV antenna and splits firewood and cans tomatoes. At my house, I’m in charge of livestock and my husband focuses on the vegetable garden. Some market gardeners I once met divide things up this way:  she grows crops in one field using a tractor, and he manages another field using draft horses. An elderly neighbor who spent a lifetime homesteading with her husband told me that she often put in long days in her youth—she would work at her off-farm job all day, come home and fix supper, and head out to the fields to help with the haying until dark—but never resented it because he, too, was carrying a heavy load and working long hours.

Gender Roles On The Homestead: What’s The Right Way To Do It?

Image source: Pixabay.com

All people, both men and women, have particular challenges that make it harder for them to tackle certain tasks that others can do with relative ease. They might lack the upper body strength needed for driving cedar fenceposts into the ground or have a phobia about snakes that makes them anxious about working in areas of snake habitat or have seasonal allergies that keep them away from certain plants.

Everyone has definite strengths, as well. They may have a special way with animals that makes them easier to manage, or have a knack for keeping engines running, or be tall enough to throw hay bales into the loft without a ladder, or so skilled at cooking that they can create a delicious meal out of anything.

Weird Gadget Can Jump-Start Your Car — And Charge Your Smartphone!

It makes sense for the person who can do the task more easily to do it whenever possible, letting jobs fall naturally into the hands of the one most likely to do them best. Sometimes people are equally capable and it comes down to preference. There are jobs that some of us really hate doing, and others that we don’t mind or even enjoy. My husband rarely asks me to take on tasks that I hate if he doesn’t mind doing them and has the time, and I afford the same consideration for his preferences, as well.

Timing matters, too. Not unlike most households, homesteaders often divide up chores according to who is available to do so at the time it needs to be done. One parent does evening chores while the other helps with the 4-H project, the person whose route home from work is closest to the feed store picks up grain on the way by, and everyone takes turns sitting up all night with a pregnant animal headed for a difficult delivery.

Timing is important not only in day-to-day operations but also seasonally. The partner who stays out of the kitchen for most of the year might spend the harvest season knee-deep in pressure canners and blanch pots, and the one who prefers to work indoors might have little choice but to make an exception during certain conditions.

Skills and routine timing aside, real life on a homestead means that sometimes stuff happens when it happens, and whoever is available is the person who is responsible for it. The sick mare, the broken gate, the predator in the chicken house, the sourdough starter needing to be stirred, the beans needing more water as they bake, or the dog getting porcupine quills in its nose—the person whose watch it is at the time is the person who has to take care of it.

Many homesteaders work more or less together on projects. For my husband and me, the most rewarding part of what we do is the privilege of doing it side-by-side as much as we can. Rather than spend a day on the homestead on opposite ends of the homestead, we often join forces for everything from firewood-processing to cooking to barn cleanouts.

The answer to the question of gender workload division on the homestead is that there is no one right answer. In relationships where tradition is paramount, it is likely that division of labor might reflect that philosophy. Other couples and families might do things very differently. It all works toward a successful homesteading venture, especially if skill, timing, necessity and the joy of spending time together are all taken into account.

Do you agree or disagree? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Do You Need That to Survive: Cargo Trailer

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As long as we are talking about trailers, you might also want to consider a pop-up style camping trailer. You have seen them, the ones that fold down into a solid box with a trailer hitch for pulling with essentially any type of vehicle equipped to haul a trailer. They have canvas sides, with a […]

The post Do You Need That to Survive: Cargo Trailer appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

5 Tips to Help Preparedness Beginners Focus on the Right Things

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Getting prepared for emergencies can feel overwhelming. Preparedness beginners may feel that they have to prepare for anything and everything all at once, but there is a better way. Here are 5 tips to help you get started with your emergency preparedness efforts.

The post 5 Tips to Help Preparedness Beginners Focus on the Right Things appeared first on Simple Family Preparedness.

Start Prepping!: Get Prepared – for Life: A 10-Step Path to Emergency Preparedness so You Can Survive Any Disaster

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You don’t like to think about it, but deep down you know it can happen. Disaster can strike without warning, leaving your family without water, food, or electricity and without medical or police support. How will you survive when that happens? How will you protect your family from threats of violence? Buying insurance, writing wills, getting our teeth cleaned, and saving for retirement are just a few of the precautions we routinely take to mitigate risks, but most people fail to prepare for what’s most important. They fail to prepare for their own survival. With 91 percent of Americans living in places at a moderate to high risk of disasters, and with all of us dependent on a very fragile life-support system, it’s time for you to take preparedness seriously. When you listen to this audiobook you will: Understand the 27 disasters you’re likely to face, why some people perish when others don’t, and how to ensure your family survives. Master situational awareness and the survival mind-set you need to avoid becoming a victim of violence. Know when to stay, when to bug out, and how to implement an evacuation plan. Learn the best non-firearm options for self-defense. Discover the best ways to generate electricity, store water and food, and handle sanitation and medical care on your own. Start Prepping! is the ultimate guide to personal emergency preparedness. It will help your family comfortably survive manmade and natural disasters and stay safe from everyday violence. You can’t hide from the risks we face, but you can prepare for them. Listen to Start Prepping! now, and give yourself some peace of mind – because the day after disaster strikes, it’ll be too late.

The post Start Prepping!: Get Prepared – for Life: A 10-Step Path to Emergency Preparedness so You Can Survive Any Disaster appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

The Accidental Farmers: An urban couple, a rural calling and a dream of farming in harmony with nature

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BOOK DESCRIPTION
This book is a personal memoir of an urban couple’s journey to farming, rather than a how-to guide, and is sure to delight those interested in moving to the country or simply learning more about the struggles of sustainable farming.

When Tim and Liz Young decided to leave their comfortable suburban life and become first-time farmers in rural Georgia, they embarked on a journey that would change their lives. The Accidental Farmers reveals how the couple learned that hamburgers, bacon, and eggs don’t come from the supermarket but from real animals that forge emotional bonds with their human caretakers. Seeking a middle path between a meatless lifestyle and the barbarism of factory food, Tim and Liz created Nature’s Harmony Farm, a sustainable oasis where rare breed animals and humans live together searching for something nearly lost by both humans and the animals…how to live naturally off the land.

REVIEWS
“Tim Young has written a maddeningly enchanting description of how he and his wife Liz decided to dump their successful careers in the corporate world and seek a simpler life of organic farming in harmony with nature. With wit, humor and precision, Tim mesmerizes the reader as he and Liz learn how to achieve a life of harmony with the natural world. I promise you a compellingly delightful read.” – Mildred Armstrong Kalish – author of Little Heathens

“Tim and Liz Young describe the many benefits of a return to agrarian life, one of which is a return to vibrant health; because the nutrient-dense meat, fat and organ meats of animals fed on fertile soil is the absolute basis of human health and fertility. In a most compelling way, they present that beautiful equation: healthy soil equals healthy animals equals healthy human beings.”  – Sally Fallon Morell – author of “Nourishing Traditions” and President of the Weston A. Price Foundation

“You may have successful job or career but perhaps you are bored to death with it now and looking for something more challenging. If you have always been attracted to rural life, this book is made for you! Tim and Liz Young recount the joys and sorrows along with the victories and defeats of finding success in one of the most challenging professions; not just farming but also farming a totally natural way. I particularly recommend their thoughts on the ‘dark side of farming’ and Tim’s very well reasoned discussion of what financial profit means in farming.” – Gene Logsdon – author of The Contrary Farmer

The post The Accidental Farmers: An urban couple, a rural calling and a dream of farming in harmony with nature appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

How to Make Money Homesteading: So You Can Enjoy a Secure, Self-Sufficient Life

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Check out startacheesebusiness.com for a great course on self-sufficient income!

Wouldn’t you like to escape the hectic pace of modern life and enjoy a worry-free, self-reliant lifestyle? A lifestyle where your family shares lasting memories of living self-sufficiently instead of being slaves to digital devices and traffic jams. Whether you hope to move to the country or simply stay closer to the city, this book will show you:
How to create streams of self-sufficient and passive income wherever you are That you can live a vibrant, healthy lifestyle and take care of yourself and your family How you can get out of debt just as others did on their path to self-sufficiency The 23 Critical Questions to ask before buying rural property That you can insulate yourself from financial collapse and SHTF doomsday scenarios How to retire happy and use homesteading as the NEW retirement planFeaturing profiles of 18 homesteaders and farmers who share intimate stories of their own journeys toward a healthier, freer, more fulfilling lifestyle, this book provides actionable ideas that you can use to achieve your dream of self-sufficiency.From how others got out of debt, to what to consider before buying land, to the critical steps to take when setting up a sustainable homestead or farmstead business, this book details the strategies that will save you money, generate income and put you on the path to self-sufficiency.Read How to Make Money Homesteading TODAY, and be sure to check out my newest book, START PREPPING!

The post How to Make Money Homesteading: So You Can Enjoy a Secure, Self-Sufficient Life appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

Secret Garden of Survival: How to grow a camouflaged food- forest.

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Imagine a food garden that you only have to plant once in your life-time, that takes up very little space, that will provide food for you and your family for the next 30 years; that can grow five times more food per square foot than traditional or commercial gardening; and where you never have to weed, never have to use fertilizers and never have to use pesticide– ever. All diguised as overgrown underbrush, so nobody knows you have food growing there! This book will show you how to do it in one growing season!

The post Secret Garden of Survival: How to grow a camouflaged food- forest. appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

What Do You Really Know About The Shelf Life Of Meds?

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Nowadays, more people are falling victim to a range of illnesses that require supervision and medication from a doctor.

From asthma, diabetes, and hypertension to anxiety disorders and cancer, just about every ailment also has a range of medications that can be used to treat it or alleviate the symptoms.

You probably have your own drug reserve. And there are times when you don’t finish up a bottle of medicine, but still keep it for uncertain times. Do you know how to use them safely after a long time storage in case you need them?

Here are 5 questions answered on the shelf life of meds. Did we miss anything? Keep reading and complete your knowledge with our special report.

What the Date on the Bottle Really Means?

If you could take a look at the bottle the pharmacist removes your medication from, you’d be surprised to see that the recommended discard date does not match the one on the manufacturer’s packaging. Why? The pharmacists store medications in ideal settings, and also because manufacturer packages have features not found in consumer bottles.

For example, the manufacturer may add a desiccant/oxygen absorbent to the package or it may have a more airtight seal. Are you doing this at home? No, you’re not, for sure!

Once the medication is transferred to another container, it’s expected that ideal storage conditions no longer exist. Even though the shelf life of pharmaceutical supplies also drops each time a bottle is opened, the shelf life is expected to reduce much faster once the drug is in consumer hands.

Many people will tell you that individual drug molecules and stabilizers don’t have an alarm clock that suddenly goes off once the date stamped on the bottle is reached. While this may be true in a literary sense, there is no avoiding the fact that some molecules in the bottle begin changing as soon as the manufacturer forms each dose.

Get this lifesaving information about surviving when hospitals are shut down!

Can Medications Expire Before The Date Listed on the Bottle?

Even though manufacturers guarantee that drugs remain at a stable level of potency up until the expiration date, some things can cause them to expire sooner. And here are just a few common things you may be doing that shorten the shelf life of medications more than expected:

Storing medications in a medicine cabinet above a sink

Moisture from the sink can and will find its way into the medicine chest. If the medicine bottles aren’t airtight or not sealed properly, then all that moisture can seriously alter the potency levels of the drugs. Aside from that, if you store medications on beside a kitchen sink or even on a nearby counter, all that moisture can wreak havoc.

This is also true for herbal and dietary supplements. You have only to see how these medications will clump together in the bottle after just a week or so of sitting on a sink. Even if you don’t open the bottles very often, moisture will still seep in.

Storing medications over a stove or other source of heat

No matter whether you store medications over the kitchen stove or near a heating vent, all that extra heat can have a destabilizing effect.

Sunlight or artificial light reach the meds for prolonged periods of time

While you don’t necessarily have to treat all medications like camera film, avoiding light is still very important.

Storing medications in a refrigerator or freezer

If you are going to put them in cold places, pay attention to ideal storage content and moisture build up in these appliances, to keep their potency.

Liquid vs. Pill Based Drugs. Which One is Better?

If you have ever stored foods away for a longer period of time, then you already know that dehydrated foods last longer. In a similar fashion, pill based drugs also have a longer shelf life than liquid versions.

You will also find that drugs suspended in an ointment may have a shorter shelf life. For example, the active ingredient in liquid and ointment based eye treatments may have a shorter life span than the exact same active agent dispensed in pill form.

Click here to subscribe to Survivopedia’s newsletter and get this month’s report to discover more facts about the shelf life of meds. 

What Does the Army Know about the Shelf Life of Meds?

Over the years, the military and others have been wondering if properly stored, unopened drugs are actually potent after the listed discard date.

Studies done conclude that many drugs are still perfectly good 2 – 5 years after the listed discard date.

While these studies can be used to find out about some drugs, they may or may not tell the whole story. In particular, if the study is based on a name brand drug from the developing manufacturer, that does not mean the generics have the same storage characteristics.

Does Oxygen Absorbents and Desiccants Help?

Many oxygen absorbents used for food actually wind up emitting moisture, and makes them virtually useless for storing medications. Today, you can buy a single product such as Pharmakeep that combines a desiccant and an oxygen absorbent. It is made just for medication and can help extend the shelf life of many different drugs.

When it comes to the shelf life of any given medication, it’s difficult to know how safe the drug actually is. The manufacturer will guarantee the drug up until a certain date, but that does not mean it won’t do any good afterward.

If you choose to play it on the safe side and never take a medication past the discard date listed on the bottle, you should still make sure that you store the drug properly within that time frame.

What to Worry about When Using Expired Medications

No matter how hard you try, there may be times when you have to choose between taking a chance on using outdated drugs or having no medication at all. When in this situation, avoid any drugs that show the following characteristics:

  • The tablets or gel capsules are stuck together, brittle, or show signs of becoming malformed.
  • The medication has an unusual (for the drug) or foul odor
  • Liquids that separate out into different layers to do not recombine easily when shaken.
  • Insulin, other injectables, or inhaled drugs have a cloudy appearance or they are separated into discernible layers
  • The original seal on the medicine bottle has been broken for more than a year. In some cases, such as insulin, the lifetime for an opened vial or pen may be as little as 30 days.
  • The drug is in a class or family that is known for having a shortened or reduced shelf life.

Learn more about shelf life and how it works so that you can choose the best methods for each drug in your cabinet.

Aside from helping you save money, good medicine storage practices will also increase the chance your health will not be endangered by taking a medicine that no longer does what it is supposed to do.

If you are going to thrive in a situation were medicines may not be available, knowledge is the only doctor that can save you when there is no medical help around you.

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This article has been written by Carmela Tyrell for Survivopedia.

Fractured State (Fractured State Series)

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A man collides with a sinister political conspiracy in an explosive race against time.In a future California ravaged by drought and on the brink of political upheaval, a high-profile assassination triggers a cascade of violence and sabotage facilitated by the highest levels of power. Nathan Fisher, an unassuming government employee, is drawn into the unraveling conspiracy after accidentally witnessing a suspiciously timed clandestine military-style operation.Hunted by ruthless killers seeking to ensure his silence, suspected by the authorities, and aided only be a loyal Marine officer with a mysterious agenda, Fisher and his family must somehow stay a step ahead of their relentless pursuers, navigating a dangerously changed world in a desperate search for sanctuary.With their lives on the line and California on the brink of secession, can they save themselves—and ultimately their country?

The post Fractured State (Fractured State Series) appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

The Jakarta Pandemic

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By the USA Today bestselling author of The Perseid Collapse series!
THE JAKARTA PANDEMIC:

Cases of a highly lethal virus appear in major cities around the globe. Most ignore the warning signs.

Alex Fletcher, Iraq War veteran, has read the signs for years. With his family and home prepared to endure an extended period of seclusion, Alex thinks he’s ready for the pandemic. He’s not even close.

The unstoppable H16N1 virus rapidly spreads across the United States, stretching the fragile bonds of society to the breaking point. Schools close, grocery stores empty, fuel deliveries stop, hospitals start turning away the sick…riots engulf the cities. As hostility and mistrust engulfs his idyllic Maine neighborhood, Alex quickly realizes that the H16N1 virus will be the least of his problems.

***The sequel, The Perseid Collapse, is now available***
“It delivers a vicious punch of violence and heroism for the reader to endure and admire. I could hardly put The Jakarta Pandemic down until I finished it.” – Amazon Reviewer (2012)

“The tension builds as difficult choices are made, when no good options seem to be available. I found certain segments to be uncomfortably realistic, at times creepy in the way you could feel things closing in around the family.” – Amazon Reviewer (2013)

“It makes you think just how prepared you really are for any kind of emergency. It makes you question your resolve in a potential crisis. How far are you willing to go to protect your loved ones? Every day that goes by, these characters have to question what is right and what is wrong. Take the trip thru this book. You won’t be disappointed.” – Amazon Reviewer (2013)

“Pay attention as you may learn a few things in this book that could help you make the best of an emergency situation. For that matter some of the info in this book may very well save your life.” – Amazon Reviewer (2013)

“Anyone who has relished running to the hardware store before a big storm to stock up on essentials will be drawn to Steve Konkoly’s intricately-researched and drawn breakdown of our supply systems, and transfixed by his description of what it takes to survive six months of enforced isolation behind the locked(booby-trapped, draped and shuttered) doors of one’s own home.” – Amazon Reviewer (2011)

“I found the setting to be a refreshing change from other PA novels. Stories in this genre tend to focus on the world at large or center on a group of people traveling on a journey to find safe harbor. This novel centers on one family hunkered down in their home and how they interact with their neighbors on their street. I was quite impressed with the level of research put into this novel, the author clearly did his homework.” – Richard Stephenson, author of the critically acclaimed New America series.

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Black Flagged Alpha (Volume 1)

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By USA Today bestselling author! Over 500,000 books in series sold.

“Bourne Identity from the suburbs”- Amazon Reviewer

“Extreme Adrenaline Rush”- Amazon Reviewer

“…explosive thriller in the tradition of Flynn, Thor, Clancy…”- Amazon Reviewer

“Cutting edge, explosive, action-packed read.”- Amazon Reviewer.

BLACK FLAGGED ALPHA: Book One in the Black Flagged series (Previously Black Flagged)

Daniel Petrovich, the most lethal operative created by the Department of Defense’s Black Flag Program, protects a secret buried in the deepest vaults of the Pentagon. Blackmailed into executing one final mission, Daniel’s carefully constructed “life” rapidly disintegrates into a relentless federal manhunt–and a “24-style” race against the clock to suppress the shocking truth about his past. To survive, he’ll release the darkest side of his concealed identity. A dark side with few boundaries–and even fewer loyalties.

Black Flagged lays the foundation for a gritty, high-octane series exploring the serpentine link between covert operations and government agency politics.

Fans of Ludlum and Thor alike will revel in this new Black Ops series.

Limited time! Buy the Black Flagged Bundle (Books 1-3) for $9.99 (40% discount)!

Book 1: Black Flagged Alpha
Book 2: Black Flagged Redux
Book 3: Black Flagged Apex
Book 4: Black Flagged Vektor
Book 5: Black Flagged Omega

The post Black Flagged Alpha (Volume 1) appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

Succession Planting – How To Get The Most From Your Garden This Year!

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If there is one simple gardening method that can help feed your family consistently, its succession planting. Succession planting is all about sowing the right amount of seed to have plants to feed your family for a specific period of time. As

The post Succession Planting – How To Get The Most From Your Garden This Year! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

How to Prepare an Electricity-free Kitchen

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There are a number of situations in which you may find yourself without electricity and you want to be prepared all of them. Depending on the number of people in your family or group, your setup needs may vary. Here are some options to explore for making sure that you can still prepare wholesome homemade meals in the event you find yourself without power.

Small but Powerful

For something small and compact that can travel easily, consider getting a Pocket Rocket by MSR. They are a longstanding staple of backpackers all over the world and can literally be assembled with one hand and weigh mere ounces. They pack enough heat to boil a couple cups of water in a few minutes. However, their gas canisters typically do not hold more than 6 hours of burning fuel and have to be replaced frequently. If you are looking for a small but portable way to boil water in less than two minutes for your dehydrated meal, a JetBoil may be your best bet in that arena. The size of a large coffee cup, they screw into the top of a gas canister for added stability and windproofing. JetBoils also come with attachments to turn them into a French press, a frying pan and a cooking pot.

Feast or Famine

For larger groups, you are going to want a stove and cooking area that has multiple burners and a larger surface. Stoves that collapse and are easily transportable, like the classic Coleman double burner, are a great option for a family of four or small group of people. What these kinds of stoves do not offer is a cooking platform or a food preparation area. If you are going to be stationary for a while, consider getting a table with legs and a side food preparation table. Stoves, like the Camp Chef Pro Series Deluxe Three, are equipped with propane tanks that hold a large amount of gas and are refillable and the dual platforms on either side are useful for setting utensils, condiments and cutting boards.

Accessories

For the sake of longevity, invest in metal, rather than plastic, utensils. Melting or breaking a plastic spatula will render it useless. Metal utensils hold up for a long time — same goes for your plates and cups. Put together a kitchen box with long lasting supplies such as reusable towels (as opposed to one time use paper towels), waterproof matches and fire starter. It is wise to stock up on gas canisters or propane to ensure that you have enough cooking fuel in the event that you lose power and have to fire up one of your cook stove substitutes. If you don’t want to worry about fuel, consider getting a large griddle to turn any camp fire or heat source into a cookable surface as long as the area is flat.

Author Bio: W.M. Chandler is a Colorado native and works best with her head in the clouds. She is an avid researcher and enjoys writing about unfamiliar subjects. She writes passionately about nature and the outdoors, human connections and relationships, nutrition and politics. Twitter: @wmchandler1212

Why And How We All Need To Store Lots Of Beans

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I must confess, I store lots of beans because I love beans, just about any kind of bean suits me. The price of food continues to rise every day and I think beans may go up in price because most people cannot afford meat for a protein. I actually stopped eating meat about a year ago because I read what animals are fed before the meat reaches our tables. I wish meat tasted more like it did when I was younger without all the hormones and antibiotics added. The added pressure from Monsanto to force farmers to use GMO corn in the feed or get arrested really goes against my grain, no pun intended. I love to hear that people are raising their own beef, goats, chickens, or rabbits. I applaud them for trying to feed their animals without GMO (genetically modified organisms) feed. I’ve said before I couldn’t kill an animal and then eat it. Yes, if I was starving I would, maybe. I have tasted grass-fed beef and it tastes a lot like the old days with real flavor. Oh, and fresh chicken without the hormones, is so much better. But, here again, I have made the decision to no longer eat meat, that’s how I roll these days.

I can still remember the deer Mark so proudly brought home after hunting the poor thing and hanging it up in the garage. Wow, then we dragged that baby into our kitchen. I have never looked at a deer quite the same out in the fields ever since that day. We cleaned it, cut it, and wrapped up all those red chunks of meat. I never could cook it so I could eat it. Yes, everyone told me to let it age for a few days, marinate it, or cook it with this or that spice and it would taste just like regular beef. Nope, none of it worked for me. BUT, I know a lot of awesome hunters who love hunting and eating the wild game, any kind is great for them!

Lots of Beans

You can buy beans in little bags sitting on the grocery store shelves, you can grow beans in your garden if you live in the right ‘zone”. You can even buy 50 or 100-pound bags of beans, just about any kind of bean you prefer to eat. You can buy #10 cans of beans and #10 cans of instant beans. The instant beans you just add water and cook for about 20-30 minutes, depending on the brand you buy. Nowadays I usually buy cases of vegetarian refried beans. I also buy kidney beans, black beans, garbanzo beans, navy beans (white beans), and chili beans. All you need is a can opener if we have a disaster and we lose power to open the cans. The ones that are ready to eat I can eat right out of the can if need be, no heat required.

Sometimes I think people think beans are only for chili, or soups. They are great for that, but they can be used in so many dishes, or on salads, can’t you just picture the salad bar with the kidney beans right now? Remember, if you don’t use up all the beans before they expire you can donate them to your local food bank, trust me they will love them!

1. Pinto beans are great for refried beans.

2. Kidney beans are great with veggies from the garden or to make chili.

3. Red chili beans I use to make chili.

4. White Northern beans are great with a little chicken broth, celery, and onions to make a pot of soup. Add ham if desired.

5. Blackeye peas are great for a side dish or to make hummus.

6. Anasazi beans great for southwestern dishes or soups.

7. Black beans are yummy in tacos or as a side dish. I wish I had the recipe for black beans from Texas. My sister lives there and they know how to make the best salsa and black beans.

8. Chickpeas (Garbanzo) they are awesome to make hummus or add to a salad.

9. Cannellini beans are great for soup.

10. Lima beans are great for soup or a side dish.

I always figure if I start with one cup dry beans I will have three cups cooked beans. You can store beans in buckets with Gamma Lids: Gamma Seal Lid – Red You can also get Gamma lids at some of your local grocery stores, but oh, how the price of these have gone up! They are so worth the price, no more sore fingers opening those 5-gallon buckets!

Here’s my favorite white chicken chili recipe:

Easy White Chili

  • 3 cans (15 ounces each) of small white beans (not drained)
  • 2 cans (12.5 ounces each) of canned chicken (drained), or use some leftover cooked chicken
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup mozzarella cheese (grated)
  • 4 ounce can green chilies (diced)
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 16-ounce jar of salsa
  • sour cream to garnish
  • Tortilla chips crushed for garnish

Instructions:

  1. Add all the ingredients in order into a slow cooker and cook on low 5-6 hours. Serve with crushed tortilla chips on the soup with a dollop of sour cream.

PRINTABLE recipe: Easy White Chili by Food Storage Moms

Anti-Gas:

I found this great product while teaching classes in a store in Salt Lake City, Utah. It is Organic Ajwain Seeds.  After you soak your beans, drain off the water and cover with fresh water and add the required amount of Ajwain seeds. You just add 1/4 teaspoon of Ajwain Seeds to 2 cups of dry beans while cooking.  The spice smells so good. It’s like a Mexican seasoning. It’s organic and adds flavor to the beans, as well as the anti-gas factor! I still add my favorite spices like cumin, chili powder, cinnamon, cocoa, etc. Ajika Organic Ajwain Seed, 2.2-Ounce

I believe storing lots of beans will help stretch the dollar and we can share a meal with a neighbor after a disaster or at a bean burrito party! Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected.
Prepare Your Family for Survival: How to Be Ready for Any Emergency or Disaster Situation

Farberware Classic Stainless Steel 16-Quart Covered Stockpot

The post Why And How We All Need To Store Lots Of Beans appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How Hackers Gain Access to Your Home

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by Joseph Mack The popularity of the smart home has been growing in leaps and bounds in recent years and while that should be a good thing for consumers it does raise some concerns. Unfortunately there will always be some unscrupulous individuals out there determined to take advantage of innocent people at every opportunity – that includes both the real world and the cyber universe. There have been several high profile incidents in which hackers have used smart devices in […]

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Apartment Homesteading for Preppers

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by Heath

There are many things to worry about when you have your mind set on preparing for the worst of outcomes. One of these problems is providing food for yourself when the SHTF, and that only compounds on itself when you live in the city. Undoubtedly there are advantages to living in a city, but how can you have a successful homestead in a city? To be even more specific – Is it even possible in an apartment?

This article will outlay all the basics you need to know to get you started on your homesteading adventures in your apartment. You will learn life hacks to get the most out of your space and gain the knowledge you need to have meaningful yields from your urban homesteading adventures.

The Garden

Your first step is developing all of your growing areas into something worth growing vegetables in. This includes any window space, kitchen window, or balcony if you have one. If you have a balcony with one of those sliding glass doors, you have a jackpot regarding growing space in an apartment.

Any windows you do have will need to be cleared away of furniture as this will be your only way to get sunlight to your plants. You will also have to keep your window blinds or curtains open for the entirety of the day to get the little amount of sunlight that you do get. This can raise the issue of people being able to see what you are doing, but the risk is a necessary one.

Once you have designated the growing areas; you will need to plan out how you are going to use your growing pots, vertical gardens, staggered gardens, hanging baskets, trellises, planter boxes, and balcony pots. All of these are available for you to maximize your growing space.

vertical pots herbs on balcony

Any wall that gets a decent amount of sunlight will beg for a vertical or staggered garden. The vertical garden is built as one unit stacked on top of each other so you can grow in many beds within the same amount of space. Staggered gardens would be best utilized on the balcony or next to a sliding glass door. If you have a big enough window, it could be used from the wall next to the window and staggered out in front of it. Staggered gardens are best described as the descending rice fields you see in the mountains. It’s a great use of space as you can have different levels of dirt for various plant’s needs in one area.

You will also want to set up your trellises along walls for vine plants you may choose to grow. If your space is too limited for trellises, you can always use hanging baskets for growing them. Other plants like tomatoes, cucumbers, and leafy greens like spinach do well in them as well. The best part is harvesting as all you need to do is pick them off like apples in a tree unless you are growing greens. It’s important to note that you want to keep an eye on how much sunlight you are getting with hanging baskets as they tend to get a lot which could be detrimental to your leafy greens.

If you have a balcony, you will want to maximize your growing space on it because it will most likely be the area where you receive the most amount of sunlight. This is a great opportunity for planter boxes and balcony pots. There are many options for you to choose when it comes to these, so the best advice is to find something solid and built to last. You will find out quickly if it’s cheap when you come out in the morning to find your planter box spilled out on the ground.

The balcony rails can also work as a trellis. You may need to add some cross sections to it, but it will work perfectly for you if that is an option you need.

It’s important to stress this one more time as it will save you a lot of headaches. Do not buy cheap pots, planters, or materials for building. You need these things to last you a long time, and if the SHTF you might not have the opportunity to replace something that has broken. It’s better to fork out the few extra dollars on the thicker better pots, than the flimsy ones that you can break with your hands if you tried hard enough.

The Soil

You will need soil for your garden, and hopefully a lot of it. Unfortunately, you will have to buy this probably, or if you are patient and resourceful enough, you can find someone who is selling or getting rid of their top soil. Either way, you will need it unless you are going a hydroponic/aquaponic route.

Once you have the right amount of soil, you will need to keep the microbial bacteria happy, and that means providing organic material to the soil from time to time. Without a doubt, the best way to do this is composting.

With compost, you provide the soil with all of the vital and subtle nutrients we find in healthy soil. It’s the only sure way of accomplishing this without having to spend a dime. The only problem is the limited space in the apartment.

For making compost in an apartment, you will need a compost bin to put all of your table scraps – excluding meat and dairy – into. These bins vary in sizes, and a lot of them will have an easy way to turn it so oxygen gets to the microbes so they can break down the material into compost.

Ideally, you will want to “hot compost” as opposed to “cold compost.” This simply means that the mixture of nitrogen-rich content(Roughly 30%) to carbon-rich content(Roughly 70%) is at the perfect ratio for the bacteria to do what it does best. When done correctly, you will be able to have usable compost in a fraction of the time. It typically takes “cold compost” to be ready anywhere from 6 months to a year! This is a massive difference to hot compost which can be ready in as little as two weeks.

There are other factors to hot composting that need to be addressed if you want to be successful. You have to ensure that the compost is always moist. It should be as moist as a wet sponge. The next thing you will want to make sure you do is to “turn” the compost. This is essential because the bacteria is aerobic, meaning it needs oxygen to thrive and work. If you can compost within your apartment, it should be in a bin that is easy to flip or turn.

If you are unable to make your own compost; you will have to buy it, or you should expect to get less and fewer yields over time, and eventually degrade the soil to something that won’t give life anymore. There are many varieties out there, but the best option is anything organic. You really don’t want to use Miracle-Gro, or anything similar. They will grow big plants, but the additives they are introducing into your soil are harmful to a healthy lifestyle. Finally, in case of the SHTF scenario, make sure you have a surplus of compost if you have to buy it.

gutter

Water Collection

Collecting water is one of the most important aspects to homesteading, and for the needs of an apartment homesteader, it becomes vital to your garden’s survival. You will also be extremely limited to what you can do in regards water collecting. The simplest method at your disposal if you have a balcony is setting up gutters to collect water. The outlet will have to go into a bucket, but bringing out as many plants as possible when it is raining, and collecting what you can from the gutters will help tremendously.

Your other option is creating a water collector from a tarp, four poles, and a bucket for the water collection. All you need to do is set it up when you know you will have rain. The four poles suspend the tarp above the bucket, and at the low point, a hole in the tarp will pour water into the bucket.

This is the easiest way to collect water. You will undoubtedly turn some heads by doing this, but the benefits far outweigh the negatives for this one.

Hydroponic/Aquaponic

I won’t be going into too much detail here, but suffices it to say you can get either of them going in your apartment for relatively cheap.

These systems use a growing medium instead of soil to grow plants. With the hydroponic system, you will need to add additives to your water for the plants. While the aquaponic system uses fish to fertilize the plants, and the water is filtered and recycled back to the fishes.

Aquaponics stands apart from hydroponics on the fact that you can also raise fish for consumption, and not have to pay for those additives that a hydroponic system needs. Both will require electricity to run, and the aquaponic system will need more because of the aerator for the fish tank.

This can be a potential problem in a SHTF situation and we have outlined some ways you can make your entire hydroponic or aquaponic system work without electricity in the article stated previously.

Alternative Energy

Due to your limited space, there isn’t much you can do in this regard. Your only option is to install solar panels on your balcony – if you have one. This could potentially take up valuable growing space, and the growing space should always take priority. The best advice is to hire a professional to assess your situation and tell you your options, or if it is even worth it.

You could also install a wind generator on your balcony, but the output probably won’t be great. Experiment with these options and get some professional advice if you really want to collect solar or wind energy for your power use.

rabbit

Raising Rabbits

Because you live in an apartment, you won’t be able to raise much of anything in regards to meat. You have fish from the aquaponic system, but you are very limited to what you can keep after that. Chickens are completely out of the question so you really only have one option. Rabbits.

Mostly kept as pets, they are a good source of protein when there is nothing else. They are very easy to keep and take care of, and the investment isn’t too steep considering the situation. You could potentially feed them entirely from your garden if you are capable of growing enough produce.

The best part is their birth rate. It’s a common saying, “They breed like rabbits.” This statement is entirely true. The gestation period for rabbits is roughly 30 days, and they tend to give birth to a litter of 4-12! The problem then becomes, “Do I have enough space for all these rabbits?”

As the chicken is the ultimate homesteader animal; the rabbit is arguably the ultimate urban/apartment homesteader animal.

Closing Thoughts

Turning your apartment into an urban homestead will be a challenge with ups and downs to learn from. What is important is to use this article as a guideline and not the end all to truth. There are always innovations and new techniques to try when it comes to homesteading, and this holds true to urban homesteading. Even if you are in a one bedroom apartment, you can turn that into a homestead, and be prepared for the challenges that the future may throw at you.

What Are Your Prepper Gear Recommendations?

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What Are Your Prepper Gear Recommendations?

Last week I wrote up an article on the best prepper gear I could think to buy for myself – items that have been on my wishlist for absolute ages and were above average in terms of cost, but were worthy (in my mind) purchases considering my perceived value of them in terms of their […]

This is just the start of the post What Are Your Prepper Gear Recommendations?. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


What Are Your Prepper Gear Recommendations?, written by Elise Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

Interview With Kevin From Wilderness Safety Institute

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Interview With Kevin From Wilderness Safety InstituteIn this weeks Survivalist Prepper podcast we had Kevin from Wilderness Safety Institute on to talk about wilderness medicine, EMT skills, water filtration, survival myths and a few other subjects. Because there is so much information that goes into each of these subjects we will probably have Kevin on in the future…watch for that.

Kevin is an instructor at Wilderness Safety Institute where they have courses on wilderness survival skills, basic survival skills, urban survival and first aid. Here is a little from his bio page at WSI…

Kevin has had an avid interest in the outdoors since his father took him fishing at age 3, and has continued to pursue many outdoor activities for over 45 years, such as hiking, camping, fishing, trapping, and hunting.

While serving as a Reconnaissance Specialist in the US Military, he started his diving career, and holds the certifications of DiveMaster and Master Scuba Diver, with over 15 specialties.

For most of his life, he has not only been continually learning, but has used that knowledge about nature and the outdoors to teach others.

Kevin has taught members of Search and Rescue teams, participated in numerous SAR missions, given lectures on diving medicine at university hospitals, volunteered as an EMT and firefighter in his local community, served as an Assistant Scoutmaster with a local Boy Scouts Troop, and actively participates in educational podcasts and videos for EMS providers.

For more about Kevin visit his bio page here.

SPP201 Interview With Kevin From Wilderness Survival Institute

Here are a few notes from the show…

Wilderness medicine: We didn’t talk about medicinal herbs, we talked about how to help yourself when no help is available, and learning the basics. Wilderness medicine could help in many disaster scenarios, not just in the woods. – prevention

The SURVIVAL acronym: In any survival situation, or any critical situation it is important to stay calm and focused. Keeping your wits about you can eliminate unnecessary mistakes. Here is an article I wrote in the past about the S.U.R.V.I.V.A.L. acronym. 

Roughing it at home: Learning survival skills doesn’t mean you need to head out into the woods for a week. learning to do things at home without modern conveniences can show you how things might be, not just how everyone else says it will be.

Learning skills: You don’t need a degree to be survival smart. Taking smaller courses and classes can teach you needed survival skills without becoming an “expert”. Don’t totally depend on YouTube University.

Becoming EMT certified: The cost to become EMT certified depends on your area, in my area it’s about $1,500 and takes a few months. This is something that is well worth the time and money…unfortunately I just don’t have it right now. This is why the smaller basic courses might be a better option.

Quick Clot, good or bad? Avoid the older style granules, but the short answer is good. If you need to stop severe bleeding, you need to stop it. Doctors hate it, because the wound needs to be derided, But when it’s life or death the choice is simple. Here is a QuickClot training link I found that goes over what it is, and how it works.

Why suturing is not a great idea (for most people):  As preppers, we hear all the time about suturing and why it’s a necessary skill. We talked in the show about why it’s not a good idea for most people, and some alternatives like Steri Strips and the Isreali wound closure we talked about a few weeks ago.

Survival show myths: With the magic of editing, these “survival experts” can do just about anything. The truth is that while we can gleen some minor education from these shows, doing something (taking classes) is much better than watching something.

Water filtering education: what will do what – Katadyn Hiker PRO – Katadyn Micropur MP1 Purification Tablets (The only tablet or liquid proven effective against viruses, bacteria, Giardia, and Cryptosporidium in all water conditions) (Water filter link Article)

The Disaster Podcast: Kevin is a recurring guest on the Disaster podcast which is available on iTunes and other podcasting apps. This podcast is great! It goes over disaster situations from a medical perspective.

Training Classes Discount for Members: Kevin is a trainer for a number of survival courses, and if the group is large enough he will travel just about anywhere (in the U.S.) to teach. Kevin has offered a 25% discount for Survivalist Prepper Academy members. If you are interested just send me an email and I’ll get you in touch with Kevin.

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The Survival Entrepreneur!

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The Survival Entrepreneur! Jamea Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio in player below! There are lots of people out there making varying degrees of money from the survival niche. Whether its owning a blog, writing a book or even some level of training or consulting there is money to be made. There are even people making … Continue reading The Survival Entrepreneur!

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