America’s Food Supply Chain Is Fragile. I Learned That The Hard Way.

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America’s Food Supply Chain Is Fragile. I Learned That The Hard Way.

Stock photo.

I stopped at a supermarket recently to pick up a few items. I live out in the country and stay pretty well stocked up on food and supplies most of the time, but I keep a running list and make a habit of crossing items off it whenever I happen to be in town.

I walked into the produce section and encountered a shocking scene. Instead of the mounds of fresh fruits and vegetables piled high like I’m accustomed to seeing, I instead was met with the sight of bare wooden shelves.

An expanse of empty shelves in a big regional chain store is unnerving. We all realize that it does happen in extenuating circumstances, such as a blizzard or hurricane. And it is not unusual to find very few choices of hams available the day before Easter or the hot dog buns sold out on the Fourth of July weekend. But to find produce suddenly stripped bare on a random Spring day? Americans are not used to that.

I had seen temporary signs posted in the entrance, asking customers to excuse the appearance inside and citing the reason to be a recent warehouse fire further south, but had not paid them any real attention. In a first-world society where goods are easily acquired and food is abundant, we can afford to be dismissive of such notifications.

Just 30 Grams Of This Survival Superfood Provides More Nutrition Than An Entire Meal!

Or can we?

America’s Food Supply Chain Is Fragile. I Learned That The Hard Way.A store worker advised me that it could be another few days before a shipment of fresh produce and other goods arrived. I often joke that where I live, in a rural area of a rural state, is “at the end of the food chain.” Food travels a long way to reach my grocery stores, often the width of the continent, sometimes leaving me with the choice of two-week-old peppers or rock-hard peaches. Even after crossing the state line, deliveries are made to stores in the handful of smaller cities further south before getting to my neck of the woods.

It Was Right Here in America

Suddenly, it was no joking matter. The warehouse fire made me realize what it really means to be at the end of the line.

“Wow,” I exclaimed to my husband after leaving the store. “It felt like I had stepped into Argentina.”

It could have been any food-insecure place on the planet. But it was right here in America, in a place where people expect to have access to anything and everything, all the time.

There was nothing urgent on my list, and I knew there was a full pantry of canned and frozen goods at home. Being unable to purchase the food on my list that day was nothing more than an inconvenience for me.

But it was jarring to be faced with empty shelves, and it led me to ponder what-ifs. What if the fire had been at a major regional hub instead? What if it had been something with an even greater impact, such as a widespread power outage or a couple of major highway bridges washed out by floods or a damaging earthquake?

If I had been scared, I would have run through the produce section and scooped up everything I saw, from rutabaga to endive, whether it was on my list or not. But then again, if I had been scared, chances are other people would have been scared, too. If the situation had been serious, there might have already been a run on the store by the time I arrived, cleaning out not only the fresh foods but the cereal and canned corn and boxed stuffing mix and frozen pineapple and everything else, as well. What then?

America’s Food Supply Chain Is Fragile. I Learned That The Hard Way.It is widely believed that grocery stores stock only three or four days’ worth of food at any given time. Modern transportation and computerized inventory management are generally considered reliable strategies for the 21st century.

If the three-day inventory rule is accurate, it is likely calculated using sales during normal conditions. In case of an emergency, there is no way to know how long the store’s goods would last.

Are Most Americans Prepared?

Another what-if I considered is this: even during the minor interruption of food supply that did occur, what if my cabinets were bare and my refrigerator empty? It was just a few days, and there were still plenty of alternative food choices in the store. And there are other grocery chains—although most towns within an hour’s drive have only the one—so it still would not have been truly life and death. But for those large numbers of people who do not keep at least three days’ worth of food on hand, something as small as a regional warehouse fire could have a significant impact.

The Next Generation In Solar Backup Generators Is Finally Here!

This tiny little glitch in the food supply chain was a powerful wake-up call — even for me, a person already cognizant of possible shortages enough to consider myself something of a prepper. The experience of being surprised by empty shelves on an otherwise normal day made the concept of true disaster feel real somehow, and drove home how very fragile our food supply chain really is.

I wonder if most Americans are truly aware of how very close to the precipice we live our lives. A look around the world at empty store shelves and looting and long lines — waiting for basic food supplies — should prompt us to acknowledge that it really could happen to us. A severe weather event, a worker strike, a drought, a flood, an electronic mishap, a grid-down situation — any number of things could come between us and our ability to attain affordable food, with little or no warning.

Of the many reasons for stocking up and being prepared for the unexpected, people sometimes overlook the simplest and most likely to happen scenarios. But these events can be extremely valuable. They can remind us that emergencies can and do happen when we least expect them and help us remain aware of our own need to keep an adequate household food supply on hand.

Food insecurity on a wide scale may be less likely here in America than in many other corners of the globe, but it is folly to be so complacent as to assure ourselves that it can never happen here. My recent encounter with temporarily bare shelves is an excellent testament to the importance of being prepared for the unexpected, from the tiniest of inconveniences to absolute disaster.

Do you agree or disagree? Have you ever experienced empty shelves? Share your thoughts in the section below:

America’s Food Supply Chain Is Fragile. I Learned That The Hard Way.

America’s Food Supply Chain Is Fragile. I Learned That The Hard Way.

Stock photo.

I stopped at a supermarket recently to pick up a few items. I live out in the country and stay pretty well stocked up on food and supplies most of the time, but I keep a running list and make a habit of crossing items off it whenever I happen to be in town.

I walked into the produce section and encountered a shocking scene. Instead of the mounds of fresh fruits and vegetables piled high like I’m accustomed to seeing, I instead was met with the sight of bare wooden shelves.

An expanse of empty shelves in a big regional chain store is unnerving. We all realize that it does happen in extenuating circumstances, such as a blizzard or hurricane. And it is not unusual to find very few choices of hams available the day before Easter or the hot dog buns sold out on the Fourth of July weekend. But to find produce suddenly stripped bare on a random Spring day? Americans are not used to that.

I had seen temporary signs posted in the entrance, asking customers to excuse the appearance inside and citing the reason to be a recent warehouse fire further south, but had not paid them any real attention. In a first-world society where goods are easily acquired and food is abundant, we can afford to be dismissive of such notifications.

Just 30 Grams Of This Survival Superfood Provides More Nutrition Than An Entire Meal!

Or can we?

America’s Food Supply Chain Is Fragile. I Learned That The Hard Way.A store worker advised me that it could be another few days before a shipment of fresh produce and other goods arrived. I often joke that where I live, in a rural area of a rural state, is “at the end of the food chain.” Food travels a long way to reach my grocery stores, often the width of the continent, sometimes leaving me with the choice of two-week-old peppers or rock-hard peaches. Even after crossing the state line, deliveries are made to stores in the handful of smaller cities further south before getting to my neck of the woods.

It Was Right Here in America

Suddenly, it was no joking matter. The warehouse fire made me realize what it really means to be at the end of the line.

“Wow,” I exclaimed to my husband after leaving the store. “It felt like I had stepped into Argentina.”

It could have been any food-insecure place on the planet. But it was right here in America, in a place where people expect to have access to anything and everything, all the time.

There was nothing urgent on my list, and I knew there was a full pantry of canned and frozen goods at home. Being unable to purchase the food on my list that day was nothing more than an inconvenience for me.

But it was jarring to be faced with empty shelves, and it led me to ponder what-ifs. What if the fire had been at a major regional hub instead? What if it had been something with an even greater impact, such as a widespread power outage or a couple of major highway bridges washed out by floods or a damaging earthquake?

If I had been scared, I would have run through the produce section and scooped up everything I saw, from rutabaga to endive, whether it was on my list or not. But then again, if I had been scared, chances are other people would have been scared, too. If the situation had been serious, there might have already been a run on the store by the time I arrived, cleaning out not only the fresh foods but the cereal and canned corn and boxed stuffing mix and frozen pineapple and everything else, as well. What then?

America’s Food Supply Chain Is Fragile. I Learned That The Hard Way.It is widely believed that grocery stores stock only three or four days’ worth of food at any given time. Modern transportation and computerized inventory management are generally considered reliable strategies for the 21st century.

If the three-day inventory rule is accurate, it is likely calculated using sales during normal conditions. In case of an emergency, there is no way to know how long the store’s goods would last.

Are Most Americans Prepared?

Another what-if I considered is this: even during the minor interruption of food supply that did occur, what if my cabinets were bare and my refrigerator empty? It was just a few days, and there were still plenty of alternative food choices in the store. And there are other grocery chains—although most towns within an hour’s drive have only the one—so it still would not have been truly life and death. But for those large numbers of people who do not keep at least three days’ worth of food on hand, something as small as a regional warehouse fire could have a significant impact.

The Next Generation In Solar Backup Generators Is Finally Here!

This tiny little glitch in the food supply chain was a powerful wake-up call — even for me, a person already cognizant of possible shortages enough to consider myself something of a prepper. The experience of being surprised by empty shelves on an otherwise normal day made the concept of true disaster feel real somehow, and drove home how very fragile our food supply chain really is.

I wonder if most Americans are truly aware of how very close to the precipice we live our lives. A look around the world at empty store shelves and looting and long lines — waiting for basic food supplies — should prompt us to acknowledge that it really could happen to us. A severe weather event, a worker strike, a drought, a flood, an electronic mishap, a grid-down situation — any number of things could come between us and our ability to attain affordable food, with little or no warning.

Of the many reasons for stocking up and being prepared for the unexpected, people sometimes overlook the simplest and most likely to happen scenarios. But these events can be extremely valuable. They can remind us that emergencies can and do happen when we least expect them and help us remain aware of our own need to keep an adequate household food supply on hand.

Food insecurity on a wide scale may be less likely here in America than in many other corners of the globe, but it is folly to be so complacent as to assure ourselves that it can never happen here. My recent encounter with temporarily bare shelves is an excellent testament to the importance of being prepared for the unexpected, from the tiniest of inconveniences to absolute disaster.

Do you agree or disagree? Have you ever experienced empty shelves? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Top 5 Ammo Types for Your Survival Guns

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When SHTF and security is a concern, the best firearm is the one you have with you–so long as its loaded and you know how to use it.  While that notion holds true if disaster were to strike tomorrow, you have time to consider the logistics of your firearms preparation before a threat becomes imminent.

To that end, some ammunition is considered more viable and effective for survival use than others, though specifically can be considered the best.  In a survival scenario, availability is key when it comes to weapons and ammunition selection.

Thus, the following five types of ammunition have been selected primarily for their high availability in normal times, which is likely to linger on when SHTF.

1. .22LR

22LRThe .22 caliber Long Rifle rimfire cartridge is commonly considered the best all-around survival ammunition.  The rounds are produced by nearly every ammunition manufacturer and are available for most makes and models of both .22 caliber pistols and rifles.

The generic 40-grain high velocity round can be found for a dime a dozen, while more powerful rounds are also tailor-made for mid-sized game hunting, self-defense, and competition shooting.

Its availability, variety, and affordability are what make the .22LR round a must-have for long-term disaster survival, when other variants of ammo may become a scarce and expensive commodity.  Accordingly, .22LR cartridges are lightweight enough to carry 1,000 rounds (or more) in the event you have to bug out.

Hunting for your own food becomes a necessity when your stores run dry in the aftermath of a crisis. Fortunately, the .22LR is among the most trusty ammo for small-game hunting, whether chambered through a bolt-action, lever-action, single-shot, or semi-automatic rifle.  Long-barreled .22 caliber pistols may also be serviceable for small-game hunting with the right variety of cartridge in the right conditions.

As a relatively small round, the .22 is not the best self-defense ammunition, but when SHTF you have to use what you have to defend what’s yours.  If you stock up on high-performance rounds, your abundance of ammo will at least give you a numbers advantage when it comes to disposable ammunition against a potential threat.

2. 12-gauge

12-gaugeThough many say the .22LR is the ultimate survival round, a large portion of the prepping community agree that the shotgun is the ultimate survival weapon.  To that end, the 12-gauge shotgun shell deserves a spot in any survival defense system.

Though some brands produced for specific shooting purposes can be pricey, generic 12-gauge rounds are relatively inexpensive and widely available.

When it comes to efficient ammo consumption, most people prefer pump-action shotguns to the often complicated and slower-loading semi-automatic.

12-gauge shotguns have been a staple for hunters of both four-legged and flying game for decades, and have thus proved their practicality for use in a survival situation.  Bird shot shells will take down most flying fowl and small game, while buckshot and slug shells can be used against deer and other bigger game.

12-gauge shotguns are also widely carried by members of the law enforcement and military communities, as they are among the most formidable firearm in close-quarter scenarios.  When loaded with buckshot, a 12-gauge can mow down pretty much any target within 10-yards, while slug rounds will extend the shotgun’s range and accuracy.

3. 9mm

9-mmThe 9mm is easily the mostly widely used pistol round in the world. There has been a longstanding debate between the 9mm and .45 caliber as to which makes the better pistol round, but ultimately its up to personal preference.

However, if we’re going on availability alone, the 9mm wins the race when it comes to long-term supply in a post-disaster survival situation.

Like the .22 rimfire, there are a lot of options to choose from when it comes to 9mm rounds. 115-grain FMJ and 124-grain NATO rounds will likely remain the most readily available and inexpensive in the dawn and aftermath of a disaster, and both are favored for their reliability when loaded in older-model pistols and submachine guns.

Though most often found in handguns, there are some pistol-caliber carbine rifles that employ the use of 9mm rounds. While a pistol is a must have in any layered defense, a 9mm carabine rifle provides an additional platform for your 9mm rounds to be used for more effective self-defense.

Accordingly, they’ll do just as much justice as the best .22LR against small game for emergency hunting use.

                                                                                                   4. 5.56 NATO

5As the primary round issued to American military servicemen and women, no prepper should be without a rifle or carabine that fires the 5.56x45mm NATO round.

The fact that weapons factories, military installations, National Guard stations, and thousands of residential homes are currently filled with 5.56 rounds, there isn’t likely to be a shortage on availability any time soon.

The 5.56 NATO has been field-tested and battle-approved to be a highly effective anti-personnel round at a range of about 300-meters, depending of the barrel length of the gun.

When it comes to post-disaster survival, 300-meters is quite a distance to attempt hitting any target, human or animal.  While you’ll find some relief in knowing you’ll have your perimeter covered, your efforts should be focused on designating targets within 100-meters, both for hunting and self-defense.  Though advanced optics will improve your accuracy, a military-style 5.56 rifle with basic iron sights can easily take down a buck at a moderate range in the hands of a steady shooter.

Overall, you know you’ve got your hands on a reliable and versatile round in the same ammunition used by the most formidable military in the world.

                                                                                                       5. .308

308-ammo

The .308 Winchester–a shortened version of the .30-06–is a great alternative to the .22LR and 5.56, a jacketed version of the .22, for hunting and all-around survival purposes.  .308 rounds are available in weights between 147 and 180 grains and offer significantly more muzzle velocity and stopping power than .22 and .223 rounds.

The .308 Winchester is essentially a civilian version of the 7.62x51mm NATO round, though the two are not identical and the rounds are not always interchangeable.  

The .308 has a reputation for reliable accuracy, and thus has long been favored by competition rifle shooters, in addition to a plethora of hunters.

From a 24-inch barrel, .308s have an effective range of about 800-yards. Though they would be on the small side for the largest of North American game like moose and brown bear, which would be best hunted using .300 Magnum rounds, .308 Winchesters are suited for hunting most big game from bucks to bobcats.

Most AR10–and some AR15–platform rifles chamber .308 Winchester rounds, making them equally suitable for defense purposes.  Though the recent ammo shortage scares have many concerned over the future availability of rifle ammunition, .308 rounds seem to have promising odds for the long-term.  As a commonly used sporting and military rifle/carbine round, .308s are manufactured by dozens of North American and European companies alike.

Though you may prefer a grade of ammo not mentioned above, keep in mind that you will likely have to pay more to stock more in normal times and look harder to maintain your stores when SHTF.  Because they are already so widely used in the law enforcement, military, hunting, competition, and recreational shooting communities, the five types of ammo mentioned above are considered to be incredibly useful and versatile selections for disaster survival.

Regardless of your favorite(s), make sure you store and rotate your ammo appropriately to maintain its effectiveness and keep your shooting skills sharp.

Source : Survivopedia.com

 

Make sure you like BackdoorPrepper on Facebook to be updated every time we find an article for innovative ways you can become a better prepper .

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Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (5/6/17)

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Here are the top 7 articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks.  But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 4/30/17 – 5/6/17

Peace,
Todd

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Tech Meltdown!

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I’m finally back online after experiencing a full tech meltdown over the past week. What I thought was just a simple battery gone bad ended up being a completely dead laptop, then my Internet connection went down… More details in my You Tube video:

Worldwide cyber attack 2017

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A fast-moving and devastating wave of cyber attacks is sweeping the globe, reportedly exploiting a flaw exposed in documents leaked from the US National Security Agency.

Systems and Progress

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My BOB is repacked. I still need to add a couple things but the core of it is set up. I need to add one of those recharging things as well as a phone charger. Also a couple maps specifically for the bag. My safe stuff (cash, vehicle titles, etc) is in a small backpack ready to grab in the safe.

I repacked my Go Box A to reflect my current firearm stash. So .22lr for the 10/22, .380 for the LCP, 9 for the Glock, 5.56 for the AR and 7.62. A couple mags for the core guns and one each for the nice to haves plus a mag pouch for the AR, a holster for the Glock and cleaning stuff round it out.

A pair of pants sit by the speedy cabinet with 2x each Glock and AR mags n a holster. That sits on a very comfortable pair of leather slip on shoes. By that is a PC with 2 more AR mags, a Glock mags an a med kit. With that set up I would have 3 spare Glock mags and 4 AR mags. For me that’s all I can see needing these days. Sure if things went totally to shit I might want more but that won’t happen overnight and I have another rig for that anyway.

I would like to go to the new Haley DC3 rig and eventually I will.

At the current juncture I am pretty happy with this system. Next is the heavy bug out stuff. Also I might make a full on mad max set up just for fun.

NSA Tools used in Major Cyber Attack: Cyber Attack hits 74 Countries; Cripples UK Hospitals

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A large-scale cyber attack was launched today, hitting at least 74 countries and seriously damaging the UK’s health care system. […]

The post NSA Tools used in Major Cyber Attack: Cyber Attack hits 74 Countries; Cripples UK Hospitals appeared first on Off Grid Survival – Wilderness & Urban Survival Skills.

Ransomware Virus Cripples Hospital Computers; Operations Cancelled; Emergency Rooms Closed

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Ransomware Virus Cripples Hospital Computers; Operations Cancelled; Emergency Rooms Closes

Hospitals, clinics and ambulance services across the United Kingdom were disrupted by one the largest ransomware attacks in history Friday.

At least 16 hospitals operated by the National Health Service (NHS) in England were affected by the attack, which impacted tens of thousands of computers across the globe, including FedEx’s computers in the U.S., The Independent reported.

Operations were cancelled and ambulances were turned away from the emergency room at one London hospital, CNN reported. Barts Health NHS Trust in London reported “experiencing a major IT disruption and there are delays at all of our hospitals.”

The ransomware apparently took over the switchboards and shut down the phone system.

Are You Prepared For A Cyberattack? Get Backup Electricity Today!

“We are aware of a major IT secure system attack,” an NHS trust in Derbyshire tweeted. “All IT systems have been temporarily shut down. More information will be available shortly.”

The ransomware, identified as the Wanna Decryptor, asked hospital personnel for 300 bitcoins to get access to their computers, The Independent reported. Since a bitcoin was trading for $1,760.99 on May 12, the ransomware bandits were demanding $528,297 for access.

But Wanna Decryptor is spreading far beyond the UK, The Independent reported.

“This cyberattack is much larger than just the NHS,” Travis Farral, director of security strategy for the cybersecurity firm Anomali Labs, told the newspaper. “It appears to be a giant campaign that has hit Spain and Russia the hardest.”

What is your reaction? Share it in the section below:  

Radioactive Storage Tunnel Collapse at Hanford, Plutonium Releases Likely

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stock here:  the recent collapse of a Radiation Storage Tunnel, which in reality is a Radiation Storage Linear mound, threatens the USA with toxic Plutonium. 

They have since infilled it with 55 truckloads of dirt, so that will slow the release.   But still allow rainwater to leech the nuclear waste into the groundwater.

———————————————————————-
An ENE participant found this interesting data….indeed, these “tunnels” are extremely hazardous.

 Cooter

From the Hanford website:
“There are four events that would cause an unmitigated exposure of at least 25 rem to a non-worker located 100 meters away: • An atmospheric dispersible event caused by a partial or complete failure of the PUREX structures. This would be a short acute ground release duration event without plume meander causing the following unmitigated exposures. Storage Tunnel No. 1 –58 rem; Storage Tunnel No. 2 –76 re; 202-A Building and systems –120 rem. • A fire in PUREX Tunnel #1 associated with its wooden structure could cause an unmitigated exposure of 70 rem. • A partial collapse of the 202-A building roof could cause a 25 rem exposure. • A fire in the N-Cell could cause an exposure of 25 rem because of the residual inventory in the gloveboxes, potential combustibles, and potential ignition from S&M operations.”
That explains why the folks at Hanford sent everyone home.

This site is dedicated to pounded on the horrific Hanford. 

————————————————————————————–

https://emily-peterson-c1y9.squarespace.com/news-coverage

We track all news articles and reports generated about Hanford and post them here. Check back regularly, as this page is updated daily. For archives of articles from 2009 – 2016, click here. 

MAY 2017

9 Smart Ways To Stay Safe Around Livestock

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9 Smart Ways To Stay Safe Around Livestock

Image source: Pixabay.com

No matter how long you’ve been around farm animals, and even though you consider many of them as pets, there always will be times when they’ll behave unpredictably. A sudden movement, a loud and strange noise, or even just the scent of a female animal in heat, picked up by a male, can elicit the most erratic behavior – endangering even the seasoned homesteader.

It’s always wise to make safety a priority. Who wants to be accidentally stepped on, knocked over, kicked, bitten, squished, head-butted or thrown off a large animal just because it got spooked, stressed out or over-excited by something? Sprains, bumps, bruises, bites, abrasions and all kinds of injuries can be avoided if precautionary measures are taken when working around livestock.

Every animal tends to have its own temperament above and beyond its breed characteristics, gender, size and training. It also tends to be irritable and aggressive when it’s hurt, isolated from the herd or brought to new surroundings. Mothers are extra protective when with their young, while males are particularly excitable when it’s mating season.

It’s best to approach each animal with care — especially if children, elderly, strangers or inexperienced guests and neighbors are around.

Diatomaceous Earth: The All-Natural Livestock De-Wormer!

Here are a few tips to help you:

1. Always handle animals in a calm, non-threatening way. Approach them deliberately from the side where they can see you, but not directly from the front which they can misinterpret as aggression. Make it a habit to announce your arrival by calling or talking to them. Work calmly and confidently around large animals. They can sense the stress, anger and nervousness of humans, and that could make them uncomfortable, too. When milking, grooming or handling, touch them first on their front or side. Most animals have a wide range of view, but they have a blind spot around the rear. Touching them suddenly in the hindquarters could give them a jolt. This is especially true when dealing with young or spooky horses. Stay close to your fidgety animal, keeping your hand on its body as you move around it, and speak to it so it knows where you are the whole time. When milking or trimming goats’ hooves, keep your face away from its legs. Goats are known to kick in all directions; whereas horses and mules kick out to the back, and cows to the front and sides. In all cases, keep out of their kicking zones.

2. Don’t put your face or head directly over an animal’s head. When petting or handling them, keep your head to the side. Bucks and rams, especially, may head-butt even their owners – usually for play and excitement. And don’t ever trust a bull — even a sitting bull. If you lean over them, you could get a bruised chin or worse, a broken nose. (Be sure to de-horn your goats and cattle.)

3. Always open the gate inwardly, not out, when entering a pen or corral. This would prevent the quick, sly little ones from escaping.

4. Always have an escape path. Many injuries involve livestock being startled and pinning their handlers against a hard surface. When working with large animals, always have a way out, especially in closed quarters.

5. Don’t wrap the lead rope around your hand when walking an animal bigger and stronger than yourself. If it bolts, the noose would tighten around your hand and you’ll get jerked and dragged along. Simply holding the rope firmly so it doesn’t slip from your hand should suffice.

6. Don’t put your fingers inside a goat’s mouth. Even though they don’t have upper teeth and don’t bite on purpose, sticking a finger in there to check the inside of their mouth or steal a cud could hurt you. The teeth on a goat’s lower gums are very sharp, able to snap off tree branches and peel bark off trees easily.

7. Wear protective clothing. Long-sleeved shirts and pants, gloves, boots. When working around cattle and horses, steel-toed boots are recommended. Ordinary leather or worse, running shoes, are no match to heavy horse hooves! Additionally, it won’t hurt to wear a helmet and shin guards when riding horses.

8. Keep facilities and equipment well-maintained. Make sure gates are swinging, hinges are greased, latches are working, and animal restraining gear are available. Keep walkways and work areas dry, tidy and free from tripping, falling and slipping hazards.

9. Wash hands and remove soiled clothing after handling livestock. People can catch diseases, like rabies and ringworm, from animals. If your animals show signs of illness, treat it promptly and monitor it closely. It pays to familiarize yourself with symptoms of common diseases. Remember to wear disposable rubber gloves when working with sick animals. And if they die, be sure to dispose of them properly and to disinfect possible contaminated areas. Always practice good sanitation and hygiene. If you have a cut or a wound, keep it covered while working with animals.

What advice would you add? Share your tips in the section below: 

References:

  • http://nasdonline.org/44/d001612/handling-farm-animals-safely.html
  • https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/farm-safety-handling-animals
  • ipmnet.org/tim/Farm_Safety/Farm_Safety_Tip_-_Livestock_Safety.pdf
  • http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/10-simple-ways-to-keep-you-safe-on-your-farm-zbcz1605

Choosing the Best Rifle Sling – Part 1

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Written by John Hertig on The Prepper Journal.

Early long guns could be carried in two hands ready for instant use or in one hand for almost as quick use.  But you really could not do anything else with that hand or those hands.  It became quickly obvious that a hands-free way of carrying a long gun was needed, and probably the first sling was simply a piece of rope tied to each end of the gun. Times have changed and today this article will be begin with some history, but will also share how to choose the best rifle sling for your  use.

Introduction to Slings (Part 1)

In the late 17th century, as European militaries were arming more and more men with muskets, sling “swivels” started to appear on military firearms.  Generally this was a slotted ring on the bottom of the stock near the butt, and a matching ring on the underside of the forend.  A flat strap, usually of canvas, was then threaded through these rings.  There was generally some length adjustment ability.  In the 1870’s, a new U.S. military rifle was introduced which came with a fairly new concept: a sling made of leather.

As the experience with slings became more common, people found that besides allowing for hands-free carry, a properly set up and fitted sling could help achieve greater accuracy.  The model 1907 sling was the height of sling development as far as support while shooting goes, where the forward arm is inserted between the straps of the sling and “locked” in place with “keepers”.  Despite efforts to replace it, this model continued to be an official U.S. Military option until the days of the M16, which came with a simple adjustable nylon strap, returning the sling to a mere carrying device.

Note that even with a sling which is designed only for carrying, there is a technique of wrapping the sling around your forward arm which provides some of the stability of a M1907 style sling.  This technique is called “hasty sling” because it is pretty quick and doesn’t require a lot of adjustment.

Originally the sling attachment points, and thus the slings, were usually along the bottom of the gun.  This was not really a problem with early firearms, but as magazine fed guns started to appear, the sling and the magazine tended to interfere with each other a bit.  Slings along the side of the gun could fix this problem, but were by no means ambidextrous and did not work as well for shooting support.

Quick Disconnect Mounts

Civilian shooters preferred a sling which could be easily attached and detached, encouraging the development of quick detach sling attachments.  The strap is threaded through the QD attachments, which then can be easily attached to or removed from the matching mounts on the gun.  Nowadays there appear to be at least five possible true QD options to put on the end of your sling.

Which of these options can be used on a particular gun depends on what mounts are built-in or added to that gun.  It is optimal to have the same QD attachment on both ends of the sling, but it is not a requirement if having mismatched attachments is appropriate.  It is handy to have the same mount or set of mounts on similar guns, so you don’t necessarily have to have a separate sling for each one.

STUD Mount

One of the first choices was “studs” screwed into the wood or clamped around the barrel.  There was a hole through this stud and flat sides perpendicular to the hole, and the matching part had two flat flanges separated by the width of the stud, with a pin through them.  Attached, there was a flange on each side of the stud and the pin through the flanges and the stud.  Uncle Mikes has an extensive history with these swivels and still have a good selection.  They are pretty good on sporting arms, but for tactical use they are not optimal.  Early models could be “popped off” as the moving flange was merely spring-loaded.  Some later models have a threaded knob, which when screwed down to the flange, prevents it from unintentionally opening.

CUP or HOLE Mount

Another early option was a “cup” inlet into the stock with a groove around near the top.  The matching part had some small balls around the circumference, which clicked into these grooves.  A button in the center retracted the balls so the part could be removed.  An alternative mount to the cup is a hole in a piece of metal of the same thickness as the distance from the top of the cup to the groove.  This system is fairly heavy-duty and can rotate side to side, which can be both good and bad.  A few have built-in stops to prevent complete rotation, keeping the sling from getting twisted.

RING Mount

The M-LOK Paraclip Sling Mount is the M-LOK compatible variant of the older MSA – MOE Sling Attachment.

 

More recently, rings started appearing on tactical guns.  These can accept a quick connect hook, and there appears to be three common choices.  There is the Magpul Paraclip, slightly similar to a clothespin.  This is fairly bulky; on the one hand, it does not fit on smaller rings, but on the other hand, is very stable.  If it comes with a cross-bar lock (and you use it), it is highly resistant to unintentional release and even without using the lock I have not had a problem.  Next is the HK snap clip.  This is very versatile and flexible, but is a bit noisy and floppy, and if you twist it right, it can pop off by itself.  The third common option is the Mash Clip.  This has a structure similar to a split key ring, but rather than having to pry the layers apart, there is an area you squeeze to separate the layers.  Like the HK clip, it is a bit noisy and floppy, but is much more secure.

There are a few other hooks which might work and are available from some sling makers.  One is called a “trigger snap”.  There very well may be a version which is strong enough and secure enough for sling usage, but the ones I’ve used (on keychains and other non-sling items) release accidentally and even bend open.  Another is a freaky-looking hinged hook, which I don’t know the name of and have never seen in person.  Basically, before relying on any connector other than the common ones, investigate it thoroughly.  You want to make sure it won’t bend or break, won’t release accidentally, is acceptably easy to attach and detach, and does not get “tangled up” with the gun.

SLOT Mount

The slot mount, like the original slotted ring, is not a quick disconnect attachment.  Although it, like the original slotted ring, can approximate a QD attachment if you strap a quick connect buckle to the slot, and have the other part of the buckle on the end of the sling.

No Mount

Having no mount on your gun does not mean you must do without a sling or even without a QD sling.  One option is to have a strap wrapped around the stock or forend to which a sling can be attached.  Most often, this attachment point is a ring or a quick connect buckle.  If you have a picatinny rail on the gun, pretty much any kind of mount you want is available to be clamped on to the rail.

Combination Mounts and Adapters

There are a few “combination” mounts available, which offer more than one type of connection.  Blackhawk has a nice one to attach to a picatinny rail which offers a cup, slot and ring.  This is another way that one sling can connect to multiple guns, or different slings can connect to the same gun.  Another rare option is various “adapters”, which connect to one type of mount and provide the connection for a different QD connector.  Finally, there is the “Universal Wire Loop” which can connect to anything the wire or cord can fit through.

Sling Types

Nowadays, the most common slings are nylon or equivalent.  A few are woven out of paracord, and ones made of leather, including the venerable M1907 style, are still available.

The classic sling is attached to the gun at two points, near the butt and near the front.  These are known as “two point” or “dual point” slings.  These are pretty good for carrying a long gun, but have some problems in getting the gun into action quickly.  One option is to put one arm through the sling and hang the gun on the same side.  This is fairly quick to get into action, but very insecure; the gun can easily slide off the shoulder and down the arm, resulting in dropping the gun.  On the other hand, if you put your arm and head through the sling so that the sling bears on the opposite shoulder, this is very secure, but slow to get into action.

In the 1980s, there were attempts to improve the tactical capabilities of the sling by developing the “three-point” or “triple point” sling concept.  This added more strap, so that the shooter’s body was enclosed by the strap.  Thus the “three points” were the two points on the gun and the third point was the person carrying the gun (since the sling was “attached” to the body).  One common characteristic of a three-point sling seems to be an additional length of strap which goes between the two attachment points on the gun.  Often the forward part of the sling which was to be attached to the wearer’s body was attached along this length of strap.  The problem with this concept was that the additional strap along the gun could interfere with the mechanical operation or use of the gun.  Furthermore, some of these designs used various mechanisms to extend the gun for use or retract it for carrying, and these mechanisms could be easy to miss under stress, or a pain to return for carrying.  These designs tended to focus on transitioning from carry to use, and not providing support.

One interesting sling variation which actually attaches to the gun at three points (but is not considered a “three point sling”) is the “Ching sling“.  This was intended to approximate the support of the M1907 sling but be much quicker to get your arm into.

The next major evolution in slings was the single (one) point sling.  As you might expect, this sling is attached to the gun at just one point, usually right behind the receiver and not near the butt as was common up to this point.  The “other end” of the sling was attached not to the gun, but to the sling itself, allowing a quite secure attachment to the body.  This is a very good option for quick access, allowing a free range of movement of the gun and easily switching from strong side to weak side shoulder as needed to get around obstacles.  And if you suddenly need your hands, you just drop the gun and it hangs in front of you.  The down side is that being attached at just one point; the gun can swing around, bumping you and everything around you.  This is not a good option for long-term carrying, but is hard to beat when quick access is important.

As a solution to the weakness of the single point sling, the “convertible” sling was developed.  This is a two point sling with a ring or buckle near one end, to which the forward end of the sling can be attached, turning it into a one point sling.  This gives you the best of both types of slings.  Other improvements were elastic elements in the sling which helped to absorb shock or chest expansion, an attachment point on the sling or your belt, allowing you to tie down the forward end of the gun when in single sling mode, and wide-range quick-adjustment options.  By the time you combine these features, you get a sling which makes the three point sling obsolete.

Tune in next time for some hints on choosing a sling and a look at a few tactical choices.

The post Choosing the Best Rifle Sling – Part 1 appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Store Food Like a Pro Using Mylar Bags

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Humans need food for sustenance. All catastrophic end-of-world scenarios force people to think one way or another on how they can get food to survive.

You may have heard about Mylar Bags when you were looking for a way to store large quantities of food. You may be wondering how Mylar bags are different from any other bulk food storage options available in the market. How do you use one for storing rations?

Searching about it online can possibly raise more questions than answers. So in an effort to lift that veil of mystery surrounding Mylar bags, we discuss the most common questions and tell you all about using Mylar bags to store bulk emergency foods safely and efficiently.

Quick Navigation:

 

A. What is a Mylar Bag?

Let’s get something cleared up first. The word Mylar is not a brand name but rather one of the many variations of a material called BoPet. What is BoPet? If we were to prolong it, the name means “Biaxially Oriented Polyethylene Terephthalate”. Mylar is a trade name coined by a company called DuPont way back in the 50’s. This remarkable polyester film material was then used by NASA for their space programs.

BoPet is a film that’s produced when you stretch polyethylene terephthalate. It’s an amazing material best known for its superior tensile strength. Moreover, it was discovered that Mylar had excellent blocking abilities against moisture, gas, light and aroma. It’s a godsend for preppers because it could effectively block electrical waves as well.

Mylar is thin, flexible and light, but these properties belie the fact that it’s one of the most durable and strongest materials there is. You can see Mylar used to great effect in space blankets, insulators, solar filters and atmospheric helium-filled balloons.

Many materials for long-term food storage were used, but Mylar beat them all handily. This makes Mylar as the go-to material for people who want to keep their foods fresh and edible for years on end.

 

B. Why is Mylar Best for Long-Term Food Storage?

Mylar is better than other food storage materials such as vacuum-sealed, plastic, dry-packed and metalized bags. Think of Mylar as a clear resin made of light polyester material encased in aluminum foil. It’s like a portable, flexible tin can that stores large amounts of food.

It presents some advantages over traditional tin can varieties in a number of ways. Mylar is stronger, is certainly more flexible, and it keeps away elements that could prematurely spoil rations. It has all the good features of all food storage types- strong, light and sealed.

You can pack in food without worrying about breakage. The polyester film conforms on the food you put in, and it collapses when the air is removed. When you put in the food items and vacuum seal them, your food will be safe from the outside elements. You’re in full control when it comes to humidity, light and oxygen content. Survivalists should know that these three elements spoil food much faster than anything else food comes in contact with.

 

1) Mylar VS Metalized VS Dry Pack Pouch Bags

Dry pack pouches, metalized storage bags and Mylar have something in common- they are all alike! Don’t be confused when your seller refers to Mylar bags as such. All of these are made from the same Mylar material. Make sure to check whether the bags are food-grade. Mylar is just one brand of polyester film, like Xerox is a brand of a copier machine.

On Using Plastic Bags

Plastic bags as long-term food storage solutions are only good if you’re packing in salt. By themselves, salt is a hardy food ingredient that doesn’t require reinforced packaging, even when you need to keep it for a long time.

Plastic bags are thin by nature. They aren’t totally air-tight. They tear easily and they allow light to pass through. As you have probably learned by now, heat, moisture and light are your worst food enemies in long term aspects. Not counting food pests, fire, and other destructive acts of nature, of course.

2) On Using Vacuum Sealed Bags

Vacuum seal bagsVacuum seal bags such as the ones made by FoodSaver are great because they are convenient and easy to use. The air is sucked out of the bag to keep your food preserved and fresh. That’s where the advantages end. Mylar bags are more durable and tougher. Vacuum sealed bags may develop breaks 3, 4 years after they are put in long term storage.

Don’t rule out the usefulness of vacuum sealed bags though. They’re a good alternative for when you need to store food for short to medium lengths of time. You’ll just have to be diligent about rotating the foods you put in vacuum bags and using them as everyday meals when enough time has passed. Make sure to put in oxygen absorbers if you intend to store them for more than 12 months.

Mylar bags are the best in what they do- keeping your food safe for the longest time. You can rely on Mylar bags to store nutritious food when the end of the world finally comes.

 

C. How To Use Mylar Bags For Storing Food

There’s no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to your food and Mylar bags. The best and the most efficient use of a Mylar bag is when the size is just right for the type of food you’re packing in.

Mylar bags come in different thickness and size. To keep it simple and not get overly complicated, you can categorize your food and the corresponding Mylar bag to just two sizes- Small and Large.

The perfect size for small food storage are the 1-gallon sizes. You can put in small food items that aren’t needed in bulk, i.e., preserved fruits, dehydrated meats, cooking ingredients such as salt, baking powder and other spices.

Then, for the ones that are stored in bulk, i.e., wheat, beans, rice, etc. you’ll want to go for the large-sized bag. A 5-gallon Mylar bag is suitable for most of these food types. They aren’t too heavy and won’t take too much space. As a side bonus, 5-gallon Mylar bags can be paired with 5-gallon buckets, which will give you even more storage benefits.

The best range of thickness in Mylar bags are between 4.3 to 7 mils. The thicker a Mylar bag is, the more it can repel light and moisture. The only downside to this is that thicker bags are more expensive.

It boils down to how much light and humidity you want to keep out of your food. Standard 3.5 mils bags can still get penetrated by light, which could lead to a rude shortage just when you need food the most. Opt for Mylar bags that are at least 4.3 mils in thickness. This way you won’t have to worry about light and humidity entering your emergency food rations.

 

D. Using Mylar Bags With 5 Gallon Buckets

5-gallon buckets are great for protecting one of your most valuable assets- food. When thinking about long-term storage, you should always think about the worst things that could happen to your food and water, and come up with solutions to counteract them.

Light and humidity may not be able to penetrate your Mylar bags, but that doesn’t mean insects, rodents and bugs couldn’t as well. They can chew through Mylar material fast and leave it exposed to the outside elements. Plus, your 5-gallon buckets can double as extra storage for when the rations are opened.

The best 5-gallon buckets you can buy are the food-grade ones that have protective lids on top. Simply fill up your Mylar bag with the appropriate food, place it inside the 5-gallon bucket and close the lid. Your stored food will be impervious to light, humidity and any hungry rodents or animal that come your way.

Get thick, hard plastic buckets that can withstand gnawing, biting and chewing. Also, as a wise precaution, use only new food-grade 5-gallon buckets. You won’t want to put in your precious food rations into a non-food grade bucket, because a non-food grade plastic bucket has dyes and harmful chemicals that could seep into your food supply. Contaminated grains and food won’t be good for safe consumption.

Don’t buy second-hand or previously used plastic buckets because you won’t know if they’ve been used to store fuel, paint or chemicals in the past. The porous nature of plastic absorbs any chemical that has spilled to the material makeup, which in turn contaminates the food stored within.

Invest in a few more dollars and get new, food-grade 5 gallon buckets. After you fill your Mylar bags with food and put them inside the buckets, store them in a cool, dry place for optimum storage.

 

E. Oxygen Absorbers- How Do They Work?

Did you remember to place an oxygen absorber into each Mylar bag before storing them? But wait, how do these oxygen absorbers work?

Oxygen absorbers, or O2 absorbers get the extra oxygen inside Mylar bags when you seal them. It stands to reason that the bigger your Mylar bag, the more oxygen absorber you’ll need. They are measured in cc units.

Here’s how they work- you put in the appropriate amount of oxygen absorber before you seal the bag for storage. Once sealed, the O2 pack does its job of eating up any excess oxygen that’s still present in the bag.

O2 absorbers are important if you want food that can stand the test of time, because oxygen is a huge factor when it comes to your food’s shelf life. You’ll need to figure out the right amount of oxygen absorber to use. Too little and your food will have a reduced shelf life. Too much and you waste valuable money that could be used for other survival measures.

Oxygen absorbers come in different cc’s- 50, 100, 300, 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 sizes. Let’s simplify the process of finding the right amount of O2 absorber to use by doing a simple computation and rounding up the results. Here’s a useful link you can use- https://youtu.be/Xl5-z77jDow

It’s better to add a little bit too much oxygen absorber than adding too little. The effect of not putting in enough oxygen absorber has far graver consequences than wasting a bit of money. You can also take the guesswork out of the picture and buy Mylar bags that have O2 absorbers included.

 

F. The Art of Sealing Mylar Bags

Here’s a quick overview on how to use a food sealer to pack your Mylar bags:

Have you got everything you need? Make sure you have the food you want to store, the 5-gallon buckets, the Mylar bags and a heat source for sealing.

Sealing your Mylar bags is one of the most important process in long term storage. A poor seal results in a reduced quality of food, which in turn degrades effective shelf life. Pay attention and you’ll get the art of sealing food in no time flat!

Here are the 3 things you need to know about effective food sealing:

1) The end result should be a debris-free Mylar bag that’s completely flat and has just the right sealing temperature.

Let me explain why this is. The flatter a Mylar bag is, the better seal you can get. Heat is applied to the open end of the Mylar bag, and the material starts to melt. The two ends co-mingle when both sides are at the melting point. It’s like welding two pieces of metal.

Intense heat is applied to one end to turn the material into heated liquid. Two heated liquid materials are brought together to fuse into one. When the heat source is shut off, the material reverts back to solid state and the ends form as one.

A pocket of air that stands between the two ends of a Mylar bag will directly reduce the effectiveness of the seal. The process might work out well at first, but upon closer inspection the seal will be at its weakest near the air pocket. You can be sure that the weakest spot in your Mylar bag will be the one to break first in due time.

2) Don’t skip the process of removing all foreign materials, even the minute particles.

The seal needs to be flat and clean. Try to be as thorough as you can, because a bit of dust or an unwanted piece of food will compromise the storage process. Getting one in-between the two ends of the Mylar bag greatly reduces the surface contact between the two joined points. This is not acceptable because air, light and moisture will seep in the weak spot. Food shelf life will be significantly reduced.

3) Control the heat during the sealing process.

The temperature and the timing is important in this one. Too much heat will melt your Mylar bags and render it unusable. Too little and the surface points will not join together, and you won’t have a proper seal at all. The bag will look like it’s sealed, but sooner or later the ends will come undone and your food will be exposed to the elements.

There’s one way to ensure the best sealing process available, and that is to invest in a good Mylar bag sealer. Investing means spending a little more as compared to buying alternative options such as a hair straightener or a clothes iron. This will pay off in dividends later on as you’ll have food that’s as fresh as the day you sealed them in. Remember that food will be one of the most valuable resources in SHTF situations.

It’s fine if you’re set on using a hair straightener or a clothes iron to seal your Mylar bags in. Just make sure to thoroughly test for a good seal afterwards. Check back after 6 months and see if the seals are still in place.

Here’s an easy method in using hair straightener to seal your Mylar bags- Fill your Mylar bag with food, put in the oxygen absorbers, then use the hair straightener to seal the end of your Mylar bag. Keep the bag flat and eliminate any foreign particles for the best seal. If you’re using a clothes iron, then you’ll need a flat area or a board to work with. Fill your Mylar bag with food, put in the O2 absorber, lay it flat on the board and gently iron the ends of the Mylar bag.

Finally, you can make use of a vacuum sealer to lock in your Mylar bags. These devices can effectively create a vacuum inside your food bag and seal them at the same time. You’ll notice though, that Mylar bags are smooth while vacuum-sealable bags are dimpled in nature. The dimples are so that the vacuum sealer can effectively work its magic.

The effectiveness of sealing Mylar bags using vacuum sealers are lessened, but there’s a trick you can use to seal them just like you’re using food saver bags. A vacuum sealer is also one of the best food storage tools for everyday use. If you have veggies, fruits or meat that you want preserved for a week or two, then may want to invest in one.

Here’s some more helpful tips on the art of sealing a Mylar bag:

1) Don’t overfill your bags with food.

2) Seal the top inch and nothing else. This will be a boon when you’ve opened the bag and want to re-seal it for later use. Don’t forget to include the oxygen absorber before sealing it up again.

3) When packing powdery ingredients like flour, wipe the inside edges to eliminate any material that could compromise the seal.

4) Check back your sealed Mylar bags a few days after. They should still look great and compressed by then. If not, then the seal didn’t work and the Mylar bag is compromised.

5) Seal noodles and pasta in their original packaging. Open up the package a bit first so the oxygen absorber will work its way inside the package.

 

G. Organizing Your Food Storage

Survivalists will do well to organize their bug out bags, vehicles and survival equipment. It should be an essential part of your discipline. Knowing what kind of food each bucket and Mylar bag has will save you the time and energy you can use for other things.

Label each Mylar bag and 5-gallon bucket with the food and the date you sealed it. The bags can be labeled using a sharpie. Allow sufficient time to dry so it won’t smudge. You can make use of sticky labels not only to organize your Mylar bags, but to organize the rest of your survival bags and storages as well.

Label boxes, packages and bottles with useful information. The time may come when you’ll not be present to help family members determine the correct box to open. It serves as a training tool for them to be more self-reliant.

If you have the extra time, include the information that came with the food package. A box of beans can be cut up and inserted into the 5-gallon bucket with the Mylar bag. You’ll have a detailed information into the food you’re storing. This is especially useful if one or more of your family members have food allergies.

Here’s a helpful video that walks you through the entire food storing process using Mylar bags, O2 absorbers, 5-gallon buckets and sealing the food in place- https://youtu.be/mR_vQcd3sb0

 

H. Creating a Step By Step Food Storage Action Plan

Mylar bags can sound intimidating, but with a little bit of knowledge and some how to’s, they can turn out to be quite easy to use. Once you have your oxygen absorbers, your 5-gallon bucket, your Mylar bags and your food, then it’s time to do a step-by-step emergency food storage action plan!

Step 1. Choose the food you want to store long term and buy them.

Step 2. Get your Mylar bags in both 1-gallon and 5-gallon sizes.

Step 3. Buy plenty of oxygen absorbers.

Step 4. Go to the hardware store and purchase new food-grade 5-gallon buckets with lids.

Step 5. Secure the best heat sealing device.

Step 6. Bring your organizational tools such as the labelers, the sharpies and the checklist to the table.

Step 7. Open your Mylar bags, put in food, add some O2 absorbers, seal them up and place them in 5-gallon buckets.

Step 8. Find a cool, dry place and store your Mylar bags in them.

Step 9. Rejoice! Your chances of surviving an end-of-days scenario has just gotten a little better.

Baby Powder Causes Cancer? Jury Awards Ill Woman $110.5 million

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Baby Powder Causes Cancer? Jury Awards Ill Woman $110.5 million

A popular product that you likely have in your medicine cabinet and use regularly may cause cancer.

Three juries have found that Johnson’s Baby Powder — also known as talcum powder — causes ovarian cancer.

The latest ruling was for Lois Slemp, who received $110.5 million in a lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson. Jurors in St. Louis determined that 40 years of talcum powder use gave Slemp cancer.

“I trusted Johnson & Johnson. Big mistake,” Slemp told jurors in a taped disposition, according to AP.

Slemp was too ill to attend the trial or speak to reporters, said her attorney, Jim Onder. She developed ovarian cancer that spread to her liver after using Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower to Shower for feminine hygiene for 40 years.

Beet Powder: The Ancient Secret To Renewed Energy And Stamina

Research cited by Onder and his associates at the trial claimed that exposure to talc — an ingredient in baby or talcum powder — increases a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer by 40 percent. Talc has been sold by companies like Johnson & Johnson for more than 120 years – since 1894.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer labeled talc a possible carcinogenic (cancer-causing agent). Researchers are not sure how talc causes cancer, but studies linking it to the disease go back to the 1970s, AP said.

baby powder -- flickr - creative commonsAround 22,400 American women develop ovarian cancer every year, according to the American Cancer Society. Most of those women, around 14,080, will die of the disease.

“My advice has always been not to use talc on a regular basis in the genital area, and I haven’t changed that opinion for 30 years,” Dr. Daniel Cramer of Brigham and Women’s Hospital told CBS News. Cramer has testified in talcum powder lawsuits.

More Lawsuits Coming

This is the third time a jury has found that talc causes cancer. A jury awarded Gloria Ristesund $55 million in another case in May 2016.

Talc was found in Risesund’s ovarian tissue, attorney Ted Meadows told CBS News.

“There are studies that go back decades showing that genital use of talcum powder increases the risk of ovarian cancer,” Meadows said.

Another jury awarded Deborah Giannecchini $70 million in September 2016. Jurors found that Johnson & Johnson and a supplier named Imerys Talc were negligent in the manufacturing and marketing of talcum powder products.

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Preppers University – Sign Up Now

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Preppers UniversityFounded by Lisa Bedford of The Survival Mom fame and prolific writer, Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper, Preppers University is a unique and interactive online school designed for a small group of highly focused students, willing to commit their time and energy to ensure their homes and families are prepared.

Preppers University Instructors

A really impressive list of instructors has been gathered to teach and be available for questions. Click through some of their web sites and look at the books that this group have authored. This is the best online resource I have seen to date!

Lisa Bedford, The Survival Mom: Lisa is the founder of The Survival Mom blog, an author, speaker, and will teach webinars throughout the course.


Daisy Luther is a prolific writer and author and is Co-Founder of Preppers University. Daisy’s expertise lies in the practical application of preparedness and common sense survival. She will be teaching webinars throughout the term.


Dr. Arthur T. Bradley is nationally known as an expert in EMP research. He has written numerous books, both fiction and non-fiction, and joins us to talk about EMP preparedness.


​Fernando Aguirre is better known to some as FerFAL, author, blogger, and survivor of Argentina’s economic decline and collapse. Fernando will join us to talk about realities of an economic collapse.


Jim Cobb is the author of 9 books related to survival and preparedness. He joins Prep U students to teach Suburban/Urban Survival and Security. Jim is a private investigator and is the lead consultant with Disaster Prep Consultants.


Mark “Merriwether” Vorderbruggen Ph.D. has been a forager all his life. Author of Idiot’s Guide to Foraging, he’ll be teaching how to harvest nature’s free food to supplement your food storage pantry.


Herbalist Cat Ellis shares her experience and expertise in a session focused on natural remedies for times when there is no doctor. Cat is a blogger, author, and hosts 2 podcasts.


Patrice Lewis, well-known columnist for World Net Daily, author, and blogger at Rural-Revolution will teach our Intensive students the realities of rural life. Our students will leave her session with a thorough understanding of the pros and cons of a rural homestead.


Cherie Norton is an NRA Firearms Instructor and an avid homesteader. She is a long-time advocate of the Second Amendment and will be presenting a webinar about keeping yourself safe through situational awareness.


Tammy Trayer is a freelance writer and author, radio show host and homesteader. She’ll talks to students about living of the grid, and surviving with no power.


Lisa Egan is a researcher and writer. She has a BS in Health Science. Lisa has worked as both a personal trainer and nutritionist. Her experiences help to give lots of information when she talks about bug out boot camps in her webinar.


Selco is the founder of SHTF School. Join him when he discuses what it’s really like to live in a war-torn country.


Steven Konkoly graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1993, receiving a bachelor of science in English literature. He is the best selling author of multiple books including the recently released Fractured State books. In his webinar, he’ll talks all about Pandemics.


A. American is the author of the Survivalist hit series. He is a prepper, survivalist and avid outdoors men with a wide knowledge of medicinal and edible plants.


Rick Austin is the author of Secret Garden of Survival. He is a researcher, farmer, and survivalist and will join us to teach you how to grow a plentiful and sustainable food supply that is camouflaged and hides in plain sight.


Brandon Smith is the founder and chief strategist behind the Alternative Market Project. He’ll join students in an informative webinar.


Tim Young is author of the bestselling book How to Make Money Homesteading, as well as many other books that can help people enjoy a more prepared and self-sufficient lifestyle.

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Does North Korea Have the Ability to Destroy Our Electrical Grid?

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When it comes to winning it is not always about the size or capability of a country’s army, but rather its willingness to use weapons of mass destruction. Like in any fight, it is often mindset that determines the outcome. Seeing how this country sometimes gives in or capitulate to demands that seem outrageous and […]

The post Does North Korea Have the Ability to Destroy Our Electrical Grid? appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

Does North Korea Have the Ability to Destroy Our Electrical Grid?

When it comes to winning it is not always about the size or capability of a country’s army, but rather its willingness to use weapons of mass destruction. Like in any fight, it is often mindset that determines the outcome. Seeing how this country sometimes gives in or capitulate to demands that seem outrageous and […]

The post Does North Korea Have the Ability to Destroy Our Electrical Grid? appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

7 Famous Types of Orchids You Can Grow

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The post 7 Famous Types of Orchids You Can Grow is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

In previous centuries, orchids were a real rarity. Orchid hunters would head off on perilous voyages to tropical areas and bring these delicate flowers back home for wealthy households. Orchids were associated with class, elegance and extraordinary beauty fit for royalty. This particular flower is reported to have first come about during the time of […]

The post 7 Famous Types of Orchids You Can Grow is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

We’re All Tenant Farmers: Oregon Plans to Douse Azure Standard Organic Farm in Pesticide

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If you buy organic products, chances are you have heard of Azure Standard, which is sort of like a mobile co-op that delivers well-priced organic food and products in … Read the rest

The post We’re All Tenant Farmers: Oregon Plans to Douse Azure Standard Organic Farm in Pesticide appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

Slow Cooker Sweet + Spicy Pulled Pork

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The next time you think about making slow cooker pulled pork, remember to use apple juice as the liquid and play with the spices you have. Sweet and spicy are my family's favorite. What are yours? | PreparednessMama

Freezes well and feeds a crowd. My husband has always liked to cook and BBQ. When we moved to Texas a few years ago the BBQing got kicked up a few notches. He will cook hamburgers, chicken, steak and even ribs. The one thing I crave and can’t get out of my head is the […]

The post Slow Cooker Sweet + Spicy Pulled Pork appeared first on PreparednessMama.

Now, Let’s Get Started!

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     If you’ve been following the last few blog posts then you know where I’m going.  Hopefully, you have dived into the Word and really studied all that Jesus had to say about what the Kingdom of God looks like on this earth. And if you truly believe that the Power of the Father resides in you, and that you are a Son or Daughter, Prince or Princess of the Kingdom, then all the deceiving lies of the Enemy will be eliminated. These are the lies he has told you to make you afraid, and caused you to deny your position in the Kingdom.

     So, if you can step out from behind the wall that Satan built between you and the Power and Authority you have been given, you should be asking, What’s the next step?  All I can do is tell you the path that God took me down.  Your path may look a little different, but we should all end up at the same destination … being bold in declaring ourselves as witnesses of another world; in other words, demonstrating what it looks like when the power of Heaven invades this earth through us, the ambassadors of the King!
     There are many modern-day pastors and leaders who are rock solid in their Biblical understanding of our relationship with God, and our commission from Jesus to do the works He did.  I have no problem in recommending studies by Curry Blake or Bill Johnson on how to follow Jesus’s instructions regarding our Commission and His model for destroying the works of the devil. Others such as Dr. Charles Kraft and Dr. Kurt Payne offer exceptional models for Deliverance.  Taken together, it all adds up to HEALING, a word that encompasses all that Jesus did to alleviate the human condition: Preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all manner of sickness and all manner of disease among the people; and they brought unto Him all sick people that were taken with divers diseases and torments, and those which were possessed with devils, and those which were lunatick, and those that had the palsy; and He healed them (Matthew 4:23-24)   
     Search those names on YouTube and watch every video you can of their teachings on both physical and inner (spiritual) healing. Scripture is the foundation of their teachings and they will help you overcome any of your “religious sacred cows” that are blocking you from stepping out in faith. Once you have spiritually discerned that all this is God’s Truth, then I would recommend that you make an appointment to get delivered.  You don’t want anything between you and God that the Enemy can exploit. THEN, just start!  Begin with your family and friends.  I guarantee that there is someone you know who is physically in pain. Ask them if you can pray for them and lay hands on them to release the power of Heaven into their pain.  Just step out in faith and obedience and watch the Father work.  If nothing happens, do it again.  It is your Faith that will make their healing a reality.  If you believe that what the Father did for Jesus, He is also willing to do for you, then the power will be released.  God wants to work with us and through us!
   

 
     If you have a family member struggling with a spiritual issue, both Dr. Kraft and Dr. Payne offer easy-to-follow models for Inner Healing and Deliverance.  As long as you step out in obedience, knowing that it is the Father, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit who are doing the work in the person (not you) and that you are Their instrument to see the person spiritually healed, then God will guide you to success.  He wants to use you (just as He used Jesus, and then the Disciples) to see people healed. He will not give you more power than you can handle, and if you will listen for His voice and His instruction, He will give you more authority and more power as you proceed.

     The bottom line is that in pursuing our Biblical Commission, we are really seeking more of our God.  At some point, we have to let go of our fears of deception and our personal safety and chase after Him with abandon, willing to lose ourselves in order to gain Him.  As Bill Johnson says, “We must believe that our God is big enough to keep us safe in our quest for more of Him.  Practically speaking, many Christian’s devil is bigger than their God… It’s an issue of trust. Our hearts must be turned completely towards the One who is able to keep us from falling”. 
     And I know that recommending watching YouTube videos or reading books other than the Bible may not be the normal route for growing our faith and obedience, but I think we learn best from people who are actually doing the works Jesus did and bearing fruit from their labor.  I mean, what have we really learned from the theories of classroom Christians who never walk out their faith?  If you are convinced (and I hope you are!) that we should be doing what Jesus did, then it only makes sense to study how those who have had success in these areas are doing it.
     I don’t know about you, but I want to work in the Father’s miracle realm like Jesus, and experience what He experienced.  I want those personal encounters with God and the Holy Spirit! I want to see the lame walk, and the blind see, and the dead raised!  And I want the power that can make that happen flowing through me!  I want to see in the Spirit the way the Apostle John did, and I want Paul’s “Damascus Road” moment in my life.  I want the deepest intimacy I can get with my Father, and I want to share it with others and see their lives impacted in the same way, so that they can go out and share it with more people.  I want to see Earth overlaid with the fragrant atmosphere and scent of Heaven. I believe that was what Jesus was walking out during His short time in this world.  And look what He started!  Now it’s our time and our turn!  Are you willing to follow His clear Biblical instructions? Then, what are you waiting for?
Psalm 119:10    “With my whole heart I seek You; let me not wander from Your commandments!”

Are You Making These Steps To Resilience?

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People strive for independence from big government for different reasons. Maybe you’re a “traditional” prepper who is worried about, and preparing for, a future disaster. Until then, you may be perfectly happy living with all of the modern conveniences. On the other hand, you may be seeking to be self-sufficient today and in the future.

Some people do this because they’re concerned about the planet. Others may do it in order to be able to feed themselves without depending on the government or grocery stores. Maybe you’re worried about all of the chemicals used in commercial farming. Or maybe it’s a combination of all of these.

I consider myself to be resilient. The old analogy “watch your pennies and the dollars will take care of themselves” applies here. I’m taking care of myself and my family today in ways that will insure that we will be able to take care of ourselves in the future, even when fragile food systems may fail. Survival is built into everything I do – I just call it being self-sufficient, present, and forward-thinking.

There are many reasons you may want to be self-sufficient, or resilient, but many of the basic tools and knowledge that you need will be the same regardless of your reason. And I’m here to tell you that as long as you have a little space, you can grow enough food to survive.

Entire communities are developing around this principle. That may seem counterproductive, but it’s really not because every household is practicing home food production and is moving away from dependence on outside manufactured products.

The entire community will be relatively unaffected should commercial foods become unavailable due to cost or disaster because they’re already growing everything they need. They may even profit because at that point, they’ll basically command the market. Of course, profit is only a side benefit, not the reason that people choose to live resiliently, but it’s there.

Learn from our ancestors the old lessons of growing your own food!

Three common resilient goals

Gardening without chemicals

Find gardening methods that don’t require commercial fertilizers or chemical insecticides/pesticides. These include composting, permaculture, and growing your own food.

Growing meat at home

You’re going to need protein, as well as (possibly) furs to keep you warm and leather to make shoes, etc. One resilient solution to raising cattle, sheep, etcetera, is to raise animals that are more efficient such as rabbits and chickens.

Finding renewable energy solutions

Dependence on the power grid is probably the single most way that the government has most of us hamstrung. Finding ways to use renewable energy from the sun, wind, and water to power our homes is a clean solution to the energy crisis that we’re facing even as I write this. It’s also the one step that you’ll have to take if you’re shooting for total self-sufficiency.

Skills that you’ll need to be resilient

Just the definition of “resilient” pretty much sums up the skills that you’ll need to become self-sufficient. You’ll need to be able to adapt and find solutions to both immediate and long-term problems.

Roll with the punches and find a way to fix things over the long haul. Other synonyms, or words closely related to resiliency, include flexibility and adaptability, and they certainly apply. I’ll throw patience and consciousness in for good measure.

You also need to shift your strategy to the long game, if you haven’t already. This simply means that you’re looking to make changes today that will leave you relatively unaffected by outside changes, and self-sufficient to the greatest degree that your situation will allow.

Finally, you need to be able to recognize, and admit, that you’ve failed. This isn’t so that you can give up; you need to know so that you can start over without wasting valuable time and resources.

Those are the basic personality traits you’ll need, so now let’s talk about technical skills. This part is the easy oane because there is very little about becoming self-sufficient that you can’t learn, either from personal experience or from the experience of others. It’s not possible to know too much.

Gardening skills:

  • Learn everything you can about your plants before you even buy the seeds.
  • Make a list of plants that you’d like to grow, then find out if they grow in your zone.
  • Learn the size of the plants that you want to grow and choose wisely according to the space that you have available.
  • Know the sunlight needs of your plants. This is important, because photosynthesis is a critical part of growth.
  • If you’re planting in the ground, know at least the basics about your soil, and match that to the needs of your plants.

You can pretty much apply these rules to raising animals, too.

Start Your Resilience with Growing Food

Resiliency isn’t about just gardening, but that’s a good place to start because you can do it from anywhere and with next to no money.

Gardening is relatively simple as long as you know the needs of your plants, and can be done for next to nothing with relatively little space. If you’re growing a container garden or even a vertical garden, you can do so in small containers, or in 5-gallon buckets. There are many different articles that I’ve written about this topic and I’d recommend that you read some of them, and even print what you think may be useful to you.

Now that you’ve studied the plants and made sure that you have the space to grow them, it’s time to get started.

It’s always best to use heirloom seeds, because those are the ones that are going to give you the same plant every season. In other words, if you plant a beefsteak tomato plant from the seeds of last year’s beefsteak tomato plant, you’re going to get the same fruits. Open pollinated plants would be next choice. Hybrid plants aren’t reliable from one season to the next, so just skip them.

The next thing you’ll need is containers. You can buy 5-gallon buckets at Home Depot, but you can get them for free from restaurants and bakeries. They buy their food in bulk, then throw away their buckets. If you’re growing tomatoes or other vining plants, you’ll need stakes or trellises.

Finally, you just need your seeds and soil. The soil, of course, depends on what you’re growing, but should consist of a combination of compost and soil. Sand is often good to mix in, too, especially if you live in an area that has a clay-based soil.

These are extremely general tools, but if you have these basic components available to you, you can grow your own food.

As always, knowledge is power and when you’re working to feed yourself, it’s much better to learn from the mistakes of others than to have to learn from your own.

In summary, there are many techniques that resilient people utilize and work into their daily lives in order to be self-sufficient today, and in the future.

The goal is to live in pretty much the same manner after the disaster as we did before it, because we remain unaffected. Back in the days, our ancestors knew how to do it. It’s time to go back to our roots and uncover their secrets that helped them survive harsh times.

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Are you making these steps to self-sufficiency? Why did you chose to be resilient?

If you live a resilient, self-sufficient lifestyle, or are trying to, tell us about some of your efforts in the comment section below. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask those, too!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

Podcast #143: Preparedness For Mother Nature

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May 12th, 2017: In today’s show I talk about the need for Preparedness For Mother Nature as well as living a life of preparedness.  I also give some examples of how our level of preparedness has helped us in some pretty scary situations. If you like Mountain Woman Radio you can also Subscribe to me on […]

The post Podcast #143: Preparedness For Mother Nature appeared first on Trayer Wilderness.

Spring into summer preparedness

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Each season brings with it its own optimal timing for certain aspects of preparedness. With summer a few weeks away, it’s time to take full advantage of the warm, sunny days ahead.

Plant something!

A garden is the obvious choice, but what about shrubs and trees planted in strategic locations? The longest growing days are ahead, and now is the time to think ahead two or three years in your planning.

· Where do you need thorny bushes and other plants to create a natural barrier for a more secure home and property?

· Where might shade trees come in handy for helping to keep your home cool and power bills down during the summer?

· Which herbs do you use most often in your cooking? Plant them now and dehydrate your harvest throughout the summer for fresh-tasting home-grown herbs throughout the year.

De-clutter something!

I can’t over-emphasize the importance of de-cluttering your living space. We think that things bring us comfort, but the opposite is true. We can get easily overwhelmed by our belongings and their maintenance, and soon they own us! Have you ever wondered why a stay at a hotel or resort is always so relaxing? One reason is that we’re not surrounded by things we have to clean, dust, arrange, insure, secure, fix, and worry about.

Start with the room or part of the house you use the least. Even if it’s a closet or a set of cupboards, if you rarely access them, chances are their contents have little importance to your day-to-day life. Here’s a free preview of a great online book to get you going, The Get Organized Answer Book.

 

Clean something!

Since it’s time for spring cleaning anyway, why not begin using all-natural, homemade cleaning products? It’s much safer, easier, and cheaper to stock up on ingredients like vinegar, lemon juice (or lemon powder), dish soap, and baking soda. A few essential oils, such as teatree oil or orange blossom, will make your new solutions fragrant and pleasant to use. Check out these websites for some great recipes:  How to make a non-toxic cleaning kit and Recipes for natural cleaning products.

Motivate someone!

Kids will soon be out of school with lots of spare time on their hands.  This is the best time of year, then, to introduce them to a new skill or hobby.  If it’s a practical skill that could become important to your family’s preparedness, so much the better.  Even little ones can have their own gardens, with each plant and herb labeled.  Older kids can help with canning, pickling, and jelly making.  (Pickling cucumbers are in season right about now.)  Think about all the skills you wish you knew.  Now, why can’t your family and friends learn them together?  If you need suggestions, check out my past Skill of the Month list.

Get outdoors!

image by paala

Nothing teaches the importance of self-reliance and outdoor skills quite like a camping trip, even if it’s just over-nighting it in the backyard!  Everyone quickly learns the importance of water, food, shelter, and how to solve problems creatively.  I also believe it’s important to get kids outside and away from constantly being inside.   A day hike through a park, a visit to a State or National Park, even a picnic where kids learn they have to pack everything they’ll need and then pack out all their trash, teach important concepts.

Unplug something!

I admit this next suggestion isn’t for the faint of heart, but what could your family accomplish if the TV and video games were unplugged for a week?  It’s a scary thought because parents have to set the example, but when my family did this for two weeks (the TV was turned off every night), we re-discovered Family Reading Night.  You’ll discover lost hours that can be used to organize, de-clutter, clean, play, plan, read, and have fun!

Update something!

This is the season to update all your emergency kits.  The Bug Out Bags, the 72 Hour Kits, the Get Home Kit…they all need to be updated twice a year, and now is the time to do it.  Check to make sure that food hasn’t spoiled and that liquids haven’t leaked.  Are all the shoes and clothes still the right size?  Can you reorganize anything to make the kit a little neater?  How about adding an inventory sheet to the Kit, or add to your Survival Mom binder, so you’ll always know what is supposed to be in each kit?

Summer will be over before you know it.  Hard to believe, but every year it seems to get shorter and shorter.  Jump into action this week and make the most of these long days that seem to never end.

 

 

 

 

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What You Need When You Travel With Your Dog

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Do you sometimes want a list that tells you what you need when you travel with your dog? Mark and I recently went to Salt Lake City, Utah for the weekend and, oh my gosh, it brought back memories of having a toddler or baby. All the stuff we have to take when it’s a puppy is a bit overwhelming. I decided I needed a list to check off, I really did! I have had Shih Tzu puppies or dogs since my youngest daughter was in the sixth grade. Camille came home from school one day and said her teacher was selling a ShihTzu puppy. Back then we didn’t even know what a Shih Tzu looked like or anything about the ShihTzu breed. Well, I went to the veterinarian in our neighborhood and asked him what kind of a dog would be good for our family of four young daughters. I said we wanted a quiet dog that would be loving and sit on our laps. I wanted one that would not shed. I knew I was going to have the dog groomed, but for me, that is better than having dog hair everywhere. I didn’t want a dog that shed because I have so many allergies. That sounds a bit strong, I don’t have that MANY allergies, just the normal pollen allergies. Dr. White said a Shih Tzu was perfect for us. It’s not the smartest dog on the block, but a very loving dog. He left out the Shih Tzu’s can sometimes be stubborn…..that’s okay we love them anyway.

Well, we decided as a family to purchase this cute female Shih Tzu puppy at the school where Camille attended. Keep in mind we had never paid for a pet, except maybe a goldfish or two. We nearly choked writing out the check for $150.00 for this cute little puppy we named, Chelsea. This was way before the Clinton’s were in office, just so you know. It just now donned on me that we had a puppy with the same name as President Clinton’s daughter. Wow! Anyway, we loved this puppy so much we added another one. We actually bred Chelsea so we could have a playmate for her. So here comes Charlie, a son. We kept and sold the other puppies to cover the purchase of Chelsea. Well, sort of, it’s expensive to have puppies. We had her neutered, I couldn’t put her through another pregnancy.

We enjoyed those two dogs for about 12 years and they died about six months apart. I really tried to go without having a dog around the house, I really did. But, I couldn’t. The next thing I know Mark is sending me pictures of some Shih Tzu puppies. Yep, I went to buy one and came home with two. I couldn’t decide which one, so I bought both of them. Thank goodness for doggy doors so the dogs can go in and out of the door to use the potty on their own. I was busy working and we couldn’t think of a name and we saw a can of Pepsi on the counter and named one Pepsi. I named the other one Boston because I liked the name. We had this set for ten years.

Then Mark and I retired, at least part time. We said to each other, we don’t want a dog. We don’t want a dog. Yes, we said this many times. THEN, this last year I really missed having a puppy around. So, the search was on for a new member of the family. Here comes Bentley, a black and white male Shih Tzu. Oh my gosh, they are so dang cute when they are squishy and waddling around the house. Yes, we love Bentley. Here is a list for travel that’s probably a bit overboard, but I want to be prepared for the unexpected. It’s almost the same as my 72-hour kit for pets.

Travel With your Dog:

PRINTABLE list: What You Need When You Travel With Your Dog

I hope this list helps you as much as it helps me! I don’t travel that much, but I don’t want to forget anything and have to go to a store for medicine for Bentley. If something serious happens I can go to a veterinarian with him. Thanks again my friends for being prepared for the unexpected. Even our beloved pets need to be prepared, so now you know what you need when you travel with your dog. May God bless you!

The post What You Need When You Travel With Your Dog appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Aggressive Tolerance!

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Aggressive Tolerance Bob Hawkins “The APN Report“ Audio in player below! For sake of anything else, I’ve coined a new term describing the situation I’ve been dealing with concerning my hurricane damaged house these last six months. I bet you forgot this show’s inaugural broadcast was immediately after Hurricane Matthew took a bite out of … Continue reading Aggressive Tolerance!

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Scientists May Have Finally Found a Solution to Antibiotic Resistance

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Antibiotic-resistant superbugs may be the gravest threat to human health in the 21st century. After over-prescribing antibiotics for decades, multiple strains of bacteria are now immune to treatment. Millions of people are infected with these superbugs every year in the US, and tens of thousands die. And that’s just the beginning. We may be in the early stages of the post-antibiotic era, and if this trend isn’t reversed, superbugs may be killing more people than cancer does by the year 2050.

As you might expect, the scientific community has been desperately trying to find a solution to this crisis for some time. And fortunately, scientists have made some significant progress in recent years. In 2016 for instance, researchers from the Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts discovered Teixobactin, the first antibiotic to be found in nearly 30 years. And with that discovery, they figured out an entirely new avenue of research that could bring about many more antibiotics in the near future.

Of course, that doesn’t really solve the problem with antibiotic resistant superbugs when you think about it. It only serves to kick the can down the road. It’s entirely possible that any new antibiotic that is brought to market, will be thoroughly abused by the medical and agricultural communities. New resistant strains of bacteria will emerge, and we’ll be back to square one.

What we really need is a whole new approach to using antibiotics and treating bacterial infections. Preferably, something that bacteria can’t readily adapt to. Fortunately, a researcher by the name of Dr. Bruce Geller has come up with a new treatment method that might just fit the bill.

“Bacteria will develop resistance to any one antibiotic or antimicrobial given enough time,” says Dr. Bruce Geller, a professor of microbiology at Oregon State University. “Because they’ve had a 4 billion year head start in the evolution of mechanisms to adapt to changing environments, they’re very, very good at getting around any antimicrobial they might encounter.”

So rather than just coming up with a new antibiotic, which bacterial strains would surely become immune to, he’s developed a compound that when exposed to bacteria, eliminates their resistance to antibiotics.

Geller’s megaweapon is a PPMO designed to neutralize resistance mechanisms in bacteria, leaving them vulnerable to antibiotics. “This molecule can restore sensitivity to standard, already-approved antibiotics in bacteria that are now resistant to those antibiotics,” Geller says, which eliminates the need to invest time and money in developing new antibiotics. So how does this PPMO work?

A PPMO is a type of synthetic molecule that mimics DNA and can bind to the ribonucleic acid (RNA) of a cell. RNA takes the information stored in the DNA of a cell, translating it into proteins that carry out the various functions of that cell.

Imagine a gene as instructions, written in a letter. Normally, the RNA receives this letter and carries out the instructions, creating the appropriate proteins. The PPMO instead intercepts the letter along the way, replacing it with one that commands the RNA to do nothing. So Geller’s team can create a PPMO that binds to the gene that produces NDM-1 — an enzyme that neutralizes antibiotics — and silences it. Suddenly, the bacterium has no defense mechanism.

Of course, PPMOs aren’t a broad, perfect solution. For instance, Geller points out that a different kind of PPMO would have to be developed for each type of infection. So this method will be mainly used when a doctor knows exactly what is afflicting a patient. Despite that, what Dr. Geller has created is probably the best solution to antibiotic resistance that has been developed so far, and is the best hope we have to stem the tide of the superbugs.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

2017 Suburban Steader Update – Week 19

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I can’t believe how quickly these weekly updates come.  Seems like the last one was just yesterday.  I guess that means I’m keeping busy.  Week 19 y’all! Can you believe we’ve exhausted almost twenty weeks in 2017? Been pretty busy around the Suburban Steader Homestead this week.  Come along and check out what went on.

Essential Survival Skills That Kids Should Know ASAP

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How safe are our kids today? Isn’t it a very valid question? It’s quite natural that we, as parents become so protective and in this blind love, we end up doing everything for them. We are proud of the fact that our kids are 100 % dependent on us. But is that fair? Think about, … Read more…

The post Essential Survival Skills That Kids Should Know ASAP was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.