Seeking nature loving, self sufficient, peaceful, positive people

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Hello my name is Kenton, my wife and I are 30 years old. We have an infant son and 3 cats, we are hoping to get a dog. We are moving onto our property in mid June. The property is 160 acres of forest located in Central Ontario, Canada. The west part of the property is about a half mile from the Frederick House River. It is about a 30min drive to Iroquois Falls and 45mins to Timmins. The property is surrounded by Crown land. We are looking for positive, family and pet friendly, nature loving, self sufficient, peaceful people. Please e-mail me with interest and/or questions. Thank you.

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Can You Really Worship As You Work?

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Can You Really Worship As You Work?

Image source: Pixabay.com

As a pastor, I often hear something like this: “What I do at work is—work. What I do at church is for the Lord.”

Is this the right attitude? What does the Bible say about our work?

In Genesis 2:15, the Bible connects our work to something bigger—worship. The Hebrew word for “work” comes from the same root word as “worship.” So, Adam worshipped God not just by staying away from those out-and-out sinners (there were none — yet!) and reading his Bible (there wasn’t one — yet!), but he worshipped God by doing what God told him to do—work in the Garden.

Isn’t it also telling that 39 out of the 40 miracles in the book of Acts happened outside the walls of the church gathering? Or, that most of Jesus’ parables dealt with workplace environments?

Let me ask you: Do you see your work as worship? Is it possible to clean toilets to the glory of God? Or make sales calls to the glory of God? Or build a building to God’s glory?

Yes, everything and everyone is being put to work for the glory of God. Whether you know it or not. To do the work of the Lord for the glory of “self” is not an inferior approach; it is a stab in His back.

Let me offer you four ways that work can be worship and apply this practically:

First, work can be worship because it accomplishes God’s intention for you in creation.

Remember, Genesis 2:15 happened before sin entered the world. Work wasn’t a part of the curse of sin—it was part of God’s plan from the beginning. The word used for work in Genesis 2:15 also can mean “develop” or “prepare.” We take the “raw goods” (literal and figurative) of the earth and cultivate them for God’s praise and the profit of other people.

Christian Heroes For Christian Kids: These Amazing Stories Are Putting God Back Into History!

Can You Really Worship As You Work?

Image source: Pixabay.com

But, yes, it is true that God cursed the ground and made work toilsome (Gen. 3:16-20). Pastor Tim Keller summarized it well when he said, “The Fall means, we should expect to be regularly frustrated in our work even though we may be in exactly the right vocation.”

So, what do you do if you hate your job and it’s toilsome and it’s not what you want to do?

Stay faithful as an act of service to God and to benefit others. There can be pleasure in it.

Remember: Paul made tents (Acts 18:3). His call was to the Gentiles (Acts 13:46-47). Making tents wasn’t his call – but he did it to advance God’s kingdom.

Second, work can be worship because it aims for the top integrity.

Indeed, workplaces aren’t always known for being places of truth and morals. However, as Christians, we can treat work as worship because we seek to display and handle every situation and interaction with the highest standard of justice and integrity before God. Our faith should be reflected in how we handle ourselves.

Proverbs 11:1 says, “A false balance is an abomination to the LORD, but a just weight is his delight.”

To truly worship as we work, we must remember that we shouldn’t settle simply for the company’s ethics, but should go even higher—because God’s truth is higher than all (John 17:17). As Christians, our job is to live for God and to die for God in how we handle ourselves.

Third, work can be worship because we seek to do all things with distinction as ambassadors for the Gospel.

Can You Really Worship As You Work?

Image source: Pixabay.com

Every area of Christian living––our worldview, worship, walk, work and witness––is dependent upon the right knowledge of God.

“Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord” (Col. 3:23). If a slave can transpose his work into worship, you can to!

“In the Lord your labor is not in vain” (1 Cor. 15:58). Living for Him, in every vocation, is the only non-waste of time in all this world.

The Secret To Driving Hours With Happy Kids!

“Take this job and shove it,” then, must not be the attitude of Christians in the workplace. Our jobs are mission opportunities. When we’ve understood our calling to serve the Lord in whatever vocation we find ourselves as a light to the world, Mondays will be a joy. And doing those routine, rote, and menial tasks will be a joy, too!

Finally, work can be worship because it is all about blessing others.

Before you complain about your employer, be grateful you have one. Not only does our day of rest and worship distinguish us from the world on Sundays, but it leads to a distinct work ethic on Mondays. Working hard for your employer is a part of your calling, and when you do, unbelievers will ask, “What is this hope within you?”

If you own a business, this may mean that to glorify God you don’t ask, “How much money can I get out of this?” but, what’s more, “How is our business advancing God’s kingdom?” And it may require that you give away a lot of extra money earned for Christ’s kingdom. After all, isn’t this what our Savior did for us (2 Cor. 8:9)?

One last word of caution: Worship the sovereign, triune God—not your work! Don’t make work your security. Since Christians are hidden with Christ in God, to be a Christian is to be as secure as Christ is. If you have “put on Christ,” you are as secure as He is.

Friend, work is where you will spend most of your time on earth. Work really counts for something to God and God really matters for your work.

Do you view your work as just work—or as worship to God?

A little late on the 3 sisters and pics.

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I’m still sort of tweaking the 3 sisters garden beds.  I know what does not work from last year’s experiment. These beds are an adjustment and not necessarily the end result for the 3 sisters experiment. Via most web sites the corn and beans are  suggested to have a mound of dirt above the squash plants. I can test this out on my beds though they are only 3 ft. x 3 ft. wide.  I think adding a raised mound for the corn and beans is doable on a bed and then try a regular raised bed garden for the other beds.  Growing plants has so many variables that there are no hard and fast rules.  Each gardener must try out how thing work in the yard and garden.  If it is stupid and it works it ain’t stupid!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cedar boxes for the 3 sisters garden.

This is a bit of tweaking as corn, beans and squash did not do as well as I wanted in the big garden bed.   My garden got overgrown and was not healthy so by separating the plants I hope to create a better garden.  Those 3 beds cost about $80.00 in materials and I can afford that now.  But I started out using reclaimed materials and going “cheap” to start a garden.  Start small if you that is all you can do.  Often the hardest thing to do is just start.

The front yard edible beds.  I have a bit of work to do but over all the beds are looking darn good.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It may not look like much but I have lettuce, spinach and brussel sprouts  growing.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I thought I got of the happy little cabbages in the front yard beds,  but no luck finding them to post.

Simple and easy are not the same thing.  Almost every thing life is simple, that does not mean it is easy.  I’m not a homesteader and with my physical limitations I can not be one.  But that does not mean I can’t try and do stuff around the house.

Gosh I have learned so much from making basic raised beds to chopping up my own kindling.  We got slammed this winter so I’m prepping for a hard winter.   The worst that can happen is I’m ready for a hard winter.  The best that can happen is I’m very ready for a hard winter.

A little late on the 3 sisters and pics.

I’m still sort of tweaking the 3 sisters garden beds.  I know what does not work from last year’s experiment. These beds are an adjustment and not necessarily the end result for the 3 sisters experiment. Via most web sites the corn and beans are  suggested to have a mound of dirt above the squash plants. I can test this out on my beds though they are only 3 ft. x 3 ft. wide.  I think adding a raised mound for the corn and beans is doable on a bed and then try a regular raised bed garden for the other beds.  Growing plants has so many variables that there are no hard and fast rules.  Each gardener must try out how thing work in the yard and garden.  If it is stupid and it works it ain’t stupid!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cedar boxes for the 3 sisters garden.

This is a bit of tweaking as corn, beans and squash did not do as well as I wanted in the big garden bed.   My garden got overgrown and was not healthy so by separating the plants I hope to create a better garden.  Those 3 beds cost about $80.00 in materials and I can afford that now.  But I started out using reclaimed materials and going “cheap” to start a garden.  Start small if you that is all you can do.  Often the hardest thing to do is just start.

The front yard edible beds.  I have a bit of work to do but over all the beds are looking darn good.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It may not look like much but I have lettuce, spinach and brussel sprouts  growing.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I thought I got of the happy little cabbages in the front yard beds,  but no luck finding them to post.

Simple and easy are not the same thing.  Almost every thing life is simple, that does not mean it is easy.  I’m not a homesteader and with my physical limitations I can not be one.  But that does not mean I can’t try and do stuff around the house.

Gosh I have learned so much from making basic raised beds to chopping up my own kindling.  We got slammed this winter so I’m prepping for a hard winter.   The worst that can happen is I’m ready for a hard winter.  The best that can happen is I’m very ready for a hard winter.

Sunday Prepper Bible Study-The True Vine-Part 2

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I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing. If anyone does not abide in Me, he is cast out as a branch and is withered; and they gather them and throw them into the fire, and they are burned.

John 15:5-6

Like last week’s verse, here’s another one that needs very little explanation. Some folks will try to add lengthy expositions to this section of scripture to make it say something it doesn’t, but the Word of God is eternal and unchanging. Some may tell you these withered branches are being cast into a purifying fire. They’ll give you a false sense of security by telling you that it doesn’t matter if you bear fruit in keeping with repentance. They’ll say that those who say otherwise are teaching salvation by works.

We know that salvation is by grace through faith, and that not of yourselves; not of works, lest anyone should boast. Neither is the fruit you bear of yourselves, but it is a natural result of being connected to the vine. But as a branch, you do have a job to do. You need to stay connected to the vine. This requires discipline. It means reading the Bible, listening to worship music, attending church, and prayer. If you are not making a priority for these things, you are not abiding in the True Vine. Jesus said such branches wither and are cast into the fire.

Don’t naively think this is a fire of refinement. Fire is indifferent. Whether it is a refining fire or a destroying fire depends on the substance being cast into it. Silver is refined by fire. Dried branches are destroyed by fire.

Jesus said, “what does it profit a man if he gains the whole world yet loses his own soul?” Prepper translation: “What good will it do you to survive the coming economic collapse, nuclear war, or even a zombie apocalypse if you don’t know you will go to heaven when you die.” A recent study found that 10 out of 10 people die! On that day we will meet our Maker. It only makes sense to be prepared for that day. Click here to learn more about knowing GOD.

Have a blessed day and happy prepping!

Mark

The post Sunday Prepper Bible Study-The True Vine-Part 2 appeared first on Prepper Recon.

10/22 mag page

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Here.

If you look at the horizontal menu bar across the screen you’ll see “10/22 Mags” listed there. That’s the page for details on getting yourself the bundle of a dozen Butler Creek 10/22 nags for $110 while I still have some. Twenty bundles left.

Tomorrow promises to be a Rugerific day…Im going to test shoot the ‘new’ P95DC (function test, really), play with some 10/22’s, and possible, maybe, perhaps toy around with the pseudo-DM AR I’ve been cobbling together.

Truck garden

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Growing up I had heard of truck farms, usually small family farms, when the produce is ready, the farmer takes the produce to a farmer’s market in a truck, thus the name “truck farm”… but this is a different concept, this is actually a garden that is contained in a box truck!

This truck came to Nick Runkle and Justin Cutter in a roundabout way, large windows had been placed in the box part of the truck when it had been a mobile art gallery in its former life. The windows made it a perfect greenhouse, which is exactly what it became. Getting their funding from a Kickstarter program, they reinvented the truck to make it a fully functioning greenhouse on wheels.

As part of the renovation, the truck was converted to run on waste vegetable oil, making it even more sustainable. Where is it legal and upon getting permission, they are able to pull up behind a restaurant, they pop a hose into a barrel of waste cooking/frying oil, they hand crank the oil into a tank where it is filtered 2 times before being used as fuel. The truck comes complete with rain water catchment and its own composting box, so nothing goes to waste.

Not only are tasty veg grown inside of this truck, it is used as a teaching tool, going around to schools, spending the day teaching the kids all about sustainable gardening, from kindergarten to universities, they travel all over the USA, spreading their knowledge and wisdom.

https://youtu.be/h-g74F-U9yU

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Huge Cyber-attack and Other Notable News

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com I haven’t done a Monday Musings links share news segment in a while but there is just so much going on I had to do one today. Widespread Cyber Attack First off, there was this worldwide cyber attack with ransomware yesterday that hit at least 100 countries.  So many people were affected; hospitals could not even see patients and a lot of people’s computers were held hostage until they paid.  See Ransomware:  World […]

The post Huge Cyber-attack and Other Notable News appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

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8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

Herbs are an important part of most home gardens, especially on a homestead. When life was a little harder than it is today and doctors were few and far between, homesteaders would turn to their herb garden in times of sickness.

Below are eight of the most useful herbs our ancestors Grew. Grow them to create your own in-home apothecary.

Basil. Certainly one of the most common herbs grown in the home garden, basil is also praised for its antibacterial properties. The fluid in basil leaves can help eliminate the risk of infection when applied as a poultice to minor wounds. Boiling the leaves in water along with sea salt and cloves can create a tea to fight off influenza. Boiling basil leaves with honey and ginger can create a tea that fights colds, coughs, bronchitis and the inflammation associated with asthma.

Parsley. Although most people use parsley as a garnish, it is an incredibly powerful medicinal herb, as well. Parsley contains a number of volatile compounds that inhibit the growth of tumors. It also is rich in vitamin C, and it has been shown to be useful in reducing the effects of rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Additionally, it is rich in anti-oxidants and has been used to treat urinary tract infections, kidney stones, constipation, indigestion, anemia and high blood pressure.

8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

Oregano. Image source: Pixabay.com

Oregano. This popular herb contains powerful antiviral and antibacterial qualities. Currently, oregano oil is being studied in both its liquid and vapor form for its ability to kill listeria and hospital strains of MRSA. Oregano also is being studied for its ability to slow tumor growth in breast cancer patients and as a potential control method for type-2 diabetes.

Looking For Non-GMO Herb Seeds? Get Them From A Company You Can Trust!

Valerian. Although less common than some of the other herbs, valerian root is incredibly effective at treating sleep disorders. The name itself is derived from the Latin valere — to be in health. Valerian is especially useful in calming an overly stimulated nervous system (i.e. it’s good for fighting stress).

8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

Oregano. Image source: Pixabay.com

Lavender. Lavender oil is very effective in the treatment of minor fungal infections. Lavender oil is astringent in nature and is well-known for its anti-bacterial qualities. The scent of lavender lessens anxiety and promotes a sense of calm and well-being. Strangely enough, lavender oil has also been shown to promote hair growth when used regularly for prolonged periods of time, although caution is advised for long-term topical use, since some undesirable side effects have been noted (including a slowing down of the central nervous system).

Mint. Mint is an incredibly versatile herb. In addition to its many culinary uses, mint tea is also used to treat indigestion or inflammation of the gut caused by illness. It offers relief from nausea due to motion sickness. Mint oil can be used to alleviate headaches, and it lessens the severity of migraines. The aromatic properties of the oil can be used to clear up congestion caused by colds and the flu. The antiseptic properties of mint oil are useful for the treatment of insect bites, small cuts, minor burns and as an acne treatment.

Chamomile. German and Roman chamomile have been used for centuries for their anti-inflammatory properties. Chamomile tea can be used to sooth gastrointestinal problems, such as heart burn, diverticular disorders and spasms of the stomach and intestine. It is useful as a mild sedative, and it helps alleviate insomnia. Chamomile salves are used in the treatment of hemorrhoids and minor wounds. Chamomile has also been shown to be effective in combating morning sickness, teething symptoms in young children and colic.

Dill. The seeds and leaves are the most useful portions of the dill plant. For centuries, people have turned to dill for the treatment of diarrhea, excess gas and dysentery. Dill also has been studied for its ability to promote good bone density, reducing the symptoms associated with arthritis and fighting off bacterial infections throughout the body. Dill promotes good oral health and is effective at removing free radicals from the body.

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please consult with a qualified health professional first.

What herbs would you add to our list? Share your own list in the section below:

8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

Herbs are an important part of most home gardens, especially on a homestead. When life was a little harder than it is today and doctors were few and far between, homesteaders would turn to their herb garden in times of sickness.

Below are eight of the most useful herbs our ancestors Grew. Grow them to create your own in-home apothecary.

Basil. Certainly one of the most common herbs grown in the home garden, basil is also praised for its antibacterial properties. The fluid in basil leaves can help eliminate the risk of infection when applied as a poultice to minor wounds. Boiling the leaves in water along with sea salt and cloves can create a tea to fight off influenza. Boiling basil leaves with honey and ginger can create a tea that fights colds, coughs, bronchitis and the inflammation associated with asthma.

Parsley. Although most people use parsley as a garnish, it is an incredibly powerful medicinal herb, as well. Parsley contains a number of volatile compounds that inhibit the growth of tumors. It also is rich in vitamin C, and it has been shown to be useful in reducing the effects of rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Additionally, it is rich in anti-oxidants and has been used to treat urinary tract infections, kidney stones, constipation, indigestion, anemia and high blood pressure.

8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

Oregano. Image source: Pixabay.com

Oregano. This popular herb contains powerful antiviral and antibacterial qualities. Currently, oregano oil is being studied in both its liquid and vapor form for its ability to kill listeria and hospital strains of MRSA. Oregano also is being studied for its ability to slow tumor growth in breast cancer patients and as a potential control method for type-2 diabetes.

Looking For Non-GMO Herb Seeds? Get Them From A Company You Can Trust!

Valerian. Although less common than some of the other herbs, valerian root is incredibly effective at treating sleep disorders. The name itself is derived from the Latin valere — to be in health. Valerian is especially useful in calming an overly stimulated nervous system (i.e. it’s good for fighting stress).

8 Medicinal Herbs Our Ancestors Grew In Their ‘Home Apothecary’

Oregano. Image source: Pixabay.com

Lavender. Lavender oil is very effective in the treatment of minor fungal infections. Lavender oil is astringent in nature and is well-known for its anti-bacterial qualities. The scent of lavender lessens anxiety and promotes a sense of calm and well-being. Strangely enough, lavender oil has also been shown to promote hair growth when used regularly for prolonged periods of time, although caution is advised for long-term topical use, since some undesirable side effects have been noted (including a slowing down of the central nervous system).

Mint. Mint is an incredibly versatile herb. In addition to its many culinary uses, mint tea is also used to treat indigestion or inflammation of the gut caused by illness. It offers relief from nausea due to motion sickness. Mint oil can be used to alleviate headaches, and it lessens the severity of migraines. The aromatic properties of the oil can be used to clear up congestion caused by colds and the flu. The antiseptic properties of mint oil are useful for the treatment of insect bites, small cuts, minor burns and as an acne treatment.

Chamomile. German and Roman chamomile have been used for centuries for their anti-inflammatory properties. Chamomile tea can be used to sooth gastrointestinal problems, such as heart burn, diverticular disorders and spasms of the stomach and intestine. It is useful as a mild sedative, and it helps alleviate insomnia. Chamomile salves are used in the treatment of hemorrhoids and minor wounds. Chamomile has also been shown to be effective in combating morning sickness, teething symptoms in young children and colic.

Dill. The seeds and leaves are the most useful portions of the dill plant. For centuries, people have turned to dill for the treatment of diarrhea, excess gas and dysentery. Dill also has been studied for its ability to promote good bone density, reducing the symptoms associated with arthritis and fighting off bacterial infections throughout the body. Dill promotes good oral health and is effective at removing free radicals from the body.

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please consult with a qualified health professional first.

What herbs would you add to our list? Share your own list in the section below:

Serrated Vs Straight Edge Knives

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I have heard many arguments in regard to the serrated vs straight edge knife dilemma. The truth is that there are pros and cons of both types of knife edges, and the choice of which type is better largely depends on the function you expect it to serve and the situation you will be using […]

The post Serrated Vs Straight Edge Knives appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

What Makes An Organic Chicken Organic?

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A chicken is a chicken is a chicken—right? Many consumers still think so, but thankfully the tide is turning. Slowly but surely, our convenience-driven society is starting to ask the right questions about both conventionally raised and organic chicken.

No longer are they just concerned about price per pound.

Now, they’re also wondering:

How healthy was this chicken when it was alive?

Is this meat contaminated and going to make me sick?

Did this bird receive constant doses of low-level antibiotics?

Awareness Is Growing

This shift in the modern food system is leaving more customers than ever concerned about the life their meal lived before winding up on their plate.

Concerns about tainted meat1http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2014/02/the-high-cost-of-cheap-chicken/index.htm and the growing threat of antibiotic resistance2http://thegrownetwork.com/antibiotic-resistance/ means that sourcing clean, healthy, and sustainable poultry is more important than ever.

For this reason, many people are turning to organic certification as guidance for buying their chicken.

According to the Organic Trade Association, sales of organic poultry in the U.S. rose 11 percent in 2013,3https://www.ota.com/resources/market-analysis and the number continues to climb. Even so, organic chicken still makes up less than 1 percent of the total poultry market, meaning there is plenty of room for demand to grow.

While most conscientious customers equate “organic” with health, sustainability and humane treatment for animals, few have a solid understanding of what the term specifies.

To uncover exactly what organic certification legally means and what it only implies, let’s look at the facts.

The Meaning Behind ‘Organic’

The term “organic” is property of the USDA, meaning it has legal control over the kinds of products that are certified.

In regards to chicken and other poultry, the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) is the authority that sets the definitions4http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/02/what-is-organic-free-range-chicken-usda-poultry-chicken-labels-definition.html for common labels like organic, free-range, cage free and more.

The difference with organic food comes from the way it is produced. Per the USDA,5https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/What is Organic.pdf organic growing must “integrate cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity.

By regulation, organic food must be grown or raised without pesticides, herbicides, antibiotics and synthetic fertilizers, and be free from genetic engineering.

The Specifics for Chickens

Being organic is a lifelong process for poultry.

From the time they are two days old, organic chickens are fed a balanced diet of organic feed, live in generally clean housing that provides more than two square feet per bird,6http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/01/18/510474179/organic-chickens-get-more-room-to-roam have access to the outdoors, and are never treated with antibiotics.

In order to maintain their organic certification, chicken farmers need to follow strict standards and have their farms inspected regularly by the USDA.

Organic Chicken Growing Conditions

While many farmers find the requirements for raising organic chickens to be more than sufficient for promoting animal welfare, the mental image most people have of the life of a typical organic chicken is likely far from reality.

For example, though organic chickens are required to have outdoor access, there are few provisions about how much time they should spend outside or even how much space they need.

This means that many organic chickens live their lives in factory farm settings where “outdoor access”7http://homeguides.sfgate.com/difference-between-organic-freerange-chicken-79293.html is restricted to small cement pens that few, if any of the chickens take advantage of.

In fact, a study8http://www.organicagcentre.ca/Docs/AnimalWelfare/Soil Association/Welfare standards organic v free range.pdf from the UK looked at the ‘free-range’ tendencies of 800,000 organic birds and found that even though the birds technically had access to the outdoors for eight hours a day, fewer than 15 percent of the birds were ever outside at any time.

Because chickens evolved foraging under trees and tall greases, it seems they have little preference for the overly bright, open air spaces that conventional farms provide for them to range in.

Should You Choose Organic Chicken?

While organic chicken has grown in popularity throughout the world, some diners aren’t sure that it’s worth the cost.

Store brand chicken usually costs $1.50 per pound, but the price of organic chicken ranges from $2.50 to over $10.00 per pound.

Complicating the situation farther, nonorganic chickens are often plumper than organic birds, both because of their heavy diet optimized for weight gain and because they are processed with water to add an appearance of juiciness.9http://www.reuters.com/article/us-money-chicken-organic-idUSKBN0FM24Q20140717

Finally, while grass fed beef and pork has a distinctive flavor when compared with conventionally raised cuts, it’s much harder to taste the difference between organic and nonorganic chicken.

However, the higher price comes with some significant benefits, both for the environment and for those who eat it.

If you want your meat to be free from antibiotics, genetic engineering and raised in a way that takes the sustainability of the environment into consideration, paying for organic chicken is worth the cost.

Does Farm Size Matter?

As the popularity of the organic movement has grown, so has the size of the farms that provide organic meat.

In fact, large-scale producers now dominate the organic industry to the point that smaller growers are often crowded out.

This can make comparing organic practices between farms a little like comparing apples and oranges, as the commitment to sustainability can vary considerably based on the size of the farm.

Inevitably, larger farms often get away with more lenient practices.

Part of the problem comes because large farms can afford to hire lobbyists to shape the policies for organic certification.

Because large farms have the most to lose when organic regulations become stricter, they tend to push for looser standards10http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/08/business/organic-food-purists-worry-about-big-companies-influence.html so that they can maintain their profitability.

For this reason, large organic farms often more closely resemble conventional factory farms than the pastoral ideal that most organic enthusiasts prefer to picture.

Similar Terms and Their Definitions

While the term “organic” may be more loosely defined than most consumers prefer, it’s just one of over a dozen terms used to describe different ways of raising chickens.

Like “organic,” many of these terms also imply far more than they legally mean.

Most are designed for factory farm operations, and some brands (like Perdue)11https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YkbpH0gjKs&feature=youtu.be even pay to receive USDA certification that is exclusively for them. For this reason, it’s often a good idea to take the implied claims on chicken labels with a grain of salt.

Some of the most common classifications for grocery store chicken are below.    

Poultry Grades: Poultry grades are ways to categorize the physical characteristics of each bird, including the plumpness of meat, the distribution of fat, and overall bone structure.

All chickens inspected by the AMS are given a grade of A, B, or C, with Grade A poultry being the highest quality.

However, poultry grades indicate nothing about how an animal was raised and instead refer to the quality of the cut.12Serious Eats: Know Your Chicken. What USDA Poultry Labels Actually Mean

Free Range: To be considered free range, chicken producers must provide their chickens with outdoor access for at least half their lives.

However, the term doesn’t require birds to actually spend time outside,13http://homeguides.sfgate.com/difference-between-organic-freerange-chicken-79293.html meaning that “free-range” birds are often tightly packed into indoor coops with small cement paddocks that few, if any, of the birds spend time on.

This means that many of the birds labeled as free range in the grocery store may never have spent more than a few minutes outdoors, much less on pasture. However, similarly certified free range birds may have spent their lives on gorgeous green pastures- making the term largely meaningless for any real insight.

Cage Free: Legally used as a label for egg-laying hens, “cage free” refers to the fact that the hens weren’t kept in cages to make collecting eggs more efficient.

While all birds raised for meat are cage free, some brands still carry the label as an attempt to earn consumer credit for a practice that is already standard throughout the industry.

No Antibiotics Administered or Raised without Antibiotics: Because poultry is usually raised in enormous flocks, diseases can spread quickly.

For this reason, most conventional farmers use antibiotics to keep their birds from getting sick.

Chicken labeled ‘no antibiotics administered’ was never treated with antibiotics, meaning that the farmer responsible found other ways to maintain the health of his flock.

No Hormones: Using growth hormones and steroids on poultry has been illegal since 1959, so any producer that advertises that their birds are hormone free is taking credit for something that has long been standard in the industry.

Natural: This term refers to meat that isn’t overly processed and doesn’t contain artificial flavors, colors or preservatives. Because almost all poultry falls under the category of “natural,” the term is largely meaningless.

Fresh: To qualify as fresh, chicken can’t be cooled below 26 degrees Fahrenheit before being sold. 

In Summary

While the organic regulations for chicken don’t go as far as many people would prefer, they are a standardized way to get a sense of the origins of your meat.

Choosing certified organic chicken might not guarantee that your bird spent its days foraging for worms under the sunshine, but it ensures that it was raised on an organic diet, without antibiotics, and with access to the outdoors.

If you’re looking for a way to become more conscious about the food you eat, choosing organic chicken is a smart place to start.

References   [ + ]

1. http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2014/02/the-high-cost-of-cheap-chicken/index.htm
2. http://thegrownetwork.com/antibiotic-resistance/
3. https://www.ota.com/resources/market-analysis
4. http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/02/what-is-organic-free-range-chicken-usda-poultry-chicken-labels-definition.html
5. https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/What is Organic.pdf
6. http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/01/18/510474179/organic-chickens-get-more-room-to-roam
7, 13. http://homeguides.sfgate.com/difference-between-organic-freerange-chicken-79293.html
8. http://www.organicagcentre.ca/Docs/AnimalWelfare/Soil Association/Welfare standards organic v free range.pdf
9. http://www.reuters.com/article/us-money-chicken-organic-idUSKBN0FM24Q20140717
10. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/08/business/organic-food-purists-worry-about-big-companies-influence.html
11. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YkbpH0gjKs&feature=youtu.be
12. Serious Eats: Know Your Chicken. What USDA Poultry Labels Actually Mean

The post What Makes An Organic Chicken Organic? appeared first on The Grow Network.

Reader Question: Bug Out Realities

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Harry Flashman said “If you have to flee, where (in general theory) would you go? I’m not asking specifically, just your thoughts. If I had to abandon my compound I’d be screwed. The only place I can think to go in the event of some major Black Swan event would be deeper into the Appalachian mountains, where I would surely starve when winter came. Remember the old guy in “The Road” played by Robert Duvall? I don’t want to end up like that.”

Ryan here: Harry, There is a disconnect between what I am thinking about and preparing for in this context and what you are thinking about. You are focused on a black swan type event sort of in line with what survivalist authors love writing about. I am focused on events which fall short of that. 

There are many reasons a person might need to leave where they live, if just for a period of time. Natural disasters such as storms, hurricanes, tornados, wildfire, etc come to mind. Social unrest is another. Various occasional events such as gas leaks, overturned rail cars with nasty chemicals, etc happen also. 

The point here is there are a bunch of actual real life (vs survivalist fantasy and or very unlikely events) reasons you might need to leave your home in a hurry. 

These problems also have the advantage of bejng much more manageable than an EMP and cannibal hordes. I am not “bugging out” to be mad max or the man and son from ‘The Road’, I’m probably going to be in a Motel 6 in the nearest unaffected city ordering take out and talking with my insurance company.

Along these lines my gear is set up accordingly. Stuff like sleepwear, deodorant, an IWB holster for the G19, clothes I could wear in normal society, etc. Sure there is good, water purification, first aid, etc. It is roughly a 50/50 mix between overnight bag and a more conventional ‘bug out bag’.

I hope that explains my thinking. 

What you could do? 

For the more likely fire scare, sudden trip to the hospital, race up to see the kids in an emergency you could put together a kit like mine. 

For the black swan/ conventional survivalist scenario. I would find a couple of places that are abandoned or very isolated and cache a bunch of gear there. Lots of effort and implied tasks but it would give it the ability to leave your place quickly and have some logistics. 

May 2017 EDC Pocket Dump

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May 2017 EDC Pocket Dump

Mega minimal ’round-the-house EDC today. Gotta say I love that Boker. Didn’t think I would get used to the deployment mechanism, but after one day of EDC, it became second nature. Review of it coming soon! Everyday Carry Item Breakdown Fountain Pen Pilot Vanishing Point Pocket Knife Boker Plus Exskelibur I Wallet Paul Smith Leather […]

This is just the start of the post May 2017 EDC Pocket Dump. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


May 2017 EDC Pocket Dump, written by Thomas Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

How to Get the Most Food from Your Survival Garden

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Written by R. Ann Parris on The Prepper Journal.

Boosting Our Garden Productivity

Our practices can affect our garden productivity hugely. Sometimes that’s as easy as changing our mindsets, so that the time and labor it takes to garden is lowered, which allows us to do more. Sometimes it’s embracing “Semper Gumby” and accepting the feedback our gardens and yards offer us, and sometimes it’s looking at our home and yard spaces differently. Sometimes it’s letting the Johnson’s be the Johnson’s and contenting ourselves with being us – with our needs and abilities the measuring standard we use. In some cases, the practices we apply might be hugely unconventional. In other cases, they’re tiny things only in our minds. They can all make a difference when it comes to successful growing. Here are a few ways we can cut down on the labor and time of gardening and increase our yields, whether we’re just getting started with some pots or whether we’re ready to expand our production in times of crisis when food production has stopped.

Pick the Right Plants

Sometimes if we’re after heirlooms and open-pollinated plants so we can collect seed, it can be tough, but whenever possible, selecting local or regional plants and seeds will boost our success. They’re adapted to if not developed specifically for our climate, so there’s a better chance of them performing for us than something that was produced across the country, even of the same cultivar.

If we can’t find our choices locally, we can do some research. There are some proven winners that work across multiple USDA growing zones for most types of veggies and even most of the field crops we’ll grow.

Most of our county extension, state Ag department, and the Master Gardener’s programs will have stock lists of varieties that perform well regionally within the state and county. Remember that the Big Ag guys are going to most likely be spraying and irrigating, so look for and ask about dryland farming varieties and varieties that are resistant to pests.

We can also improve our gardens by selecting disease-resistant varieties whenever possible. Not dealing with a crop illness at all is far easier on the labor, pocketbook, and productivity of a garden.

We also want to pick the right plants for us, and the right number of plants.

15,000 Non GMO Heirloom Vegetable Seeds Survival Garden 32 Variety Pack

Ten or twenty tomatoes take a lot of work, and a lot of resources. On the other hand, ten or twenty pea or bean plants is likely to only yield enough for a couple of meals at once. Four-square-feet of corn is nearly nothing – one, maybe two meals for 4-5. Four-square-feet of spinach could be salads and greens for a whole season, depending on family size.

Determinate plants dump the majority of their produce all at once, which can lead to a glut we have to deal with, and then they die. That can be good or bad.

If we want to go with determinates, for some things like squash and tomatoes, maybe we stagger two to four plants at a time for a small family or a beginner. It makes less to deal with at one time, and it lets us re-plant after them at a reasonable pace for busy people as well.

Alternatively, maybe we go with a longer-lived set of indeterminate plants that trickle in produce at a rate we can consume or process easily.

Proximity – Plan garden plots along paths we already take, and near the resources they’ll need.

Proximity

Location, location, location – we hear it all the time when finding property, but it’s just as important once we have our space to play with. The closer we can put our gardens to our homes, the more attention they’re going to get and the less time we’re going to spend crossing ground to go weed, water, fetch tools, and harvest.

Once we’re hitting about fifty-percent of our veggie consumption, it’s tough to keep the whole garden close at hand, but we can still keep rotations plants that require a lot of water, that get harvested from regularly, and our problem-prone plants near at hand.

The closer we can put our gardens to our homes, the more attention they’re going to get

We also want to be mindful of proximity to water. Since rooflines are going to be our most common rain catchment points (using our free salvaged buckets and totes), we can check both those boxes keeping at least some of our beds along our common walkways to and from the house and garage or sheds, or establishing beds near doorways and outdoor water faucets.

With our beds near the house, we’ll then also want to keep some of the maintenance basics like hand tools and maybe a watering can right there handy as well. The most regularly used items are fairly compact, so they should fit right in with our porch broom or a bucket or deck box near the door.

Eliminate Ego

Right up there with making our life easier by picking out plants that are proven winners and producers, is giving ourselves a break. The neighbors might have a bare earth garden without a speck of a weed. Martha Stewart and the Neeleys might have awesome, bountiful beds with expensive chipped mulch or thick mats of straw.

Good for them. They’re not us.

We can take advice from them if we want – and if their advice falls in line with our growing style, and the desire to be more self-sufficient, which means cutting some of the umbilical cords to Lowe’s and Tractor Supply. We can ask what varieties they use, maybe even trade some seeds. We need to not compare ourselves – or our gardens – to them and theirs.

Every person and family is different, and soil changes step by step. The extra time being cultivated, a reliance on outside fertilizers, different wind and sun patterns, and a devotion to watering can all have effects.

We also need to just be nice to ourselves. If the weeds aren’t big enough to bother the plants, they’re not hurting anything; take a few minutes to enjoy family or a book now and then. If we have to pick between having cardboard between rows and beds, or running a tiller or weed-eater or hoe, go with the time and fuel and labor-saving ugly.

All our garden should be about is our yield and our health and our abilities, compared only to our past.

The rest of it, that’s just ego. Hubris is how mere mortals take down the gods and giants in all the good stories. Stick with humble and happy.

Slow, Steady Solutions

This is actually a permaculture principle. What it means is that we add things at a pace where we can handle them, where they will thrive, and where we can accept feedback from them – and adjust accordingly. It goes hand-in-hand with that ego point above. But also, it’s about learning, and not getting overwhelmed.

Whether we’re just starting or expanding, it can be tempting to go for broke. And sometimes, we break. Then we get discouraged, either by a method and we write it off, or by this whole gardening thing in general.

We can also break the bank trying to do it all at once, either getting started or making changes or trying to keep up with others’ results.

Deciding on our pace should include a look at our financials. Sometimes it’s more economical to buy or rent a machine and get lots done in a few hours, but sometimes we’re better served with a shovel and a post-hole auger and working by inches over days and weeks.

We do need to get started with gardening, but make changes and expand at a pace we can maintain. In the end, we’ll have a better situation than if we rushed around and ended up unhappy or worn out later.

Leave Room to Renovate

When we eke out our plots and expansions, we can benefit from leaving ourselves some elbow room through and around them. Especially if we’re new, we might also want to use a more temporary “build” for the first few rounds.

Container gardens, lasagna beds, using established flower and ornamental beds for veggies, expanding at the base of trees or hedges just a foot or two, and inexpensive beds made from things like shelving units can help with that. So can doing an unbounded, free-form bed instead of starting off with brick or timbers.

That way we have a chance to test out our water solutions, placement around our homes and placement of our tools, our composting systems, make sure it’s not too dry or too sodden or in a frost pocket or heavily shaded come June, exposed to winds, or affected by our livestock locations, and then actually apply the feedback that our plants themselves will give us.

Then we can go around and reinforce our beds with timbers and CMU if we’re happy, or reassemble them somewhere else if we’re not, or go whole-hog with our in-ground, tilled-out methods.

Having extra elbow room also allows us to try out new methods as we become aware of them, and have space to maneuver or change focus as we lose mobility due to injury or age, or as our family situation changes.

In the end, our gardens and our time in them will be far more productive if we leave ourselves room to adjust for better efficiency or economy down the line.

Bed Down Beds

Cover vegetable beds with leaves in the winter.

At the end of the season, cover garden soil with something, no matter what it is – tilled plots eked out of the yard, actual built raised beds, unbounded lasagna beds, pots and planters.

The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible

Maybe it’s newspaper you soak and then weigh down with loose sticks and rocks and the brick/CMU for a later project, or cardboard that gets screwed into timbers. Maybe it’s a tarp, some old shower curtains, or a patchwork of trash bags and duct tape. Maybe it’s a layer of mown leaves and pine needles. In some cases, you might actually plant a cover crop that will grow for a bit and then get killed off in winter’s cold, forming a mat.

Do whatever it takes, but cover gardens for the non-growing seasons.

It’ll reduce the amount of work necessary to start all over in spring, because it’ll prevent or limit weeds – especially from trees that have long, hard-to-kill roots and the most prolific annuals – and in some cases, it will deprive any that are already in the soil of light come spring.

In most cases, covers of all kinds will also help prevent compaction from winter and early spring rains, so it’ll take less work to loosen soil for planting again.

Even piles of unused mulch can benefit from being covered.

Mulch is there to help us prevent weeds on top of the benefits of reducing compaction and creating a slow-breakdown feed for our beds. If it sits open to the sky, weed seeds can blow in, and some of those weeds will get roots going all the way through the pile, a foot or more deep. We don’t really want to be moving weeds into our garden beds, especially not when there’s a fast, easy way to prevent it.

Garden Management Practices

How we manage our gardens, and even the mentalities we adopt as we plot them out and watch them over the season, has major effects on how much yield they return.

Siting and plant selection in particular is crucial, no more so than for busy people. It’s also crucial that we be realistic with ourselves and with our goals – because every style of gardening requires at least some labor and inputs from us to be successful.

Veggie gardening can be rewarding, but it can also be frustrating. Using practices that make it a little easier to get started now and that leave room for improvements in the future can limit some of the frustrations, and can let us work out the kinks while there are still grocery stores filled with cheap produce to cover our gaps.

The post How to Get the Most Food from Your Survival Garden appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

About Powassan Virus

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This graphic showing the number of cases from 2006-2015, is the work of the CDC It has been known since 1958.

             In 2012 I did a series on tick borne illnesses here and then later expanded the series to include insect envenomation injuries.   Of course, public health issues change and expand over time. This is one such needed update.

                  Powassan Virus is also a tick borne virus which is a flavivirus. It is therefore related to The West Nile Virus, St. Louis Encephalitis, and some other tick borne encephalitises.  Seventy five cases of it have been proven within about the last ten years and are most often seen in in either the Great Lakes Region of the United States or the Northeastern Region of the US.   A person bitten by a tick might feel alright after contracting Powassan virus, but they may also go on to experience fever, chills, vomiting, seizures, confusion,and potentially death.   Patients for whom the disease is identified may need hospitalization for ventilatory support, drugs to prevent brain swelling and for intravenous hydration and fever control.  A small percentage of those with this illness will die. A larger percentage of those will have permanent neurologic issues secondary to the encephalitis which is possible. When encephalitis occurs, muscle wasting, memory issues and other neurologic problems may occur.

                  Anyone who has received a tick bite and is now sick or febrile (with a fever) needs to seek medical care immediately. The incubation period for Powassan Virus is one week to one month long.  There is presently no preventive vaccine available.  There are two types of this virus that have been isolated and both are pathogenic (disease causing) in human beings. This is a nationally reportable disease.

            Although Powhassan virus is relatively rare, it is increasing in incidence. It is also found in Canada, and it is named for the area in which it was first described. It has also been detected in Russia.  Powhassan virus can be transmitted in as little as 15 minutes of having a tick embedded upon you. It is not transmissible from person to person.  I will add additional information as possible.

           Please see my prior posts on strategies for avoidance of tick bites.

Survival Medicine with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy

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Survival Medicine with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy! Forrest & Kyle “The Prepping Academy” Audio in player below! Special guest Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy. That’s right, from “The Doom and Bloom Survival Medicine Hour.” Together they have written “The Survival Medicine Handbook.” Dr. Alton also has a New York Times Bestseller “The Ebola Survival … Continue reading Survival Medicine with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy

The post Survival Medicine with Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Everything you ever wanted to know about MREs, and then some

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MREs

Meals Ready to Eat (MRE) seem to make it into the stockpiles, bug out bags, and trunks of many preppers.  Yes, I have a few cases of them, too. Unfortunately, few people do the leg work to fully understand MREs and whether they are a wise decision for themselves. Below are some tips to help if you have considered buying these meals as part of your food storage and emergency plans.

Purpose of MREs

You should consider the source and purpose of MREs. Most of us are familiar with MREs as military food. Uncle Sam created them to fuel fighting soldiers in combat situations. The taste has to be decent enough to avoid revolt from the troops and to encourage them to eat the whole thing.  If the the troops aren’t eating, it is a waste of money, weight, volume, and more importantly, calories/fuel.

Equally as important as what goes into MREs, is what doesn’t get put into them. Uncle Sam does not want troops to have gas, loose stools and lots of bathroom breaks on the battle field.  You can expect a certain amount of constipation to be “built-in” to MREs.  Ingredients are not added to increase constipation, but they definitely remove any items or contents that would encourage a regular or loose stool. The objective with the MRE is to fuel the troops and for that fuel to be 100% eaten and converted into energy.

MREs And Food Storage

I have never seen the cardboard cases that MREs are packed in. Included should be a label that says- MREs are only intended to be eaten for 21 days! Using the military’s plan of two per person, per day, times 21 days equals 42 MREs.  Twelve are in a case, which is almost four cases of MREs per person. Keep in mind that these MRE stocking levels only account for half of your daily caloric need, and you would still need to augment this diet with at least one hot meal of regular food per day.

Three years is the advertised shelf life of MREs.  Of course, with proper storage, they could last much longer, but we shouldn’t be planning for best-case scenarios. We should definitely be planning for worst-case scenarios. To learn more about food storage, check out these articles!

Math And Rotation

With the assumption that MREs have a shelf life of three years and that you can eat them 21 days in every year, you would then stockpile 42 times 3 = 126 MREs per person at any given time (minimum). That’s 10.5 cases per adult. To make the math easy, I will go ahead and round that up to 12 cases per person.  Every year you will need to buy four new cases of MREs, and respectively use up four cases per year. As a result, this will maintain the restocking rate and freshness.

The above figures are minimums. Let’s assume that we could go 21 days “on” MREs, and then two or three or five months “off” MREs. And again, return to another 21 days “on” again. Stockpiling twice as many MREs is possible if you wanted. Just remember, you need to double your consumption to keep up with proper rotation. Four MREs a month need to be eaten by each person.

Think twice about your MRE stockpiles. If you are going to buy them, be prepared to buy them annually and exhaust an equal number annually. Figure on buying or restocking a third of your supply each and every year.

Side effects

Any person that is considering MREs for food storage should first understand the duration at which our bodies can tolerate them. Eating an MRE based diet is like going on any new diet. You are consuming food that your body is unfamiliar with processing.   Anyone who has spent any time on a diet, will tell you that, weird things can happen to their body. A change in stool, urine, digestion, energy or appetite is not uncommon. MREs are no different.  A persons body is not accustomed to them and will revolt in some manner. Keep in mind, that these side effects are not necessarily unique to MREs. If you switched to a 100% freeze-dried diet from a commercial manufacturer, for example, you would probably encounter similar results.

Supplement Your Storage

As a general rule of thumb, Uncle Sam tries to get the troops at least one hot meal per day.  Guidelines like this imply that with 21 days of MREs, this isn’t the only thing the troops are eating.  Troops in combat burn about 4,200 calories per day. Each MRE contains about 1,200 calories.  The troops are issued two per day, assuming a hot breakfast, and then MREs for lunch & dinner while out on patrols/maneuvers. This typically creates a negative caloric balance. With our military troops are only eating about 2,400 – 3,600 calories per day, but burning about 4,200 calories. As you can see by the numbers, this is not the ideal food pyramid or anywhere close!

MREs are simply a survival food. Can you eat them for more than 21 days and survive?  Sure.  Should you?  Probably not. It’s much more economical to buy freeze-dried products in #10 cans, which have a shelf life of 10, 20, 30+ years. Freeze dried products don’t need to be rotated as often, so there is less worry about eating them up before their expiration date. To learn more about freeze dried food and what is available, check out Thrive Life!

Practicality and Traveling

It is not practical to use MREs in bug out bags or when hiking. They are heavy, bulky and contain water. Remember, these are designed for troops who are going out on short-term, lightweight patrol missions. The military will airdrop any extra-needed supplies and food they may need. Some preppers may not feel compelled to stock MREs. Much lighter and possible cheaper alternatives are available!  Ration emergency food bars are one of these alternatives. The caloric intake you need is there and they are easy to pack. Check out this informative article about the importance of calories and food storage.

Take note if you are traveling on an airplane with MREs. They are not TSA approved the way they are. Heating elements within them are banned from checked, as well as carry-on, baggage.  Since you want to fly with your MRE, break it open and remove the individual packets, and take the heater element out.

What I Store

Our food pantry has about 90 days of food & water for four people. In addition, we have one hundred #10 cans of foods per person (400 cans total).  I am slowly working on tripling that amount. Lastly, we have 24 cases of MREs per person, 96 cases total. We annually refresh at 8 cases per person per year. Each person in our household has to exhaust eight MREs per month. To do this, we take them with us on vacations, cross-country trips during the holidays, on the boat, etc.  We even give them away to friends and family. In the trunk of our car, we always keep about a half-dozen. If they go bad, we just throw them away. Over time, we have noticed that they don’t really spoil, they just seem to lose their nutrition.

What About Others?

Within our food storage, we keep twice as many MREs as we should have. During an emergency we are prepared to help support family, friends and neighbors. Our storage is not equipped, nor do I want to feed them for the long term. Rather, to give them about six MREs per person, and tell them to hike-out to safety or to other friends.  We can’t have them drain our pantry, but they can take the MREs as a gift and use it to get the heck outta dodge.  They don’t have to go away empty-handed.

By my calculations, we could send as many as 36 people away with six MREs per person, and still have 63 MREs per person for our family. Added to that, we also have one hundred #10 cans of freeze-dried food, which should be enough to feed one person for a whole year. We have four people and store 400 cans of food. From our experiences, we have learned that about 100 cans will fit beneath a king-sized bed.

Hopefully this has been a beginning point for you, as you consider MREs and the other types of foods that you can store. Buy a case or two and try them out. Take note of how your body digests them, what meals you like the taste of and plan your MRE storage and rotation accordingly.

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Mother’s Day Special All Week Long!

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Mother's Day Special

Mother’s Day Special!

Who does most of the grocery shopping in your house? Who makes sure you’re well fed by preparing healthy meals? Who loves you more than anyone else?

I would guess for most of us – it’s Mother. Help her out with a gift of the most delicious and healthy emergency food anywhere. She will thank you and you will enjoy making her happy.

So here’s your chance to get 20% Off on all your favorite items!

Click Here Now!

Survival Medicine Hour: Expired EpiPens, Hepatitis C, Rodent Control 2

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Expired EpiPens Still Effective?

This week’s Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discusses a new study from the California Poison Control System that indicates that EpiPens may be therapeutically effective even years after their expiration dates, welcome news given that a two-pack costs $300, even in generic form. Plus, part 2 of rodent control, this time how to get rid of rats and mice that already infest your retreat.

That’s a lot of rats!

 

Plus, Joe and Amy discuss the increasing epidemic of Hepatitis C in people who are using or abusing opioids like heroin and other drugs. Learn the obstacles to controlling this deadly disease and what might be done to help.

 

All this and more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour! To Listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/05/12/survival-medicine-hour-expired-epipens-hepatitis-c-rodent-elimination

Follow us on Twitter @preppershow, FB at Doom and Bloom ™, and YouTube at DrBonesNurseAmy!

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

Joe and Amy Alton

dr. bones and nurse amy

Fill those holes in your medical supplies by checking out Nurse Amy’s entire line of kits and individual items at store.doomandbloom.net!

Kits by Alton First Aid

Important Topics: A Massive Ransomware Cyberattack, Ebola, and…Umm…Ice Cream

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Survival Saturday is a round-up of the week’s news and resources for folks who are interested in being prepared.

This Week in the News

This week on Survival Saturday, while … Read the rest

The post Important Topics: A Massive Ransomware Cyberattack, Ebola, and…Umm…Ice Cream appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

Prep Blog Review: Follow These Tips To Maximize Your Harvest

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Homegrown vegetables and herbs are more delicious, nutritious, and sustainable than store-bought food. But growing your own food can be challenging sometimes especially if you are limited by space, poor soil, limited budget, or all of them.

Keeping top-quality home-grown produce on your table all year round is not so difficult if you follow the steps I’ve gathered for you for this week’s Prep Blog Review. If you have any other comments or ideas, please share them in the comment section.

  1. Succession Planting – How To Get The Most Of Your Garden This Year

“If there is one simple gardening method that can help feed your family consistently, its succession planting.

Succession planting is all about sowing the right amount of seed to have plants to feed your family for a specific period of time. As the growing season progresses, seed is planted again a few weeks later so that the harvest will be spread out accordingly.

With succession planting, you can keep fresh produce coming all season long

We have all been there. We plant a huge area of lettuce, beans or corn all at once. And then of course, it matures all at the same time. Before you know it, you become overrun by more produce than you can possibly consume. The result – a large part of the crop goes to waste.”

Read more on Old World Garden Farms.

  1. Alternative Soil Conditioners For Organic Gardening

“The soil in your garden is a very complex structure of elements and it has both advantages and disadvantages. To improve the soil and keep a successful garden you need to apply soil conditioners. The ones described in this article are alternatives to compos and manure.

Over the years I’ve experienced with various types of soil conditioners since I had to work with poor soil in my garden.

I was surprised to discover that there are other organic materials that you can dig into your soil.

You can use these soil conditioners as mulch to help improve drainage or water-holding capacities.”

Read more on Prepper’s Will.

  1. 7 Best Flowers For Your Vegetable Garden

“If you want a healthy garden, whether decorative, or an edible vegetable garden, you absolutely need to incorporate flowering plants. As a critical part of any healthy ecosystem, flowers provide food and/or habitat for beneficial insects (especially bees and butterflies), and humming birds, while adding natural aesthetic delight for children and adults alike.

The more nectar that your garden has available, the more balanced of an ecosystem you will have, since only a small number of insects are actually pests.

The more insects you have, the less chance your garden ecosystem has of getting out of balance and pests taking over.

Flowers have other benefits to the garden as well, including use as ground covers, nutrient accumulators, and aromatic pest deterrents, among other functions.

With this in mind, we’ll take a look at some of the best companion plant flowers for your vegetable garden.”

Read more on Homestead Survival Site.

  1. 10 Common Herbs You Should Know And Use

“Using herbs in cooking – fresh or dried – increases the flavour and taste of your food and often improves the visual appeal. Most of us want our food to look good. Have you ever looked through those recipe cards from the 1970s?

Everyone’s mother had a set, I think.

Despite what the recipe might actually have tasted like, we are turned off by mashed potatoes and steamed fish covered in white sauce or an Easter ham dressed up to look like the Easter bunny.”

Read more on Just Plain Living.

This article has been written by Drew Stratton for Survivopedia. 

What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2017-5-13)

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  This weekly post is an open-forum (any topic) to voice your thoughts, opinions, concerns, or questions for others. Lets hear about what you’ve been doing this week for preparedness. The more who comment, the more who benefit from the discussion… First timer? Lets hear from you too 😉   ———————————– Note: We appreciate that […]

How Pine Pollen Can Be Used as a Super Food

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ReadyNutriton Guys and Gals, this piece is designed to make you aware of the many benefits of pine pollen.  That’s right, it’s a superfood that can be put to many uses, and we’re actually coming up on the time that it can be harvested in the wild.  Raw pine pollen is good for a lot of different things, especially exercise and physical training.  Let’s outline some of the qualities of it and cite some references for your perusal.

Pine Pollen is a Powerhouse of Nutrients

Pine pollen is, technically, the male “sperm” cells of the pine tree, and is analogous to a plant-formulated testosterone.  Don’t smirk, ladies: in this form, it is very beneficial for you as well.  Studies prove that low testosterone levels in both genders (yes, women also have a minute quantity of it in their bodies) cause cholesterol levels (the “bad” form of it) to increase.  Low levels also cause losses of bone and tissue that translate into aging prematurely, and also significant weight gain (fat), sexual problems, and cardiovascular problems.

With men, in particular, low testosterone levels lead to a higher probability of cancer.  Pine pollen can fight all of these with its components of Phyto-androgens, which are the sexual hormones found in human beings but produced in plants.  This is really neat stuff because the pine pollen gives you androstenedione, testosterone, DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), and androsterone.  Sift through the archives and you’ll find some articles I wrote on DHEA and testosterone that go into detail.

Some of the ailments that raw pine pollen can fight off are high cholesterol, chronic fatigue, and diabetes.    These conditions have been dramatically improved by the regular addition of pine pollen to the diet.  Although these Phyto-androgens are almost identical to the ones produced by the human body, there is still a slight difference, and this is beneficial: the difference enables the body to continue producing its normal levels of the androgens without being affected by the addition of the pine pollen.

It can be taken in the form of powder or tincture, and with either case mixed with a beverage.  The tincture is the more easily-consumed out of the two forms.  Here are a few websites to help you in your quest for further information:

http://www.rawforestfoods.com/questions.html
http://rawfoodhealthwatch.com/pine-pollen/
http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Pine_Pollen…

The pine pollen is also made up of about 35% protein and contains 7 essential amino acids.  To refresh your memory from the articles I have written previously, essential amino acids are those necessary to the body that are not produced within the body, i.e., we must obtain them from food.  Here they are, with the 7 essentials being underlined:

  • Alanine 17mg
  • Arginine 30mg
  • Aspartic acid 33mg
  • Cysteine 3mg
  • Glutamic acid 47mg
  • Glycine 21mg
  • Histidine 6mg
  • Isoleucine 16mg
  • Leucine 25mg
  • Lysine 24mg
  • Phenylalanine 17mg
  • Proline 26mg
  • Serine 16mg
  • Threonine 15mg
  • Tryptophan 4mg
  • Tyrosine 11mg
  • Valine 19mg

The recommended amount to consume is ½ to 1 tsp per day.  Pine pollen is also chock full of vitamins and minerals, as well as acids and a ton of substances that normally we buy in bunches, such as resveratrol and MSM.  These substances are all right there in the pine pollen.  I have seen many places to order it online, and your finer health food stores will (at the bare minimum) be able to order it for you.  As with all things, consult with your physician prior to using any of the information or materials mentioned in this article.  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

4 Secrets to Becoming a Successful Gardener

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4 secrets to becoming a successful gardener | Backdoor Survival

Gardening is a skill and anyone who tells you something different is not being totally honest. That being said, having a successful gardening experience depends on many outside factors including, but not limited to soil conditions, available sunlight, the length of the growing season, seed quality, and pest control. Still, many of these factors can be overcome with skill and experience.

In this article, Dan Chiras shares his time-proven tips on what it takes to become a successful gardener.

The post 4 Secrets to Becoming a Successful Gardener by Gaye Levy first appeared on Backdoor Survival.