Burglars Tried To Rob Woman In Wheelchair. But She Had A Gun.

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Burglars Tried To Rob Woman In Wheelchair. But She Had A Gun.

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Two burglars were no match for an elderly Cleveland woman in a wheelchair and her gun.

“I put the gun up to the window of the door and I yelled, ‘Get off my property,’” Melinda Vandal said she told the two men.

One man was trying to come into her door and the other was cutting the screen on a window of her garage on July 10, she said.

Tired Of Losing Freedoms And Looking For A Second Country? Read More Here.

One of the men apparently dropped a knife and they ran off when they saw Vandal toting the gun.

“It was last Monday morning around 10:30,” Vandal told Fox 8. “I looked at the door and there was a man, right there, right outside looking like he was going for my door.”

Police are looking into the incident but have made no arrests.

“It’s hard for me to relax or sleep because I keep seeing his face,” Vandal said.

She is now keeping her doors locked and her gun close.

“It never used to be like this around here,” Vandal said, noting she has lived in her home for more than 20 years. “I don’t want to ever hurt anyone, but I feel like I need to protect myself.”

What is your reaction? Share your thoughts in the section below:

 

 

Changes to my Side Bar Categories

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I’m going to make a couple changes to the category side bar.
One will be the deletion of several sailing blogs. For me and where I live, a sailboat would make a great Bug Out Vehicle (BOV) and for anyone else who has easy access to the oceans.

Reading sailboat blogs are fun and makes me want to join them, so as I came across other interesting sailboat blogs I added them. Suitable BOV live aboard sailboats such as 30 to 39 feet costing $25,000 to $80,000 are comfortable to live on but the maintenance is very expensive. Some who live and sail on this size of boat claim they were on a tight budget but actually didn’t have a budget. They have plenty of money so that rules out their thoughts as Preppers! Another blog features an upgrade from a tired 37-foot boat to a $500,000 catamaran! Oh sure, budget my butt!

Just a note; if I were to be a liveaboard on a 39-foot sailboat the local marina charges $400 a month plus electric for the docking. It includes Wi-Fi, bath house and laundry facilities.

I will keep three Sailing Blogs because they are green start-up sailors and reading them will show you what they have gone through from the very beginning of their adventure if you’d like to have a sailboat BOV:

“Zero to Cruising”

“Life on The Hook”

“Mid-Life Cruising”

If you want to keep reading the others, you’ll have to copy their address and save them for yourself. Next week I’ll make the deletions.

I also added another category “Opinion Blogs”:

Warning the language can be strong! These blogs as I add them, are ticked off Patriots and vent their feelings.

Survival Foods For Your Garden.

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It is said that you will never starve if you are growing Jerusalem Artichokes. The Jerusalem Artichoke is a root crop & member of the sunflower family. The green foliage can be fed to stock & chooks as can the root itself. You only need one root bulb to start your crop.

Nutritional Information:


Grow Tulsi: The Super-power Salad Herb

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Growing tulsi (holy basil) is super-easy!

About two years ago, I joined a community garden and planted a 4-foot by 8-foot plot. A friend has a local nursery, so I picked up some plants to get started and used seeds for the rest. One of the plants I purchased was a goji berry bush. To be honest, I am not the best community gardener. I have problems incorporating regular visits to the garden into my weekly schedule.

Getting Everything Planted

A few weeks after I got everything planted, I noticed another plant growing like crazy next to my goji berry bush. I tried to cut it back, so the goji would have room to grow.

The leaves tasted like a spicy mint that was very pleasant.

The Takeover

As the weeks went by, this crazy plant literally took over and smothered the goji berry bush.

Every time I would go to my plot, I would cut it back. It didn’t work. Then, it started to flower. It had tiny whitish purple flowers on a long stalk. I brought a few of the flowers home so I could research and identify the plant.

Have you seen this article on how to identify plants.

It turned out to be holy basil or tulsi (Ocimum tenuiflorum).

When I harvested my garden plot, I decided to bring the tulsi home to see if it would grow. It lasted a while with a lot of flowers. Then it died completely, or so it seemed. The tub was on my front porch and left there throughout the winter.

Annual Revisits

When the weather started to warm again, I saw the green leaves of the tulsi start to sprout out of the soil in the tub.

The Harvest

We have been harvesting tulsi for the last eight months. It is delicious in our salads. It adds a spicy, mint flavor similar to regular basil.

The Many Benefits of Tulsi

In India, people have been growing Tulsi for its medicinal properties for more than 3,000 years. Holy basil is considered a sacred plant in Hinduism.

In traditional medicine, Tulsi is used for:

  • Stress
  • Digestive problems
  • Treating colds and fevers
  • Treating allergies & infections
  • Strengthening the immune system
  • Treating hair and skin disorders
  • Dental health
  • Repelling insects and treating insect bites

Tulsi is very important in Ayurveda and naturopathy, because the plant is loaded with antioxidants, phytonutrients, essential oils, and vitamins A and C, which have been known to help manage diabetes and high blood pressure. If you use a few tulsi leaves regularly, it will help the body function properly.

It is known to have antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. It is considered an adaptogen, (a substance that helps the body adapt and function optimally).

Besides adding it to salads, the leaves are easy-to-make into a tea.

Add it to your garden

There are more than 100 varieties of Tulsi. If you have a warm, sunny place in your garden or on your porch or windowsill, consider adding a tulsi plant. It is perfect in a container garden with other sun-loving herbs. It is easy-to-grow and requires very little care.

In the late spring or early summer, when the temperatures in your area are around 70°F, sow seeds outdoors. If you want an early start, sow the seeds indoors in a sunny window.

Put the tulsi seeds on top of the soil and lightly press down for soil contact. Spray the seeds with water or compost tea. Keep the soil moist until the seeds germinate in about 1 to 2 weeks.

Pinch the top of the tulsi plant when there are four to six pairs of leaves for a bushier plant.

Harvest Tulsi

Harvest the tulsi leaves throughout the growing season. As the plant gets bigger, use a pair of scissors to cut the larger leaves or cut an entire branch.

Use the fresh leaves the same day, or they will fade. Or dry the leaves by collecting the branches. Place them in a dry place away from direct sunlight. Move the stems around about three times each day until the leaves are crisp and easily crushed.

 

Do you have tulsi in your garden? How do you use it? Tell us in the comments below.

 

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The post Grow Tulsi: The Super-power Salad Herb appeared first on The Grow Network.

Stowing Your Clothes In a Pack

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A few weeks ago a family friend asked me to go over what should be in their son’s pack and review a few backcountry  techniques.


So, three days later Nick and his buddy Daniel are at my door with a surprise guest, Nick’s 
Mom.

We had a great three hour session.  Very straight forward.  Perfect for a summer hike.

Towards the end of our time together, Daniel showed me a novel way to stow ones clothing in a pack.  A day’s collection of clothing rolled up into a simple bundle.

Step 1 – Layout the gear.  All the clothing is light weight.



Step 2 – Fold up the gear.  Place clothing so that it can be rolled from bottom to top.  Note that the sock’s opening is outward.


Step 3 – Begin rolling.  Keep it tight.

Step 4 – With the bundle tightly rolled, roll the sock backward over the clothes.
That’s it.

5 Old-Fashioned, Overlooked Ways To Save Time And Money

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5 Old-Fashioned, Overlooked Ways To Save Time And Money

No doubt, technology can help save you time and money. Remember when you used to have to wait until after 7 p.m. to call long-distance because it was cheaper? Now, though, we can talk to our loved ones anytime we like!

But technology can’t do everything as cheaply or as quickly as we would like to think.

Here are five ways you can save time and money by doing things the old-fashioned way:

1. Turn off your phone.

My mother was quite a talkative person, but she would sometimes take the receiver off the hook. That’s good advice, even in the days of smartphones and cell phones. If you allow the phone to dominate your life, you literally could spend 24 hours of every day answering emails, sending texts, and chatting on Facebook. Whenever you really need to get something done and you find that you are constantly interrupted by your phone, turn it off.

2. Organize your life.

Spending a few minutes to make out lists, organize your closet into business and casual clothing, and write down important reminders (and put them on the fridge) will save you more time and money than you can imagine!

3. Know the difference between needs and wants.

Warren Buffett once said that if you buy things you don’t need, you will soon find yourself selling the things you do need. Be certain that you are buying (or paying for) what you need first.

Learn Everything You Don’t Know In “The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets”!

Do you have a gym membership that you pay for each month, but that you only use a half dozen times a year? Do you really NEED a rice cooker when a pot with a lid works just as well? Yes, “wants” are nice to have, but if you find that you are short on cash every month, perhaps it’s time to prioritize your needs and wants. Our ancestors were great at this, weren’t they?

4. Put your kids to work.

Many parents make the mistake of thinking that when they do everything for their child, they are showing them that they are loved. “They will have to work their whole lives, let them be kids now,” we hear.

Unfortunately, this will end up costing parents tons of time and money. Children might feel more loved, but they also will spend their entire lives feeling entitled to this sort of treatment. Show your children real love by teaching them that everyone needs to work and pull their weight. No, you don’t have to send them out to the fields to hoe weeds, but when I was only five, I made my own bed, dressed myself, put my dirty clothes in the hamper, got my own breakfast (cereal and milk), and did simple chores after school such as feeding the dog and putting the mail on the kitchen table.

5. Keep it simple.

I have a confession to make: I don’t own a food processor. Amazing, but true — although I did buy a used one once. At least in my case, I found that the effort and time it took to take it apart and clean it was far more time-intensive than if I used a simple knife to cut food. A blender and a knife does almost everything a food processor does for far less money and effort. This isn’t to say that I don’t love kitchen gadgets, but many of them cost a lot of money and are time-intensive.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:  

A U.S. State Just Took A Bold Stand On Food Sovereignty

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A U.S. State Just Took A Bold Stand On Food Sovereignty

Image source: Pixabay.com

Does your delicious homemade goat cheese elicit requests to buy it? If so, unless you are a licensed home producer—which likely involved having to spend thousands of dollars on facilities and equipment and jumping through many hoops—unfortunately you probably have to turn away potential customers and much-needed cash.

Whether you make goat cheese, raise poultry or livestock for meat, have an excess of fresh cow’s milk available, or produce any other kind of value-added farm product, it may be illegal for you to sell directly to consumers. This creates a lose-lose situation, leaving the neighbor who would gladly pay for fresh farm products having to instead buy elsewhere, and leaving the farmer with more food and less money than needed.

One place this is no longer true is in the state of Maine. New bipartisan legislation now gives local communities the authority to regulate—or not regulate—the sale of farm products directly to consumers. Known as “the food sovereignty bill,” Legislative Document No. 725, “An Act to Recognize Local Control Regarding Food and Water Systems,” was introduced by Democratic legislators, widely supported on both sides of the political aisle, and signed into law by a Republican governor. Although Maine is the first state in the nation to enact such a law, there is widespread public outcry for this kind of food freedom to take hold across the nation.

Maine’s LD 725 states in summary that it “…authorizes municipal governments to regulate local food systems and the transport of water for commercial purposes by ordinance and requires the State to recognize such ordinances.” In short, towns and cities in Maine can now allow farm fresh food to be produced and sold within the municipality without the risk of any interference from the state.

Learn Everything You Don’t Know In “The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets”!

More than a dozen Maine communities have already adopted local food sovereignty ordinances, beginning with the landmark legislation in the tiny town of Sedgwick in 2011. But without the state recognizing their authority to do so, the municipal ordinances had minimal real-life impact at the time. The newly passed state law changes everything.

A U.S. State Just Took A Bold Stand On Food Sovereignty

Image source: Pixabay.com

The cost of setting up production according to state regulations in most areas of the country is unrealistic for small producers. Creating a licensed facility can cost tens of thousands of dollars, making it out of the question for small family farms wanting to sell small batches of homemade pickles or raw dairy products made on the kitchen stovetop or a few dozen humanely processed meat birds. But the new food sovereignty law allows purchases of those kinds of products to be overseen by towns and cities, setting the stage for far more opportunities for farmers and freedom of choice for consumers. If the fast-growing list of Maine municipalities creating laws to allow such activity is any indication, government intervention in farm-to-table food sales could soon be a thing of the past.

What Opponents Are Saying

Not everyone approves of the new law. There has been some pushback from some state entities, as well as from some farmers and food-producing organizations. They fear that food safety is at risk, along with product reputation. Allowing food to be marketed directly to consumers without any inspections or safety measures in place could set us back into a bygone era when the risk of foodborne illness was far greater than it is today, according to some opponents.

Supporters of food sovereignty, however, applaud the way it will allow people to interact personally with food producers and make their own decisions about whether or not they trust their food handling practices.

Food sovereignty proponents in Maine and across the nation have long been advocating for the wisdom of people being allowed to take control of their own health and safety choices. Well-known farmer and food freedom advocate Joel Salatin has written extensively about the value of transparency in food production—instead of letting the government decide whether his own poultry processing facility uses safe handling practices, he encourages consumers to come see for themselves.

There are a few caveats. The law allows for sales of food products only within the community, meaning that farmers in very small towns will still have a very limited pool of possible customers. And if the world’s best goat cheese is made in a farm kitchen a few towns over, it will still not be legal to purchase it directly.

Rules for farmers’ markets will likely not be affected. Being comprised of an aggregate of farmers and products from several different towns, they will still use state guidelines. However, many vendors at commercial markets represent larger farms for whom the licensing procedure is more manageable and is already in place.

Maine’s new food sovereignty law is by no means perfect. But for those seeking the ability to buy and sell food the old-fashioned way, it is a great place to start.

What do you think about the law? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Top 6 Ways To Preserve Eggs

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When it comes to preserving eggs there is a lot to know. Powdered egg products are nice to have during survival situations and long emergencies but they are quite expensive to purchase. Fortunately there are ways to preserve eggs and maintain their nutritional value for an extended period of time. Understanding Preservation Chicken, duck, and. . . Read More

The post Top 6 Ways To Preserve Eggs first appeared on Backdoor Survival.

Being Mr. Nice Guy Will Get You Killed in SHTF

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I’m a pretty nice guy. I avoid confrontations and try to get along with everybody I meet, but there are some people in this world that you just can’t get along with. No matter how nice you are or how much you compromise with them, they will stab you in the back first chance they […]

The post Being Mr. Nice Guy Will Get You Killed in SHTF appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

The Best Brush Cutter: Gas and Electric Options

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The post The Best Brush Cutter: Gas and Electric Options is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

If you’re at war with overgrown grasses and shrubbery on your property, you already know that a cheap low-powered weed whacker isn’t going to cut it. You need something more powerful. But how do you choose a brush cutter that will handle the bushy undergrowth you have? Do you want something that multitasks, or just … Read more

The post The Best Brush Cutter: Gas and Electric Options is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Women’s Preps For TSHTF And Now |episode 156

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Women's Preps For TSHTF And Now |episode 156
Photo via Flickr by Hans Splinter

Women’s Preps For TSHTF And Now |episode 156

http://www.survivalpunk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/femalepreppingepisode.mp3

Download

This week is a special episode. To talk about women’s preps for TSHTF Mike and I brought on His wife and my girlfriend Serenity. 

Make sure you listen to the end of the podcast for a surprise. 

 

  • Female prepping
  • Include the women. Teach them and make instructions.
  • Personal hygiene.
  • Most of this stuff is easy to coupon
  • Straight razors take practice. Old school safety razors.
  • Peeing standing up
  • She wee
  • Menstruation
  • Stock up on Midol
  • QueenVictoriaa was prescribed weed for menstration pains
  • UTI’s 
  • Chocolate and comfort foods
  • Pregnancy. Birth control
  • Find a local midwife
  • Yeast Infections
  • Childcare needs
  • Being armed

Links

Zombie Squad Forums Women’s Health In The PAW

How To Pee Standing Up

Where There is No Doctor

She Wee

 

Subscribe to the Survival Punk Survival Podcast. The most electrifying podcast on survival entertainment. 

Want to hear yourself on the podcast? Call in with your questions at (615) 657-9104 and leave us a voice mail. 

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The post Women’s Preps For TSHTF And Now |episode 156 appeared first on Survival Punk.

Here’s Why It Doesn’t Matter If North Korea Is Actually a Nuclear Threat

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Those who believe that our own government is perfectly willing to commit an atrocity and then blame it on someone else tend to deny threats when they’re brought up consistently … Read the rest

The post Here’s Why It Doesn’t Matter If North Korea Is Actually a Nuclear Threat appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

How to Actively Prepare for When “Winter Is Coming”

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Moving to Norway? Iceland. Maybe Minnesota, where they have three seasons, Winter, Winter, Winter and Construction?

Or maybe you just want to prepare for global climate change in general, cause, well, um.

If you are a delicate desert flower that can endure temperatures above 100 degrees Fahrenheit barely breaking a sweat, just the thought of moving up north likely makes you shiver. Or maybe, sub 30-degree temperatures actually make you sweat more.

Whatever your case may be, let Lord Eddard Stark’s sage advice put you at ease, “Brace yourselves. Winter is coming.” Unlike the trials in Game of Thrones, preparing your body for cold climates, though a feat, can be quite fun.

There are many ways to prepare your body for acclimating to frigid weather conditions; everything from ice baths to eating ice cream. So, how do you prepare? I promise, it’s not as bad as you think.

Ice Baths?

 

Yes. Ice Baths. Though typically used by athletes for post-workout recovery and injury therapy, ice baths for acclimation, other than just moving to the region and gutting it through, stand resolute as the quickest, most effective way to prepare your body for a major climate shift.

By easing your body into freezing temperatures for short stints, you train your internal temperature gauge to compensate for varying climates. When taking an ice bath, a key aspect to remember is that cold slows your system down by reducing blood flow. This is why when you move vigorously in cold temperatures, your body warms up. Basic science. Therefore, when climbing into your bath, especially for the first time, ease into the temperature change recommended by your machine’s individual instructions. Do not assume colder is better, especially in the beginning. Trust your body’s signals and allow it ample time to adapt. In fact, cold showers are an excellent step towards climbing into a large tub of ice.

After 5 to 8 minutes of exposure in your tub, climb out and dry off. Though you will be tempted to warm up immediately, just as you eased yourself into the cold, be sure to allow your body the chance to gradually warm after each exposure. This will condition your system to warm naturally in cold weather and eventually gauge the cooler temperatures as normal.

A full list of cold therapy tips is outlined by acclaimed coach Andy Schmitz in his article 8 Ice Bath Do’s and Don’ts. Though specifically designed for athletes, his exposure tips will surely help you if ice baths are a route you choose to take.

Be sure to read your ice machine’s instructions. Keeping your ice machine clean prevents buildup to maintain an efficient production rate. This will also help it produce more shapely cubes. Compacted ice stays colder longer, so you’ll get more bang for your buck.

Eat colder foods.

Ice Cream, Smoothies, Freeze Pops, the list goes on forever. Frozen dessert is by far the easiest way to begin your acclimation. Not only will consumption teach you to moderate your taste buds, but, with the reinforcement of brain freeze, you will learn–and extend–your cold tolerance threshold. This will give you a rough measure of your personal acclimation progress as you implement the ice bath method.

However, this advice is not a license to throw your diet out the window—especially one prescribed by a doctor. That said, gaining a few extra pounds during this eating process will provide you with slightly more insulation, a crucial aspect to sustaining warmth in colder climates. Further, with the warmer clothes you’ll undoubtedly be wearing, an ice cream sandwich or two will actually aid you in filling out that sweater from Aunt Betsy. Up to you whether this is a good thing.

Climate Clothes Climax

Speaking of sweaters: shopping for proper winter attire is essential in your prep. If you are moving from a southern region—specifically a place where lizards bask in the sun all day or monkeys do their Tarzan routine—you are not likely to have a thick knit cap let alone a pair of snow shoes. As you’re packing your bags, be sure to leave the shorts and remember the parka.

Learn the art of layering. Layering will be your best friend as you’re acclimating. Long underwear, leggings, thermal undershirts, and waterproof socks are your key base layers. After that, indoor apparel usually consists of sweaters and the occasional hat. Outdoor apparel often consists of your typical Christmas movie apparel: a woolen trench or pea coat—unless you go the parka route—a thick hat, flannel or fur-lined gloves, insulated boots, and a sturdy scarf. All of these items are available for purchase online or in your local store up north—unless you’re moving to an igloo park. (Just kidding. That’s not a thing.)

Into the Wild [White] Yonder

Moving up north or enduring extreme climate change may seem a cautionary tale, but if care is taken, your body will adjust to the harsher climate. With your new snow shod experiences, you will soon see just how wonderfully ice transforms ordinary landscaping. In time, you will come to enjoy your new way of life. Until then, sip your coco and let your eyes rove over the gently wafting boughs of the newly crystal laden trees.

The post How to Actively Prepare for When “Winter Is Coming” appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

How to Actively Prepare for When “Winter Is Coming”

Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Moving to Norway? Iceland. Maybe Minnesota, where they have three seasons, Winter, Winter, Winter and Construction?

Or maybe you just want to prepare for global climate change in general, cause, well, um.

If you are a delicate desert flower that can endure temperatures above 100 degrees Fahrenheit barely breaking a sweat, just the thought of moving up north likely makes you shiver. Or maybe, sub 30-degree temperatures actually make you sweat more.

Whatever your case may be, let Lord Eddard Stark’s sage advice put you at ease, “Brace yourselves. Winter is coming.” Unlike the trials in Game of Thrones, preparing your body for cold climates, though a feat, can be quite fun.

There are many ways to prepare your body for acclimating to frigid weather conditions; everything from ice baths to eating ice cream. So, how do you prepare? I promise, it’s not as bad as you think.

Ice Baths?

 

Yes. Ice Baths. Though typically used by athletes for post-workout recovery and injury therapy, ice baths for acclimation, other than just moving to the region and gutting it through, stand resolute as the quickest, most effective way to prepare your body for a major climate shift.

By easing your body into freezing temperatures for short stints, you train your internal temperature gauge to compensate for varying climates. When taking an ice bath, a key aspect to remember is that cold slows your system down by reducing blood flow. This is why when you move vigorously in cold temperatures, your body warms up. Basic science. Therefore, when climbing into your bath, especially for the first time, ease into the temperature change recommended by your machine’s individual instructions. Do not assume colder is better, especially in the beginning. Trust your body’s signals and allow it ample time to adapt. In fact, cold showers are an excellent step towards climbing into a large tub of ice.

After 5 to 8 minutes of exposure in your tub, climb out and dry off. Though you will be tempted to warm up immediately, just as you eased yourself into the cold, be sure to allow your body the chance to gradually warm after each exposure. This will condition your system to warm naturally in cold weather and eventually gauge the cooler temperatures as normal.

A full list of cold therapy tips is outlined by acclaimed coach Andy Schmitz in his article 8 Ice Bath Do’s and Don’ts. Though specifically designed for athletes, his exposure tips will surely help you if ice baths are a route you choose to take.

Be sure to read your ice machine’s instructions. Keeping your ice machine clean prevents buildup to maintain an efficient production rate. This will also help it produce more shapely cubes. Compacted ice stays colder longer, so you’ll get more bang for your buck.

Eat colder foods.

Ice Cream, Smoothies, Freeze Pops, the list goes on forever. Frozen dessert is by far the easiest way to begin your acclimation. Not only will consumption teach you to moderate your taste buds, but, with the reinforcement of brain freeze, you will learn–and extend–your cold tolerance threshold. This will give you a rough measure of your personal acclimation progress as you implement the ice bath method.

However, this advice is not a license to throw your diet out the window—especially one prescribed by a doctor. That said, gaining a few extra pounds during this eating process will provide you with slightly more insulation, a crucial aspect to sustaining warmth in colder climates. Further, with the warmer clothes you’ll undoubtedly be wearing, an ice cream sandwich or two will actually aid you in filling out that sweater from Aunt Betsy. Up to you whether this is a good thing.

Climate Clothes Climax

Speaking of sweaters: shopping for proper winter attire is essential in your prep. If you are moving from a southern region—specifically a place where lizards bask in the sun all day or monkeys do their Tarzan routine—you are not likely to have a thick knit cap let alone a pair of snow shoes. As you’re packing your bags, be sure to leave the shorts and remember the parka.

Learn the art of layering. Layering will be your best friend as you’re acclimating. Long underwear, leggings, thermal undershirts, and waterproof socks are your key base layers. After that, indoor apparel usually consists of sweaters and the occasional hat. Outdoor apparel often consists of your typical Christmas movie apparel: a woolen trench or pea coat—unless you go the parka route—a thick hat, flannel or fur-lined gloves, insulated boots, and a sturdy scarf. All of these items are available for purchase online or in your local store up north—unless you’re moving to an igloo park. (Just kidding. That’s not a thing.)

Into the Wild [White] Yonder

Moving up north or enduring extreme climate change may seem a cautionary tale, but if care is taken, your body will adjust to the harsher climate. With your new snow shod experiences, you will soon see just how wonderfully ice transforms ordinary landscaping. In time, you will come to enjoy your new way of life. Until then, sip your coco and let your eyes rove over the gently wafting boughs of the newly crystal laden trees.

The post How to Actively Prepare for When “Winter Is Coming” appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Sting Salves: 5 Ways to Treat Different Types of Bug Bites

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Some bug bites are a mere irritation, while others can be painful or even dangerous. Fortunately, first aid strategies can help mitigate the issues associated with common types of bug bites. Here’s what you need to know.

Mosquito Bites

Perhaps the most common type of bite to be afflicted with, mosquito bites are characterized by a red, itchy bump. This occurs when the insect inserts a proboscis into your skin to feed on blood; in response, the body releases a histamine response that causes the itchy inflammation. For that reason, an over-the-counter antihistamine cream provides the fastest relief. You can also try soaking a green tea bag and placing it over the affected area, or taking an oatmeal bath.

Bee and Wasp Stings

If you’ve been stung by a bee or wasp, the first step is to look for the stinger. This can be easily removed by scraping the skin with a credit card in the affected area. Then, treat symptoms like inflammation and burning by first cleaning the skin with mild soap and water, then taking an NSAID like Advil. Seek immediate medical attention for signs of an allergic reaction, such as trouble breathing or swelling of the throat or tongue. Before summer rolls around, consider consulting a company like Allstate Pest Control to check your property for bee or wasp nests.

Fire Ant Bites

As its name suggests, this insect’s bites cause painful burning, followed by itching and blistering. Calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream can usually soothe these symptoms. Be aware of signs of infection, such as a fever or increased pain in the area of the bites.

Spider Bite

Depending on the type of spider, symptoms can vary from small, pimple-like bumps to chest pain, nausea, and vomiting, according to Real Simple. When you have a spider bite, apply ice every 20 minutes for 72 hours to slow the spread of venom throughout the body. Over-the-counter pain medications can help with discomfort. Seek medical attention if you have severe pain, nausea, or any other unusual symptoms.

Tick Bite

If you’ve been bitten by a tick, you may notice redness, itching, or burning as well as the tick still present on your skin. In some cases, the insect can be as small as 1 millimeter. Remove the tick with tweezers as carefully as possible to avoid crushing the insect, which can make illness more likely to spread. A bulls-eye shaped rash or flu-like symptoms can be a sign of a serious disease, such as Lyme or Rocky Mountain spotted fever, so seek immediate medical attention.

When spending time in a wooded area this summer, protect yourself from bug bites by using a repellent spray and avoiding scented lotions and skin products.

Dixie Somers is a freelance writer and blogger for business, home, and family niches. Dixie lives in Phoenix, Arizona, and is the proud mother of three beautiful girls and wife to a wonderful husband.

Sting Salves: 5 Ways to Treat Different Types of Bug Bites

Some bug bites are a mere irritation, while others can be painful or even dangerous. Fortunately, first aid strategies can help mitigate the issues associated with common types of bug bites. Here’s what you need to know.

Mosquito Bites

Perhaps the most common type of bite to be afflicted with, mosquito bites are characterized by a red, itchy bump. This occurs when the insect inserts a proboscis into your skin to feed on blood; in response, the body releases a histamine response that causes the itchy inflammation. For that reason, an over-the-counter antihistamine cream provides the fastest relief. You can also try soaking a green tea bag and placing it over the affected area, or taking an oatmeal bath.

Bee and Wasp Stings

If you’ve been stung by a bee or wasp, the first step is to look for the stinger. This can be easily removed by scraping the skin with a credit card in the affected area. Then, treat symptoms like inflammation and burning by first cleaning the skin with mild soap and water, then taking an NSAID like Advil. Seek immediate medical attention for signs of an allergic reaction, such as trouble breathing or swelling of the throat or tongue. Before summer rolls around, consider consulting a company like Allstate Pest Control to check your property for bee or wasp nests.

Fire Ant Bites

As its name suggests, this insect’s bites cause painful burning, followed by itching and blistering. Calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream can usually soothe these symptoms. Be aware of signs of infection, such as a fever or increased pain in the area of the bites.

Spider Bite

Depending on the type of spider, symptoms can vary from small, pimple-like bumps to chest pain, nausea, and vomiting, according to Real Simple. When you have a spider bite, apply ice every 20 minutes for 72 hours to slow the spread of venom throughout the body. Over-the-counter pain medications can help with discomfort. Seek medical attention if you have severe pain, nausea, or any other unusual symptoms.

Tick Bite

If you’ve been bitten by a tick, you may notice redness, itching, or burning as well as the tick still present on your skin. In some cases, the insect can be as small as 1 millimeter. Remove the tick with tweezers as carefully as possible to avoid crushing the insect, which can make illness more likely to spread. A bulls-eye shaped rash or flu-like symptoms can be a sign of a serious disease, such as Lyme or Rocky Mountain spotted fever, so seek immediate medical attention.

When spending time in a wooded area this summer, protect yourself from bug bites by using a repellent spray and avoiding scented lotions and skin products.

Dixie Somers is a freelance writer and blogger for business, home, and family niches. Dixie lives in Phoenix, Arizona, and is the proud mother of three beautiful girls and wife to a wonderful husband.

8 Things I Learned From Poison Ivy

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Earlier this summer, my kids developed poison ivy. Upon investigation, we found a healthy patch of the stuff in the back corner of the yard, right next to the swing-set. As my husband is highly allergic to poison ivy, it was my job to pull up and discard the patch before the kids got into it again. Precautions were taken by wearing long pants and gloves. Afterwards, my clothing was immediately removed and washed. During my shower, I scrubbed down with Dawn dish soap, but it didn’t matter. Within a week I had poison ivy rash up and down both arms and on the trunk of my body.
Now as Survival Moms, we like to think we’re prepared at home for many medical problems, and most of us just aren’t the type to call the doctor at every sneeze, or rash. Two weeks later, I had exhausted every home remedy and my eye started to swell shut. I knew the poison ivy was winning, and I turned to my health care provider for a steroid treatment. After I started feeling better I started to evaluate the experience. These are a few strategies that I think can be applied to any minor medical issue or injury.

Educate yourself about poison ivy

The very first thing I did was read up on poison ivy. What were the common symptoms? What was the usual progression or stages of the illness? What were some uncommon symptoms? This way, I was prepared for what was coming, both for my kids and myself. Now, we had plenty of access to Google searches, but I also have several books on my shelf in case we had not. These including Where There Is No Doctor: A Village Health Care Handbook by David Werner and Carol Thuman, and NOLS Wilderness Medicine by Tod Schimelpfenig and Joan Safford. These books cover injury and illness situations where there is limited or no medical care available. But I also have an older copy of Mayo Clinic Family Health Book that I found at a library sale. It is more focused on visiting the doctor, and using modern medicines. Having the variety a great selection for home reference should be a must.

Find out the danger signs

During my searches, I also made notes of the most serious symptoms, or when it might be time to call a health care professional. For poison ivy, some of those symptoms included difficulty breathing, poison ivy rash spreading to private places on the body, or eyes swelling shut. That way, I was prepared to instantly recognize if the illness I was dealing with had taken a turn for the worse, and I could act immediately. If this was a SHTF scenario, I think this would be the most crucial step.  Sometimes health care is not available in an emergency situation, so you’ll want to think through whoever or whatever you can to be on standby for extra help. Possibly a neighbor with nurse’s training, or locating an epi-pen or other “advanced” treatment, depending on the illness or possible danger signs.

Learn Home Remedies

As poison ivy is an affliction that generally runs its course in a few weeks, the goal is often to alleviate the suffering. To this end, there were a number of home remedies that I came across including exposure to sunlight, various essential oils, vinegar and baking soda, and Dawn dish soap. Another book on my shelf that is full of old time advice (and just plain fun to read!) is The Encyclopedia of Country Living: The Original Manual for Living off the Land & Doing It Yourself by Carla Emery.
TIP- Did you know that you can use birch trees to relieve the symptoms of poison ivy? Find out how! 

Treat The Symptoms

You might not be able to determine an illness, exactly identify the stage it’s in, or discuss it in medical terminology.   One thing I’ve learned the last couple years looking into natural and homeopathic remedies, is to always just treat the symptoms. It’s actually a fascinating concept, because we’re so used to getting a specific diagnoses and attacking a certain illness. But the mind-set shift to treating symptoms instead of The Disease (whatever it may be)  is in my opinion, a crucial one to make for Survival Moms. If medical care isn’t available, you just have to do your best to treat yourself or your family. Treating symptoms, rather than worrying about exactly identifying the illness, seems like the perfect strategy for a time when medical care may be limited. In fact, that’s exactly what our great-great-grandmothers did. There were poultices for the chest, and for infection. They couldn’t explain scientifically why or how these worked, but they knew they did.
TIP- In an emergency preparedness scenario, liniment-making is a good skill to have in order to provide extra comfort for burns and sunburns, strains and sprains, and injuries from accidents or trauma. Learn how to make these liniments to help sooth poison ivy and others ailments.

Recognize when you need to seek medical attention

Remember that list of “danger signs” from above? Keep those handy and constantly evaluate whether you or your patient has actually started showing these signs. For my poison ivy, those signs were having a rash on more than a certain percentage of my body, and having my eye swell shut.  Acting quickly would be even more essential in a time of limited options!

Re-evaluate your medical supplies

In our case, 4 out of 5 people in our family came down with at least some poison ivy rash in the same month. I feel like I have a wide variety of first aid supplies, and am generally ready for almost any common illness or injury. But I only had 1 bottle of Tecnu poison ivy wash on hand, 1 extra tube of itch cream, and no Calamine lotion as an alternative. True, at least I had this base covered in our first aid  supplies. But we exhausted these supplies within days, and there clearly wasn’t enough for extended treatments, had medical help not been available for some reason.  So now my goal is to go back through these supplies and increase quantities of what I have on hand, up to enough treatments for 5 people.
TIPS- Do you have all that you need in your medical supplies? Look at your family, where you live and potential hazards in your area. Plan accordingly. Here are 23 supplies that many people overlook.

Plan to get tough if SHTF

Maybe its not a grid-down situation. Or you just don’t have medical insurance, maybe you’re out of town and you don’t want to or can’t seek medical care right away. Sit down with your family and talk through what you’re willing to “tough out” if someone gets sick or injured. Discussing things like this in normal times, when everyone is calm could reduce a lot of stress later on when everything seems to be falling apart and you have a sick or injured person.

Treat your patients with care and compassion

The most surprising lesson for me personally, though, was how miserable I was. Although my kids had mostly healed by the time my poison ivy became critical, I understood first hand how much pain and discomfort they had been in. I’m certainly the type of parent to encourage my kids to buck up, and we don’t tolerate a lot of whining and crying in our house. Even so, I understood better after my experience that anyone who feels sick may feel worse or differently than you think they do. Next time they’re sick, I do plan to give them a little more compassion, and try to find additional methods of pain relief or comfort. (Still no whining, though!)
Keep in mind, of course, these are general lessons that I personally learned from my experience, not actual medical advice. But these strategies could be applied to any illness or injury. You might even be able to run through these steps in a matter of minutes if something happens at your house.
Why don’t you take a few moments this week to re-evaluate the quantities of your first aid supplies, or read up on a common ailment?

12 Troubles & Solutions For Your Aquaponics System

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Setting up an aquaponics system isn’t quite as easy as you may think, though it’s not brain surgery, either.

It’s also a great way to grow fish and plants at the same time, in a unobtrusive loop that provides fresh produce grown in nutrient-rich soil and a healthy protein source, raised in an environment that you know for a fact isn’t steeped in chemicals or mercury.

Plus, it’s a huge step toward self-sufficiency.

However, as with everything we do, things go wrong. That’s when it’s a good idea to turn to somebody who’s been there.

I don’t have a system myself, but I contacted some folks who do, and they gave me the lowdown on some of the most common problems to pop up in an aquaponics system so that I could share them with you.

I’ve also included some rookie mistakes that are common, so that you can maybe avoid them before you make them.

Discover the golden days’ practice for getting all you can eat food without buying from the supermarket!

1. Don’t Forget to Stir the Hydroton

Even though hydroton has a great surface area and isn’t prone to packing down, you don’t want to allow anaerobic conditions to develop in little pockets.

This can kill your plants, or at least cause root rot. Make sure that you stir it every few months just to keep everything running smoothly.

2. My Plants are Dying

Unfortunately, if your plants are dying, there can be several different problems that are causing it. Go back through and check to make sure that they’re getting plenty of water and oxygen – check the roots to see if they’re healthy because that’s a good indicator.

The pH may be off, or you might have parasites or fungi. These two problems are fairly easy to diagnose. Check your pH using strips, and examine your plants for signs of bugs or mold.

If your ammonia ratio is off, the solution is simple: feed the fish and reduce the number of plants that you have. If your system doesn’t self-correct the pH, you need to consult an expert because moving too far in either direction will kill your system.

3. Aphids

These horrible, plant eating mini-monsters are the bane of many a farmer’s existence.

They can knock off a plant population faster than you can say beautiful tomatoes, and they’re hard to get rid of. If you get them, plant more dandelions and carrots because they attract ladybugs, which eat aphids.

Ladybirds eat them, too. This is a war, though, so make sure that ants are farming the aphids, because if they dare, the ladybugs will be killed. Also, make sure you introduce your ladybugs at night.

4. Colors are Fading

If your plants are fading, there’s a mineral deficiency. You could to do a mineral test on your water to see what it’s missing, which is what a lot of rookies may rush to do.

Just use Maxicrop or another good-quality mineral fertilizer and use it according to directions.

5. Foamy Water

This seems to be a top concern on many of the boards that I visited and the reason is so simple that you’re going to laugh, especially when I tell you that it’s relatively easy to fix.

Just like in college, there’s probably soap in the fountain. Some detergent or another has made its way into your system, and the solution is to do a 50 percent dechlorinated water change every day until the foam goes away.

Make sure that you always used cleaning products that won’t harm your fish or your plants, and always clean in such a manner that you don’t shock your fish. Keep as many good bacteria as possible alive in your system.

6. Dead Fish

It’s common to have a dead fish sometimes, but if it becomes a regular occurrence, or there’s more than one dead, you need to check your system, especially the ammonia levels.

Too much ammonia will kill your fish quickly. The easiest way to fix this is to prevent it by checking your levels regularly.

If the problem continues, check all of your system components, including your bell siphon. Make sure that there’s plenty of oxygen in your water and that you’re flushing frequently enough.

7. Don’t Restrict Access to Fish Tanks

It’s tempting, even for experienced gardeners, to want to save space by placing the grow beds above the tanks, but resist the urge because it can cause a ton of problems.

Make sure that you can see into the back corners of the tank, and you are able to catch your fish. Also, make sure that you can easily access all of the components of the fish tanks and beds.

Oh, and you’re probably going to want to change the waters, or you may need to at some point. If you can’t access the tank, that’ll be tough.

8. Letting the Water Get too Hot

This can be a problem for a couple of reasons. Warm water encourages algae growth, but the main problem is that many fish aren’t tolerant to warm water.

If your tank is exposed to the sun for the majority of the day, you may cook your fish, or the oxygen in the water will decrease to the point that your fish will suffocate.

Neither situation is good, so make sure that you choose the right fish for your area, and make sure that it’s shaded if it needs to be.

9. Bugs

We just discussed the smaller parasites, but now let’s talk about the bigger bugs such as beatles that will eat your spinach faster than you do.

You can deal with them by using an organic bug repellant such as garlic  water that won’t hurt your fish, you can spray them off with the hose, or set up a bug trap that possibly drops them into the fish tank, where your fish will snack on them, or you can arrange for predator bugs that will kill your insects but leave your plants alone.

Spiders, wasps, certain flies, and certain beetles will help you get rid of many predator bugs.

10. Having too Many Fish

This is important if you want a functional system. If you have too many, big fish will eat the small ones, and the biofilter won’t be able to effectively convert or catch all of the fish waste.

A good rule of thumb for beginners is to keep one fish per every eight gallons of water or so.

11. Leaving the Algae in Control

Algae is natural, but you don’t want it to get crazy because it will cause harmful fluctuations in the pH of the water. Make sure that you clean around all of the fixtures of your system as well as in the tank.

12. Feeding Your Fish Improperly

Some people feed their fish hourly, but that’s not typically necessary. It kind of defeats the purpose of having a circular system that takes care of itself fairly well. You should feed them more than once a day, though.

There are several problems that can happen with your aquaponics system, but most of them are fairly easy to troubleshoot. If you have a problem that you just can’t solve, there’s a huge community out there that’s willing and able to help, so you’re not going it alone.

The one piece of advice that a couple of my experienced aquaponics gardeners offered was to learn as much about the process as possible BEFORE you start putting yours together.

That way, you have a good idea of what you may run into and can avoid many of the common problems.

If you have anything to add about troubleshooting aquaponics systems, please share it in the comments section below.

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

Six Ways To Obtain Food After It Hits The Fan

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Regardless how well-prepared you are and how you assume a SHTF scenario will unfold, food will still become a problem as time goes by. If the crisis scenario is not a short-term one, you will have to learn how to obtain food one way or another. Both Mother Nature and the remaining traces of civilization … Read more…

The post Six Ways To Obtain Food After It Hits The Fan was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

CDC Reveals 84.1 Million Americans Have Prediabetes, And Most Don’t Know It

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Diabetes is without a doubt, the most significant health scourge of the modern world. Year after year, the percentage of the population that suffers from this costly disease seems to increase, as our society becomes more obese and less physically active. With diabetes affecting 29 million Americans and counting, at a cost of $7,900 per person per year, it is arguably the largest financial burden on our medical system.

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Unfortunately this health crisis about to get a lot worse, because according to a recent study conducted by the CDC, there is a shocking number of Americans who are living with the precursor to this disease, known as prediabetes. And it turns out that the vast majority of the people who have prediabetes are completely unaware of their condition.

The report found that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, representing 9.4 percent of the population. Another 84.1 million people have prediabetes, the condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes if left untreated.

The rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady even as the disease continues to be a growing health burden in the country…

…In 2015, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in adults age 18 and older.

The report also found that nearly one in four adults in the United States are living with diabetes and do not know it and only 11.6 percent of adults with prediabetes knew they had the condition.

That certainly doesn’t bode well for the future. The percentage of the population that is afflicted with diabetes has essentially doubled over the last 20 years, and it looks like it could double again over the next generation. By some estimates, it could triple by the year 2050.

However, it doesn’t have to be this way. If people know that they are at risk of developing diabetes, they’ll be more motivated to take measures that will turn their health around. By simply eating better food and exercising more, anyone can stave off type 2 diabetes.

But to see if you are currently suffering from prediabetes, you first have to know the symptoms. They include chronic fatigue, being abnormally hungry, unexpectedly losing weight despite eating a lot of food, and having to use the bathroom more frequently than usual.

Of course, there are a lot of things that can cause those symptoms, and the only surefire way to know is to visit a doctor. But if you want to know if a trip to the doctor is worth it, you can take a blood glucose test at home. Testing kits aren’t terribly expensive, and they are pretty simple to use. They will give you the ability to take what is called a “fasting plasma glucose test.”

All you have to do is avoiding eating for at least 8 hours, or take the blood test in the morning after you wake up. If the blood glucose monitor tells you that your glucose level is between 100 and 125 mg/dL,  then there is a very good chance that you have prediabetes. If it’s any higher than that, then you may be among the 8.1 million Americans who have diabetes and don’t know it.

So if you’re overweight, out of shape, or have a history of diabetes in your family, it would be wise to get tested. It’s cheap and easy to do, and knowing the real status of your health could save you lots of pain and money over the remainder of your life.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Cash: Level-1 Prepping & Preparedness

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Cash for preparedness. It’s smart. Why? Because if and when the power goes out there will be no transactions with digital currency. This will also affect some stores and their ability to accept cash, but chances are that you will be able to find what you need and pay cash. Prepping and Preparedness (Level-1) is for up to one week of disruption. While the world won’t end, your life could certainly be disrupted if the event lasts up to one week. You might need to go out and buy some more food, supplies, gasoline, or whatever else. However today’s modern

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6 Habits of Highly Effective Preppers

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In 1989, Stephen Covey published his timeless book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, and launched not only a “7 Habits” empire, but changed countless lives.

I was reviewing his list of habits and was struck by how many of them directly apply to preparedness and survival, from everyday emergencies to worst case scenarios. Here are 6 of Covey’s habits and how they apply to prepping.

1. Be Proactive

To be frank, none of us have all the time in the world to get prepped. Even folks on vacation have to be concerned about sudden emergencies like this recent event in North Carolina. Even small emergencies catch most people unaware, and even fewer people are ready for the truly big crises that life has to offer.

It’s not enough to just know about impending catastrophes, such as a worldwide depression or the possibility of an EMP, and neither is it enough to spend hours researching survival topics. If you and your family are to survive and thrive well beyond any crisis, it requires being proactive right now, today. Steven Covey was right to have this as his first Habit.

2. Begin with the end in mind

What do you want your family and home to look like following a major catastrophe? Do you want to have enough food, water, medicines, and supplies to last at least six months? A year? Do you want to have cash, gold, and silver cached in case of a banking collapse? Do you want to be strong, healthy, and fit, able to do plenty of physical labor and take care of the family? Do you want your home to be the one in the neighborhood that survives because it is surrounded by sandbags that protect it from flood waters?

Develop an actual picture in your mind of what your optimal survival scenario will look like:

  • Who will be with you?
  • How will you all arrive at that destination?
  • How will you make sure that your survival situation is secure?
  • What will you have in terms of gear and supplies?
  • How will tasks be delegated?
  • What will a typical day and night be for the duration of this scenario?

With a crystal clear picture in mind, you can then set goals in order to achieve it. Without that clear goal in mind, you’re taking a gamble on something where every day counts.

3. Put first things first

The basics of survival are water, food, shelter, and warmth. Wherever you live right now is where you must begin. That off-the-grid survival retreat may or may not become a reality (and may or may not be desirable – but that’s the subject of a different article), so don’t put off becoming as prepared as you possibly can be right were you are today. Fully cover the basics first.

4. Effective preppers think win-win

Too often, survival minded people circle the wagons and include only their immediate family and, maybe, their very closest friends. But history has shown repeatedly that it’s groups of people who do best when it comes to survival. Neighborhoods and towns who band together following a tornado, for example, recover more quickly than someone trying to do everything on his or her own.

Look for ways to connect with others in your survival plans. No, you shouldn’t tell anyone everything, but sharing ideas, strategies and being supportive of others will increase the chances of your own survival, and that’s smart. If the people surrounding you also have plans and supplies for survival, it’s a win-win for everyone.

How to find those people? Well, as author Jim Cobb says, “Go places where preppers tend to hang out.” Gardening classes, prepper Meet-Ups, fishing and hunting clubs, and so on.

5. Seek first to understand, and then be understood

Not everyone has the same level of concern for survival as you. Some relatives and friends may even seem hostile when you mention food storage and being prepared for emergencies / disaster. Normalcy bias is the default setting for nearly everybody, and since our brains are already wired for that response, it’s no wonder that so many people cringe when “prepping” is mentioned.

There are many reasons why people are oblivious to impending dangers from health issues to hurricanes. Rather than try to force someone to change their mind, spend time listening and asking questions. You may discover that the reason they don’t want to hear about preparedness is because they are frozen with fear and your lectures force them even further into a fear-filled corner.

6. Sharpen the saw

It takes far more effort to cut down a tree with a dull saw than a sharp one. You’ll be able to set clearer goals, stay focused, and accomplish more when you take care of yourself mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually.

Always remember that you are a pivotal factor in the survival of your loved ones. When you don’t take care of yourself, they become more vulnerable. Who will protect them if you can’t or are untrained or unfit to do so?

Find time to decompress. Read a book just for entertainment, pray, get into a regular exercise routine, do some of the things you know you should do, but don’t. In a crisis, you’ll need to be prepared in every way to respond quickly, decisively, and with authority. That won’t happen sitting in front of a video game, regardless of what level you’re on in League of Legends.

Based on these 6 Habits, where do you stand as a prepper?

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Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom !

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Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom Ray Becker… “The Ray Becker Show” Audio player provided! A show opener with the latest in economic news. After that a review the Prepper Roundtable from last Friday night. Then we  spend some quality time with Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom. I first came … Continue reading Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom !

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