Part 2 Of “Are You A ‘Snowflake’ Or A ‘Meteor’?” Becoming A Meteor.

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Last week a group of four Combat Arms Veterans contributed to a post I wrote concerning the premise that, “on a good day, a civilian that has taken 3 or 4 SUT type classes from a Tactical Trainer won’t even be at the experienced Infantry PFC level”. Although the majority of the comments, both here on […]

A Homesteader’s Shocking Lesson About ‘Added Sugar’

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A Homesteader’s Shocking Lesson About ‘Added Sugar’

Image source: Pixabay.com

While making plans with a farm apprentice regarding her upcoming move to our homestead and discussing room-and-board details, she let me know that she did not eat any foods with added sugar. She wouldn’t mind fixing her own meals separately, she told me, but I assured her it would be no trouble for me to take the whole household off sugar. I thought eliminating sugar was just a matter of cutting out dessert foods, which didn’t seem like a big deal.

What never occurred to me was that sugar, in one form or another, is added to a great many common foods. While it is no surprise to find sugar in soda pop, candy, pastries, ice cream and other so-called junk food, it came as a bit of a shock to learn how many other prepared foods contain it. Even more so was the shock of learning how much I—as one who considers my cooking style to be mostly from whole foods—use it in meal preparation, as well.

Cutting sugar completely from our diet was far more difficult than I had imagined it would be. Like many Americans, I was so accustomed to using sugar in my everyday cooking that I didn’t even always notice how often I use it. After the apprentice’s arrival, I was amazed to realize how many of the recipes I’ve used for years contain sugar. Just a few tablespoons here or a teaspoon there had never seemed significant, but I began to become aware of how much it really was.

Even foods as basic as breads suddenly presented problems. I make a great homemade corn bread, for example—northern style, with yellow cornmeal and sugar. Most yeast breads contain sugar, too, along with many of even the healthiest muffins.

Homemade soups and sauces usually call for a little sugar, adding just the right touch or bringing out the flavor of everything from pumpkin soup to spaghetti sauce. And while I don’t put sugar in my beef or chevon stews, I do add a little browning sauce that includes—you guessed it—sugar.

One day when I was collecting ingredients in the pantry for a casserole that included store-bought cream-style corn, the apprentice reached for the can and read the label.

‘What?! No Way’

“It has sugar in it,” she told me.

“What?!” I was astonished. “No way.” I checked the label and saw she was right.

Once I started looking for it, I found sugar lurking everywhere. The round buttery crackers I usually crumbled on top of my macaroni-and-cheese are sugar-sweetened. So are canned soups. And all kinds of sauces—from barbecue, which you might suspect, to Worcestershire, which you probably wouldn’t. Ketchup too, along with pickles and relishes and other condiments. Even breakfast cereals billed as “regular” and “plain,” often contain added sugar.

Even simple sandwiches posed challenges. Regular peanut butter is sweetened, as of course are jams and jellies. Mayonnaise and most brown mustards contain sugar, as do some luncheon meats. Perhaps a salad instead—but wait, store-bought salad dressings and croutons are loaded with sugar!

A Homesteader’s Shocking Lesson About ‘Added Sugar’

Image source: Pixabay.com

Even foods we often think of as healthy alternatives sometimes contain sugar. Items like granola, nutrition bars, fruit-based drinks, fruit rollups, and other foods marketed to children can be sugar-laden.

The Many Names of Sugar

One of the reasons many people use more sugar than they realize is that sugar disguises itself under many other names. Careful label-readers often don’t find “sugar” listed, but will instead see ingredients such as dextrose, maltose, cane juice or solids, fructose, high fructose corn syrup, glucose, and dozens of other words that all mean the same thing: added sugar.

By some accounts there are 40, 50 or even more different terms for added sugar. It can be derived from sugar cane, sugar beets, corn, coconut and other plants, and processed in a wide variety of ways into many forms. Often a packaged food label will list several sugar variations, the combination of which can result in an astounding total volume of sugar per serving.

Avoiding sugar can be tricky. It helps to become familiar with all the names it goes by in order to be able to pick it out of an ingredients list. Poring over labels can be tedious, but it gets easier with practice. The more important it is to avoid sugar—that is, the more serious the health consequences of eating it—the more crucial it is to read ingredients lists and know how to recognize sugar in all its various forms. The keys are diligence and determination.

Most people alive today grew up on a fairly steady diet of sugar. Even those of us who are health-conscious may well consume more sugar than we are aware of. To some of us, we are so used to everything from breads to canned fruits to breakfast staples being so chock full of sugar that these foods taste a little foreign to us without it.

Lessons Learned

My homestead underwent a radical change in eating habits when we began learning to accommodate a completely sugar-free person into our menu planning. Some of it was easy. We substituted natural sweeteners such as local honey and our own maple syrup into foods with a great deal of success. With other items, we tried simply omitting sweeteners altogether and learned to like them that way.

Although many people use popular sugar substitutes with satisfaction, we steered clear of them because none of us cared for the taste or didn’t want to add more processed ingredients to our diets. Using artificial sweeteners is a personal choice, but it is worth remembering that some fake sugars pose health threats of their own.

The apprentice was able to eat homemade breads with little or no negative reaction, probably because the sugar used in the dough was processed and transformed by the yeast organisms prior to baking. However, some bread recipes use more sugar than others, and I learned to tailor my bread-making by using less sugar, substituting natural sweeteners when practical, and using more whole grains to offset the sweetness.

After the apprentice moved on, we were glad to return to using sugar in some foods but found that we were perfectly content without it in others. But we now have a better understanding of the widespread pervasiveness of sugar in foods, both prepackaged and homemade, and this new awareness better equips us to make conscious choices to consume it or not.

Do you have advice for avoiding sugar? Share your advice in the section below:

Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (7/9/17)

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Here are the top 7 articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks.  But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 7/1/17 – 7/8/17

Peace,
Todd

Trump’s right: Adaptability is Key

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I was reading the news today and read something President Trump said about people not moving to where jobs are available.

Trump is right about this: Americans need to move where the jobs are

August 3 at 3:57 PM
Vehicles sit in rush hour traffic at the interchange between the Interstate 405 and 10 freeways in this aerial photograph taken over Los Angeles, California. (Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg).

President Trump said something last week that deserves a lot more attention. Americans “are going to have to start moving,” Trump said in his interview with The Wall Street Journal (Politico leaked the full transcript of the exchange this week).

He’s right.

Americans aren’t packing up and moving as they used to. Mobility is at an all-time low, according to the Census Bureau, which has tracked how many Americans change addresses since World War II. About 10 percent of Americans moved in the past year, the Census Bureau found. That’s way down from the 1950s, ’60s, ’70s and early ’80s, when more than 20 percent of the nation was on the go.

(continue reading https://www.washingtonpost.com/….)

 /

Making ends meet is a key factor when it comes to finances, a rather important aspect of preparedness. I read all the time about people not finding jobs, or not finding good ones or jobs that pay well. Well… sometimes there aren’t any around and you need to move.

Especially in smaller communities this can be an issue, even more so if the specific town or general area is going through a depression.

In general people don’t like moving. It’s a very natural instinct to feel safe in the environment you know and avoid changes but sometimes they are necessary. It’s also true that once you do it a couple times it gets easier and moving when needed or when you feel like it isn’t scary any more. Like with everything else in life, we adapt, we get used to it. And when you get used to adapting to new places, new people and new surroundings you don’t stress over doing it again if you have to.

Now I’m not saying move around all the time. Sometimes though, it is worth the effort, especially if the economic stability will allow greater peace of mind, security and overall a better quality of life in general.
FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

5 Ways to Teach Your Kids Survival Skills!

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5 Ways to Teach Your Kids Survival Skills With everything that is going on in the world today, and the fact that many children are addicted to technology, these 5 ways to teach your kids survival skills can really help to make a difference in their lives. From identifying plants to building a shelter, to … Continue reading 5 Ways to Teach Your Kids Survival Skills!

The post 5 Ways to Teach Your Kids Survival Skills! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Best Garden Structures That Help Extend the Growing Season

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One of the greatest food assets a prepper can have is a year-round garden. Yet, gardens do not grow well in all locations. To help extend the growing season, this blog article looks at some of the tools that preppers can use to grow more productive gardens wherever they live. Gardening Techniques that Shorten the. . . Read More

The post Best Garden Structures That Help Extend the Growing Season first appeared on Backdoor Survival.

3 Military-Approved Techniques That Will Make You A Better Shooter

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3 Military-Approved Techniques That Will Make You A Better Shooter

Image source: Pixabay.com

Editor’s note: The writer is an active duty officer in the military.

If you are new to shooting or are unhappy with your shooting abilities, here you will find some basic shooting techniques to become a better shot.

Becoming a better shooter takes more than simply going to the range and shooting. While that will probably help a little bit, the only way to improve is by changing your techniques – techniques I was taught early during my military service.

Since this article is aimed at both skilled shooters and beginners alike, I should say at the outset: Ensure that you have zeroed your weapon and know how to properly and safely operate it.

Proper shooting technique can be broken down into three main categories: shooting position, breathing and trigger squeeze.

Shooting Position

Shooting position refers to how you position your body and your weapon while you are shooting. With a long gun, there are a few key things to keep in mind. The weapon should be firmly positioned against your body, in the pocket between your shoulder and your chest. Your head should be pressed against the stock of the weapon in a comfortable spot that you can easily return to each time you shoot. Aiming down the sights becomes much easier and more natural when you position your head in the exact same way each time. Your non-firing hand should have a light grip, but also should be slightly pulling the weapon into your shoulder.

You Don’t Need A Firearms License For This Weapon!

With a handgun, your grip should be the exact same each time you shoot. There are many different ways to hold a handgun, and my recommendation would be to practice with all of them until you find what works best for you. Personally, I like to have both of my thumbs on the side of my pistol, pointing downrange. I also like to put a little tension on the weapon by pulling a little with my forward hand against my locked elbow. For me, this limits recoil and makes it easier to reacquire a target. As far as your body position, you want to have your elbows locked, and you should be in a slightly crouched position so that the weapon is at eye level. Similar to what was mentioned above, get used to shooting in the same body position every time, as it will make aiming come much easier. Usually, when someone has trouble aiming down the sights, it’s because of their body position. Regardless of weapon, get comfortable shooting in the same position. You’ll be surprised how easy it becomes to aim.

Breathing

The next step is breathing. While you are breathing and your arms are in your shooting position, they will naturally move up and down slightly. This causes your weapon to move up and down slightly, which throws off your aiming ability. There are two easy ways to fix this problem. Either hold your breath momentarily to steady your aim or shoot in between exhaling and inhaling. In a controlled situation, shooting between breaths is preferable, but in a high-stress situation, holding your breath will work, as well.

Trigger Squeeze

The final tip may be the most important. A good trigger squeeze will save you tons of heartache at the range. The fundamentals of a good trigger squeeze are a slow, controlled pull followed by a slow, controlled release. Jerking the trigger back will cause you to twitch the weapon slightly, which results in inaccuracy. Many people teach you to “pull the slack” out of the trigger, which means pulling the trigger back to the final positive block before the firing pin goes home. Practice on your unloaded weapon.

Most weapons have a slight stop in the trigger, right before it engages. After “pulling the slack” out of the trigger and then firing the weapon, keep the trigger held back momentarily. This prevents a jerky release, which once again moves the weapon slightly and interferes with your ability to continue looking down the sights to reacquire your target. Then, slowly release the trigger back to that positive block, ready to shoot again. One last tip on pulling the trigger – try not to anticipate the shot. If you are anticipating the recoil, you will jerk the weapon and have an inaccurate shot.

These three simple tips will almost certainly improve your shooting ability. When I just want to practice shooting, I usually shoot four rounds at a time, and judge each iteration to see what I need to improve. You will find that it gets easier and you improve each iteration that you shoot. Practicing shooting using these tips will allow you to develop muscle memory, so that in the event the unpredictable does happen, you will be ready to accurately engage the threat.

What advice would you add? Share your tips in the section below:

SafeGuard Body Armor

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This is a guest post from SafeGuard Body Armor.SafeGuard Body Armor

You can never know when danger will strike or when an emergency will take place, but there is no excuse not to be prepared. If a hurricane rolls through your neighborhood and wipes out the power down your entire block, it could be days before it gets turned back on. Or, if you get lost out in the woods on a hunting trip, you will need supplies to build an overnight shelter and wait for a rescue party. As unlikely as these situations may seem to you now – when you’re safe and sound in your own home – they can happen to anyone at any given moment. If you don’t want to learn this the hard way, start planning early.

Bringing a bag of essentials on all travels, and keeping one in the house just in case of emergencies like power outages, thunderstorms, or tornadoes may already be habit. But while some items to include are fairly obvious like medicines, food supplies, matches, gas, etc. – others can be missed. Body armor is a piece of equipment that may seem unnecessary now, but becomes vital in the event of unforeseen situations that warrant protection.

The bare minimum your bug out bag should cover is the 3 basic necessities you need to live; food, clothing and shelter. After that we look at supplies to make your life more comfortable or more secure and body armor falls in the category of the latter.

What is the purpose of body armor?

Body armor is one of the greatest of modern marvels. It has saved thousands of lives, mostly those of cops and soldiers, but it increasingly being used by civilians as well. It can protect people from death or serious wounds. The majority of survivalists have made body armor part of their standard bag out bag.

Body armor can have different protective qualities, which are ballistic (against bullets), stab (against knives, pieces of glass, etc.) and spike (needles, ice picks, etc.) resistance. Each of these types of protections are characterized in the U.S. by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). A vest can have both ballistic and spike and/or stab resistant qualities. However, more commonly, body armor that provides ballistic protection does not provide stab or spike protection.

What type of body armor do I need?

Body Armor is rated at different levels based on the NIJ standards. Because the protection of the armor increases with the level, so does its weight and the cost. Ballistic body armor is rated by the Department of Justice against different round calibers. Basic soft body armor does not stop penetration from sharp objects and weapons, but it will stop thick-bladed stabs and offers protection against slashing attacks. These makes them suitable to wear in places, where there are large gatherings of people (protests, marches, during riots, etc.) as in close quarters – people often use concealable but deadly weapons, such as knives, broken bottles, screw drivers or other piercing objects to cause harm.

Basic levels, such as Level IIA. (Level I is not in use anymore) through IIIA are considered soft body armor types and don’t always offer sufficient protection in high-tension situations, while Level IV provides the fullest protection against pistol and melee weapons but is bulkier and heavier on the wearer.

If you want to ensure you receive maximum protection, you should go for a combination of ballistic and stab proof systems that are available for purchase online but they are more expensive. In terms of bullets – pistol bullets are easier to stop than rifle bullets, because they are slower. This type of combined protection gives the best chances of surviving in risky situations, such as riots or a scenario, where you might need to travel from point A to point B while facing attacks and poor weather conditions.

How can body armor keep you safe? – SafeGuard Body Armor

It’s hard to put into words just how important body armor is, but let’s just say – it can be the difference between life and death in a number of scenarios. Still, many survivalists are quick to buy different type of guns and ammo, but overlook protective vests. However, it’s really this simple – if you own a gun or plan on owning a gun, you should also have a bulletproof vest in your house.

Planning ahead and being prepared for a number of scenarios gives you time to equip yourself with the right type of body armor and stay safe in all circumstance. Equipping yourself with adequate protection helps you stay safe in specific circumstances. You need to understand how body armor works, what it can and cannot do for you against different threats, and how to select the best one for you to make an informed decision when buying one.

If you found this article helpful/interesting, please Share it by clicking on the social media links. Thank you for helping us grow!

The post SafeGuard Body Armor appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

SafeGuard Body Armor

This is a guest post from SafeGuard Body Armor.SafeGuard Body Armor

You can never know when danger will strike or when an emergency will take place, but there is no excuse not to be prepared. If a hurricane rolls through your neighborhood and wipes out the power down your entire block, it could be days before it gets turned back on. Or, if you get lost out in the woods on a hunting trip, you will need supplies to build an overnight shelter and wait for a rescue party. As unlikely as these situations may seem to you now – when you’re safe and sound in your own home – they can happen to anyone at any given moment. If you don’t want to learn this the hard way, start planning early.

Bringing a bag of essentials on all travels, and keeping one in the house just in case of emergencies like power outages, thunderstorms, or tornadoes may already be habit. But while some items to include are fairly obvious like medicines, food supplies, matches, gas, etc. – others can be missed. Body armor is a piece of equipment that may seem unnecessary now, but becomes vital in the event of unforeseen situations that warrant protection.

The bare minimum your bug out bag should cover is the 3 basic necessities you need to live; food, clothing and shelter. After that we look at supplies to make your life more comfortable or more secure and body armor falls in the category of the latter.

What is the purpose of body armor?

Body armor is one of the greatest of modern marvels. It has saved thousands of lives, mostly those of cops and soldiers, but it increasingly being used by civilians as well. It can protect people from death or serious wounds. The majority of survivalists have made body armor part of their standard bag out bag.

Body armor can have different protective qualities, which are ballistic (against bullets), stab (against knives, pieces of glass, etc.) and spike (needles, ice picks, etc.) resistance. Each of these types of protections are characterized in the U.S. by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). A vest can have both ballistic and spike and/or stab resistant qualities. However, more commonly, body armor that provides ballistic protection does not provide stab or spike protection.

What type of body armor do I need?

Body Armor is rated at different levels based on the NIJ standards. Because the protection of the armor increases with the level, so does its weight and the cost. Ballistic body armor is rated by the Department of Justice against different round calibers. Basic soft body armor does not stop penetration from sharp objects and weapons, but it will stop thick-bladed stabs and offers protection against slashing attacks. These makes them suitable to wear in places, where there are large gatherings of people (protests, marches, during riots, etc.) as in close quarters – people often use concealable but deadly weapons, such as knives, broken bottles, screw drivers or other piercing objects to cause harm.

Basic levels, such as Level IIA. (Level I is not in use anymore) through IIIA are considered soft body armor types and don’t always offer sufficient protection in high-tension situations, while Level IV provides the fullest protection against pistol and melee weapons but is bulkier and heavier on the wearer.

If you want to ensure you receive maximum protection, you should go for a combination of ballistic and stab proof systems that are available for purchase online but they are more expensive. In terms of bullets – pistol bullets are easier to stop than rifle bullets, because they are slower. This type of combined protection gives the best chances of surviving in risky situations, such as riots or a scenario, where you might need to travel from point A to point B while facing attacks and poor weather conditions.

How can body armor keep you safe? – SafeGuard Body Armor

It’s hard to put into words just how important body armor is, but let’s just say – it can be the difference between life and death in a number of scenarios. Still, many survivalists are quick to buy different type of guns and ammo, but overlook protective vests. However, it’s really this simple – if you own a gun or plan on owning a gun, you should also have a bulletproof vest in your house.

Planning ahead and being prepared for a number of scenarios gives you time to equip yourself with the right type of body armor and stay safe in all circumstance. Equipping yourself with adequate protection helps you stay safe in specific circumstances. You need to understand how body armor works, what it can and cannot do for you against different threats, and how to select the best one for you to make an informed decision when buying one.

If you found this article helpful/interesting, please Share it by clicking on the social media links. Thank you for helping us grow!

The post SafeGuard Body Armor appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

8 Simple Habits All Expert Gardeners Do Every Day

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The post 8 Simple Habits All Expert Gardeners Do Every Day is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

If I had it my way, I’d have titled this: The 20,493 Tips Successful Gardeners All Follow. What I’m saying is, there are a million little things that incredible gardeners do to get amazing harvests and beautiful gardens. This list is my summary of the bigger ones — the essentials that many newer gardeners overlook or … Read more

The post 8 Simple Habits All Expert Gardeners Do Every Day is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

It Removes Splinters. It Heals Wounds. It Makes A Great Salad. And Chickens Like It, Too.

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It Removes Splinters. It Heals Wounds. It Makes A Great Salad. And Chickens Like It, Too.Chances are you have chickweed growing in your backyard. But did you know this herb has multiple medicinal purposes?

It grows between four and 12 inches long and produces small, yellow and green leaves. Small white flowers also develop on the plant.

One of the most common uses is on the skin. If you have a minor burn, you can help heal it with a chickweed salve. Chickweed also is a great addition to homemade lotions.

You even can use the juice from the plant to draw out splinters! If you spend any time working in the garden or around wood, you need chickweed.

Do You Want Fast, All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effects!

Those are just two of the medicinal properties of chickweed. Here are a few more:

  • It soothes itchy and sore skin conditions.
  • It acts as a diuretic for those who suffer from congestive heart failure or obesity.
  • It is used it some parts of Asia to help regulate a woman’s menstrual cycle.
  • It can be used to help increase a mother’s milk flow after birth.
  • It relieves constipation.
  • It is used in an infusion or herbal tea to soothe coughs and hoarseness.
  • It treats asthma and bronchitis.
  • It treats rheumatic pains and wounds.

Of course, Chickweed has non-medicinal uses, too. Believe it or not, chickweed during the Victorian era was once planted in gardens to add to salads and sandwiches. Chickweed is rich in Vitamin C and potassium, as well as Vitamin B complex, so feel free to add it to dishes!

If you are a poultry owner, chickweed is a favorite among birds. In the spring, it is a nutritious weed for poultry to eat, refreshing them after a long winter. It is one of the first plants that grow

How to Reap the Benefits of Chickweed

Most herbalists create tinctures from chickweed. It transfers its properties into vodka, brandy and other alcohol well. Another great choice is to make a heat-infused herbal oil. Doing so allows you to create salves, lotions and ointments featuring chickweed.

Chickweed is truly a versatile and beneficial herbal weed to harvest in your backyard. Don’t let it go to waste!

How do you use chickweed? Share your tips in the section below:  

Gun Show

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The big Missoula Gun Show is this weekend (starting today, actually). I’m going to put on my human suit, trot down there, and see if I can turn a Gold Cup into a pair of Glocks (or a Belgian HiPower).

Although, come to think of it, I could use an ACOG……..

See you there.

 

ETA: Merciful Crom…I like an SKS as much as the next guy, but when you dump $300 worth of Tapco and UTG crap onto it and bbua-tize to make it an AK47 you hit the point where you should just buy an AK47. Seriously.

A Soldiers Experience

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: This article was submitted by Tom D. to Pat awhile ago. I am publishing it, with some “military language” edits, since it provides some insights into the reality of military life and some good points for us all to consider. Tom D. – we all thank you for your service.

First things first, I am an active duty soldier in the U.S. Army. I have been in for about ten years and have multiple combat deployments under my belt. I would not call myself an avid prepper (right now), but there is one thing that is always on my mind. SECURITY. Don’t get me wrong, I want to be able to prep as much as possible, but we have unique situation while serving.

Being in the Military really does have its pro’s and con’s when it comes to prepping. The biggest con to me is the fact that we are always moving. I lived in Western Texas for a few years. There, I started adding to my “stash” for desert survival. Both of our kids had walk in closets, and they were too small to walk so my wife and I turned those closets into strongholds for food and water (along with other supplies). We bought a house at the outskirts of the city with a mindset that if TSHTF we could get out fast. Our house was also as far away from Juarez, Mexico as possible while still being in the El Paso city limits. I had a dirt bike and ATV for quick getaways, and knew the lay of the land and how to utilize the wadis (valley, ravine or channel) to my advantage. We had all the fire power we needed, but not too much where we were wasting money on guns. Long story short is, we were moderately prepared. That is, until I got orders to move the family to the Seattle/Tacoma area in Washington state.

After feeling like we would be as good as we could get for TEOTWAWKI (The End of the World as We Know It) in Texas, I showed up here. Washington is an entirely different beast. It rains over half of the year and I am now in a Major Metro Area. I went from my primary concern being an Economic Collapse or Major Terror Attack to now worrying about Mount Rainier deciding to blow. Here in Tacoma we have one major escape route. That is Interstate-5. The issue is that I-5 is a road block now without any sort of emergency. Once TSHTF it will be impossible to go north or south in a vehicle. The ocean to the West and mountains and then high dessert to the east. These are all issues that I need to create new COA’s (course of action) and alternate COA’s to be prepared.

Now that you have seen some of the pain with moving, I will bring up my next Con with being an Active Duty Prepper. DEPLOYMENTS! Many people have a commute of an hour or so on the Civilian side of the house. With us it can be much different. If I am in Afghanistan again when TEOTWAWKI happens, things will be much different. I am a combat arms soldier and have had to fire a weapon at other people before, so that is not the most mind-bending thing for me. The hard thing to consider is my wife and children possibly having to do the things I have done or seen in a combat zone without me. You can train all you want, but will never know how you will react in certain situations until they are staring you in the face.

    

No matter where we live, my wife will have weapons at her disposal. She knows how to shoot, and she has supplies. In a world-wide catastrophe, we have to accept that we may never see each other again if I am on the other side of the world. Luckily, we are already prepared for that before any deployment to begin with.

If the power is still on, whether deployed or not I promise each and every one of you reading this that myself and every Soldier I know would go to our families and friends first.

I read an article written by Pat about two years ago that seemed to question what the Military would be willing to do to its own people. My friends and family have asked me similar questions before as well. I am going to explain this to the best of my ability. First off, a lot of people think that every Soldier or Marine is a robot that takes orders and blows stuff up. That couldn’t be farther from the truth. Less than 10 percent of the entire Armed Forces is Combat Arms. Everyone else is Support. So, the thought of every able-bodied Soldier coming to private residences to kick down doors and take you to FEMA Camps is out of the question.

The topic of Prepping is a conversation that I think I have had on every field problem I have ever been on in the Army. Most of the soldiers I know do not have caches of goods prepared for when TSHTF. Nearly all of them do have a plan for when it does happen. Most soldiers are prepared to fight whoever and whatever is out there if they have to. If you are in the Military, it is easy to get your Subordinates to form a team for such scenarios. It is also great for Unit cohesion. In Texas, my house was the Rally Point for my team. We had weapons and defense measures prepared and available to last a hot minute. The best part of our plan was that every member of “my Team” was trained and proficient in soldier skills. Every one of them had been through medical training, knows land navigation and had access to vehicles with GPS capabilities that would track every vehicle we had if necessary. We had been through hard times together and know how to handle each other when it got tough.

Sure, we were not the most organized group with lots of land for farming and honestly were not prepared for a kind transition. We were a group of grunts ready to fight our way through what we had to in order to survive. I have learned that Security is always #1 while serving. It is that way in combat, and it is that way when I go to bed at night. So why would it ever be anything different for TEOTWAWKI.

The one thing that has always been the general consensus was that if anybody gave us orders to turn on our own people, we would all refuse. Most people that join the Military do it out of pride for their Nation and families. There might be ones and two who want to follow along with some plan to implement Martial Law, but I will gladly say that the clear majority of us would be getting home to our families at the same time and be ready to fight the “bad guys.”

 

The post A Soldiers Experience appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

(video) Underground Walipini Pit Greenhouses Produce Tomatoes Year Round

Click here to view the original post.

An underground greenhouse makes a lot of sense in arid climate of New Mexico. I came across a super effective and simple Walipini inspired greenhouse that was home made by Mark Irwin.

Check out this video where Mark shows you what he has been doing and how he is making a small side income by selling tomatoes to the Albuquerque market year round.

I am a big proponent of lots of little side income businesses. Diversity ensures there is always something coming in.

Note that I’ve put the references Mark mentions down below the video.

Enjoy – and comment! We love to hear from you.

Here is the link to download the excellently written pdf on “Constructing A Walipini Pit Underground Greenhouse”

 

Access our growing selection of Downloadable eBooks…

…. On topics that include growing your own food, herbal medicine, homesteading, raising livestock, and more!

Sign up for your FREE pass!

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The post (video) Underground Walipini Pit Greenhouses Produce Tomatoes Year Round appeared first on The Grow Network.

(video) Underground Walipini Pit Greenhouses Produce Tomatoes Year Round

An underground greenhouse makes a lot of sense in arid climate of New Mexico. I came across a super effective and simple Walipini inspired greenhouse that was home made by Mark Irwin.

Check out this video where Mark shows you what he has been doing and how he is making a small side income by selling tomatoes to the Albuquerque market year round.

I am a big proponent of lots of little side income businesses. Diversity ensures there is always something coming in.

Note that I’ve put the references Mark mentions down below the video.

Enjoy – and comment! We love to hear from you.

Here is the link to download the excellently written pdf on “Constructing A Walipini Pit Underground Greenhouse”

 

Access our growing selection of Downloadable eBooks…

…. On topics that include growing your own food, herbal medicine, homesteading, raising livestock, and more!

Sign up for your FREE pass!

Save

The post (video) Underground Walipini Pit Greenhouses Produce Tomatoes Year Round appeared first on The Grow Network.

Can It! Building Your Food Storage From Scratch

Click here to view the original post.

 

Stocking your pantry with home canned goods is not only prudent, it’s a simple and inexpensive way to build your food storage. When you can up what is in season (at the peak of freshness, flavor and low price) you’re taking a seasonal approach to your canning. I know that in June or July, I’ll be canning as much strawberry jam as I possibly can. I know that in the Fall it’s apple pie filling and applesauce, and in Winter it will be venison soup with fresh venison and all those potatoes and carrots I stored away from the garden!

We can year round, in bulk. We can jams, condiments, soups, fruits & veggies, chili, stews, meats and more. When I started canning I had no idea that first batch of Apricots for my husband would turn into my primary method of food preservation for our family. Canning has turned into a lifelong endeavor for me. I really enjoy it, not to mention what a blessing it is to our family.

Canning is very simple to do; fills your pantry with delicious healthy foods, and gives peace of mind. Yes, it takes time and effort, but ‘anything worth doing’ does!

Canning has become a lost art; a lost method of food preservation. Folks let themselves be intimidated, thinking, “surely it must be too difficult” – not at all. With a few safety rules ingrained in your brain, the proper equipment and instruction, you can build your food storage from scratch!

In canning, there are 2 types of processing: Water Bath and Pressure Canning. We’re going to start with Water Bath canning and the supplies and tools you’ll need to get started.

Must Haves:

Canning jars

Deep kettle with jar rack

Canning jar lids and rings

Lots of old kitchen/ hand towels & hot pads

Canning Tongs & Wooden Spoon

You’ll want a “Ball Blue Book of Canning” – a must have. You can find them at Amazon, or any place that sells canning supplies & equipment, it is the “canning bible”. I constantly refer back to mine each year!

Jars! You can buy canning jars, again, at any store that carries canning equipment. They can range, from $8 to $15 per case of 12. I scour garage sales in the summer hunting good canning jars. When buying from a second hand source, be SURE to pick up every jar and inspect it for cracks and for nicks in the mouth of the jar. If the mouth of the jar has one little nick in it, the lid will not seal or if it does it won’t hold or will result in bad food that could possibly make your family sick. Make sure to double check the jars!

I often hear ‘what size jar do I use’? Well, that is relative to your family. Are there 2 of you? More than likely half pints & pints will work (depending on what you are canning and your preferences) if you have 4 or more in your family, chances are a half pint of anything is a waste of time & effort– you might want to can in only quarts! I use a variety from half pints to quarts, depending on what I am canning. Anything larger than a quart, is NOT recommended, as you may not get your food to hot enough temperatures, evenly, inside the jar due to its size and therefore your food can end up being unsafe. I tend to can in quarts for the most part, that serves our family well, fits my canners well and saves me on wasting lids.

TIPS- What do lost socks have to do with canning jars? Figure out the mystery here!

A deep canning kettle and rack are for water bath canning and can be bought online or anywhere that sells canning equipment, or look to relatives that possibly don’t can anymore, estate, garage or tag sales! I picked up the two I have, at garage sales for $1.00 or less each–they’ve served me for years!

Canning Jar lids & Rings; you will need brand new lids to seal your jars. Lids have long been that of the metal with rubber seal, one time use only, variety. Those are great, I’ve used them for years—and the rings, are obviously something you save and use repeatedly. I’ve stocked up on these through a couple places that I found the best price for bulk buying. I’ve also discovered REUSABLE canning jar lids! These are fantastic, and can be found at www.reusablecanninglids.com I’d highly recommend checking into them. Great to have on hand, especially when ‘running to the store’ for more disposable lids, is not an option.

You will go through a lot of towels; between setting jars on them, to wiping rims (the rims of the mouth of the jar must be perfectly clean to meet with the rubber on the lids and form that ‘seal’), and of course the occasional mess to clean up! Have a bunch on hand; garage sale or thrift stores are a great place for these if you don’t already have them on hand.

You’ll want canning tongs (this is just what I call them—they are just ‘tongs’ that you’d use in everyday cooking) and a wooden spoon as well; simple things that make the job easier. Canning tongs, a magnetic wand “lid lifter” (or a plain ol’ dinner fork) will lift your lids out of very hot water; enough said. Having a wooden spoon (or a chopstick!) on hand is great for poking down into your filled jars to release any air bubbles. I pick up extra wooden spoons at garage sales often, I love to cook with them and the old ones are sturdy and last!

Some other ‘nice’ but you can ‘get by without things’ are the canning funnel to keep your foods IN the jar and save you messes and loss of spilled/lost food, I have a couple plastic ones & a stainless steel one—LOVE them all and they’ve saved me countless messes! A jar lifter is quite handy, really great tool to SAFELY lift your jars out of the water– this should be on the MUST HAVES LIST, but you can let your water cool and then get them out that way, too. The magnetic wands they have out these days are pretty nice too–but then again an old pair of tongs or a fork will do the job as well. A ladle would be wonderful for scooping hot jam or soup or chili into jars, but an old coffee mug does the job too.

As you can see, much of your canning equipment can be picked up pretty cheap (think grandma’s attic, thrift store and garage sales!), and it’s completely worth it– the food you preserve is tastier, healthier and just all around better for you and yours; not to mention it is a great way to stock the pantry as foods are in season and at their best price! This is the ONLY way for me to get healthy produce on my table year round, keep my pantry stocked and keep adding continually to my food storage. When I am not canning I attempt to keep all my canning ‘stuff’ tucked away in my water bath canner on the shelf, that way, it’s all easy to find for the next batch of whatever I am blessed to put up for my family!

I watch for things on sale at the store and as I go through my freezers or if I have a neighbor that is giving away their garden overflow…always be on the lookout for things you can put up and you’ll have those shelves stocked before you know it.

Other items you’ll want to stock up and on hand for canning are:

Pectin: You can buy this by the little box or in bulk, you can get a variety from no sugar, to some sugar to full sugar to all natural (Pomona’s Pectin).

Canning Salt: Lots of varieties, and every canner has their own preference. There is standard in the box Canning Salt, Kosher Salt, Sea Salt…the list goes on…use your favorite (just not standard “Iodized”) I like Kosher Sea Salt.

Sweetners: Some folks use good ol’ “C & H Sugar”, some use raw honey, some use organic sugar and some doesn’t use any sugar and use grape juice in their jams (I do all of the above depending on the recipe and my family’s preferences). Whatever you choose, have it on hand.

Vinegars: White and Apple Cider (Braggs is fantastic).

That’s our ‘get prepared list’ for Canning 101. Get your canning supplies together and let’s stock our pantry!

Let’s start with Applesauce; it is versatile, easy to make and is great for everything from just eating out of the jar, to baking with, creating a base for baby foods and more! There are as many ways to do this, based on your taste, as there are apple varieties! For us, it goes something like this:

We take our apples (any variety or a mixture, depending on your favorites!) and wash them. My grandmother always used Pink Ladies or Jonagolds; she was right, they make the most beautiful applesauce! When stocking the pantry I’ll use whatever apples I can get a hold of. We then peel them & slice off pieces (smaller sized chunks or thinner slices-no ‘half apple’ pieces here) of apple down to the core, right into a stock or crock-pot. Once we have our stock/crock-pots about 3/4 full or so, I turn them on low, add in about a cup of water, and a cup of sugar. Then put the lid on and let it cook for about 30 minutes on a stove top in a stockpot or 4-6 hours in a crock-pot (depending on temps, etc) , checking it every hour (or a little more often, you do not want it sticking or burning–if it gets dry, just add a bit more water) and giving it a good stir. Once it has cooked down and is the consistency/taste we want, we prepare to water bath can it.

Now, that being said, you can certainly add in some other goodies to create a different flavor to your applesauce! We’ve done ours with cinnamon, sugar, brown sugar…I’ve even heard of folks adding a few ‘red hots’ candies to each jar! Some folks will sprinkle their apples with a tiny bit of lemon juice before putting the lid on the crockpot, some cut up their apples into a bowl of water and lemon juice to prevent browning; however it will brown up a bit when cooking in the crock nonetheless. Crock-pot applesauce is extremely forgiving and simply adapts to the makers personal preferences, it’s a beautiful thing! When I do make a batch with cinnamon, I just sprinkle a bit in at a time and stir, until my taste-testers unanimously agree on the end result.

I water bath my pints for 20 minutes and my quarts for 25 minutes; check your Ball Blue book or County Extension office for times based on your elevation.  Putting up homemade applesauce is a great staple for the pantry and one of the easiest ways to preserve the apple harvest.

TIP- If you want to thing outside the box when it comes to canning, check out Weird Canning!

Look for more lessons in canning and preserving– coming soon– learn to build your pantry and food storage, from scratch, through canning!

Save

Save

Can It! Building Your Food Storage From Scratch

 

Stocking your pantry with home canned goods is not only prudent, it’s a simple and inexpensive way to build your food storage. When you can up what is in season (at the peak of freshness, flavor and low price) you’re taking a seasonal approach to your canning. I know that in June or July, I’ll be canning as much strawberry jam as I possibly can. I know that in the Fall it’s apple pie filling and applesauce, and in Winter it will be venison soup with fresh venison and all those potatoes and carrots I stored away from the garden!

We can year round, in bulk. We can jams, condiments, soups, fruits & veggies, chili, stews, meats and more. When I started canning I had no idea that first batch of Apricots for my husband would turn into my primary method of food preservation for our family. Canning has turned into a lifelong endeavor for me. I really enjoy it, not to mention what a blessing it is to our family.

Canning is very simple to do; fills your pantry with delicious healthy foods, and gives peace of mind. Yes, it takes time and effort, but ‘anything worth doing’ does!

Canning has become a lost art; a lost method of food preservation. Folks let themselves be intimidated, thinking, “surely it must be too difficult” – not at all. With a few safety rules ingrained in your brain, the proper equipment and instruction, you can build your food storage from scratch!

In canning, there are 2 types of processing: Water Bath and Pressure Canning. We’re going to start with Water Bath canning and the supplies and tools you’ll need to get started.

Must Haves:

Canning jars

Deep kettle with jar rack

Canning jar lids and rings

Lots of old kitchen/ hand towels & hot pads

Canning Tongs & Wooden Spoon

You’ll want a “Ball Blue Book of Canning” – a must have. You can find them at Amazon, or any place that sells canning supplies & equipment, it is the “canning bible”. I constantly refer back to mine each year!

Jars! You can buy canning jars, again, at any store that carries canning equipment. They can range, from $8 to $15 per case of 12. I scour garage sales in the summer hunting good canning jars. When buying from a second hand source, be SURE to pick up every jar and inspect it for cracks and for nicks in the mouth of the jar. If the mouth of the jar has one little nick in it, the lid will not seal or if it does it won’t hold or will result in bad food that could possibly make your family sick. Make sure to double check the jars!

I often hear ‘what size jar do I use’? Well, that is relative to your family. Are there 2 of you? More than likely half pints & pints will work (depending on what you are canning and your preferences) if you have 4 or more in your family, chances are a half pint of anything is a waste of time & effort– you might want to can in only quarts! I use a variety from half pints to quarts, depending on what I am canning. Anything larger than a quart, is NOT recommended, as you may not get your food to hot enough temperatures, evenly, inside the jar due to its size and therefore your food can end up being unsafe. I tend to can in quarts for the most part, that serves our family well, fits my canners well and saves me on wasting lids.

TIPS- What do lost socks have to do with canning jars? Figure out the mystery here!

A deep canning kettle and rack are for water bath canning and can be bought online or anywhere that sells canning equipment, or look to relatives that possibly don’t can anymore, estate, garage or tag sales! I picked up the two I have, at garage sales for $1.00 or less each–they’ve served me for years!

Canning Jar lids & Rings; you will need brand new lids to seal your jars. Lids have long been that of the metal with rubber seal, one time use only, variety. Those are great, I’ve used them for years—and the rings, are obviously something you save and use repeatedly. I’ve stocked up on these through a couple places that I found the best price for bulk buying. I’ve also discovered REUSABLE canning jar lids! These are fantastic, and can be found at www.reusablecanninglids.com I’d highly recommend checking into them. Great to have on hand, especially when ‘running to the store’ for more disposable lids, is not an option.

You will go through a lot of towels; between setting jars on them, to wiping rims (the rims of the mouth of the jar must be perfectly clean to meet with the rubber on the lids and form that ‘seal’), and of course the occasional mess to clean up! Have a bunch on hand; garage sale or thrift stores are a great place for these if you don’t already have them on hand.

You’ll want canning tongs (this is just what I call them—they are just ‘tongs’ that you’d use in everyday cooking) and a wooden spoon as well; simple things that make the job easier. Canning tongs, a magnetic wand “lid lifter” (or a plain ol’ dinner fork) will lift your lids out of very hot water; enough said. Having a wooden spoon (or a chopstick!) on hand is great for poking down into your filled jars to release any air bubbles. I pick up extra wooden spoons at garage sales often, I love to cook with them and the old ones are sturdy and last!

Some other ‘nice’ but you can ‘get by without things’ are the canning funnel to keep your foods IN the jar and save you messes and loss of spilled/lost food, I have a couple plastic ones & a stainless steel one—LOVE them all and they’ve saved me countless messes! A jar lifter is quite handy, really great tool to SAFELY lift your jars out of the water– this should be on the MUST HAVES LIST, but you can let your water cool and then get them out that way, too. The magnetic wands they have out these days are pretty nice too–but then again an old pair of tongs or a fork will do the job as well. A ladle would be wonderful for scooping hot jam or soup or chili into jars, but an old coffee mug does the job too.

As you can see, much of your canning equipment can be picked up pretty cheap (think grandma’s attic, thrift store and garage sales!), and it’s completely worth it– the food you preserve is tastier, healthier and just all around better for you and yours; not to mention it is a great way to stock the pantry as foods are in season and at their best price! This is the ONLY way for me to get healthy produce on my table year round, keep my pantry stocked and keep adding continually to my food storage. When I am not canning I attempt to keep all my canning ‘stuff’ tucked away in my water bath canner on the shelf, that way, it’s all easy to find for the next batch of whatever I am blessed to put up for my family!

I watch for things on sale at the store and as I go through my freezers or if I have a neighbor that is giving away their garden overflow…always be on the lookout for things you can put up and you’ll have those shelves stocked before you know it.

Other items you’ll want to stock up and on hand for canning are:

Pectin: You can buy this by the little box or in bulk, you can get a variety from no sugar, to some sugar to full sugar to all natural (Pomona’s Pectin).

Canning Salt: Lots of varieties, and every canner has their own preference. There is standard in the box Canning Salt, Kosher Salt, Sea Salt…the list goes on…use your favorite (just not standard “Iodized”) I like Kosher Sea Salt.

Sweetners: Some folks use good ol’ “C & H Sugar”, some use raw honey, some use organic sugar and some doesn’t use any sugar and use grape juice in their jams (I do all of the above depending on the recipe and my family’s preferences). Whatever you choose, have it on hand.

Vinegars: White and Apple Cider (Braggs is fantastic).

That’s our ‘get prepared list’ for Canning 101. Get your canning supplies together and let’s stock our pantry!

Let’s start with Applesauce; it is versatile, easy to make and is great for everything from just eating out of the jar, to baking with, creating a base for baby foods and more! There are as many ways to do this, based on your taste, as there are apple varieties! For us, it goes something like this:

We take our apples (any variety or a mixture, depending on your favorites!) and wash them. My grandmother always used Pink Ladies or Jonagolds; she was right, they make the most beautiful applesauce! When stocking the pantry I’ll use whatever apples I can get a hold of. We then peel them & slice off pieces (smaller sized chunks or thinner slices-no ‘half apple’ pieces here) of apple down to the core, right into a stock or crock-pot. Once we have our stock/crock-pots about 3/4 full or so, I turn them on low, add in about a cup of water, and a cup of sugar. Then put the lid on and let it cook for about 30 minutes on a stove top in a stockpot or 4-6 hours in a crock-pot (depending on temps, etc) , checking it every hour (or a little more often, you do not want it sticking or burning–if it gets dry, just add a bit more water) and giving it a good stir. Once it has cooked down and is the consistency/taste we want, we prepare to water bath can it.

Now, that being said, you can certainly add in some other goodies to create a different flavor to your applesauce! We’ve done ours with cinnamon, sugar, brown sugar…I’ve even heard of folks adding a few ‘red hots’ candies to each jar! Some folks will sprinkle their apples with a tiny bit of lemon juice before putting the lid on the crockpot, some cut up their apples into a bowl of water and lemon juice to prevent browning; however it will brown up a bit when cooking in the crock nonetheless. Crock-pot applesauce is extremely forgiving and simply adapts to the makers personal preferences, it’s a beautiful thing! When I do make a batch with cinnamon, I just sprinkle a bit in at a time and stir, until my taste-testers unanimously agree on the end result.

I water bath my pints for 20 minutes and my quarts for 25 minutes; check your Ball Blue book or County Extension office for times based on your elevation.  Putting up homemade applesauce is a great staple for the pantry and one of the easiest ways to preserve the apple harvest.

TIP- If you want to thing outside the box when it comes to canning, check out Weird Canning!

Look for more lessons in canning and preserving– coming soon– learn to build your pantry and food storage, from scratch, through canning!

Save

Save

The Best SHTF Rifle Cartridge

Click here to view the original post.

by a guest contributor

The AR 15 has a reputation as a SHTF firearm, and while there is a reason for this reputation, a lot of us forget exactly why it’s one of the better options. We stock up on the 5.56×45 NATO and the tactical rifles that are chambered for this cartridge, and we can tell you why we believe it’s the best SHTF rifle cartridge out there.

Before we jump into the meat of the article, we do want to point out that there is no one all around, godsend, holy-grail of a cartridge out there. While we have gone with the 5.56×45 round, we are in no way downplaying the effectiveness of other combat rifles or even hunting rifle cartridges. At some point, you just have to make a choice and have the facts to back it up.

Why the 5.56×45

In this article we are going to look at several performance categories and compare the data from five 5.56×45 rounds. Below are five rounds that we have selected for looking at these categories. This is a small sample size for the options that are out there but will give us a look at what this cartridge can do.

  • 56×45 NATO Hornady BTHP Superformance Match 75gr
  • 56×45 NATO Federal American Eagle FMJ 55gr
  • 56×45 NATO Winchester FMJ 55gr
  • 56×45 NATO Hornady FMJ Black 62gr
  • 56×45 NATO Magtech HPBT 77gr

Weight

While having ammo stocked away somewhere might make this section irrelevant for some, the lighter weight of the 5.56×45 NATO compared to other cartridges is important to note.

If you’re having to go on the move for a few days or haul out somewhere quickly, these lightweight rounds are going to allow you to carry much more ammo without being fatiguing. In survival situations, cutting down on unnecessary weight and reducing the amount of fatigue can be a major factor in staying alive.

Range

The effective range of a cartridge, especially one to be used in survival situations, is extremely important. From CQB to shots at several hundred yards, a go-to SHTF rifle cartridge needs to have the capabilities for all of these ranges. While up close and personal isn’t an issue for most rifle cartridges, not all shots are going to be at 25 yards. If you are put in a position where you have to take shots at 50 to 200 yards, are you going to be confident in taking the shot?

Using our selected rounds, let’s take a look at the short range trajectory measuring bullet drop (in inches) over the course of the bullet’s flight.

Graph 1

Most 5.56×45 ammunition you go with can handle shots out to 100 yards. If you have good optics, you can even extend that range with the flat trajectory of this cartridge. The heavier bullets are going to take some more adjustments.

But what about extended ranges?

Graph 2

The trajectory for the 5.56×45 rounds and the cartridge as a whole is still relatively flat out to 300 yards. Once you get into the 400-yard range, you are looking at some heavy adjustments to shot placement while 500 yards is tough shooting for just about anyone. However, if you compare the trajectory of the 5.56×45 vs the 7.62×39, the latter just shows too much bullet drop to even be an effective round out past the 300-yard mark, which is one of the reasons we picked the 5.56×45 for this article.

Of course, none of this matters if the bullet doesn’t have any pop behind it.

Stopping Power

When things go south, and you are fighting for survival, the opportunity might arise that you have to protect your own or you must go out and hunt for food. Both of them require a cartridge that is going to be able to provide enough stopping power to deter and kill targets.

Stopping power encompasses several different factors such as the energy associated with the bullet traveling downrange, the bullet’s penetration, and the wound created. In this section, we will take a look at our selected 5.56×45 rounds and discuss how their kinetic energies make them a viable cartridge when SHTF.

Like the trajectories, we are following the bullets from the muzzle out to 500 yards.

Graph 3

What we are measuring is the force (ft.lbs) that is associated with the bullet and will be transferred to the target on impact.

While there are more deadly cartridges on the market, these 5.56×45 rounds are carrying over a 1,000ft.lbs of force at 50 and 100 yards where the vast majority of shots are going to fall. Even out past these ranges we are still talking about 500-800 at 400 yards.

Most criticism for the 5.56×45 is that it loses its effectiveness at distances out past 100 yards. And yes, they drop off, but 700ft.lbs of force slamming into is going to make you turn the other way, and we can’t be told otherwise.

Recoil

The low recoil of this cartridge provides the biggest reason we like the 5.56×45 cartridge for when SHTF. Take a look at the recoil of the five 5.56×45 NATO rounds we have been looking at.

Graph 4

photo source: Shooter’s Calculator

All of the 5.56×45 rounds we have selected and most factory loads have less than 10ft.lbs of recoil energy generated when firing. What this means in our eyes is you have a firearm that can be handled easily in close quarters and can be fired in semi-auto or auto for successive shots without losing too much accuracy. That’s a game changer for survival situations.

Accuracy

Look, you can read all the blogs you want of some guys groupings, but the simple fact is that accuracy depends so much more on the shooter than on the equipment. While your firearm, optics, and the cartridge itself needs to be of high enough quality to perform reliably, most factory loads are going to perform as well as the rifle operator is trained.

The 5.56×45 has minimal recoil compared to other cartridges used for similar purposes, short range trajectory is relatively flat, and even long range trajectory is manageable with a high-quality scope that has been sighted correctly. With some time on the range, the 5.56×45 cartridge’s bullet is going to go where you put it.

Price and Availability

Below, we have listed some of the retail prices for the rounds that we looked at in this article. As you can see, it can be expensive, or it can be relatively cheap. These rounds can often be found in bulk quantities as well. What matters is that you are compiling a stock of ammunition that you are comfortable and confident in and that will fit your shooting situation.

Availability, as most of us have experienced, can swing one way or the other pretty wildly depending on a lot of outside influences. For right now, things are looking good, and you should not have any problems getting your hands on the specific round you need. With that, things can shift any day so don’t put off stocking up for too long.

Ammunition Price
5.56×45 NATO Hornady BTHP Superformance Match 75gr

 

$17.79 (20 rounds)
5.56×45 NATO Federal American Eagle FMJ 55gr

 

$53.99 (120 Rounds)
5.56×45 NATO Winchester FMJ 55gr

 

$8.99 (20 Rounds)
5.56×45 NATO Hornady FMJ Black 62gr

 

$12.49 (20 Rounds)
5.56×45 NATO  Magtech HPBT 77gr

 

$600 (1,000 Rounds)

The Drawbacks

We don’t believe there is a perfect round, especially when SHTF. There are cartridges that have better performance characteristics for certain situations. The 5.56×45 cartridge, while an excellent self-defense round for when things go south, it does have its weaknesses when compared to other cartridges.

It does not have the stopping power of other cartridges used on the AR platform and other high powered rifles. This, of course, means you get some of the better qualities of the 5.56×45 that we have discussed earlier. For possible intruders, it’s got enough force behind it to dispatch, incapacitate, and at the least deter unwanted guests.

Where it falls short is in the big game hunting category, especially at distances of 200 yards or more. When SHTF, sooner or later hunting is going to be a factor in your ability to survive. Small game and even deer within 100 yards are still possible. With the right shot, you might even be able to take deer a bit further than 100 yards without having to spend the day or night tracking a wounded animal. For anything larger, the 5.56×45 just falls short compared to other cartridge options.

Conclusion

Like we stated at the beginning, there are plenty of cartridges available that are viable options. What we hope is that we presented the case for the 5.56×45 NATO round as a go to rifle cartridge for when SHTF.

Its low recoil makes it fabulous for handling in tight situations, it has a flat trajectory that allows you a wide range of shots and has the knockdown power to bring down targets within 200 yards and at the minimum deter them at increased distances. It’s readily available ammunition, and we think that if you give it a go, you might find you have a new favorite cartridge to stock up on.

Successful Self-Sufficiency: 4 Tips for Growing Your Own Food

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You can start living a more self-sufficient lifestyle by having your own supply of home-grown food. Growing your own food can be done easily even if you don’t have any previous experience cultivating crops. Here are four great tips for growing your own food.

Know the Right Growing Seasons

Different crops grow better during certain time of the year, so it’s important that you know the right growing seasons in your particular area. In general, spring is the best time of year for growing asparagus, pea greens and sweet onions. Cranberries, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower often do best in the fall. Crops that you can grow throughout the entire year include carrots, collard greens and mushrooms.

Have a Reliable Irrigation System

It’s important that you always have a working irrigation system that works efficiently enough to keep all your produce watered. The best irrigation systems come with multiple sprinkler heads that disperse plenty of water and are easy to program. Some systems can even be programmed to automatically turn on and shut off at specific times so that you won’t have to remember to manually perform these functions yourself. Work with a professional like Hydrotech Irrigation Co or someone similar to get something set up that will work for you in the long term.

It’s also a very good idea to have a back-up source of water on your property, such as a well, in case you ever experience issues with the water supplied by the city.

Use Growing Containers

Not all fruits and vegetables need to be grown in the ground, and you can use containers to grow food in many areas around your property. These containers are particularly handy if you don’t have your own field or large yard and would like to grow much of your food indoors. Herbs, peppers and blueberries are just some of the foods that you can grow in these containers. Just be sure that your containers are placed in areas where there is adequate sunlight or artificial light.

Beware of Pests

Whether you choose to grow most of your food indoors or outside, you’ll want to find ways to protect your crops from pests. You can spray commercial pesticides to kill off many of the bugs that may try to invade your fruits and vegetables. If you don’t want to use pesticides that might contain harmful chemicals, you can try one of several natural remedies. Some of these natural concoctions use items like garlic, red pepper and baby shampoo. Typically if you want to protect your whole property you would

Growing your own food can unlock the door to a freer, more self-sufficient life. By learning the proper growing methods and taking the right precautions to ensure healthy crop growth, you can start cultivating your own food in no time.

Kara Masterson is a freelance writer from Utah. She graduated from the University of Utah and enjoys writing and spending time with her dog, Max.

Podcast #155: Sweet Lime Pickles

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August 4th, 2017: In today’s show I share our Sweet Lime Pickle Recipe with you as well as some great canning resources: The Trayer Wilderness Cookbook ~ Homesteading The Traditional Way – Volume 1 The Made-from-Scratch Life: Simple Ways to Create a Natural Home Fiercely DIY Jam, Jellies and Fruit Butters Home Canning With Confidence Course […]

The post Podcast #155: Sweet Lime Pickles appeared first on Trayer Wilderness.

How To Build A Disaster Tool Kit – Tools For After It Hits The Fan

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When there’s wreckage everywhere and you hear cries for help, you will need to act and act fast. To handle the aftermath of a disaster you need to make sure you have the proper tools to get to work. Building a disaster tool kit is the clever way to go and here is why. My … Read more…

The post How To Build A Disaster Tool Kit – Tools For After It Hits The Fan was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Two Is One, Money Edition

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Remember a while back, I wrote about why it’s smart to carry cash? Even though I don’t like to carry a lot of cash, I keep some in my pocket at all times just in case. Well, just in case became the case for me one afternoon. I’ve been having problems with one of my […]

The post Two Is One, Money Edition appeared first on Smart Suburban Survival.

Framework vs Formula In Ministry

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     I’m actually hesitant to begin this topic, because I’m sure that I will leave out some principle that I believe about following Jesus’s models, so I run the risk of being mis-interpreted.  But this topic has come up in a number of conversations I have had with other Christians about the ministry the Lord has brought to Mark and me, so I think it bears discussion.
     These conversations have centered on the method, for lack of a better word, of how we approach each deliverance session of our ministry. There has been concern raised about whether we use a “formula” and if that is consistent with Scripture and Jesus’s healing/deliverance ministry.  Let me begin to answer those concerns by saying that the word formula has a decidedly negative connotation, suggesting a set procedure or blueprint that we follow.  And I agree that there is no “one-size-fits-all” plan that is a failsafe path to setting the captives free.  Jesus treated each person’s situation individually and was led by the Spirit to do what needed to be done to end their physical sickness or spiritual torment.

    But that being said, there are common denominators in what ails people.  The unforgiveness, anger, jealousy, child molestation, rejection, abandonment, blindness, paralysis, demonic oppression, and many more physical and spiritual afflictions that Jesus healed are the same ones that we see burdening people today. The difference is that when Jesus walked the earth, those people experienced His physical presence during their deliverance.  Today, He appears to them from the spiritual realm as we partner with Him in their deliverance.
     So, do we use a particular formula when we co-labor with Jesus in a deliverance session?  While there are common issues that are addressed in every deliverance — such as events in their lives that were possible openings for demonic oppression; or spiritual roots that must be explored in regards to particular illnesses — we listen for the Holy Spirit’s guidance as to the direction Jesus wants to take the individual in helping them to see that He was always there with them and He desires to set them free from whatever is keeping them in bondage.  So, rather than “formula”, which implies a fixed recipe that is never adjusted, I prefer to say Jesus has shown us a “framework” from which to work out of; a flexible shell that can be modified and customized to fit that person’s spiritual identity — we start with the model He has brought to us (inviting the Kingdom of Heaven into the situation) and then let Him and the Holy Spirit mold it to fit that person’s needs.  We just do what Jesus tells us, or what we see in the spirit that He wants done … the exact same principle that He followed with the Father.
     It is important to understand that the details, if you will, of the deliverance might change … we see Jesus healing by instructing the blind man to wash in the pool of Siloam; in another case, He spit on the eyes of a blind man; He healed the Centurion’s servant from afar; and the woman with the issue of blood was healed by touching His robe.  We see in the Bible that Peter’s shadow was used by God to heal the sick in the streets; and that handkerchiefs and aprons that Paul had touched manifested healing.  The point I am trying to make is that there was no set method, yet there were various [and consistent] configurations of healing that seemed to apply … the spoken word; the laying on of hands; and, sometimes a combination of these practices or customs that God used to heal.  In other words, there was a foundation upon which God and the Holy Spirit based their instructions to Jesus, and later to the Apostles and Disciples of Jesus.

     It is no different today.  In regards to those with whom I am acquainted [who are obedient to God’s calling to a deliverance ministry], I would be willing to say that no two deliverance sessions would look exactly alike.  How could they?  What needs to be healed is going to be different in each case!  But I would also stand on the statement that there is a basic framework that is common to all and adhered to by everyone who seeks to heal and deliver from a Kingdom perspective … that framework begins with being led by the Spirit to heal that person the way God desires them to be healed — because He knows what they need.
     You see, it is God, Himself, who lays the path a deliverance or healing will take.  That’s why you see the variety of physical healings and spiritual deliverances throughout the Bible.  Whether it was Jesus, or those that came after Him, all have listened to the Father and the Spirit for guidance.  And if we see some repetition in that Spirit-led instruction, who are we to say that God doesn’t know which of His divine principles for healing work better than others? And we might begin our ministries with a limited set of instructions, but as we become more proficient with the work God has given us to do, we invariably find that those instructions evolve, and new, higher level instructions are imparted.  God has set no limitations on what He can share with us to set His people free.
     So while God has particular principles that serve Him well, He is not bound by any formula, and neither are His deliverance ministers.  However, we operate within a framework that the Spirit leads and has shown us works! But we always do whatever the Holy Spirit directs. Just as God uses creative methods to bring people into the Kingdom, He does the same when He heals and delivers. Those creative methods might look conspicuously like a formula to those on the outside, but every move is orchestrated by the Father and conveyed by the Spirit.  It is our humble desire to always have Jesus abiding in us, and to walk as He walked.  

John 14:10    Do you not believe that I am in the Father, and the Father is in Me? The words I say to you I do not say on My own initiative or authority, but the Father, abiding continually in Me, does His works [His attesting miracles and acts of power].  

Night Vision Devices Critical for Nighttime Security

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Night vision devices are amazing force multipliers and are commonly used in the military. Did you know that American civilians can get them too? Why will these devices be critical for nighttime security? Following true SHTF, it will make all the difference because current technology provides stunning visibility at night. And those who have night vision will rule the night. The enemy who wants to take your stuff (or worse) will likely make their attempt at night. Not saying that there won’t be plenty of daytime security issues however nighttime is a whole different thing. If the enemy has night

The post Night Vision Devices Critical for Nighttime Security appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Prepper Blades: Which is Better the Blade vs. Tomahawk?

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ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, the stores are flooded with the types of knives and axes you can pick up.  So, what to buy, and why?  A simple question, fair enough.  One of the problems that people face is that they like an “all-around” tool with multiple functions, when there are different, specialty tools and weapons for diverse functions. Let’s compare tomahawks and knives, and see where we go to, alright?

Firstly, whether it is a knife or a tomahawk, the first essential is to know your tool and train with it to maximum capacity.  You should follow this principle in all you do with weapons, tools, or gear.

Here’s a rule to follow.  You need to be able to use your tool or weapon: 1. specifically, and then 2. generally

I will explain.  When you have an OSS Fairbairn-Sykes stiletto dagger, this blade is primarily a combat knife.  That is its specific function: to fight with, plain and simple.  In addition to this, you need to know the other capabilities the knife possesses and how to employ them.  An example is a “thrower,” or throwing knife.  The Fairbairn-Sykes can be thrown; however, this takes practice and it is not the knife’s primary function.  Its primary function is close-quarters combat and for stealth (such as sentry takedown, etc.).  I mentioned that you should always buy such tools and weapons in pairs: one to practice with, and the other to have in mint condition for use in the “real” world and when the SHTF.

Same for a tomahawk.  Oh, there are some that are really high-end, such as those made by Hibben, Schrade, Kel-Tec, etc., that can run you into the hundreds of dollars.  This is a combat weapon, and needs to be trained with as such: buy two and use one to train with and the other for when the SHTF.  That is the specific purpose of a tomahawk: not to cut sector stakes or firewood.  The tomahawk is not to be used for pounding in tent poles and then making kindling for your campfire.

And yet it can be used as such, as a general use if called for.  When would that be called for?  When you’re freezing to death and need to build a fire, and that’s all you have to cut dead fallen timber.  The need outweighs the original specialty use.  Tomahawks take a lot of practice to use.  Personally, I prefer throwing knives over tomahawks.  They cannot be used the same to cut wood and kindling or to chop, but as fighting implements, they are (for me) more accurate and reliable.  Also, you can mount one on the end of a staff and turn it into a spear either for defense or hunting (a secondary, general function).

As I mentioned in another article, Hibben makes (in my opinion) the finest throwing knives that money can buy.  Another factor about throwing knives that I like is the fact that they can be mounted on your vest and employed more easily and quickly than the tomahawk can be drawn.  On the other side of the coin, the tomahawk generally provides you with more reach on your opponent if you swing it rather than throwing it.  The decision is one of preference, but the point of effectiveness is the same for each weapon: training.


You need to be as one with your weapon and know it inside and out…all of its capabilities primarily as a weapon and secondly as a tool.  Your life may one day depend on mastery of the weapon.  It may be all you have.  There is no substitute for proper training.  You can have the best equipment in the world but without the ability to employ it?


When the SHTF, you may just have gathered up those supplies for someone who knows how to use them…and will take them away from you.

My preference is to have a tomahawk strapped to the outside of my rucksack…a backup weapon that could be turned into a tool if needed, and my primary is a set (no less than 3) throwing knives…Hibbens being my blades of choice, nd on my person.  Whatever your choice…tomahawk or knife…become and expert with it.  There is no substitute for training to expert standards.  You must set the standard for yourself, and the life you save first may well be your own.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

How To Survive When Caught In The Middle Of A Shooting

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In today’s modern world, robberies, shootings, muggings, and other criminal activities have become more common place.

If you don’t know what to do in these situations, the odds are you could become a victim of a shooting.

Here are some things you can do if you wind up in the middle of a shooting and need to avoid getting hurt.

Scenario 1: The Shooter is In Your Area, But Not Close to You

If you are not armed or don’t have sufficient training with the gun you are carrying, the best thing you can do is run away from the shooter and get to a safe location.

Once there, call 911 and report the incident.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Scenario 2: The Shooter is So Close You Cannot Run Away, But You Can Still Hide

Depending on the situation, you may only have enough time to find a place to hide, but not completely leave the scene. Evaluate possible covers that will give you the most protection and also the ability to maneuver if you need to – a school, restaurant, other place of business, or a even a home.

Here’s what to do to save yourself.

Find a Hiding Spot

Find a room that is out of the shooters view and away from the path of murder, and destruction.

The room must offer some protection from incoming bullets such as thick heavy doors and walls.

Lock or Block the Door

The hiding area door should be heavy duty, lockable, and without windows (unless they are steel wire reinforced safety glass).

If not lockable, it must be possible to barricade the door closed. Use heavy items like tables and chairs, heavy storage boxes or anything else that could greatly slow the shooter down. The shooter must be made to feel that it will take too long to break into this area.

If they think it will take too long to get in, or it isn’t worth the time or trouble, they may leave the area to look for easier targets.

Put a Solid Barrier between you and the Shooter

It is always to your advantage to know as much as possible about the construction of any building that you are in.

For example, if you are in a store, is the back delivery area divided from the rest of the store by a cement wall? What about the bathrooms, specialty centers, or other areas that may have a cement or other thick wall that can be put between you and the active shooter?

If you are in a restaurant, pay attention to counters and other areas that may be fortified.

Find Safety in Small Spaces

Always know where the staircases and paths to the cellar or basement are located. There is a chance the active shooter will be pointing upward, not down while on his/her path of destruction. In addition, staircases may have closets or small rooms under them that may be built of cinder block. They may also have metal lining or some other heavy material that will make them more resistant to bullets.

Aside from that, the shooter may be looking to find as many people as possible, so there is a chance they will look for bigger, more obvious rooms instead of waste time with what looks like a closet.

While You Are Hiding in Place

Once you find a suitable location, it will still take some work to remain safe. If you have children hiding with you, they have to follow these guidelines too. You should also be teaching your children about how to hide, and stay safe when hiding as soon as they are old enough to remember and understand what you are telling them.

Stay away from the door and make no noise. Do not talk, whisper, or pray out loud. Turn cell phone ringers and vibrators off. There must be complete silence. If someone can’t comply, gag them! Everyone’s survival depends on it.

These days, many people also have service animals or small pets with them. It can be very hard to keep a dog from whimpering, barking, or even growling if they sense an emotionally charged situation. If you have a service animal, practice hiding drills with them. This includes making sure they will stay as silent and still as possible until you direct them to pursue more normal activities.

Crouch behind heavy items that can offer protection from incoming fire like heavy furniture, tables, or full large shipping containers.

If there is a closet or bathroom in the room, hide in there. The additional walls will give some extra protection from gun fire. In addition, if the shooter looks into the outer room and sees no one, they may not bother to look in the other enclosed areas within the room.

Dial 911 to let the police know that there is an active shooter at your location. If the shooter is close, keep the phone line open for police to hear what is going on. Do not put the speaker phone on. Remember, you don’t want any stray sounds to give away your location.

Sometimes shooters will yell, knock on doors, and pretend to be police to fool hiding individuals to come out of hiding. Don’t open the door for any reason. If you have a cell phone with you, find out from the emergency dispatch if the police have arrived, and if they are at your door. Be as quiet as you can. Wait for confirmation before coming out of hiding.

Scenario 3: When You Can’t Get Into a Room

Consider a situation where you are in the middle area of a store, or some other area where it is not very easy to get to a room or other safe enclosure. The first thing you will have to do is decide which direction is best to go in when you have a chance.

Usually, the back of the store will have a loading area, as well as rest rooms and building maintenance rooms. Unless you are a dealing with a work place violence scenario, these rooms may be the best ones to head for. You may be very tempted to head for the front of the store, but you run the risk of being caught in the crossfire, especially if the police are surrounding the area.

Once you have a general direction to head in, you can use the aisles and anything else in the area for cover. Do not rely on the shelves or items on them to stop bullets.

Stay as low as you can to the ground, and also try to avoid aisles with anything that might explode or catch fire if a bullet hits it.

Scenario 4: Hiding Outside

Many people think that if they are outside, there is no real need to worry about the presence of an active shooter. On the other side of the equation, if the shooter sees you, they may shoot through a window or decide to go outside and see if there are other targets of interest.

You should still focus in getting as far away from the scene as possible, but it may still be necessary to hide.

Here are some things you can do:

  • If you are outside and shots are being fired in your general direction, try to hide behind a concrete wall or a large dirt mound. These items offer both good cover and concealment.
  • Places that offer concealment will only hide your presence, but they will not stop the bullets from hitting you. Tall grass, bushes, or even wooden signs will work for this purpose. If at all possible, lay flat on the ground so that you don’t cast a shadow. Try to pick an area that has a slight depression so that you won’t be as likely to be hit by a stray bullet. At night, you can use darker shadow areas as hiding places. Try to choose a spot where a flashlight shining won’t give away your presence.
  • If there is a car nearby, try to stay near the engine area, as it is the most likely to stop the bullets. Remember, the shooter may see your feet under the car, so try to remain crouched, but keep your feet so they are not visible behind the tires.
  • Deep drainage ditches with 3-4 foot diameter conduit piping can also be used as a temporary hiding place. Here you would be out of sight and hopefully out of mind.
  • Getting into a storm sewer drainage system or under ground utility service tunnels may not be easy, but it will provide excellent cover and safety from a topside active shooter. Just remove the cover and drop down to safety, replace the cover if possible, and move out of the well lit areas.

What To Do While Hiding in Place Outdoors

As with hiding indoors, make sure you remain as quiet as possible. This includes making sure the cell phone ringer and vibrator are turned off.

Keep a low profile and stay down as low as possible. Do not move unless you absolutely have to.

Call 911 to give the police your location and tell them if the active shooter is still in your area. Keep the phone line open for the police to monitor the situation.

Never light matches, turn on lights, or turn on anything that might reveal your presence. This is especially important if you decide to take refuge in a tunnel, conduit, or other dark area. If an active shooter suspects that people are hiding in these locations, they may follow you in. Staying as invisible and quiet as possible will be to your advantage.

Scenario 5: Escaping While in Plain Sight of the Attacker

Even though there may be no cover available, there may still be a chance for you to escape, if you know what to do. Here are some tips that you can help you avoid as many bullets as possible:

Zig Zag Running

When running away from an active shooter, never run in a straight line. Always run in a zig zag pattern.

Doing this forces the shooter to keep changing his shooting and aiming angle.

Don’t be an Easy Target

If there are closer individuals running in a straight line, the shooter will usually switch to shooting the easier targets.

Look for the Dark Side

It is possible to use darkness or low lighting conditions to escape from an active shooter at night even if they see you. The trick here is to get the shooter to fire at something other than yourself.

Once the shooter fires, they will have just destroyed their night vision, and it will take a minute or two for them to spot you again. Use that time wisely to either take cover or travel as far away as you can. Remember to stay low and move fast.

When escaping at nighttime, be aware of how much the moon lights up the escape route. If it is a full moon, there will be enough light for the shooter to see you clearly and take the shot. If there is a new moon or no moonlight at all, the lack of lighting will help to conceal you and will make it easier to escape.

Against the Light

In daylight, try to get in a position where the sunlight is low on the horizon and behind you. Here the shooter has to deal with bright sunlight and must overcome its blinding effects to shoot at you. This kind of lighting can also produce shadows that will serve to hide you.

Find Cover

Even though the area you must run through is in plain sight, that doesn’t mean the land is totally flat or with no place to hide. There will always be little depressions or rises in the land that might be used to hide in or behind. Drainage ditches and other depressions will work for this purpose.

If there is a fire hydrant or a traffic light control box in this area, use it as a temporary cover, then move out again towards a safer location. Remember to zig zag until you reach an area of safety.

Using a storm sewer or an utility conduct service tunnel would be an excellent way to get safely across this area and beyond.

No matter whether you took refuge indoors or outside, there is still a chance that the shooter will remain close by for some time.

If you happen to be carrying a gun, or can make a weapon from something nearby, try and neutralize the shooter. Even something as simple as a broken bottle or a piece of metal can be used to injure or kill an attacker. The keys to succeeding will still include training and practice with improvised weapons as well as knowing what to look for insofar as a viable opening to use the weapon.

In today’s high crime areas it is important to know how to stay safe and not to become a victim. Learn how to be street smart, learn how and when to hide, and how to blend in with your surroundings.

Along with situation awareness, practice hiding as well as escape methods that will serve you well in time of need. It takes practice to get a survivor mindset and skills!

This article has been written by Fred Tyrell for Survivopedia.