14 Things Your Great-Grandparents Knew That You Should, Too

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14 Things Your Great-Grandparents Knew That You Should, Too

Our ancestors grew up in a very different world than the one we inhabit today. More and more, our world is built around the Internet — an electronic world where we have instant access to entertainment, information and communications. But their world was built more around things that had physical reality, rather than just a virtual reality.

Their world wasn’t one in which things were just thrown away and replaced when they started getting old. Rather, they would repair things and reuse them, even re-purposing them when needed. I can still remember my grandmother’s kitchen, with its stacks of margarine, Cool Whip containers — her “Tupperware” — and a host of other re-purposed items.

What are these skills? The list is long. But some are more important than others. Let’s look at a few of them.

1. Patience

Patience really isn’t a skill so much as it is an attribute. But it can be learned and improved upon with practice. It is also something that modern society lacks. From fast food to microwave ovens, we are used to immediate gratification. But if we ever have to grind the grain in order to bake our own bread, we’re going to need lots of patience.

2. Thriftiness

This is another important attribute that has been largely lost on the modern world. The reason my grandmother used Cool Whip containers was because she had grown up during the Great Depression. She couldn’t waste money if her life depended on it. Yet today we think nothing of paying $5 for a cup of coffee. When all we have is what we’ve stockpiled, we’re going to have to be parsimonious in its use.

3. Sewing and mending

Hardly anyone sews on a button or repairs a ripped seam anymore — much less alter clothes when they don’t fit. Sewing isn’t that hard a skill to learn, but few know it.

4. Skinning and butchering animals

About the only people in the country who have any idea how to prepare a freshly killed animal for eating are hunters. Even there, their knowledge is usually limited to cleaning and skinning the animal.

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Butchering is something done by a professional. Improperly prepared game can be dangerous, especially if the intestines are punctured while cleaning it.

5. Curing hides

Our ancestors used the hides off of any animals they killed, whether rabbits or ‘coons or dear.

6. Canning, smoking and curing meats

Fortunately, canning is one skill that most preppers seem to learn. But what about meat? While dehydrating meat is a simple process, smoking and curing meats is much more complicated. They also require having the right equipment and supplies on hand.

7. Saddling a horse or hitching up a team

I’m going to take a chance here and assume you know how to ride a horse. If you don’t, might I suggest you take a few riding lessons? After all, if we ever encounter a time when there’s no gas, we’ll probably have to start breeding horses like crazy, so that we have some form of transportation.

14 Things Your Great-Grandparents Knew That You Should, TooOf course, there’s more to this than just riding horses. You’ll need to know how to saddle and bridle a horse, as well. If you are fortunate enough to have a wagon or buggy or can make one, you’ll need to know how to hitch a team to them, as well as how to drive the team. There’s really quite a bit here to learn — skills that most people don’t think of anymore.

8. Saddle and harness-making

Speaking of horses, where are you going to find a saddle, bridle and harness, anyway? Riding a horse bareback is a guaranteed way of giving the horse back problems, besides being extremely uncomfortable. Worse, you’re going to be stuck pulling that plow through the earth by yourself if you can’t harness a horse to it. But how do you make a harness? While there were saddle and harness makers in times of old, there wasn’t a farmer or cowboy that didn’t have a fair grasp of these skills, too.

9. Shoeing horses

My dad was actually an old-time ferrier, the kind who didn’t just use ready-made horse shoes, but made them out of bar stock. He was also a blacksmith. This is another skill that every farmer and cowboy knew, but few have the foggiest idea about anymore. But if you don’t keep a horse properly shod and its hooves properly trimmed, the horse can go lame.

10. Gardening

This one may seem a bit simplistic, as it’s probably something you’ve already thought of; but it is essential. Some of us (like me) are not natural gardeners and need to get better at this. That takes time, especially since it can be months before our errors bear fruit (or don’t bear fruit) and many more months before we get another planting season to try again.

11. Raising chickens

In olden times, pretty much everyone, except city dwellers, had chickens running around the house. You can still see this in many third-world and emerging countries. Those chickens are really free-range, running around the yard and eating whatever they find (and chickens will eat everything).

12. Starting a fire

The most common method of fire-starting in the past was flint and steel. Today, we have much easier methods — along with the reality that those will run out eventually. Learning to start a fire by flint and steel is a worthwhile skill to learn, even though I strongly prefer using a butane lighter.

Probably the most important part of this skill is recognizing and gathering good tinder. In olden times, people kept a tinder box, which held their flint, often sewn into a leather wrapping to improve grip, as well as whatever tinder they found and gathered along the way. That way, they always had the basic necessities for starting a fire.

13. Telling time by the sun

The modern concept of the importance of time is largely because of the railroads. Once railroad time schedules came out, people needed to know what time it was, so that they wouldn’t be late. In fact, the first group of people who commonly carried a watch (pocket watches) was train conductors. As the boss of the train, it was they who were responsible for meeting that schedule. So, the railroad would issue them a watch as part of their uniform.

14. The activity of wild animals

Few people really study nature anymore, not even the activities of animals they regularly see. But if we are going to hunt those animals for food, it helps to know their habits. Hunting in a post-disaster world won’t mean spreading some feed corn on the ground and waiting in a blind; you’ll have to find the animals where they are.

Wild animals can tell us a lot about what is going on around us. They instinctively recognize danger that we don’t. They also see the changes in the seasons before we do, starting their migrations or preparations. When we become attuned to their activities, they can become the best weathermen there are.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

14 Things Your Great-Grandparents Knew That You Should, Too

14 Things Your Great-Grandparents Knew That You Should, Too

Our ancestors grew up in a very different world than the one we inhabit today. More and more, our world is built around the Internet — an electronic world where we have instant access to entertainment, information and communications. But their world was built more around things that had physical reality, rather than just a virtual reality.

Their world wasn’t one in which things were just thrown away and replaced when they started getting old. Rather, they would repair things and reuse them, even re-purposing them when needed. I can still remember my grandmother’s kitchen, with its stacks of margarine, Cool Whip containers — her “Tupperware” — and a host of other re-purposed items.

What are these skills? The list is long. But some are more important than others. Let’s look at a few of them.

1. Patience

Patience really isn’t a skill so much as it is an attribute. But it can be learned and improved upon with practice. It is also something that modern society lacks. From fast food to microwave ovens, we are used to immediate gratification. But if we ever have to grind the grain in order to bake our own bread, we’re going to need lots of patience.

2. Thriftiness

This is another important attribute that has been largely lost on the modern world. The reason my grandmother used Cool Whip containers was because she had grown up during the Great Depression. She couldn’t waste money if her life depended on it. Yet today we think nothing of paying $5 for a cup of coffee. When all we have is what we’ve stockpiled, we’re going to have to be parsimonious in its use.

3. Sewing and mending

Hardly anyone sews on a button or repairs a ripped seam anymore — much less alter clothes when they don’t fit. Sewing isn’t that hard a skill to learn, but few know it.

4. Skinning and butchering animals

About the only people in the country who have any idea how to prepare a freshly killed animal for eating are hunters. Even there, their knowledge is usually limited to cleaning and skinning the animal.

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Butchering is something done by a professional. Improperly prepared game can be dangerous, especially if the intestines are punctured while cleaning it.

5. Curing hides

Our ancestors used the hides off of any animals they killed, whether rabbits or ‘coons or dear.

6. Canning, smoking and curing meats

Fortunately, canning is one skill that most preppers seem to learn. But what about meat? While dehydrating meat is a simple process, smoking and curing meats is much more complicated. They also require having the right equipment and supplies on hand.

7. Saddling a horse or hitching up a team

I’m going to take a chance here and assume you know how to ride a horse. If you don’t, might I suggest you take a few riding lessons? After all, if we ever encounter a time when there’s no gas, we’ll probably have to start breeding horses like crazy, so that we have some form of transportation.

14 Things Your Great-Grandparents Knew That You Should, TooOf course, there’s more to this than just riding horses. You’ll need to know how to saddle and bridle a horse, as well. If you are fortunate enough to have a wagon or buggy or can make one, you’ll need to know how to hitch a team to them, as well as how to drive the team. There’s really quite a bit here to learn — skills that most people don’t think of anymore.

8. Saddle and harness-making

Speaking of horses, where are you going to find a saddle, bridle and harness, anyway? Riding a horse bareback is a guaranteed way of giving the horse back problems, besides being extremely uncomfortable. Worse, you’re going to be stuck pulling that plow through the earth by yourself if you can’t harness a horse to it. But how do you make a harness? While there were saddle and harness makers in times of old, there wasn’t a farmer or cowboy that didn’t have a fair grasp of these skills, too.

9. Shoeing horses

My dad was actually an old-time ferrier, the kind who didn’t just use ready-made horse shoes, but made them out of bar stock. He was also a blacksmith. This is another skill that every farmer and cowboy knew, but few have the foggiest idea about anymore. But if you don’t keep a horse properly shod and its hooves properly trimmed, the horse can go lame.

10. Gardening

This one may seem a bit simplistic, as it’s probably something you’ve already thought of; but it is essential. Some of us (like me) are not natural gardeners and need to get better at this. That takes time, especially since it can be months before our errors bear fruit (or don’t bear fruit) and many more months before we get another planting season to try again.

11. Raising chickens

In olden times, pretty much everyone, except city dwellers, had chickens running around the house. You can still see this in many third-world and emerging countries. Those chickens are really free-range, running around the yard and eating whatever they find (and chickens will eat everything).

12. Starting a fire

The most common method of fire-starting in the past was flint and steel. Today, we have much easier methods — along with the reality that those will run out eventually. Learning to start a fire by flint and steel is a worthwhile skill to learn, even though I strongly prefer using a butane lighter.

Probably the most important part of this skill is recognizing and gathering good tinder. In olden times, people kept a tinder box, which held their flint, often sewn into a leather wrapping to improve grip, as well as whatever tinder they found and gathered along the way. That way, they always had the basic necessities for starting a fire.

13. Telling time by the sun

The modern concept of the importance of time is largely because of the railroads. Once railroad time schedules came out, people needed to know what time it was, so that they wouldn’t be late. In fact, the first group of people who commonly carried a watch (pocket watches) was train conductors. As the boss of the train, it was they who were responsible for meeting that schedule. So, the railroad would issue them a watch as part of their uniform.

14. The activity of wild animals

Few people really study nature anymore, not even the activities of animals they regularly see. But if we are going to hunt those animals for food, it helps to know their habits. Hunting in a post-disaster world won’t mean spreading some feed corn on the ground and waiting in a blind; you’ll have to find the animals where they are.

Wild animals can tell us a lot about what is going on around us. They instinctively recognize danger that we don’t. They also see the changes in the seasons before we do, starting their migrations or preparations. When we become attuned to their activities, they can become the best weathermen there are.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

3 Reasons A Revolver Is The Ultimate Concealed Carry Weapon

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Taurus Judge Public Defender. Image source: Youtube

Before I get into explaining why I prefer carrying a revolver over a semiautomatic pistol, let me preface this by saying a few things. First, I would only make this recommendation for someone who accumulates range time. If you’re not the kind of person to spend time at the range working on your shooting, carrying a revolver is not for you. Shooting a wheel gun accurately takes range time. Accurate shooting is absolutely paramount while shooting a revolver, as you will have a decreased ammunition capacity when compared to a semiautomatic pistol. If you’re the type of person to carry, but not go shoot often, I would recommend carrying a semiautomatic pistol.

There are three main reasons I prefer carrying a revolver: versatility, reliability, and results.

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Concealable revolvers are much more versatile than concealable semiautomatic pistols. As a class of weapons, they range from very small, pocket-sized guns all the way up to guns that are capable of putting down bears while still being easily concealed. Many revolvers are able to shoot multiple different calibers, and available calibers range from .22LR all the way up to .45 Colt and .410 bore shotgun shells. This allows the shooter to fine-tune which load they prefer to carry and shoot. Plus, the fact that I regularly carry a weapon that is loaded with shotgun shells makes my heart happy.

My next reason for carrying a revolver is the reliability. Once upon a time, it was virtually impossible for a revolver to jam. I’ve since learned that it is, in fact, possible for the internals of a revolver to jam, but it is far less likely to happen. I have never had a revolver jam on me, but have had semiautomatic pistols jam on me on more than a few occasions at the range. Despite the fact that I clean and maintain my weapons, I have had multiple semiautomatic pistols jam. I would be terrified of being in a situation when I actually needed to use my carry weapon, and when I pulled the trigger, nothing happened. Carrying a revolver gives me some piece of mind. If nothing happens after the first pull, all I’ve got to do is pull the trigger again.

Another reason that I consider revolvers to be more reliable is that I find them easier to draw. Given the natural shape of a revolver, the grip is thinner than the cylinder. This creates a gap between my body and the grip of the weapon, which then makes it easier for me to draw it. I’ve found that with the square body of most semiautomatic pistols, I end up fumbling around for a second before I can get a good grip on it in order to draw it.

The last reason I prefer carrying a revolver is the results. As a whole, revolvers shoot heavier rounds at a faster speed than semiautomatic pistols do. My main comparisons when I was making the decision were .357 Magnum being compared to 9mm, and .44 Magnum being compared to .45 ACP. The revolver bullets are each around 15 grams heavier than their counterpart, and are shot with a great deal more velocity. Adding in the fact that revolvers are generally heavier than the semiautomatic they’re compared to is another plus, as it creates less recoil. Obviously, the exact numbers are dependent on the round selected, but as a general rule of thumb, revolver rounds are heavier, faster, and they create wider holes and deeper penetration.

At the end of the day, the perfect concealed carry weapon is dependent on the person carrying it, but these are my reasons for carrying revolvers over semiautomatic pistols. I find comfort in the fact that I know I can draw faster and shoot just as accurately, all while causing more damage with a revolver than I can with most semiautomatic pistols.

Do you agree or disagree? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

The Amazing European Medicinal Herb You Can Plant This Month In The U.S.

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The European Medicinal Herb You Can Plant This Month In The U.S.

Image source: Wikipedia

During the fall ,most of us are busy harvesting the last of our summer herbs. But we also should be planting fall herbs.

One of the best fall herbs is Angelica, which grows wild all over Europe. Angelica has many medicinal and culinary uses. The Angelica used for herbal medicines is Angelica archangelica.

Growing & Harvesting

Angelica can be grown from zones 4-9. This herb is a biennial plant that can last for several years if the flowering stems are not allowed to grow. In many locations, Angelica will naturally take 3-4 years to flower.

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The best time to plant Angelica is during the fall. In northern areas, you can start planting as early as the end of August. If you live in the South or other areas that are not prone to fall freezes, it can be planted into October.

The Amazing European Medicinal Herb You Can Plant This Month In The U.S.It is recommended to start these seeds indoors. The seeds can take weeks to germinate, so do not be alarmed if you don’t see any seedlings quickly sprouting. Also, do not plant them too deeply. They need light to germinate and should not be planted more than one-fourth an inch deep. The seedlings can be transplanted when they reach 3-4 inches tall. These seeds can be grown indoors through winter and transplanted during the spring. It is best to take them out during the day except in cases of freezing weather.

Some say Angelica can be grown indoors and in containers as long as the container is large enough. The soil in your container will need to be well fertilized and get a reasonable amount of light. It does best in containers that are moved outdoors during times of nice weather.

Angelica’s natural habitat is along small streams and in shady woodlands. This lovely herb needs rich soil, shade and regular water. It also requires good drainage and does not like to have soggy roots. Over-watering this plant can easily promote the growth of fungus.

There are many ways to harvest Angelica. If you are harvesting the Angelica root, it should be done in the fall during the first year. Then, you dry the roots. They can be stored for quite a while. When the plant gets large, the leaves and stalks can be harvested during the summer. These can be used in some medicinal and culinary applications. The leaves can be dried and saved for later, as well. The stems are usually candied. Seeds can be gathered when they have dried on the plant. After harvesting the seed heads, they will need to be dried another few days in the sun. Later, they can be shaken from the seed heads and stored in an airtight container.

Uses

Angelica is a great multi-purpose herb. Note that Angelica is not safe for use during pregnancy. It also should not be used in diabetics. This herb can cause increases in sugar in urine. When using Angelica root, it must be dried. The fresh root is said to be poisonous.

Angelica can be used to decrease symptoms of gas and bloating, coughs and colds, arthritis and nerve pain, menstrual cramps, respiratory illness, stomach aches and motion sickness.

The main ways to use Angelica are through dried Angelica root and Angelica seeds. Most of the medicinal uses for Angelica are infusions. They are made by pouring boiling water over the roots or seeds. You leave these infusions to sit for several hours. Once these infusions are made, you can take the infusion in doses of approximately 2 tablespoons 3-4 times each day.

Syrups can be made with honey and the infusion of the Angelica. These syrups are often found with brandy or lemon in them and used for coughs and sore throats. Angelica also can be used externally in poultices. The leaves can be bruised and applied to the chest in cases of respiratory illnesses.

Have you ever planted Angelica? What advice would you add? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

Sources:

Angelica Herb. (n.d.). Retrieved October 02, 2016, from https://altnature.com/gallery/angelica.htm

Angelica Plants For Sale | Angelica Archangelica | The Growers Exchange. (n.d.). Retrieved October 03, 2016, from http://www.thegrowers-exchange.com/Angelica_p/her-ang01.htm

ANGELICA: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings – WebMD. (n.d.). Retrieved October 02, 2016, from http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-281-angelica.aspx?activeingredientid=281

Grow Angelica. (n.d.) Retrieved October 03, 2016, from http://www.wikihow.com/Grow-Angelica

Grieve, M. (n.d.). Angelica. Retrieved October 2, 2016, from http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/a/anegl037.html

How to Grow Angelica (Angelica archangelica). (n.d.). Retrieved October 02, 2016, from http://theherbgardener.blogspot.com/2013/06/how-to-grow-angelica-angelica.html

How to Grow Angelica | Guide to Growing Angelica. (n.d.). Retrieved October 02, 2016, from http://www.heirloom-organics.com/guide/va/guidetogrowingangelica.html

PlantFiles: Angelica. (n.d.). Retrieved October 03, 2016, from http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/461/#b

So, Your Tomato Plant Has Wilted Leaves? Here’s What To Do.

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So, You're Tomato Plant Has Wilted Leaves? Here's What To Do.

Image source: ucanr.edu

The leaves on a tomato plant are good indicators of the plant’s health. Tomato leaves can display all kinds of distress signals: yellowing, brown spots, purple edges and curling are all signs that the plant needs a little extra TLC. Wilted leaves mean the same.

Don’t be too concerned, though, if you spot wilted leaves during the hottest part of the day. The leaves just may be hot and languid (like all of us!). However, if the leaves remain wilted during the cooler evening or morning hours, your tomato plant is likely sending an SOS signal. Check for these issues:

Under Watering

A general rule is that mature, producing tomato plants need two inches of water per week. If you’re a stickler for following exact rules, set up a rain gauge and supplement any weekly rainfall with manual watering, as required. That said, the two-inch guideline may be insufficient at times. Extremely hot, dry and windy weather, or watering during the hottest part of the day, can increase evaporation and decrease moisture absorption by the soil. Sandy soils drain quickly and may not hold moisture long enough for your plants’ needs. Also, two inches per week is not sufficient for most container tomatoes.

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It’s easy to check and see if there’s enough moisture in the soil. While the surface will usually be dry, soil 1-2 inches beneath the surface should feel damp. Stick your finger into the soil up to your knuckle; if the soil at the tip of your finger feels dry, your tomatoes need more water.

Fungal Diseases

If your soil seems adequately moist, and your plants seem to wilt more after being watered, they probably have a fungal disease such as verticillium wilt, fusarium wilt, or southern blight. Unfortunately, tomato plants infected with any of these need to be destroyed, to stop the fungi from spreading.

Verticillium Wilt and Fusarium Wilt

So, Your Tomato Plant Has Wilted Leaves? Here's What To Do.

Image source: Pixabay.com

Verticillium wilt and fusarium wilt are quite similar, and it can be difficult to tell which is infecting a plant. In both cases, the fungus lives in the soil, and the plant’s roots absorb it. As it infects the plant, it clogs the plant’s vascular system so that moisture can’t travel to the branches and leaves.

Both verticillium wilt and fusarium cause leaves to develop yellow spots, brown veins and wilt. Lower leaves show symptoms first. As the disease progresses, browned leaves dry up and fall off. The main difference between the two diseases is that fusarium wilt generally shows up on one side of a plant, while verticillium wilt moves more slowly, is less dramatic (noticeable), and isn’t restricted to one side.

Again, there is no cure for either of these diseases. It’s best to practice preventative measures including rotating crops, amending soil (when needed) so that it has adequate drainage, and choosing disease-resistant tomato varieties. Also, make sure to clean and sanitize all your garden tools (including tomato stakes and cages) if you suspect your plants have either of these diseases so that you don’t inadvertently transfer the fungi to a new bed. If you still end up with an infected plant, destroy it promptly and remove the surrounding soil.

Southern Blight

The initial symptoms of southern blight are quite similar to those of verticillium wilt and fusarium wilt: discolored leaves and wilt, starting at the base of the plant. However, once it progresses far enough, the plant collapses. You can determine whether it’s southern blight before your plant gets to that point; check for white hyphae or mycelia (soft, stringy, mold-type substances) around the plant’s lower stem, roots, and in the surrounding soil.

As with the other two fungal diseases, plants infected with southern blight cannot be treated.

Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

Wilting is actually the last stage of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV); long before the plant starts to wilt, the rest of the plant will be sending out serious distress signals. Typically, plants infected with TSWV are stunted and pale, and often turn a bronze color. Leaves on these plants often have distinctive markings of circular or swirling patterns. Unlike other tomato diseases, TSWV first shows up in a plant’s top leaves.

TSWV is spread by small insects called thrips, which pierce plants in order to feed off them. As with fungal diseases, there is no way to stop TSWV from progressing once it sets in. Plants (and the thrips on them) should be destroyed. The best preventative measure is weed control, because thrips will feed on weeds until tastier plants are available to them.

The good news about TSWV is that it’s not transmitted through soil, and therefore there’s no need to remove soil when destroying plants.

Bacterial Wilt and Canker

Bacterial wilt is the one tomato disease where wilt is the predominant symptom. There is generally no discoloration of the leaves. The entire plant stays green, wilts and dies shortly afterward.

Bacterial wilt is most common in hot, humid regions, and particularly in soils that have a high pH. As with the other tomato diseases discussed here, there is no treatment for bacterial wilt. Diseased plants should be destroyed and preventative measures should be taken. Rotate crops, choose modern disease-resistant varieties, monitor soil pH (and adjust as necessary), and ensure generous air circulation by spacing plants widely and pruning indeterminate varieties.

Other Possibilities

Pests such as stalk borers, root knot nematodes, and aphids also can cause wilting, but they aren’t commonly attracted to tomato plants. However, if your plant displays symptoms that don’t seem to match any of the diseases listed above, it’s worth taking a close look for pests.

Also, the allelopathic properties of some plants can adversely affect tomatoes and cause wilting. Through allelopathy, plants leach their own natural chemicals into the soil, and those chemicals can affect nearby plants in both good and bad ways. Tomatoes are negatively impacted by black walnut and butternut trees and by sunflowers. If you have wilted tomato plants, in addition to checking for diseases and pests, take a look at what’s planted nearby.

What advice would you add? Share your thoughts in the section below:

 

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How Well Do You Know Your Teeth?

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Do you know your teeth? Did you know that each one has a number?

Running your tongue across your teeth is probably the most common body movement you do. It’s important to know your teeth because it will help identify problems, give you the knowledge you need to be in charge of your dental health, and makes you aware of issues before they become problems.

But how well do you really know your teeth?

Imagine …

… Sarah’s tooth in her upper right jaw hurt. Can you imagine how much more respect, and probably better treatment, she would get from her dentist if she said, “I am having some sensitivity with tooth number 3, can I make an appointment?”

Really knowing your teeth is the first step to better dental health, and being in charge of what is used in your mouth.

A good way to start is to learn the numbers for each tooth.

know-your-teeth

© kaligula

Tooth Numbers

The adult human mouth is blueprinted with 32 teeth—16 on the upper and 16 on the lower.

Use a mirror or your tongue to identify each of your teeth and their numbers.

The first tooth is in the upper right. Then, go around to number 16, which is on your upper left. Most people no longer have their wisdom teeth, so often the first tooth in your upper right jaw is actually # 2. Number 17 starts on your lower left and goes around to #32, which is your lower right. Again, the wisdom teeth are often missing so usually the first tooth on the lower left is #18.

Get a dental mirror, and check this out for yourself!

Dental Language

If you’ve ever laid back in a dental chair and wondered what the gobbledygook the dentist was saying to his assistant, this article is the first step in unraveling that mysterious language.

Here are some terms you might hear at your dentist’s office, and what they mean:

Anterior describes things pertaining to your centrals, laterals, and cuspids.

Apex is the very bottom of the tooth’s root.

Aspirator is the little tube-like straw that sucks up your saliva.

Buccal is the tooth surface that is next to your cheeks.

Calculus is a hard deposit that forms when you do not brush your teeth and plague hardens, also known as tartar.

Caries are cavities or tooth decay.

Cariogenic is a decay-causing material.

Central means the two upper and two lower teeth in the very center of your mouth, also called Incisors.

Crown is the part of your tooth above the gum line.

Cuspids are the pointy teeth just beside the laterals. They have one point, and commonly called canines.

Dentin is the calcium part of your tooth below the enamel containing the pulp and root canals.

Enamel is a hard ceramic that covers the exposed part of your teeth.

First Bicuspids are the teeth just beside the cuspids. They have two points.

First Molars are the teeth beside the second bicuspids. These teeth have four points.

Gingivitis is reversible inflammation of the gum tissue, but does not include the bone.

Implant is a tooth replacement. The implant is different from a bridge as it is permanently attached to your jaw.

Labial is the tooth surface that is next to your lips.

Lingual is the tooth surface next to your tongue.

Lateral means the teeth just beside the centrals.

Malocclusion is misaligned teeth or jaw.

Mandible is your lower jaw.

Maxilla is your upper jaw.

Occlusal surface is the chewing surface of a tooth.

Periodontal disease is inflammation and irritation of the gums which if left untreated can cause the teeth and jawbone to deteriorate or fall out.

Plaque is a bacterial colony which has mineralized and attacked your teeth, causing decay.

Prophylaxis is a professional cleaning of your teeth by a dentist or hygienist.

Root is part of your tooth in your gums.

Sealant is a plastic coating used to protect your teeth from decay.

Second Bicuspids are the teeth beside the first bicuspids. They also have two points.

Second Molars are the teeth beside the first molars. They also have four points.

Third Molars are your wisdom teeth. Some people have them. Some people don’t. Often times, they are pulled so as not to cause problems in your mouth.

 

Have you seen this article: How Much Money Will You Spend on Dentistry?

 

know-your-teeth

© lisafx

What you need to know

  1. Being able to chew your homegrown food is essential for good digestion. Actually getting the nutrition that your body needs relies on your teeth being healthy and strong.
  2. You’ll impress the heck out of your dentist and get much more respect and possibly better care, if you know your tooth numbers.
  3. Knowing your tooth numbers and checking your own teeth regularly is very important to the prevention of tooth and gum issues.

You have more control over your dental health than you know. And healthy teeth and gums are important for a happy and healthy YOU!

Tell us in the comments below. How well do you know your teeth?

 

Your Teeth Are Alive and Can Heal Themselves!

I’ll show you how Doug Simons takes care of his dental
health with simple, easy-to-do, and effective methods.
You can too!

Click here for more information!

Save

Save

The post How Well Do You Know Your Teeth? appeared first on The Grow Network.

Surviving a CME with Vannetta Chapman-Part 2

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Christian Author Vannetta Chapman is back for the second half of our interview. We talk about surviving a CME and self-sufficiency. Get a free Kindle edition copy of her Remnant Series Prequel Overshadowed.

Since the EMP, Danny Walker’s compound has survived waves of violence and the death of many key members. When Danny gets an unexpected piece of news, he pledges to put an end to the persistent threat in Charlotte. He will kill Regent Schlusser and shut down his consortium of depravity, or he will die trying. Get your copy of Seven Cows, Ugly and Gaunt; Book Four: Vengeance today!

jm2

I use JM Bullion because they have the lowest over-spot price of any dealer I have found for silver and gold bullion. JM Bullion now offers free shipping on every order!

tpitw

Trading Post in the Woods is ran by veteran crisis responders who know how important it is to be prepared. They specialize in comprehensive natural survival remedy kits, preparedness and homesteading supplies as well as skills training. Visit them online today at TradingPostInTheWoods.com.

Ready Made Resources is a trusted name in the prepper community, because they’ve been around for 18 years. They offer great prices on Night Vision, water filtration, long term storage food, solar energy components and provide free technical service. Get ready for an uncertain future at ReadyMadeResources.com!

Fish_300x250_A

CampingSurvival.com has all of your preparedness needs including; bug out bags, long term food storage, water filters, gas masks, and first aid kits. Use coupon code PREPPERRECON to get 5% off your entire order at Camping Survival.

 

The post Surviving a CME with Vannetta Chapman-Part 2 appeared first on Prepper Recon.

Surviving a CME with Vannetta Chapman-Part 2


Christian Author Vannetta Chapman is back for the second half of our interview. We talk about surviving a CME and self-sufficiency. Get a free Kindle edition copy of her Remnant Series Prequel Overshadowed.

Since the EMP, Danny Walker’s compound has survived waves of violence and the death of many key members. When Danny gets an unexpected piece of news, he pledges to put an end to the persistent threat in Charlotte. He will kill Regent Schlusser and shut down his consortium of depravity, or he will die trying. Get your copy of Seven Cows, Ugly and Gaunt; Book Four: Vengeance today!

jm2

I use JM Bullion because they have the lowest over-spot price of any dealer I have found for silver and gold bullion. JM Bullion now offers free shipping on every order!

tpitw

Trading Post in the Woods is ran by veteran crisis responders who know how important it is to be prepared. They specialize in comprehensive natural survival remedy kits, preparedness and homesteading supplies as well as skills training. Visit them online today at TradingPostInTheWoods.com.

Ready Made Resources is a trusted name in the prepper community, because they’ve been around for 18 years. They offer great prices on Night Vision, water filtration, long term storage food, solar energy components and provide free technical service. Get ready for an uncertain future at ReadyMadeResources.com!

Fish_300x250_A

CampingSurvival.com has all of your preparedness needs including; bug out bags, long term food storage, water filters, gas masks, and first aid kits. Use coupon code PREPPERRECON to get 5% off your entire order at Camping Survival.

 

The post Surviving a CME with Vannetta Chapman-Part 2 appeared first on Prepper Recon.

32 DIY Projects for Preppers

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If you’re the type of prepper who likes to spend time in the garage or outside building your own things, then you need to check out these articles from Skilled Survival. There are enough DIY projects here to keep you busy for a while. The first article is about DIY survival gear and includes a […]

The post 32 DIY Projects for Preppers appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

More Than Thunder: How to Prepare for Summer’s Biggest Storms

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tpsdave / Pixabay

You are reading this because you want to prepare your home and family for storms you feel are getting a little worse as each year goes by. The accumulating data even has NASA detailing how storms are getting worse. From the early Pioneer days, Americans have been a resilient people who do what it takes to be ready when Mother Nature rages. Here is how you can be ready for the worst summer storms.

Develop Your Evacuation Plan

It is important to address it up front that you need to not only know when to get out but how to safely and quickly do it. Based on your lifestyle, considerations of acceptable risks, necessity of sheltering in place, finances, the weather data and more, you need to concretely as possible decide when to evacuate. Instead of wavering in making the decision to leave, your family needs a point where, when reached, you get out quickly. Be prepared to leave with “Go Bags”, and have a tertiary evacuation route plan—three routes to safety—in case your primary and secondary routes are impassable. Better safe than sorry really does apply here.

Develop a Fortified Shelter

You can accomplish this a little bit at a time to budget the expense. This may be a storm cellar if you live in Tornado Alley, or it may be a specially designed and anchored safe room in your home constructed to weather winds and flooding. Fortification includes the shelter meeting design standards to withstand the worst recorded natural weather or seismic event in your region as well as containing water, food, medications and other items your family members—including pets—will need to shelter in place during a storm.

Establish a Backup Power Supply

If you have not experienced a protracted power outage, you can get a taste of what it is like by shutting off the main breaker at your service panel on a hot summer day when everyone is home. The lack of air conditioning and Wi-Fi is likely going to be the first two things noticed to be gone. It will get hot fast, the kids will get cranky, and your refrigerated and frozen food starts to warm up. If you have a well, the water is off too, and there is no juice to even power a small fan.

Even a portable gas-powered generator comes in handy in these situations, but a whole-house generator powered by a large propane tank or underground diesel fuel storage tank is better. If you are connecting to household circuits at the breaker box, be sure to install an automatic transfer switch, like those at Enercon Engineering Inc, to protect power line workers and emergency personnel from dangerous back current feeds from your generator.

Manage Your Supplies

It is easy to become lackadaisical about keeping enough water, food for people and pets, medications, gas for cars and other supplies sufficiently stocked and rotated for freshness on hand for sheltering in place. If the storm season was mild last year, you may not be so adamant about being ready this year. If there is a history in your geographic location of residents going without for two weeks, then you should have at least two weeks of everything you need to keep life as normal as possible. What is considered as needed varies so greatly from one family to the next that a list cannot be supplied here. You need to work that out among your family, and make sure your supplies never drop below a minimum standard year round.

Being prepared takes a bit of initial and ongoing work. Just incorporate your storm preparation management into your daily routines, and delegate specific tasks to family members capable of responsibly and efficiently completing them. Put one person in charge of checking to make sure everyone is doing their jobs, which may include everything from making sure there is enough bottled water on hand to routinely checking that the backup generator works and has fuel.

The post More Than Thunder: How to Prepare for Summer’s Biggest Storms appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Farm To Table Winners – And How Should We Decorate The Table? Help!

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The names have all been drawn, and the September 2nd OWG Farm to Table dinner event is on! And now, we need a little help with some ideas to decorate our outdoor table that night!  We want to make the

The post Farm To Table Winners – And How Should We Decorate The Table? Help! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

These Are The Best Mini Cow Breeds For Milk And Meat

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Unlike chickens and some other animals, I was raised that there are milk cows and there are meat cows. We had Jerseys to milk and red and black Angus for meat. Where I came from, there really weren’t many cows in that area that were good for both meat and milk.

Now that I’m out of the little town that I was raised in, I realize that there is a whole wide world of cows out there that are great for using for both milk and meat.

Since we’re the kings and queens of multi-purpose living, and most of us don’t have a ton of space to have several of each type of cow, we need to cull the herd a bit. See what I did there?

My goal over the next few paragraphs is to lay out some options for you so that you can have the best of both worlds.

Before we get into actual breeds, know that as a small homesteader, a lesser-known, miniature breed may be better for your needs than a mainstream cow because they’re often bred for one trait or another.

They may also be bred to live a commercial lifestyle, thriving on grain and hay rather than foraging. In short, they may be less hardy, and therefore less suitable for a sustainable situation that requires low-maintenance animals.

In short, we don’t want picky cattle that cost a fortune to feed and don’t meet our needs. We need a cow that breeds easily, because we want more meat and more milk. An open (non-bred, without a calf) cow is a cow that isn’t earning her keep in any way, and that won’t do. So what if she gives a ton of milk and produces a big, beefy calf when she calves if she doesn’t breed consistently?

What I’m saying is that what commercial farmers value in a cow may not necessarily be what we value. Remember, they value volume. They want a cow that gives a ridiculous amount of milk regardless of whether she needs expensive feeds and supplements to do so. We want a cow that provides a decent, constant supply of milk without needing expensive feed.

After all, what would we seriously do with five or six gallons of milk per day per cow?

So, who cares what Big Ag says is the best cow? As usual, what’s good for them isn’t necessarily what’s good for us.

I’ve done quite a bit of research lately and have come to the conclusion that the miniature cow route may be the route to go for us little guys. Adequate milk and meat for our needs, half the feed, and half the space; it’s a great idea. If you’re looking for a full-sized cow though, these first two may be good for you.

Forgotten Lessons of Yesterday

The American Milking Devon

These cattle were originally tri-purpose: milk, meat, and draft work. They’re thought to be the first English breed to be imported to the states in colonial times. There’s a farm called Flack Family Farm in Vermont ran by Doug Flack and his family that raise these cows, and they sound like the perfect cow for what we need.

They’re a smaller breed, with three-year-old steers weighing in at 600-750 pounds, hanging. They’re also hardy and do well in hot climates, but do fine in the cold, too – obviously, because these cows are in Vermont!

The cows give 35-40 (5 gallons or so) pounds of high butterfat milk per day while living on wild pastures (clover, orchard, bluegrass, and vetch) with no grain supplementation. Wow, this cow is sounding great! His cows lactate from mid-May to early November and are milked twice a day in the spring and once in late summer and fall.

And how about longevity? According to the interview I read, he has a 14 year old cow that’s still lactating! Regarding cheese, the average milk cow milk converts about 10 percent of their fluid milk to cheese, but the Milking Devon can convert almost twice that. That’s a crazy big deal.

The meat is beautifully marbled and is purportedly just as good or better than traditional meat cattle, and the steers are raised on pasture. This is a great way to have a cow that feeds your family and provides a dual source of income to help support your farm.

Holsteins

A Holstein is a mainstream cow that’s a great balance of milk and meat.

Be warned: she’s considered a milk cow and is the top-producing milk cow in the industry. Expect up to nine gallons of milk a day. This may be good if you only want to keep two cows (in case one doesn’t breed one year). Still, that’s a LOT of milk, but you’ll have plenty of friends, and you can always can it.

The meat is said to be good, and since the Holstein is a large breed, you won’t need to raise more than one or two calves a year for meat. A note though – they eat a ton! Apparently, they aren’t great at converting feed to meat, so they require 10-12 percent more feel than the average beef cow, or milk cow for that matter.

Still, I wanted to throw them in the hat because they’re easy to come by and do produce plenty of milk and meat.

There is a miniature version of them, but apparently the cute factor comes into play when contemplating eating them. It’s an option, though.

The Belfair

This miniature cow is a cross between some of the best of both worlds. It’s a 50-50 cross of a small Irish Dexter beef cow and a Jersey milk cow. The idea was to add some of the delicious butterfat of the Jersey, but to use the Dexter to pack some meat on its bony frame. Oh, and to take away the meanness of the Jersey bull.

It worked; the result is a cow that gives good meat and milk and is docile, with even the bulls exhibiting little to no aggression.

The Belfair produces about three gallons of high butterfat milk per day and beef up quickly at around four months. The breed is small so it has a smaller appetite. Actually, it’s been called the poor man’s cow because it produces milk and gains weight on inferior pasture. Nothing high-maintenance about these cows.

The Belfair looks like a beefy Jersey cow; blacks and browns ranging from mahogany to dun. Sometimes, there will be some white, and the cow has horns, The cow is 42-46 inches at the shoulder and is actually considered a mid-sized miniature breed for registration purposes, formally known as the Belmont.

Why Go with Miniature Cows?

We just talked about the Belfair, which is a miniature cow breed, as is the Dexter, and the more I research, the more I think that miniature cows are worth looking at for those of us with little space to dedicate to cattle. I’ve also noticed that there’s a good selection of dual-purpose cows in the miniature pool. They were pretty much bred to suit our needs.

  • Midsize cows measure 42-48 inches at the hip
  • Standard cows measure 36-42 inches at the hip
  • Micro-miniature cows are less than 36 inches at the hip

That puts them at one-third to one-half the size of a regular cow. As a life-long farm girl, I have to say that this is an appealing idea, because, if for no other reason, they make smaller piles and would be easier to manage physically, especially for those of you new to milking. There’s nothing to make you grouchy faster than getting shoved out of the way by a 1000-lb animal when it’s 30 degrees and muddy.

Here are some reasons to go miniature:

  • They won’t drown you in milk, but you won’t run out, either. A mini cow will give you a gallon or a gallon and a half per day, more than enough for milk and butter.
  • You only need half an acre to an acre per cow
  • They’re 25-30 percent more feed-efficient and require about a third of what a regular cow eats. You’ll buy less and haul less.
  • One miniature cow will feed a family of four for several months

There are a few good dual breeds out there, in addition to the Belfair. The Zefu gives about a gallon of high butterfat milk per day, but from all accounts, you may have trouble butchering them for meat because it would be akin to eating the family dog since they’re so friendly.

Miniature cow breeds are certainly an attractive option for small homesteaders for all of the reasons that we’ve discussed. They’re widely available, but appear to be kind of regional, so what’s available in one part of the country may not be available in another. It’s an intriguing proposition – all of the benefits of having a cow with half of the downfalls, or maybe a third!

If you have any experience with miniature cows, or have a suggestion for a good dual-purpose cow of any size, please share with us in the comments section below.

Also, if you’d like to learn how to tan your hides, butcher your meat, can your milk, make butter, or can your beef, take a look at my book, Forgotten Lessons of Yesterday. I’ve compiled a ton of useful, diverse information so that you have it right at your fingertips, plus there are five free guides that are valuable in their own rights. Check it out!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

These Are The Best Mini Cow Breeds For Milk And Meat

Unlike chickens and some other animals, I was raised that there are milk cows and there are meat cows. We had Jerseys to milk and red and black Angus for meat. Where I came from, there really weren’t many cows in that area that were good for both meat and milk.

Now that I’m out of the little town that I was raised in, I realize that there is a whole wide world of cows out there that are great for using for both milk and meat.

Since we’re the kings and queens of multi-purpose living, and most of us don’t have a ton of space to have several of each type of cow, we need to cull the herd a bit. See what I did there?

My goal over the next few paragraphs is to lay out some options for you so that you can have the best of both worlds.

Before we get into actual breeds, know that as a small homesteader, a lesser-known, miniature breed may be better for your needs than a mainstream cow because they’re often bred for one trait or another.

They may also be bred to live a commercial lifestyle, thriving on grain and hay rather than foraging. In short, they may be less hardy, and therefore less suitable for a sustainable situation that requires low-maintenance animals.

In short, we don’t want picky cattle that cost a fortune to feed and don’t meet our needs. We need a cow that breeds easily, because we want more meat and more milk. An open (non-bred, without a calf) cow is a cow that isn’t earning her keep in any way, and that won’t do. So what if she gives a ton of milk and produces a big, beefy calf when she calves if she doesn’t breed consistently?

What I’m saying is that what commercial farmers value in a cow may not necessarily be what we value. Remember, they value volume. They want a cow that gives a ridiculous amount of milk regardless of whether she needs expensive feeds and supplements to do so. We want a cow that provides a decent, constant supply of milk without needing expensive feed.

After all, what would we seriously do with five or six gallons of milk per day per cow?

So, who cares what Big Ag says is the best cow? As usual, what’s good for them isn’t necessarily what’s good for us.

I’ve done quite a bit of research lately and have come to the conclusion that the miniature cow route may be the route to go for us little guys. Adequate milk and meat for our needs, half the feed, and half the space; it’s a great idea. If you’re looking for a full-sized cow though, these first two may be good for you.

Forgotten Lessons of Yesterday

The American Milking Devon

These cattle were originally tri-purpose: milk, meat, and draft work. They’re thought to be the first English breed to be imported to the states in colonial times. There’s a farm called Flack Family Farm in Vermont ran by Doug Flack and his family that raise these cows, and they sound like the perfect cow for what we need.

They’re a smaller breed, with three-year-old steers weighing in at 600-750 pounds, hanging. They’re also hardy and do well in hot climates, but do fine in the cold, too – obviously, because these cows are in Vermont!

The cows give 35-40 (5 gallons or so) pounds of high butterfat milk per day while living on wild pastures (clover, orchard, bluegrass, and vetch) with no grain supplementation. Wow, this cow is sounding great! His cows lactate from mid-May to early November and are milked twice a day in the spring and once in late summer and fall.

And how about longevity? According to the interview I read, he has a 14 year old cow that’s still lactating! Regarding cheese, the average milk cow milk converts about 10 percent of their fluid milk to cheese, but the Milking Devon can convert almost twice that. That’s a crazy big deal.

The meat is beautifully marbled and is purportedly just as good or better than traditional meat cattle, and the steers are raised on pasture. This is a great way to have a cow that feeds your family and provides a dual source of income to help support your farm.

Holsteins

A Holstein is a mainstream cow that’s a great balance of milk and meat.

Be warned: she’s considered a milk cow and is the top-producing milk cow in the industry. Expect up to nine gallons of milk a day. This may be good if you only want to keep two cows (in case one doesn’t breed one year). Still, that’s a LOT of milk, but you’ll have plenty of friends, and you can always can it.

The meat is said to be good, and since the Holstein is a large breed, you won’t need to raise more than one or two calves a year for meat. A note though – they eat a ton! Apparently, they aren’t great at converting feed to meat, so they require 10-12 percent more feel than the average beef cow, or milk cow for that matter.

Still, I wanted to throw them in the hat because they’re easy to come by and do produce plenty of milk and meat.

There is a miniature version of them, but apparently the cute factor comes into play when contemplating eating them. It’s an option, though.

The Belfair

This miniature cow is a cross between some of the best of both worlds. It’s a 50-50 cross of a small Irish Dexter beef cow and a Jersey milk cow. The idea was to add some of the delicious butterfat of the Jersey, but to use the Dexter to pack some meat on its bony frame. Oh, and to take away the meanness of the Jersey bull.

It worked; the result is a cow that gives good meat and milk and is docile, with even the bulls exhibiting little to no aggression.

The Belfair produces about three gallons of high butterfat milk per day and beef up quickly at around four months. The breed is small so it has a smaller appetite. Actually, it’s been called the poor man’s cow because it produces milk and gains weight on inferior pasture. Nothing high-maintenance about these cows.

The Belfair looks like a beefy Jersey cow; blacks and browns ranging from mahogany to dun. Sometimes, there will be some white, and the cow has horns, The cow is 42-46 inches at the shoulder and is actually considered a mid-sized miniature breed for registration purposes, formally known as the Belmont.

Why Go with Miniature Cows?

We just talked about the Belfair, which is a miniature cow breed, as is the Dexter, and the more I research, the more I think that miniature cows are worth looking at for those of us with little space to dedicate to cattle. I’ve also noticed that there’s a good selection of dual-purpose cows in the miniature pool. They were pretty much bred to suit our needs.

  • Midsize cows measure 42-48 inches at the hip
  • Standard cows measure 36-42 inches at the hip
  • Micro-miniature cows are less than 36 inches at the hip

That puts them at one-third to one-half the size of a regular cow. As a life-long farm girl, I have to say that this is an appealing idea, because, if for no other reason, they make smaller piles and would be easier to manage physically, especially for those of you new to milking. There’s nothing to make you grouchy faster than getting shoved out of the way by a 1000-lb animal when it’s 30 degrees and muddy.

Here are some reasons to go miniature:

  • They won’t drown you in milk, but you won’t run out, either. A mini cow will give you a gallon or a gallon and a half per day, more than enough for milk and butter.
  • You only need half an acre to an acre per cow
  • They’re 25-30 percent more feed-efficient and require about a third of what a regular cow eats. You’ll buy less and haul less.
  • One miniature cow will feed a family of four for several months

There are a few good dual breeds out there, in addition to the Belfair. The Zefu gives about a gallon of high butterfat milk per day, but from all accounts, you may have trouble butchering them for meat because it would be akin to eating the family dog since they’re so friendly.

Miniature cow breeds are certainly an attractive option for small homesteaders for all of the reasons that we’ve discussed. They’re widely available, but appear to be kind of regional, so what’s available in one part of the country may not be available in another. It’s an intriguing proposition – all of the benefits of having a cow with half of the downfalls, or maybe a third!

If you have any experience with miniature cows, or have a suggestion for a good dual-purpose cow of any size, please share with us in the comments section below.

Also, if you’d like to learn how to tan your hides, butcher your meat, can your milk, make butter, or can your beef, take a look at my book, Forgotten Lessons of Yesterday. I’ve compiled a ton of useful, diverse information so that you have it right at your fingertips, plus there are five free guides that are valuable in their own rights. Check it out!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia. 

Are You Being Called To Be A Forerunner For The Lord?

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     I guess I raise this question because of the growing number of faithful Christians I see being moved by the Holy Spirit to seek a deeper experience of abiding in the Lord. And I don’t mean “abide” in the lukewarm sense of all the Churches I’ve ever attended. By “deeper”, I mean more than acting in accordance with the morals of the Bible, or walking in the ways of the Lord — which are absolutely appropriate and necessary. By “deeper abiding”, I mean recognizing God’s voice; connecting with His heartbeat; and being willing to step outside the accepted boundaries of fellowship with God … to go to greater lengths than you’ve ever known; to be His willing partner in preparing the nations for the return of the Lord.
     I know that sounds rather vague, and is more than likely difficult to accept for those who are happy with where they are in their relationship with God, and with how their Church prescribes that relationship should be.  But for those whose spirits have been transformed by a supernatural encounter with God; or for those whose spirits recognize they are hungry for more than what they’ve been spiritually fed and are willing to seek more sustenance from God, we are finding that God has much more to offer the faithful who are bold and fearless.
     What does that look like, and what exactly is a Forerunner?  Let me answer the latter part of that question first.  Simply put, a forerunner is an advance messenger of a person or thing to come.  In the Bible, we all know that John the Baptist was a forerunner of Jesus Christ.  Luke 1:17 states, of John,  “and he will go before Him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just, to make ready for the Lord a people prepared.”  I actually prefer the Amplified version of this verse:  It is he who will go as a forerunner before Him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers back to the children, and the disobedient to the attitude of the righteous [which is to seek and submit to the will of God]—in order to make ready a people [perfectly] prepared [spiritually and morally] for the Lord.”  The role and responsibilities of a forerunner in this generation are quite apparent … to seek the will of God [and to submit to it] in preparing the people of this world for the return of Jesus.
     Isaiah actually prophesied about End-time forerunners who would prepare people by lifting a “banner message” to the ends of the earth that declares the full manifestation of Jesus’ salvation. … Prepare the way for the people…lift up a banner for the peoples [the nations]! Indeed the LORD has proclaimed to the end of the world: “Say to the daughter of Zion, ‘Surely your salvation is coming; behold, His reward is with Him…’” (Isa. 62:10-11)  We are to proclaim to the world that Jesus is returning and bringing the full manifestation of the Kingdom of God with Him!
     So, let me return to the question of what it looks like to be called by God to be a forerunner, and what and how He is showing us His message for the people of this world.  First, we need to understand that God used forerunners in previous generations when He was about to do a glorious work on the earth. And since He never changes, it should be no surprise that He would have forerunners prior to Jesus’s Second Coming.  After all, there is no event that could be more significant to the future of the earth’s inhabitants. And these forerunners always were witness to God’s supernatural attributes and power.
     Actually, the Bible gives us a history of supernatural generations in which the majority of God’s people witnessed the power of God on a regular basis. We have the generation of Moses, with the supernatural events of the plagues in Egypt, the parting of the Red Sea, and the Crossing of the River Jordan — all leading to the establishment of the Old Covenant.  Nearly 1500 years later, there was a generation that witnessed the supernatural events of Pentecost and the subsequent miracles of the works of the Apostles and the supernatural conversion of Paul — all leading to the establishment of the New Covenant.  Now, here we are, just a little over 2000 years after that last generation, in which many are asking how long until Jesus returns to establish the Millennium Kingdom?
    In each of these generations God dramatically increases the way He moves in power through His people and how He relates to them.  That is quite apparent in the generation of Moses and the Acts 2 generation.  But I am quite confident when I tell you that it is happening in this generation, too.  And God is doing it the same way.  The same Holy Spirit that guided Moses and the Apostles — that gave them wisdom to do God’s will and the power to achieve it — is working in those who are willing to answer His call in this generation.
     Remember, Jesus told us that we, who believe in Him, would do greater works than He did.  And the Bible tells us that if all the works of Jesus were to be written in books, the whole world would not have room for the books.  So why in the world does the modern Church have a hard time accepting that the Holy Spirit can be working in God’s people in new and miraculous ways that might not be mentioned in the Bible?  After all, Jesus didn’t tell us exactly what those “greater things” would be, and if he did so many more works than could be written down, why do our fellow believers doubt us when we say the Holy Spirit is showing us deeper revelations from God?

     Why can the world and the Church not understand that it is possible that we hunger to receive every spiritual insight that God will give the human spirit in this age? That our spiritual hunger is so great that we are willing to alter our lifestyle, to examine our theology, and to step out in boldness if it means God will honor our hungry hearts and spirits, and give us more to do for the Kingdom?  And I can guarantee you it’s not going to look like what the world or the Church has seen up til now.  But neither did it in Moses’s or the Apostle’s generations!
     So, when we speak of healing or casting out demons (which the Bible readily records as acts of Jesus), why are we censored and judged for speaking of “seeing in the spirit” or “warring in the spiritual realm” or allowing Jesus and the Holy Spirit to conduct “inner healing” on those kept in bondage to the Enemy?  Isn’t it possible that the Holy Spirit is revealing the “greater works” that God wants done before His Son returns? [And there is so much more being revealed, but I hesitate to share it because of the fear, doubt, and unbelief already exhibited by much of the Body of Christ!]
     The truth of the matter, as I see it, is this:  there is undoubtedly a growing spiritual hunger among the remnant of God. They are preparing themselves by going deeper into their understanding of the Word; by fasting and seeking the spiritual gifts of God; and by ministering to the needs of the lost and enslaved. This remnant is answering the call on their spirits and responding to the hunger of their hearts to perceive the purposes of God’s coming judgments — and to prepare the nations to repent and receive God’s grace and deliverance before those judgments take place.
     When the world sees the greatest manifestation of both God’s and Satan’s power [at the return of Jesus], the forerunners will have a unique focus and understanding of what is happening, and will be prepared to assist the Holy Spirit in the revelation of Jesus and the Father.  Forerunners will answer the call to be co-laborers in God’s Harvest of souls. They will be positioned to answer the confusion, fear, and anger of believers who do not possess a renewed mind (seeing the events from God’s heavenly perspective).  Forerunners will be able to assist the Holy Spirit in giving understanding of events to the End-Times Church, and they will be equipped to partner with Jesus to intercede on behalf of those who will receive Jesus as their Savior.
     So, you see, the position of Forerunner has been Biblically and historically important in compelling God’s Kingdom on earth forward, and it will be no less important in the generation that sees His return.  Is that this generation, or the next?  No one knows for sure.  But I can tell you that I praise the Lord for the knowledge and wisdom and power He is imparting to believers in this generation. I thank Him for allowing me to witness the incredible love He has for all those who will receive Jesus, and for seeing the imaginative and creative ways He manifests His power in their lives.
     And whatever measure of power and authority He gives me; whatever measure of blessings on my heart, circumstances, or ministry; whatever measure of experiencing Him I receive; by whatever measure my hungry spirit is filled  — at the end of my life, it will have been an honor to be a servant of the Lord.  I wish the same for each of you.

Isaiah 40:31   But those who wait for the Lord [who expect, look for, and hope in Him] will gain new strength and renew their power; They will lift up their wings [and rise up close to God] like eagles [rising toward the sun]; They will run and not become weary, They will walk and not grow tired.

     
   

Are You Being Called To Be A Forerunner For The Lord?

     I guess I raise this question because of the growing number of faithful Christians I see being moved by the Holy Spirit to seek a deeper experience of abiding in the Lord. And I don’t mean “abide” in the lukewarm sense of all the Churches I’ve ever attended. By “deeper”, I mean more than acting in accordance with the morals of the Bible, or walking in the ways of the Lord — which are absolutely appropriate and necessary. By “deeper abiding”, I mean recognizing God’s voice; connecting with His heartbeat; and being willing to step outside the accepted boundaries of fellowship with God … to go to greater lengths than you’ve ever known; to be His willing partner in preparing the nations for the return of the Lord.
     I know that sounds rather vague, and is more than likely difficult to accept for those who are happy with where they are in their relationship with God, and with how their Church prescribes that relationship should be.  But for those whose spirits have been transformed by a supernatural encounter with God; or for those whose spirits recognize they are hungry for more than what they’ve been spiritually fed and are willing to seek more sustenance from God, we are finding that God has much more to offer the faithful who are bold and fearless.
     What does that look like, and what exactly is a Forerunner?  Let me answer the latter part of that question first.  Simply put, a forerunner is an advance messenger of a person or thing to come.  In the Bible, we all know that John the Baptist was a forerunner of Jesus Christ.  Luke 1:17 states, of John,  “and he will go before Him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just, to make ready for the Lord a people prepared.”  I actually prefer the Amplified version of this verse:  It is he who will go as a forerunner before Him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers back to the children, and the disobedient to the attitude of the righteous [which is to seek and submit to the will of God]—in order to make ready a people [perfectly] prepared [spiritually and morally] for the Lord.”  The role and responsibilities of a forerunner in this generation are quite apparent … to seek the will of God [and to submit to it] in preparing the people of this world for the return of Jesus.
     Isaiah actually prophesied about End-time forerunners who would prepare people by lifting a “banner message” to the ends of the earth that declares the full manifestation of Jesus’ salvation. … Prepare the way for the people…lift up a banner for the peoples [the nations]! Indeed the LORD has proclaimed to the end of the world: “Say to the daughter of Zion, ‘Surely your salvation is coming; behold, His reward is with Him…’” (Isa. 62:10-11)  We are to proclaim to the world that Jesus is returning and bringing the full manifestation of the Kingdom of God with Him!
     So, let me return to the question of what it looks like to be called by God to be a forerunner, and what and how He is showing us His message for the people of this world.  First, we need to understand that God used forerunners in previous generations when He was about to do a glorious work on the earth. And since He never changes, it should be no surprise that He would have forerunners prior to Jesus’s Second Coming.  After all, there is no event that could be more significant to the future of the earth’s inhabitants. And these forerunners always were witness to God’s supernatural attributes and power.
     Actually, the Bible gives us a history of supernatural generations in which the majority of God’s people witnessed the power of God on a regular basis. We have the generation of Moses, with the supernatural events of the plagues in Egypt, the parting of the Red Sea, and the Crossing of the River Jordan — all leading to the establishment of the Old Covenant.  Nearly 1500 years later, there was a generation that witnessed the supernatural events of Pentecost and the subsequent miracles of the works of the Apostles and the supernatural conversion of Paul — all leading to the establishment of the New Covenant.  Now, here we are, just a little over 2000 years after that last generation, in which many are asking how long until Jesus returns to establish the Millennium Kingdom?
    In each of these generations God dramatically increases the way He moves in power through His people and how He relates to them.  That is quite apparent in the generation of Moses and the Acts 2 generation.  But I am quite confident when I tell you that it is happening in this generation, too.  And God is doing it the same way.  The same Holy Spirit that guided Moses and the Apostles — that gave them wisdom to do God’s will and the power to achieve it — is working in those who are willing to answer His call in this generation.
     Remember, Jesus told us that we, who believe in Him, would do greater works than He did.  And the Bible tells us that if all the works of Jesus were to be written in books, the whole world would not have room for the books.  So why in the world does the modern Church have a hard time accepting that the Holy Spirit can be working in God’s people in new and miraculous ways that might not be mentioned in the Bible?  After all, Jesus didn’t tell us exactly what those “greater things” would be, and if he did so many more works than could be written down, why do our fellow believers doubt us when we say the Holy Spirit is showing us deeper revelations from God?

     Why can the world and the Church not understand that it is possible that we hunger to receive every spiritual insight that God will give the human spirit in this age? That our spiritual hunger is so great that we are willing to alter our lifestyle, to examine our theology, and to step out in boldness if it means God will honor our hungry hearts and spirits, and give us more to do for the Kingdom?  And I can guarantee you it’s not going to look like what the world or the Church has seen up til now.  But neither did it in Moses’s or the Apostle’s generations!
     So, when we speak of healing or casting out demons (which the Bible readily records as acts of Jesus), why are we censored and judged for speaking of “seeing in the spirit” or “warring in the spiritual realm” or allowing Jesus and the Holy Spirit to conduct “inner healing” on those kept in bondage to the Enemy?  Isn’t it possible that the Holy Spirit is revealing the “greater works” that God wants done before His Son returns? [And there is so much more being revealed, but I hesitate to share it because of the fear, doubt, and unbelief already exhibited by much of the Body of Christ!]
     The truth of the matter, as I see it, is this:  there is undoubtedly a growing spiritual hunger among the remnant of God. They are preparing themselves by going deeper into their understanding of the Word; by fasting and seeking the spiritual gifts of God; and by ministering to the needs of the lost and enslaved. This remnant is answering the call on their spirits and responding to the hunger of their hearts to perceive the purposes of God’s coming judgments — and to prepare the nations to repent and receive God’s grace and deliverance before those judgments take place.
     When the world sees the greatest manifestation of both God’s and Satan’s power [at the return of Jesus], the forerunners will have a unique focus and understanding of what is happening, and will be prepared to assist the Holy Spirit in the revelation of Jesus and the Father.  Forerunners will answer the call to be co-laborers in God’s Harvest of souls. They will be positioned to answer the confusion, fear, and anger of believers who do not possess a renewed mind (seeing the events from God’s heavenly perspective).  Forerunners will be able to assist the Holy Spirit in giving understanding of events to the End-Times Church, and they will be equipped to partner with Jesus to intercede on behalf of those who will receive Jesus as their Savior.
     So, you see, the position of Forerunner has been Biblically and historically important in compelling God’s Kingdom on earth forward, and it will be no less important in the generation that sees His return.  Is that this generation, or the next?  No one knows for sure.  But I can tell you that I praise the Lord for the knowledge and wisdom and power He is imparting to believers in this generation. I thank Him for allowing me to witness the incredible love He has for all those who will receive Jesus, and for seeing the imaginative and creative ways He manifests His power in their lives.
     And whatever measure of power and authority He gives me; whatever measure of blessings on my heart, circumstances, or ministry; whatever measure of experiencing Him I receive; by whatever measure my hungry spirit is filled  — at the end of my life, it will have been an honor to be a servant of the Lord.  I wish the same for each of you.

Isaiah 40:31   But those who wait for the Lord [who expect, look for, and hope in Him] will gain new strength and renew their power; They will lift up their wings [and rise up close to God] like eagles [rising toward the sun]; They will run and not become weary, They will walk and not grow tired.