North Korea Vows ‘Thousands-Fold’ Revenge On U.S. For Sanctions

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North Korea Vows ‘Thousands-Fold’ Revenge On U.S. For Sanctions

The North Korean government is seeking a “thousands-fold” revenge against the United States following new United Nations sanctions.

Additionally, North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho told reporters that his government would reject any negotiations that involved the rogue country disarming its nuclear weapons or missiles.

“We will not put our self-defensive nuclear deterrent on the negotiating table … and will never take a single step back from strengthening our nuclear might,” Ri told reporters at an international security conference in Manilla on Monday.

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Instead, North Korea “is ready to teach the U.S. a severe lesson with its nuclear strategic force,” according to a statement released by its news agency. The sanctions target such key exports as coal, iron, lead and seafood, The Guardian reported, and could cut its export revenue by a third.

The sanctions also prevent additional North Koreans from legally working outside the country. The UN has created a blacklist of North Korean individuals and companies that will be barred from traveling and doing business.

The hope is that sanctions, passed unanimously by the UN Security Council, will bring North Korea back to the bargaining table.

China Warns North Korea

“The purpose is to pull the peninsula nuclear issue back to the negotiating table, and to seek a final solution to realize the peninsula denuclearization and long-term stability through negotiations,” Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi said of the sanctions.

China supports the sanctions, which is bad news for North Korea, The Guardian reported.

“Do not violate the UN decision or provoke the international community’s goodwill by conducting missile launches or nuclear tests,” Wang warned on Monday.

The Chinese navy is conducting war games involving marines and dozens of ships and submarines in the East China Sea near North Korea, Newsweek reported. The wargames involved drills of air attacks and amphibious attacks.

“[The Chinese] could be sending a message to the North Koreans that they will be effective in any conflict if war is to break out,” Malcolm Davis of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute told The South China Morning Post.

What do you think the U.S. should do? Share your thoughts in the section below:

4 Storage Food Mistakes You Might Be Making

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This past weekend my wife and I organized our storage / preparendess area.  We did this together so that we would both know where items of note where, instead of me just taking on the task and her having to dig for something in my absence.  We have various storage items sorted by category on heavy wooden shelving (or on the floor, example 55 gallon drums of water) and other items on commercial grade restaurant stainless steel shelving.  Mostly these are canned food items which are within easy reach, useful when making spaghetti and one is out of Ragu.

While organizing the stash we discussed where our current needs were, mostly this revolved around items we constantly use and did not have enough of. Various spices, cans of vegetables or even things like Nutella or bottled Mayo.  I think folks need to have these conversations and evaluate what their food storage situation is like, not just for some major SHTF event but a 2 week power down scenario.  The worst thing one can do is get online, drop a few grand and toss some food storage boxes in the corner just in case.  What follows are a few other potential mistakes folks might be making with respect to food storage.

Buying in Bulk

Don’t get me wrong, I too buy in bulk so let me narrow this down a bit.  For everyday items like the aforementioned can of corn, it’s nice to be able to go down and grab a can for the evening meal.  Yet if all you have are the giant bulk cans of corn, the type that would feed a family of 10 or would have to be tossed in the fridge for leftovers (for days) it might not be the best idea.  It is a bit more expensive to buy the smaller cans but that will ensure that you actually cycle through the food instead of looking at a giant can of yams and thinking, I’ll never eat all that (and moving along).

Not Layering Your Storage (Diversify)

I’ve preached this from the beginning, having various types of layered food storage.  You need items which are ready to eat with no prep at all, think MRE’s or even some canned food items.  These can also be easily transportable if the need arises for a quick bugout.  Next in line would be meals that must be prepped but are still easy to utilize, think Mountain House meal packs or similar, boil some water and you are in there.  A final option would be the large #10 cans where actually going through a decent amount of meal prep would be required.  Layering food storage allows for optimum flexibilty and that is a good thing.

Not Buying What You’ll Eat

There you are walking through the dollar store and cans of potted meat are on sale for 50 cents each, you buy $100 worth with the thought that if times ever get tough you won’t mind eating potted meat.  10 years later all those disgusting cans of potted meat are still sitting on a shelf with zero chance of being cycled through.  When it comes to our canned food storage we typicallly buy items that we can cycle through and eat on a regular basis, while I believe that canned food expiration dates are suggestions I’d like to keep things moving on a first in first out basis if at all possible.

Not Cycling Through Food

I sort of touched on this in the previous bullet point but for many of the items which are considered perishable, it’s important to cycle through them.  This evening we made some tuna salad with cans of tuna that expired 2 years ago, I feel perfectly confident that they will be fine but I might have been a bit overzealous in my tuna purchases originally.  The point is if you buy things you will not eat willingly you’ll end up wasting food as it essentially sits on a shelf and rots.  Cycle through it replacing with never items to keep things as fresh as possible.

The Bottom Line

Wait until the next big storm in your area and then go to the grocery store, watch the folks scramble to fill their carts and baskets with items that will probably only last their family another 3-5 days at best.  Having a good storage food cache on site at your location is a key component of prepardness, while building that stash try to avoid many of the mistakes listed above.

 

4 Storage Food Mistakes You Might Be Making

This past weekend my wife and I organized our storage / preparendess area.  We did this together so that we would both know where items of note where, instead of me just taking on the task and her having to dig for something in my absence.  We have various storage items sorted by category on heavy wooden shelving (or on the floor, example 55 gallon drums of water) and other items on commercial grade restaurant stainless steel shelving.  Mostly these are canned food items which are within easy reach, useful when making spaghetti and one is out of Ragu.

While organizing the stash we discussed where our current needs were, mostly this revolved around items we constantly use and did not have enough of. Various spices, cans of vegetables or even things like Nutella or bottled Mayo.  I think folks need to have these conversations and evaluate what their food storage situation is like, not just for some major SHTF event but a 2 week power down scenario.  The worst thing one can do is get online, drop a few grand and toss some food storage boxes in the corner just in case.  What follows are a few other potential mistakes folks might be making with respect to food storage.

Buying in Bulk

Don’t get me wrong, I too buy in bulk so let me narrow this down a bit.  For everyday items like the aforementioned can of corn, it’s nice to be able to go down and grab a can for the evening meal.  Yet if all you have are the giant bulk cans of corn, the type that would feed a family of 10 or would have to be tossed in the fridge for leftovers (for days) it might not be the best idea.  It is a bit more expensive to buy the smaller cans but that will ensure that you actually cycle through the food instead of looking at a giant can of yams and thinking, I’ll never eat all that (and moving along).

Not Layering Your Storage (Diversify)

I’ve preached this from the beginning, having various types of layered food storage.  You need items which are ready to eat with no prep at all, think MRE’s or even some canned food items.  These can also be easily transportable if the need arises for a quick bugout.  Next in line would be meals that must be prepped but are still easy to utilize, think Mountain House meal packs or similar, boil some water and you are in there.  A final option would be the large #10 cans where actually going through a decent amount of meal prep would be required.  Layering food storage allows for optimum flexibilty and that is a good thing.

Not Buying What You’ll Eat

There you are walking through the dollar store and cans of potted meat are on sale for 50 cents each, you buy $100 worth with the thought that if times ever get tough you won’t mind eating potted meat.  10 years later all those disgusting cans of potted meat are still sitting on a shelf with zero chance of being cycled through.  When it comes to our canned food storage we typicallly buy items that we can cycle through and eat on a regular basis, while I believe that canned food expiration dates are suggestions I’d like to keep things moving on a first in first out basis if at all possible.

Not Cycling Through Food

I sort of touched on this in the previous bullet point but for many of the items which are considered perishable, it’s important to cycle through them.  This evening we made some tuna salad with cans of tuna that expired 2 years ago, I feel perfectly confident that they will be fine but I might have been a bit overzealous in my tuna purchases originally.  The point is if you buy things you will not eat willingly you’ll end up wasting food as it essentially sits on a shelf and rots.  Cycle through it replacing with never items to keep things as fresh as possible.

The Bottom Line

Wait until the next big storm in your area and then go to the grocery store, watch the folks scramble to fill their carts and baskets with items that will probably only last their family another 3-5 days at best.  Having a good storage food cache on site at your location is a key component of prepardness, while building that stash try to avoid many of the mistakes listed above.

 

4 Storage Food Mistakes You Might Be Making

This past weekend my wife and I organized our storage / preparendess area.  We did this together so that we would both know where items of note where, instead of me just taking on the task and her having to dig for something in my absence.  We have various storage items sorted by category on heavy wooden shelving (or on the floor, example 55 gallon drums of water) and other items on commercial grade restaurant stainless steel shelving.  Mostly these are canned food items which are within easy reach, useful when making spaghetti and one is out of Ragu.

While organizing the stash we discussed where our current needs were, mostly this revolved around items we constantly use and did not have enough of. Various spices, cans of vegetables or even things like Nutella or bottled Mayo.  I think folks need to have these conversations and evaluate what their food storage situation is like, not just for some major SHTF event but a 2 week power down scenario.  The worst thing one can do is get online, drop a few grand and toss some food storage boxes in the corner just in case.  What follows are a few other potential mistakes folks might be making with respect to food storage.

Buying in Bulk

Don’t get me wrong, I too buy in bulk so let me narrow this down a bit.  For everyday items like the aforementioned can of corn, it’s nice to be able to go down and grab a can for the evening meal.  Yet if all you have are the giant bulk cans of corn, the type that would feed a family of 10 or would have to be tossed in the fridge for leftovers (for days) it might not be the best idea.  It is a bit more expensive to buy the smaller cans but that will ensure that you actually cycle through the food instead of looking at a giant can of yams and thinking, I’ll never eat all that (and moving along).

Not Layering Your Storage (Diversify)

I’ve preached this from the beginning, having various types of layered food storage.  You need items which are ready to eat with no prep at all, think MRE’s or even some canned food items.  These can also be easily transportable if the need arises for a quick bugout.  Next in line would be meals that must be prepped but are still easy to utilize, think Mountain House meal packs or similar, boil some water and you are in there.  A final option would be the large #10 cans where actually going through a decent amount of meal prep would be required.  Layering food storage allows for optimum flexibilty and that is a good thing.

Not Buying What You’ll Eat

There you are walking through the dollar store and cans of potted meat are on sale for 50 cents each, you buy $100 worth with the thought that if times ever get tough you won’t mind eating potted meat.  10 years later all those disgusting cans of potted meat are still sitting on a shelf with zero chance of being cycled through.  When it comes to our canned food storage we typicallly buy items that we can cycle through and eat on a regular basis, while I believe that canned food expiration dates are suggestions I’d like to keep things moving on a first in first out basis if at all possible.

Not Cycling Through Food

I sort of touched on this in the previous bullet point but for many of the items which are considered perishable, it’s important to cycle through them.  This evening we made some tuna salad with cans of tuna that expired 2 years ago, I feel perfectly confident that they will be fine but I might have been a bit overzealous in my tuna purchases originally.  The point is if you buy things you will not eat willingly you’ll end up wasting food as it essentially sits on a shelf and rots.  Cycle through it replacing with never items to keep things as fresh as possible.

The Bottom Line

Wait until the next big storm in your area and then go to the grocery store, watch the folks scramble to fill their carts and baskets with items that will probably only last their family another 3-5 days at best.  Having a good storage food cache on site at your location is a key component of prepardness, while building that stash try to avoid many of the mistakes listed above.

 

4 Storage Food Mistakes You Might Be Making

This past weekend my wife and I organized our storage / preparendess area.  We did this together so that we would both know where items of note where, instead of me just taking on the task and her having to dig for something in my absence.  We have various storage items sorted by category on heavy wooden shelving (or on the floor, example 55 gallon drums of water) and other items on commercial grade restaurant stainless steel shelving.  Mostly these are canned food items which are within easy reach, useful when making spaghetti and one is out of Ragu.

While organizing the stash we discussed where our current needs were, mostly this revolved around items we constantly use and did not have enough of. Various spices, cans of vegetables or even things like Nutella or bottled Mayo.  I think folks need to have these conversations and evaluate what their food storage situation is like, not just for some major SHTF event but a 2 week power down scenario.  The worst thing one can do is get online, drop a few grand and toss some food storage boxes in the corner just in case.  What follows are a few other potential mistakes folks might be making with respect to food storage.

Buying in Bulk

Don’t get me wrong, I too buy in bulk so let me narrow this down a bit.  For everyday items like the aforementioned can of corn, it’s nice to be able to go down and grab a can for the evening meal.  Yet if all you have are the giant bulk cans of corn, the type that would feed a family of 10 or would have to be tossed in the fridge for leftovers (for days) it might not be the best idea.  It is a bit more expensive to buy the smaller cans but that will ensure that you actually cycle through the food instead of looking at a giant can of yams and thinking, I’ll never eat all that (and moving along).

Not Layering Your Storage (Diversify)

I’ve preached this from the beginning, having various types of layered food storage.  You need items which are ready to eat with no prep at all, think MRE’s or even some canned food items.  These can also be easily transportable if the need arises for a quick bugout.  Next in line would be meals that must be prepped but are still easy to utilize, think Mountain House meal packs or similar, boil some water and you are in there.  A final option would be the large #10 cans where actually going through a decent amount of meal prep would be required.  Layering food storage allows for optimum flexibilty and that is a good thing.

Not Buying What You’ll Eat

There you are walking through the dollar store and cans of potted meat are on sale for 50 cents each, you buy $100 worth with the thought that if times ever get tough you won’t mind eating potted meat.  10 years later all those disgusting cans of potted meat are still sitting on a shelf with zero chance of being cycled through.  When it comes to our canned food storage we typicallly buy items that we can cycle through and eat on a regular basis, while I believe that canned food expiration dates are suggestions I’d like to keep things moving on a first in first out basis if at all possible.

Not Cycling Through Food

I sort of touched on this in the previous bullet point but for many of the items which are considered perishable, it’s important to cycle through them.  This evening we made some tuna salad with cans of tuna that expired 2 years ago, I feel perfectly confident that they will be fine but I might have been a bit overzealous in my tuna purchases originally.  The point is if you buy things you will not eat willingly you’ll end up wasting food as it essentially sits on a shelf and rots.  Cycle through it replacing with never items to keep things as fresh as possible.

The Bottom Line

Wait until the next big storm in your area and then go to the grocery store, watch the folks scramble to fill their carts and baskets with items that will probably only last their family another 3-5 days at best.  Having a good storage food cache on site at your location is a key component of prepardness, while building that stash try to avoid many of the mistakes listed above.

 

How to Build the Ultimate Car Survival Kit w./ checklist

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How to Build the Ultimate Car Survival Kit w./ checklist As of late I have been moving ever closer to the idea that how we outfit our vehicle will seriously determine our readiness. For manyAmericans they are in or around their car much more than they are in their home. Think about it. You spend …

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Checked Your Fire Extinguishers Lately? I Haven’t And That Was A Mistake…

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Just the other day I’d decided to check on my smoke alarms and fire extinguishers and while I was at it have my youngest son try to put out a very small (and controlled) fire in our driveway just so he had an opportunity to hold and use a fire extinguisher which I don’t think … Continue reading “Checked Your Fire Extinguishers Lately? I Haven’t And That Was A Mistake…”

Elevators

When I was a kid, I remember watching a tenant in the building I lived in open an elevator door by sticking a butterknife into that little round hole that we see on the door. I also remember, back in the day, that elevators had trap doors on the roof of the cab. Nowadays, the newer elevators have no such trapdoor nor little round hole on the interior of the cab. The idea being that in an emergency, the last thing rescuers want is elevator passengers crawling around the roof of the elevator.

I’ve never found much info about how those little round holes on the elevator door worked, though. And am curious about how a person would force open elevator doors these days.I know some of you reading this work in fields that might have some knowledge on the subject…anyone have any links to any references on how to escape or force your way into an elevator?

The Best Air Rifles and Pellet Guns For Survival

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Air rifles and pellet guns are becoming increasingly popular among preppers and survivalists, and with good reason. Whilst in the past some people have been a bit skeptical about the usefulness of these weapons in a survival situation, there are many reasons why a good air rifle or two should be in your bug-out kit. Today, I’ll explain why you should have an air rifle for survival situations, take a look at the different types available, and then give you our recommendations of the best air rifles and pellet guns to choose.

Why An Air Rifle?

A lot of people point out that an air rifle can never have the power of a full-sized rifle. This is certainly true, but in reality you are not going to need an AR-15 all the time. A reasonably powerful air rifle will be able to take down most types of small game – think rabbits and small birds – with no problem at all. In a survival situation, being able to collect game like this will make all the difference. In addition, air rifle ammunition is cheap, easy to carry and store, and much, much lighter than traditional rifle rounds. A coffee tin full of pellets is going to cost you less than $50, and will last for years with conservative shooting.

Types Of Air Rifle

There are several types of air rifle available, and not all of them are good for survival situations. First, stick with larger caliber air rifles: whilst it’s certainly possible to hunt with a .177, a .22 is much more effective.

Second, stay away from CO2-powered rifles. While these rifles generate a huge amount of power, the canisters that they require to function are going to get pretty hard to find in a survival situation. In addition, these canisters are pretty bulky, and essentially eliminate one of the air rifle’s biggest advantages, its lightweight, compact design.

To my mind, the only serious contenders for a survival situation are spring and pneumatic air rifles. Both of these types of air rifle make use of a simple design that is reliable, but also generate a good amount of power. In addition, a good pneumatic (i.e. ‘pump-action’) air rifle gives you the ability to vary the power generated by the rifle, so your pellets don’t over-penetrate small game.

Our Choices

There are a huge number of high quality air rifles available, but to our mind the most important features in an air rifle for survival is reliability. What you’re looking for is a rifle that has built up a great reputation in the field.

For that reason, one of our favorites is the Diana RWS 34. This is a relatively inexpensive air rifle that has a great reputation for both accuracy and reliability. If you’ve got a bit more to spend, it might be worth considering a ‘gas-ram’ rifle, which generates even more power than the traditional spring mechanism. Our choice here would be the Gamo Whisper Silent Cat, which offers huge power in a compact design.

Written by Sam Bocetta

Cycling a Tank for Aquaponics With or Without Fish

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The post Cycling a Tank for Aquaponics With or Without Fish is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Aquaponics sounds complex, but it’s really not… It just takes a little bit of knowledge and you can be off to the races, growing plants and fish in perfect harmony. In an aquaponic system, you attempt to create a symbiotic relationship between fish or other aquatic creatures, bacteria and hydroponically grown plants. The fish waste is … Read more

The post Cycling a Tank for Aquaponics With or Without Fish is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

This One Simple Strategy Will Make You a Better Prepper

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a better prepper

Many preppers and survivalists that I have known reach a level of arrogance, sooner or later. They have all their preps in place, they know multiple survival skills, and have a solid foundation of knowledge from everything from trapping small game to canning venison. However, if there’s one thing I know about any crisis scenario, it’s that they are 100% unpredictable. The very event you thought you were completely prepared for can go sideways in a moment, with your best laid plans in shambles.

Maybe it’s time for a new strategy with your prepping, one that goes beyond what the prepper pundits teach. What if you purposely put yourself in situations where you might not have all the right survival gear or there are unexpected twists that require quick thinking and adaptation. Here’s what I have in mind:

Become a better prepper by making things hard for yourself. On purpose.

Bugging out

We all have well-equipped bug out bags and intricately detailed plans for getting out of Dodge, but what if you purposely made a bug out drill far more difficult by driving a route at night, in the rain or fog, with the recording of your screamng 2 year-old in the background?

Think that might put some hair on your chest? For sure, you would have to focus with an intensity that isn’t called for on a sunny day, with temps in the low to mid-70s, but how likely is it that you’ll have those ideal conditions when the S really does hit the fan?

How about driving that route until approaching a choke point, such as a bridge or the entrance to a tunnel, and quickly make a detour, as though that point was a roadblock? Is that a realistic scenario? Yep, so why not create the scenario for yourself now, rather than simply making a mental note that roadblocks, man-made or not, could happen on the way to your bug out location?

Any difficulty you can set up to thwart your carefully laid bug out plans will serve you well by testing your ability to think, accept, and adapt to abrupt changes in circumstances.

Your food storage stash

Challenge yourself and your family to eating only what is in your food storage for 2 days, 3 days, or longer. After all, isn’t that the exact same scenario you are planning for? What if half your food was destroyed by a house fire? Move 50% of your food out of the pantry/kitchen and that is what you’re stuck with.

Now, mix things up a bit and make the situation even more difficult by requiring food to be cooked only using a solar oven (Cloudy weather? Too bad!) or only a charcoal grill. How about a scenario that mimics the real thing by having beans and rice 3 times a day for at least 2 days? You will learn so much more about the pratical applications and realities of food storage by putting yourself through these tests than you ever will by reading a prepper forum.

Have a difficult conversation

You’ve probably given some thought about how you would like your family and closest friends to continue if something ever happens to you, but have you ever sat down with them and discussed it?

No one likes to talk about death or the possibility of a loved one being so far from home they cannot ever make it back, but now is the time to think this through. I am on the road quite a bit with my job, not terribly long distances but long enough to know that the path that leads back to home may become so dangerous and/or my health and physical strength at risk that my family would have to move on with their survival without me.

All of us do our prepping with the assumption that we’ll be there when the worst happens, but what if the worst is not coming home at all? There’s plenty I want my family to know, such as how to secure the house and who I personally trust the most as prepper allies. I may have talked about this in passing but not nearly as in depth as I should — even if my family doesn’t want to think about a future without their husband and father.

If you’ve ever wondered what you would do in this scenario, this article has some excellent insights.

Push your shooting skills to new levels

It’s no secret that Preparedness Advice is very pro-2nd Amendment, and I have done more than my share of shooting over the years. Even if your shooting skills are far above average, make things a little more difficult the next time you go to the range by shooting strong-arm/weak-arm, using your non-dominant eye, shooting leaning against something, or shooting in a squatted or seated position. (If your range doesn’t allow for some of these, then find one that does, head out to the boonies to do your shootiong, or find a class that includes these other skills.)

Take a tactical class where you’ll be shooting while moving, at moving targets, and with live ammunition. I did that a few years ago and the level of intensity and non-stop adrenaline was something I never experienced before in previous classes. A lot of ranges offer classes in low-light shooting and one that challenges you with new tactical scenarios.

Again, make a purposeful decision to make things hard for yourself in order to ultimately improve your skills and become a better prepper.

Family finances

At this moment I have a great job with really good benefits, doing something I enjoy, but an economic collapse is a scenario that is always a possibility. I could hone my own survival skills, and that of my family, by whittling down our unnecessary expenses to just a few dollars a month, or even zero. What would we do for entertainment if we cancelled our subscriptions to Netflex and Amazon Prime? If we had to worry about ever gallon of gas used, that would change our lifestyle and decisions. Our eating habits would change, the temperature of our house would change, and we would get a realistic picture how an economic collapse would affect our everyday lives.

This wouldn’t be fun and we would all hate it, but what a great opportunity to not only test our preps but also learn how to cope with few, if any, luxuries that make our lives comfortable. This is something you could set up, even if only for 48 hours.

If you’re not giving yourself challenges and taking risks conscioiusly, then you may be setting yourself up for failure in a real life survival scenario. Become a better prepper by doing something VERY different. If you’re really good at something, then change it up in a way that makes it very different, requiring different knowledge and skills you might not have.

Take risks NOW, ahead of a crisis. You’l learn a lot about yourself — how easily and how quickly you adapt (or not). These tests will also give you invaluable insights as to how your family members and even prepper group members will behave when everything hits the fan.

I’ll leave you with a true story about my wife. A few years ago we both took a concealed carry class. Although she was less experienced than I, she was determined to pass the final test to become qualified. I knew she could pass the written test and was fairly certain she’d pass the target shooting test as well.

As it turns out, she almost didn’t pass the shooting test! Why? Because in all the months and months of practice, she had never had to shoot in front of a large group of spectators. She said, “I was so rattled that I was using my non-dominant eye! I was lucky to have hit the target at all!” Fortunately, she figured out what she was doing wrong, made the correction, and passed, but this is a prime example of why and how we should put ourselves into scenarios and in circumstances that bring physical, emotional, and mental discomfort in order to grow.

How could you purposely make things more difficult in order to grow as a prepper?

The post This One Simple Strategy Will Make You a Better Prepper appeared first on Preparedness Advice.

3 Ways to Enjoy Music While Off the Grid

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I don’t know about you, but I absolutely love music. I have it playing the background all the time, even now as I write this. So naturally, I’ve put a lot of thought into how will I keep listening to music when the grid goes down. There’s a reason that music has been around for […]

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The 8 Best Mountain House Meals Worth Trying

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Mountain House offers one of the longest product shelf life ranges in the industry. Their food is guaranteed to delight your taste buds even after it sits on a shelf for 30-years. How we cook food, is one of the key factors that impact taste and quality. At Mountain House, they use a home cooked. . . Read More

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Tips to Prepare Your Family from Home Invasion

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Chain Castle Burglar Closed Close Metal Stainless

Home invasion should never be taken lightly. It can terrorize your family, lead to physical abuse or cause the loss of a loved one. Although there are measures you can do to prevent unwanted people from getting inside your home, you should still be prepared in case an invasion does happen.

If you are unsure about what you need to do, here are some tips you can use to prepare your family in the event of a home invasion.

Start with a plan

You should establish a plan long before an invasion happens. Since panic and stress can easily fog your thinking, having a good plan can keep you aware of what you should do. It can keep you in control of things, too.

An effective emergency plan includes having a specific place the family should go to in case of an intrusion. You should dedicate a safe room that has reinforced locks and all the necessary items you’ll need for survival and to call for help. This includes a phone with an extra battery, flashlight and, if possible, a weapon. Do not get out of your safe room until help arrives or the situation calms down.

Part of an effective plan is practice. Role play your plan to find out which areas need modifications. Do this every 6 months and make changes to the plan as necessary. Include your kids when role playing. The more they act it out, the more they are likely to retain the information.

Use your alarm system

An alarm system is helpful in deterring burglars and intruders. It can connect you to the monitoring station, in case it’s monitored, or alert you of possible trespassers.

In the event that your home alarm system does signal intrusion, do not expose yourself to danger. Instead, use your alarm system to check your home. This is where having security cameras proves to be helpful.

If a full system doesn’t fit the budget, you can try installing a DIY home security system. Most DIY systems are inexpensive and you can easily install them without professional help. They are transferrable, too. If you are renting the place, you can easily take the system with you or transfer it to a new owner in case you decide to sell the house.

Know who to call for help

Even if you are skilled in combat, it’s still not a good idea to physically challenge the intruders in your home. Most of them go in groups and you’ll never know how many people are inside your property unless you get to see each one face to face. Consider your safety and that of your family as top priority.

At the first sign of intrusion, call for help. It can be your neighbor, local police or 911. Make sure your kids know who to call, too. Write down emergency numbers and keep a copy in your safe room and other parts of the house. Consider making them memorize those numbers, too.

Keep your phone and car keys near you

Home invasion can happen anytime, but they are more frequent at night. This is one good reason to keep your phone and car keys beside your bed.

If you hear a strange noise outside and you have no cameras to verify, press your car key’s panic button. That should trigger your alarm and scare potential intruders away from your property. It can help alert neighbors, too. After a few seconds of alarm, they are likely to look out their windows and no intruder would want that to happen.

Your car’s alarm makes a good alarm system, even if you are not at home. You can use it in parking lots in the event that you recognize threat and possible assault.

Know your neighbors

Your neighbors can be one of your strongest defenses against home invasion. In a close-knit community, intruders and burglars are less likely to attack since they can easily be spotted. Apart from that, your neighbors can also be the first people who can respond to your aid in case of an emergency. You can rely on them to check on your property when you’re out for a trip or you’re at work.

Set up a neighborhood watch program in case your community doesn’t have one yet. Talk to people who can lead the program and find out how each person can contribute. Distribute fliers, brochures and other materials to increase your people’s awareness about safety and security. You can reach out to your local law enforcers, too. They should be able to give you a more thorough lesson when it comes to protecting your family during a home invasion.

Neighborhood watch programs don’t necessarily have to be big, but it should be an effective one.

Author’s Bio:

Rose Cabrera writes for http://topsecurityreview.com/. She specializes in writing in-depth home security system reviews and safety tips and tricks anyone can use.

The post Tips to Prepare Your Family from Home Invasion appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Getting Started With Solar Cooking

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How long can you go without craving a hot, homemade meal, if you have been eating only cold rations and snacks?  If you’ve ever been without power for more than just a couple of days, eating cold ravioli or tuna out of the can gets really old, really fast. Most survival minded people realize, better than most, that it doesn’t take much to disrupt the flow of electricity we depend on for cooking. A natural disaster or freak weather event can turn the most modern home into a survivalist camp within a few hours. Electricity can also be interrupted by man-made crises, such as civil unrest, terrorism, or an EMP, making that hot meal a rare treat.

A popular slogan among survivalists and preppers is, “Always have a back-up to your back-up.”  When it comes to cooking, what is your back-up to your back-up? Do you have more than one way of cooking a hot meal when the power is down?

Getting Started With Solar Cooking via The Survival Mom

One simple addition to your emergency preparedness is a solar oven. It’s a great way to get started cooking off the grid, and is something everyone, not just preppers, should have on hand.

As long as the sun is shining and the sky is relatively clear, a solar oven can serve up a delicious pot of rice and beans and brownies for dessert without requiring any fuel. In fact, its dependence on the sun as its only source of fuel, is the reason every home should have a solar cooker. Solar cooking is an unbeatable back-up for making sure there’s a hot meal on the table three times a day. It’s also a sure-fire way to have hot water on hand for sanitation purposes and to purify water.

There Is Something New Under The Sun

Solar cooking and using the sun to preserve food has been around for hundreds of years, but only in modern times has the use of solar cookers become widespread both in the survival community and among communities around the world with unreliable electrical power. Its advantages are obvious.


9 Reasons why your home should have a solar cooker
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  • There is no need to store additional fuel.
  • Sunshine is free, unlike propane, butane, gas, and other fuels.
  • It’s possible to store several months’ worth of food, but storing all the fuel you might need isn’t as easy.
  • Once paid for, or built, if you’re the DIY type, there are no other expenses involved and maintenance is simple.
  • There are no dangerous fumes or safety issues to worry about.
  • A solar cooker can be used for every type of cooking, except frying.
  • Food never burns in a solar cooker.
  • During hot, summer months, the use of a solar cooker helps keep the kitchen, and the cook cool.
  • Over time and with frequent use, the use of a solar oven will save money on the electric bill.

A Solar Cooker For Every Home

A solar cooker is a must-have as a back-up method for cooking food. It is the single most self-reliant way to cook food and heat water, and has the additional advantage of being a DIY project if there’s a handyman (or woman) in the family.

Commercially produced solar cookers, such as the All-American Sun Oven, are perfect for the prepper who is too busy for even one more DIY project. The Solavore is another reliable brand that has been reviewed here. Depending on the brand you choose, these stoves have consistent quality construction, are designed to reach temperatures for the quickest possible cooking results, and have features for enhanced usability, such as interior thermometers, large reflecting panels (optional on the Solavore), and a weather resistant design.

However, some of these ovens carry a price tag of $300 or more and can be large and bulky. In a Get-Out-Of-Dodge scenario, there might not be room for my Sun Oven in the back of our Tahoe, and if I ever had to cook for more than my family of four, it might be too small. That’s one of the limitations of a store-bought solar cooker. You’re stuck with a standard size that may be too small, and your budget may not allow for a second cooker.

On the other hand, a DIY solar cooker can be customized to your specific needs. One friend used a large ice chest on wheels for her solar oven. She could wheel it to any location in the backyard and she chose a size that could accommodate as many as four baking dishes. Another ingenious DIY plan that can be found on the internet uses a 5 gallon bucket and a reflective sunshade. Total cost?  Not much more than ten bucks, if that. The advantage of many DIY solar cookers is that they can be dismantled for convenient transport, and all of them require materials that are already in most garages. Plans for homemade solar cookers can be found on dozens of websites and demonstration videos abound on YouTube.

The DIY solar cooker comes with a few disadvantages. If the design doesn’t maximize the amount of sunlight available, you may end up with nothing more than a hot silver box sitting out in your yard. I recommend testing and tweaking any DIY design until it consistently reaches 350 degrees or more. Reliable temperatures will help you plan mealtimes and insure that foods reach temperatures that will deter any bacterial growth. Another issue with the DIY cooker is its durability. If a slight breeze knocks over your cooker and pot of beans, you’ll know you need to fine-tune the design for added stability.

Getting Started With Solar Cooking

Regardless of which solar cooker you settle on, some foods are easiest for getting started.  Be sure to keep a log of foods you cook, time of day you begin cooking, and the length of cooking time required. This log will be a huge help to you as you branch out and begin cooking a wider variety of foods.

  • Hard boiled eggs. Place eggs on a dark colored towel or inside a dark pot inside your cooker.  After 20 minutes, check one egg for doneness. Solar cooked hard boiled eggs will be softer than those cooked in a pot of boiling water.
  • Rice is either cooked or it’s not. It’s probably the easiest food to experiment with when you’re new to solar cooking. Combine rice and water in a covered pot. Check for doneness after 25 minutes. A package of Rice-a-Roni works just as well for your experimentation.
  • Yes, brownies! Mix up a batch of your favorite store-bought or homemade recipe, pour it into a dark, greased pan and place it in your solar cooker. Use the baking times recommended by your recipe, test for doneness, and leave in for additional minutes if required. I’ve found that solar-baked brownies are usually finished in the same amount of time as oven-baked.
  • Heat water in your solar cooker to pasteurize it. Check the temperature of water after 30 minutes. At 149 degrees Fahrenheit (65 degrees Celsius), all germs, viruses, and parasites are killed. This information, along with your solar cooker, could be one more way to insure safe drinking water in an emergency and provide sterilized water for medical and first aid purposes.

Like any new skill, the only way to learn how to cook with a solar oven is to just do it. For most dishes, allow at least an extra 30 minutes to your cooking time.

Top Ten Tips For Solar Cooking

  1. Solar cooking isn’t an exact science. It requires a bit of trial and at least a few errors to determine the correct cooking time for any food.
  2. Always use dark pots and pans with any solar cooker. These basic and inexpensive Granite Ware pots work very well. If you must use a light colored or shiny baking dish, cover it with a dark colored hand towel.
  3. Thin metal baking dishes work best in a solar cooker. They will heat up more quickly and lessen the amount of cooking time needed. Again, Granite Ware is a good example of these.
  4. A thermometer is a must-have for a solar cooker.
  5. Allow your solar cooker to pre-heat for 15-20 minutes. Pre-heating will shorten the cooking time a bit.  Just be aware that the interior of your cooker will be hot, so be sure to use pot-holders.
  6. Always use a baking dish with a lid for all your solar cooking. The lid retains important heat and moisture. There’s no need for a lid if you’re baking. Pies, brownies, cookies, cakes, and bread won’t require a lid.
  7. If you’re cooking meat, make sure the interior of the oven reaches at least 180 degrees. Again, a thermometer is a must to insure food safety and predictable cooking times. This thermometer is small and inexpensive.
  8. Use the ‘slow-cooker’ method when you’ll be gone all day. Place the solar oven so that it faces directly south. Pop in your baking dish, close the lid, and by dinner time, you’ll have a hot, delicious meal waiting for you.
  9. Moisture will likely collect inside the cooker during the cooking process. Wipe the inside dry before storing it.
  10. Turn your solar cooker into a food dehydrator by propping open the oven door by a half inch or so. This allows moisture to escape while the interior of the cooker retains heat.

If you’re new to solar cooking, prepare to be amazed.  There’s nothing quite like placing a baking dish in a box out in the sun and coming back later to a fully cooked and delicious meal.  A prolonged power outage doesn’t mean the end to hot, nutritious meals when you have a solar cooker as a back-up.

 

Getting Started With Solar Cooking via The Survival Mom

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Easy Guide To Practice At Home For New Shooters

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As a gun owner, you will enjoy many rewards that come with being a responsible and competent carrier. Practicing effective and efficient shooting skills reduces the risk of injuring innocent people and also makes it easier for you to handle a crisis.

Gun owners today must practice many different scenarios, including when and when not to shoot until it become second nature or muscle memory.

When you have developed a sufficient level of muscle memory, you will have to think consciously about drawing your gun, aiming, or firing. Rather, once you know that you have to fire the gun, it will all happen in one fluid motion from start to finish.

From that perspective, practicing isn’t just about ensuring you can hit the target, it is about being able to evaluate and follow through as quickly as possible without making mistakes. Even though professional shooters make their actions look effortless, hours and years of practice go into their skills and marksmanship.

Here are some ways you can hone your skills at home using some basic devices and drills.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

The LaserLyte Training System

LaserLyte makes training kits that use a colored polymer pistol or revolver that looks and feels just like a handgun that you plan to carry. Instead of firing live ammunition, this gun fires a safe laser beam that will show up on the target. These kits can be used for drawing from concealment, target practice, or gallery shooting.

Types of training kits available (each contains your handgun replica of choice):

  • Laser Quick Tyme Kit –  The bulls eye target in this kit has a built-in timer that can be used in the on or off mode depending what your shooting requirements are.
  • Laser Steel Tyme Kit – contains two steel Tyme targets that make a metallic sound when you hit them.
  • Laser Rumble Tyme Kit – contains two can shaped laser targets that spin and make a rumbling sound when you hit them.
  • The laser Gallery Kit – contains one bulls eye target, one steel tyme target, and one rumbling can target.

Once you have mastered stationary shooting, you can adapt the system for shooting at moving targets. Did you know that you can use a Roomba vacuum cleaner, remote control truck, or other robotic devices to improve your shooting skills? Just put a laser target on top of it, pick a location to shoot from, and let the Roomba run around the room.

You can practice concealment, and use all different kinds of furniture for your drills. This includes shooting down from staircases, or other locations at head level or other heights of interest to you.

When you use the Roomba vacuum cleaner, you can be as creative as you like formulating drills. Since the Roomba’s activities can be quite random depending on how your furniture is arranged, you will also get to work a little bit on adrenalin control.

If there is a large barn or other large storage builds on the property, try using a drone to carry a laser target. With a good drone pilot, it is possible to make the target shooting training session into a custom training course for shooters.

With this type of target practice, you can work up from slow moving to faster ones, plus include plenty of variety. Or, if you need to work on your form, drill on the same patterns as much as you like.

Airsoft Pistols

Airsoft pistols are replica handguns that fire a plastic BBs. These pistols are designed after the most popular pistols of today to the point they are exact replicas, except there is a a RED ring on the barrel at the muzzle end.

You can shoot Airsoft guns in the house, garage, or outdoors. You will also find that Airsoft BBs are much cheaper than ammo you have set aside for practice at the range. To keep from losing the BBs either indoors or outside, I would recommend using a BB trap or a tarp behind the targets.

These pistols are fired either by spring action, automatic electric guns, or by gas.

Spring Action

Supplies you will need to shoot.

  1. Ammunition- 6mm pellets.
  2. Targets- shooters choice.
  3. Eye protection- shooters choice.

These are the cheapest and lowest velocity of the Airsoft pistols.  To fire this pistol, you must:

  1. Load the ammunition reservoir.
  2. Pull back the slide or cocking lever back until the spring is all the way back and locked.
  3. Aim and pull the trigger. When the trigger is pulled, it releases a piston that shoots forward through a cylinder at high speed and pressure. It is this pressure that pushes the BB out of the barrel.

Note: These pistols are very slow and must be cocked every time in to be fired. I would not recommend using them to shoot in semi-auto pistol practice.

Automatic Electric Guns (AEGs)

This firing system is good for automatic firing rifles or semi-auto pistols. These weapons use a small rechargeable battery to run a small electric motor.  This motor runs the sequencing gears, and operates the piston travel.

Supplies you will need to shoot:

  1. Ammunition- 6mm pellets.
  2. Targets- shooters choice.
  3. Eye protection- shooters choice.

How the pistol operates when fired.

  1. When the trigger is pulled, the electric motor activates, turning the piston gears, which pulls the piston back and loads the pistol.
  2. Releases the piston to pressurize the cylinder.
  3. Fires the BB down the barrel.
  4. The trigger resets for the next shot.

Notes: Be sure the battery is fully charged and the BB reservoir is full.  Some of these pistols can simulate the recoil of the fired pistols.

Gas Blow-Back (GBB)

These Airsoft pistols use a compressed gas system to shoot the BBs out of the barrel. Many of these pistols have a gas blow-back feature that causes the slide on the pistol to slide backwards and return after being fired. These gas blow-back pistols are the closest of the three types of Airsoft pistols that feel like firing a real gun.

Supplies needed to shoot:

  1. Ammunition- 6mm plastic pellets. Don’t be cheap, buy a good quality one without seams or cracks. Low quality pellets can damage the pistol.
  2. Targets- Shooters choice.
  3. Gas- There are three types of gas that can be used in the pistol. CO2, Propane, or Green gas (Propane gas that has silicone mixed in to self-lubricate the pistol.) If you use CO2, Propane or Green gas in cylinders a special converter will be needed to fill the magazine with the gas.
  4. Eye protection- Shooters choice.

When the trigger is pulled, the gas activates, which pulls the piston back and loads the pistol, pressurizes the cylinder, fires the BB down the barrel and the trigger resets for the next shot.

Safety and Shooting Features of a Good Range

In order to get the most out of shooting at home, build a range where you can practice safely and without distraction, but keep the safety in mind. Here are a few things you can do to ensure your range is as safe as possible:

  • Build the range facing away from occupied dwellings.
  • Have a well-built back stop and barricade side walls that will stop all ammunition that will be used on the range.
  • Remove anything that might cause ricochets on the range.
  • Target stands to hold paper or steel gong targets.
  • Motor or hand operated moving targets.

Types of Shooting on Your Outdoor Range

Paintball

Paintball is a sport in which players compete in teams or individually to eliminate opponents by tagging them with paintballs fired from a paintball gun.  These games can involve role playing and be carried out in many kinds of terrain.

Paintball sports give your hands-on training at “shooting” someone without using ammo that can wound or kill.  It also gives you a chance to work on strategies and hone your skills while addressing adrenaline related matters.

Like all shooting sports, when using paintball guns, the competitors need to know the capabilities of their guns and what safety gear is necessary to protect them. The following is the basic equipment needed when using paintball guns.

  • A paintball gun kit of choice.
  • Paintballs will be the shooters choice.
  • Protective clothing
    • Chest protectors that are full wrap around to protect front, back, and sides.
    • Elbow and forearm pads.
    • Helmets or head wraps.
    • Goggles for eye protection.
    • Knee and shin pads.
    • Neck protectors.
    • Groin cup.
    • Gloves for your hands.

For players outer clothing:

  • Some individuals like to wear camo pants and shirts to better blend in with surrounding terrain.
  • Full body Ghillie suit for total camouflage.
  • Boots of your choice.

Live Fire- FBI Q Course

When I was a police officer, my department used the FBI “Q” course for pistol qualifications. This is a sixty round timed course that all FBI Agents must pass to complete the requirements to become an agent. It has since been adopted by many other departments at the national, state, and local levels. This course is not difficult, but it’s a good indicator of the shooters abilities.

Your minimum passing score will be fifty out of sixty in the center squares only in a certain amount of time. Anything outside of this square is counted as a miss. The time requirements give you enough time to shoot each section of the course. The shorter time limits are designed to add a little stress and to give you a baseline to keep from shooting too slowly.

Never forget that a gunfight is fast and very violent. The faster you can shoot accurately, the better chance you have of coming out alive.

Course of fire

Starting at the 3-yard line. You will need a magazine loaded with 12 rounds total. Re-holster after each part except number 3. Don’t re-holster between strong hand and weak hand portions.

  1. Time limit 3 seconds. Draw and fire 3 rounds with your strong hand only.
  2. Repeat 1.
  3. Time limit 8 seconds. Draw and fire 3 rounds with your strong hand only. Then switch hands and fire 3 rounds with weak hand only.
  4. Re-holster an empty pistol.

Move to the 5-yard line. You will need 12 rounds total. Two handed shooting is required from this point on.

  1. There will be 4 repetitions of 3 seconds each. Draw and fire 3 rounds each. Re-holster after each 3 rounds portion.
  2. After the fourth-round re-holster an empty pistol.

Move to the 7-yard line. You will need 16 total rounds. 12 rounds in the first magazine in the pistol. 4 rounds in the reload magazine.

  1. Time limit 4 seconds. Draw and fire 4 rounds. Re-holster pistol.
  2. Repeat 1. Re-holster pistol.
  3. Time limit 8 seconds. Draw and fire 4 rounds (the gun is empty). Reload, fire 4 rounds.
  4. Re-holster an empty pistol.

Move to the 15-yard line. You will need 10 rounds.

  1. Time limit 6 seconds. Draw and fire 3 rounds.
  2. Repeat 1.
  3. Time limit 8 seconds. Draw and fire 4 rounds.
  4. Re-holster an empty pistol.

Move to the 25-yard line (barricade shooting).

  1. Time limit 15 seconds. You will need 5 rounds.
  2. Draw and fire strong hand barricade.
  3. Re-holster empty pistol.

Time limit 15 seconds. You will need 5 rounds.

  1. Draw and fire weak hand barricade.
  2. Re-holster empty pistol.

Build and practice in a Hogan’s Alley shooting range

Hogan’s Alley is any shooting range devoted to tactical shooting. These ranges are best known for teaching shooters when to shoot and when not to shoot. This is better known as Shoot Don’t Shoot Drills.

They can be very sophisticated with remote control target systems or as primitive as targets mounted on a wheeled carriage pulled along by ropes operated manually.

The Hogan’s Alley range is built to look like an average US small town or city street. Pop up targets can be used singly or in groups set at different ranges.

Video first seen on KRHAAS.

Remember to have a good mix of good guy and bad guy targets to keep the exercises interesting. When used in a Hogan’s Alley, set up pop-up targets to appear in windows, doorways, or looking over objects like cars, boats, or walls.

To keep the drills from getting boring, move the targets around to make different scenarios.

Gallery Range

The Gallery range can help the shooter to shoot different types of targets at different ranges. You can use tin cans, aluminum drink cans, or plastic bottles. These targets can be placed on a stump, suspended from frames or tree limbs, or just thrown into the target area at different distances from the firing line.

When the targets are different distances. This helps you judge distances better, hit the targets more often, and teaches you how much hold-over to use at different distances. When you can keep the targets dancing and bouncing with multiple hits, you will be well on your way to mastering this type of shooting.

When finished shooting for the day always go over the shooting area and take the brass and trash with you.

Wooden Target Stands

These target stands can be used to mount different types of paper targets at different distances from the shooting line. This is an excellent way to shoot a bull’s eye target or a “shoot don’t shoot” course of fire.

Auto-popper Steel Targets

These are steel targets that use springs to return hit targets to the upright shooting position. The targets come in many sizes of circles and animal shapes. The steel targets should be placed at different distances from the firing line and off known distances that are used regularly.

Ground Strike Targets

There are ground strike targets that are made of durable materials that can take hundreds of shots before being shot apart. They come in ball, animal, and jack shapes. When you are shooting on your range:

  1. Learn to shoot from the standing, kneeling, sitting, or prone positions at different distances from 3-25 yards from the target or further.
  2. Learn to shoot both strong and weak handed.
  3. Learn to shoot from behind barricades.
  4. Practice drawing, shooting, and reloading from each of the four positions.

Recording Your Sessions

When you are practicing at home and away from an instructor, you may not realize that you are making mistakes in both shooting form and other maneuvers.

Using a video recorder for your sessions will make it possible for you to compare your form, and discover mistakes that might otherwise prove fatal in an actual shootout.

While you may feel uncomfortable with video cameras at first, they are well worth what they will show you.

As a first time gun owner, it is very important to get the proper training. A gun is an excellent tool for self defense, and can also be used for sport and hunting.

If you don’t practice, even the best gun won’t make up for lack of experience and skill in shooting and evaluating targets. Practicing at home can give you cheaper alternatives, and also give you more time and privacy to work on your abilities and develop your survival mindset and skills.

This article has been written by Fred Tyrell for Survivopedia.

Top Ten Trees For Survival And Wilderness Living

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If you plan to bug out to or just spend more time in the wilderness, it makes sense to learn about tress you could use for survival. You would have to exploit what resources are available in a certain region and you need to recognize the species you could use to make your life easier. … Read more…

The post Top Ten Trees For Survival And Wilderness Living was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Top Ten Trees For Survival And Wilderness Living

If you plan to bug out to or just spend more time in the wilderness, it makes sense to learn about tress you could use for survival. You would have to exploit what resources are available in a certain region and you need to recognize the species you could use to make your life easier. … Read more…

The post Top Ten Trees For Survival And Wilderness Living was written by Dan Mowinski and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Kale Chips: Dehydrate & Make Your Own

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Kale chips (dehydrated), especially when sprinkled with spice during dehydration, are delicious! Kale, as many of you probably know, is very good for you. It’s a dark green veggie loaded with nutrition. I’ve read that it’s the most nutrient dense food on the planet. Here’s how to make Kale chips: The other day Mrs.J went out to the garden and came back with a bunch of Kale. I said to her, “There’s no way we’re going to eat all that tonight…”. She replied, “We’re going to make dehydrated Kale chips”. I like Kale and this sounded like a great idea.

The post Kale Chips: Dehydrate & Make Your Own appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Money Mondays: 13 Driving Tactics to Save Fuel

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Though gas prices have been staying on the lower side in the recent months, it is still a good idea to save gas whenever possible.  The money you save can be used toward other things such as boosting your slush fund or buying food and supplies for emergencies.   Source:  https://www.onstride.co.uk/blog/13-driving-tactics-save-fuel/

The post Money Mondays: 13 Driving Tactics to Save Fuel appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

Here’s What Burglars Will Tell You About Protecting Your Home From Thieves

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I’d wager that no one leaves their home without being at least somewhat concerned about the belongings that they leave behind. Contained within most homes, is the sum total of the owner’s life, and not just in a material sense. There are plenty of items with sentimental value as well. And all of it is typically protected by little more than a few locks on the doors and windows. If someone really wants to break into your home and steal what you own when you’re not around, chances are that there isn’t much standing in their way.

But if you want to make it harder for any would-be burglar to enter your home, or at least make your home a less desirable target, don’t just buy an alarm system and call it day. You should really listen to people who are burglars and take their advice. An MSNBC affiliate out of Atlanta recently did just that. They sent letters to 86 people who had gone to prison for burglary and asked them a variety questions about their crimes. Their answers could tell you a lot about how to protect your home from this crime. What they told reporters included the following:

  • Don’t advertise what you own. One burglar admitted to looking for homes that had cars with NRA bumper stickers, which would indicate that there are plenty of guns to steal there.
  • Burglars don’t just look in obvious places. If they feel safe, they’ll tear everything up looking for hidden valuables.
  • The best time to break into a house was between 12:30 and 2:30, because it’s rare for both kids or adults to be home at that time period.
  • Not all burglars are intimidated by security alarm signs and cameras, and many admitted to knowing how to disable alarms. Some suggested that cameras would indicate that there are valuables in the home.
  • As you might expect, burglars are terrified of large dog breeds.
  • Burglars aren’t typically killers. They don’t want to a serious confrontation with a homeowner, so any sign that someone is home is a deterrent.

When asked what precautions homeowners should take to keep their homes from being burglarized, most of the inmates gave similar answers. For instance, many of them suggested that homeowners leave some sign that someone is home, such as parking a car in the driveway or leaving a TV or radio on.

But the biggest deterrent is visibility, and that applies in more than one sense. They suggested that you keep your bushes and trees trimmed so that your home is easy to see. Homes that were isolated, either by the distance from other houses or by being obscured by big fences and vegetation were definitely easier to rob. It seems that the things people build around their homes to make them feel safer have the opposite effect.

And of course, visibility means nothing if no one is actually watching your home. One inmate admitted to preferring homes in communities where the neighbors were very reserved and conservative, and others recommended that you get to know your neighbors. The implication is obvious. In neighborhoods where people don’t really know each other or care about each other, it’s quite easy to break into a home.

That’s because nobody wants to get involved when they see someone hopping your fence, nobody can tell if anything out of the ordinary is going on in your home if they don’t know you, and nobody is really paying attention. As a result, nobody calls the cops.

The bottom line is that neighborhoods, where people talk to each other and don’t feel the need to build barriers between each other, are safer. And that’s probably something that we’ve known intuitively all along.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Prepping on the Cheap Part 2- Bugging Out

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Prepping on the Cheap Part 2- Bugging Out Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio player below! If you had to pick up and go right now, could you do it? How long would it take for you to gather your important documents, extra clothes, food and water, and necessary gear? If so, great. You are … Continue reading Prepping on the Cheap Part 2- Bugging Out

The post Prepping on the Cheap Part 2- Bugging Out appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.