15 Weird Foods That Were Common During The Great Depression

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15 Weird Foods That Were Common During the Great Depression

The Great Depression, with all of its hardships, was one of the most prolific times in the history of the American diet. This period required homemakers to develop creative new ways to feed their families, sometimes for less than pennies a day. But as the economy improved and more Americans went back to work, many of these dinnertime staples simply faded out of style.

Yet they haven’t faded from memory. Here are 10 Great Depression foods that seemed strange and even weird at the time.

1. Prune Pudding

Prunes were a humble, inexpensive food source during the Depression. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt actually made headlines by pressuring her husband to eat prune pudding when guests came to the White House for a visit. Why prunes? They were easily stored and didn’t cost as much as other fresh fruits.

2. Dandelion salad

Foraging was not uncommon during the Great Depression, and it was easy and free to scavenge in the backyard for edible greens. Dandelions weren’t the only produce of choice; many Depression-era homesteaders also made soups or salads out of burdock root, wild onions and other weeds. Although dandelion salad is still popular in many cultures today, it’s typically accompanied by sweet or tangy ingredients to offset the bitterness of the plant.

3. Fish …. anything

Fishing was a popular pastime during this era, not just because it was an enjoyable way to spend a Sunday, but also because it put food on the table! A weekend fish fry would produce enough leftovers for the entire week. Bones, heads and tails could be used for soup or gravy stock.

4. Creamed chipped beef

This curious dish originated in Pennsylvania Dutch country and consisted of salted beef and milk. Any kind of beef-like meat could be used (cows were difficult and expensive to raise, so goats or wild game could also be used).

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It was typically served on toast and became a staple for soldiers fighting overseas during World War II. Ever heard your grandparents talk about you-know-what on a shingle? This is it!

5. Ritz cracker crust

The purpose behind this crust has nothing to do with the crust itself, but what the buttery flavor of the Ritz crackers does for the apples. Apples were in short supply during the Depression, so the rich flavor of the crackers helped to supplement the limited apple flavor.

6. Spaghetti with boiled carrots

15 Weird Foods That Were Common During The Great DepressionCarrots were easy to grow in most homestead gardens during the Great Depression. As a result, spaghetti with boiled carrots—with the addition of a simple white sauce—was a heavily promoted, relatively nutritious dish in schools throughout the country.

7. Meatless loaf

When raising livestock was impractical or impossible, many Depression-era cooks turned to meatless loaves for sustenance. Made out of vegetarian ingredients such as peanuts, rice, cottage cheese and flour, these cakes were popular before tofu was even a thing.

8. Vinegar pie

As mentioned, fruits were in low supply and high demand during the Great Depression. During cold winter months, most families found themselves without any fruit at all. What to do about dessert? Many bakers added vinegar to a mixture of spices (such as cinnamon and cloves) and—if fortunate enough—butter or cream to create a low-cost version of a pie or cobbler.

9. Peanut butter stuffed onions

This dish was commonly suggested in newspapers and magazines as a nutritious and delicious recipe for any family’s table. Although the glop wasn’t popular for its taste, texture or nutritive qualities, it must have contributed to at least a small uptick in oral hygiene.

10. Kraft macaroni and cheese — wait, what?

James Lewis Kraft, the founder of Kraft foods, patented the process of emulsifying and powdering processed cheese in order to give it a longer shelf life—a necessity during this time period. Although the packaged dish was originally sold as a bag of pasta with a package of powdered cheese attached to it, it still exists today as one of the few Depression-era meals with lasting popularity in American households.

Making ends meet was tough during the Great Depression, but with some creative thinking and adventurous palates, these homesteaders made the most of whatever they were given.  Whether you’re planning meals for a large family or on your homestead, keep these tips in mind for ultimate success in living off the land.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

Stuff You Probably Didn’t Know You Could Compost

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Stuff You Probably Didn't Know You Could Compost

Image source: Oregon Metro

Most people know there are a lot of items that can be composted.  Vegetable trimmings, for example—things like outer lettuce leaves, tomato cores and sweet pepper seeds are no-brainers.  But for those who are ready to get really serious about reducing waste and building up a nice mix in the compost pile or container, here are a few more ideas for stuff you might not have known you could include along with a few other things you should leave out.

First, bear in mind that anything which is plant-based can usually be composted—and don’t forget that paper is made from plants.  Some plants have a higher carbon-to-nitrogen ratio than others, but all plant-based materials contain both. And that is a good thing, because your compost needs both. Here’s a partial list of high-carbon materials:

  • Cardboard
  • Paper
  • Leaves
  • Straw
  • Bark
  • Woody plants like corn stalks and brassica stems
  • Egg shells

And for comparison, some examples of low-carbon materials:

  • Kitchen scraps
  • Weeds
  • Grass clippings
  • Coffee grounds
  • Hay
  • Manure

You can consider ratios if you want to, but don’t get too stuck on them. And if you forget which plant-based materials are higher nitrogen ratios and which lean more towards the carbon end, just remember this general rule of thumb: carbon is the brown stuff, and nitrogen is the green stuff. (It isn’t a hard and fast rule, I know, since egg shells are not all brown and coffee grounds and manure are not green. But it’s mostly true.) If it gets soupy and stinky, add more brown stuff. And if it isn’t decomposing well, add more green stuff. Meanwhile, just throw it all in and amend later if you need to.

The materials visitors at my place are most surprised to see designated for compost are usually paper products—and not the ones they had ever considered separating out of the regular trash. Toilet paper rolls and paper towel rolls, for example, get composted. So do used paper towels, used facial tissues, gum wrappers, paper bags and some paper and boxboard. Even the little paper packages that my individuallywrapped dental floss comes in gets saved for the compost.

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If I used paper plates and paper napkins, I’d definitely compost those, as well. I do use paper coffee filters and pre-bagged tea (as opposed to metal filters and loose tea leaves) and just toss it all in, filters and strings and tabs and all.

The reasons I say “some paper and boxboard” are twofold. First, crisp glossy products don’t compost as well as soft dull paper does. And second, even households like mine which are diligent about not acquiring unnecessary paper still end up amassing a lot of it—probably too much for most compost ratios.

Stuff You Probably Didn't Know You Could Compost

Image source: Pixabay.com

Other possible ingredients for home composting include the results of refrigerator and cabinet clean-outs. Consider stuff like this when it’s no longer edible:

  • Bread
  • Pastries
  • Crackers
  • Cookies
  • Cereal
  • Pickles
  • Ketchup
  • Yogurt
  • Cream cheese
  • Jellies and jams
  • Anything at all that doesn’t contain meat

The sky is pretty much the limit when it comes to cleaning out the kitchen, garden, barn, henhouse or backyard.  Composting is super easy and takes very little time, once you make a habit of it. Before we open a trash can at my house, we first consider whether it can be eaten by livestock, burned, recycled or composted—we’ve done it that way for so long that it has become routine.

The one thing I would caution casual backyard composters against is including meat. Meat, either cooked or raw, can develop potentially dangerous pathogens if the compost pile does not get hot enough for long enough. Experienced composters can and do place animal carcasses into compost piles with good results, but that’s nothing you or I should try at home.

Feces from omnivorous mammals such as pigs, cats, and dogs should be left out of the compost, as well. Many people successfully compost human waste, but that is a whole art and science unto itself and should not be added to regular compost.

Another thing to remember when composting is before offering anything to the microscopic organisms in the compost which might want to consume it, make sure there are no bigger mouths around the homestead that want dibs on it. In other words, offer home and garden scraps to cattle, goats, chickens and other animals first, and toss it into the compost only after everyone else has said no thanks.

Composting all you possibly can is an excellent way to reduce household waste and create a pile of free nutrients for your garden—a win for all involved.

What would you add to our list? Share your tips in the section below: 

5 Super-Dependable Pocket Pistols You’re Gonna Love

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5 Super-Dependable Pocket Pistols You’re Gonna Love

Image source: YouTube / Iraqveteran8888

Pocket pistol. The term refers to small, highly concealable guns, generally sporting a three-inch or smaller barrel, and a standard capacity of less than nine rounds including the chamber, often less.

These little guns are popular, and for good reason. They’re easy and comfortable to pack. While carrying in a pants or jacket pocket is not without drawbacks—including serious safety risks if the gun is in the pocket with other objects and/or not inside a holster—it is convenient.

Here are five models of so-called pocket pistols I own or have tried, and feel confident in recommending:

Ruger LCR. This frame of this double action-only, hammerless revolver is made from aircraft grade aluminum. The fire-control group is polymer for weight reduction, and the cylinder is stainless steel. Rubberized grips are standard. Newer models have a white insert to make the front sight more visible; however, I have seen this little asset fall off more than one LCR. A little enamel does just as well.

The best thing about the LCR is the choice of calibers. It comes in 22LR, 22WMR (those with a capacity of eight rounds), and 38 Special five-rounder that is +P rated. Upgrade to the stainless series, and choices include 357 magnum, 327 Federal magnum, and 9mm Luger.

LCR prices vary widely depending on options, like lasers and caliber. There are currently new models for sale ranging from $100 to $800. These can be a good option for someone new to concealed carry who wants to try a revolver without a huge financial commitment.

Glock 42. Here is a .380 caliber made by a company whose reputation for dependable firearms is legendary. This smallest of Glocks has all the same basic features and external design of its full-size brethren. Much consternation has arisen from the fact that its magazines only hold six rounds. This is one gun I carry often, and I find it convenient to slide an extra mag into a front pocket just in case.

This is the first handgun for which Streamlight produced its TLR-6 laser/light combo. Since the 42 has no rail, the device clamps, then is screwed onto, the front of the trigger guard. This enhancement, along with a set of tritium night sights, has created what for me is the ideal concealable firearm. Though I’d like to pack a bigger caliber, I’ve yet to find one that equals the comfort of the small, but shootable, 380s.

Average market price for a 42 is in the low to mid $400s. Better deals can be found if one shops for them. With the suggested accessories, it’s closer to a $600 package.

Beretta Nano. Probably the newest firearm on this list, followed by the Glock. This six-plus-one capacity 9mm is one of the few concept gun designs that’s made it to the pocket pistol market. A simple striker-fired system and slim profile, with every corner and edge rounded, lend a space age look to the Nano, as well as facilitating snag-free draws.

You Don’t Need A Firearms License For This Weapon!

As on the Glock, the Nano has a reversible magazine release. Although it looks a bit top-heavy, with the bore axis riding well above the shooter’s forearm line, its recoil is not any worse than other sub-compacts in this caliber.

The Nano is well-liked by its owners for its style, dependability, and +P rating. At least some models have proven ammo-sensitive; practice with factory-new, American-made cartridges should prevent ammo-related malfunctions.

It’s cool to be modular in today’s gun industry, and Beretta designed the polymer grip and other aspects of the gun in shroud-like fashion. The company has yet to present any alternatives to the stock one.

Expect to pay high $300s to low $400s for a Nano, or quite a bit less if you’re willing to wait for a used model.

Ruger LCP II. At the corporate level, Ruger has made a true effort to listen to customer suggestions. This upgraded model of Ruger’s well-known LCP, chambered only in 380, has many improvements upon its predecessor. The trigger has a long, but not too heavy, pull and long reset. The slide stays open on an empty mag. Gone are layers of confusing, impractical “safety” measures that made the original LCP a real punisher for anyone familiar with normal firearm function.

Though I got to test the LCP II briefly, I didn’t check whether it can be dry fired. The original cannot. This is a disservice to owners who wish and should practice dry firing.

Ruger has improved the appearance of this little gun, as well, and made it altogether easier and more enjoyable to fire. It’s one of the more economical choices on this list, and also one of the lightest at 10.6 ounces unloaded. Standard mags hold six rounds. The LCP II is a reliable choice for self-defense. In the low to mid $200s, it’s accessible to most people and functions as well as any other 380.

Smith & Wesson Airweight. These classic “J frame” handguns have been around for many years, and there are many variations of them on the market, new and used. For starters, there’s a hammerless model, and that’s the one I’d call a true pocket pistol—there’s no hammer to hang up in a pocket during the draw.

These five-round 38 Special, +P-rated revolvers are extremely easy to use, and reliable, assuming the shooter is using quality ammunition. Holsters abound for the Airweight, in both leather and Kydex, as it’s a very common choice for concealed or hip carry and has been for years.

Comparable in appearance and function to the Ruger LCR, the Airweight contains no polymer components. It’s thus a bit heavier and more durable, a combination of factors that sends some shooters running towards the gun and others running away. It’s a matter of preference.

Prices for S&W Airweight hammerless revolvers are generally in the high $300s to mid-$400s. As always, many deviations from that norm exist, thanks to their senior status in the market.

Pocket pistols can seem like the ideal first choice for a beginner as they’re small and non-imposing in appearance. But there are some challenges to consider. For centerfire chamberings, recoil is greater than in an average size handgun. Slide manipulation is dependent on fingertip strength versus closed-fist strength. A pinky that dangles below a short grip is highly distracting to some shooters, and magazine insertion and ejection can be tricky if the flesh of the palm blocks the mag well. For these reasons, I usually recommend that new shooters learn on a larger handgun before “graduating” to pocket size. These little guns definitely hold an important place in the realm of self-protection.

What is your favorite pocket pistol? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

5 Super-Dependable Pocket Pistols You’re Gonna Love

5 Super-Dependable Pocket Pistols You’re Gonna Love

Image source: YouTube / Iraqveteran8888

Pocket pistol. The term refers to small, highly concealable guns, generally sporting a three-inch or smaller barrel, and a standard capacity of less than nine rounds including the chamber, often less.

These little guns are popular, and for good reason. They’re easy and comfortable to pack. While carrying in a pants or jacket pocket is not without drawbacks—including serious safety risks if the gun is in the pocket with other objects and/or not inside a holster—it is convenient.

Here are five models of so-called pocket pistols I own or have tried, and feel confident in recommending:

Ruger LCR. This frame of this double action-only, hammerless revolver is made from aircraft grade aluminum. The fire-control group is polymer for weight reduction, and the cylinder is stainless steel. Rubberized grips are standard. Newer models have a white insert to make the front sight more visible; however, I have seen this little asset fall off more than one LCR. A little enamel does just as well.

The best thing about the LCR is the choice of calibers. It comes in 22LR, 22WMR (those with a capacity of eight rounds), and 38 Special five-rounder that is +P rated. Upgrade to the stainless series, and choices include 357 magnum, 327 Federal magnum, and 9mm Luger.

LCR prices vary widely depending on options, like lasers and caliber. There are currently new models for sale ranging from $100 to $800. These can be a good option for someone new to concealed carry who wants to try a revolver without a huge financial commitment.

Glock 42. Here is a .380 caliber made by a company whose reputation for dependable firearms is legendary. This smallest of Glocks has all the same basic features and external design of its full-size brethren. Much consternation has arisen from the fact that its magazines only hold six rounds. This is one gun I carry often, and I find it convenient to slide an extra mag into a front pocket just in case.

This is the first handgun for which Streamlight produced its TLR-6 laser/light combo. Since the 42 has no rail, the device clamps, then is screwed onto, the front of the trigger guard. This enhancement, along with a set of tritium night sights, has created what for me is the ideal concealable firearm. Though I’d like to pack a bigger caliber, I’ve yet to find one that equals the comfort of the small, but shootable, 380s.

Average market price for a 42 is in the low to mid $400s. Better deals can be found if one shops for them. With the suggested accessories, it’s closer to a $600 package.

Beretta Nano. Probably the newest firearm on this list, followed by the Glock. This six-plus-one capacity 9mm is one of the few concept gun designs that’s made it to the pocket pistol market. A simple striker-fired system and slim profile, with every corner and edge rounded, lend a space age look to the Nano, as well as facilitating snag-free draws.

You Don’t Need A Firearms License For This Weapon!

As on the Glock, the Nano has a reversible magazine release. Although it looks a bit top-heavy, with the bore axis riding well above the shooter’s forearm line, its recoil is not any worse than other sub-compacts in this caliber.

The Nano is well-liked by its owners for its style, dependability, and +P rating. At least some models have proven ammo-sensitive; practice with factory-new, American-made cartridges should prevent ammo-related malfunctions.

It’s cool to be modular in today’s gun industry, and Beretta designed the polymer grip and other aspects of the gun in shroud-like fashion. The company has yet to present any alternatives to the stock one.

Expect to pay high $300s to low $400s for a Nano, or quite a bit less if you’re willing to wait for a used model.

Ruger LCP II. At the corporate level, Ruger has made a true effort to listen to customer suggestions. This upgraded model of Ruger’s well-known LCP, chambered only in 380, has many improvements upon its predecessor. The trigger has a long, but not too heavy, pull and long reset. The slide stays open on an empty mag. Gone are layers of confusing, impractical “safety” measures that made the original LCP a real punisher for anyone familiar with normal firearm function.

Though I got to test the LCP II briefly, I didn’t check whether it can be dry fired. The original cannot. This is a disservice to owners who wish and should practice dry firing.

Ruger has improved the appearance of this little gun, as well, and made it altogether easier and more enjoyable to fire. It’s one of the more economical choices on this list, and also one of the lightest at 10.6 ounces unloaded. Standard mags hold six rounds. The LCP II is a reliable choice for self-defense. In the low to mid $200s, it’s accessible to most people and functions as well as any other 380.

Smith & Wesson Airweight. These classic “J frame” handguns have been around for many years, and there are many variations of them on the market, new and used. For starters, there’s a hammerless model, and that’s the one I’d call a true pocket pistol—there’s no hammer to hang up in a pocket during the draw.

These five-round 38 Special, +P-rated revolvers are extremely easy to use, and reliable, assuming the shooter is using quality ammunition. Holsters abound for the Airweight, in both leather and Kydex, as it’s a very common choice for concealed or hip carry and has been for years.

Comparable in appearance and function to the Ruger LCR, the Airweight contains no polymer components. It’s thus a bit heavier and more durable, a combination of factors that sends some shooters running towards the gun and others running away. It’s a matter of preference.

Prices for S&W Airweight hammerless revolvers are generally in the high $300s to mid-$400s. As always, many deviations from that norm exist, thanks to their senior status in the market.

Pocket pistols can seem like the ideal first choice for a beginner as they’re small and non-imposing in appearance. But there are some challenges to consider. For centerfire chamberings, recoil is greater than in an average size handgun. Slide manipulation is dependent on fingertip strength versus closed-fist strength. A pinky that dangles below a short grip is highly distracting to some shooters, and magazine insertion and ejection can be tricky if the flesh of the palm blocks the mag well. For these reasons, I usually recommend that new shooters learn on a larger handgun before “graduating” to pocket size. These little guns definitely hold an important place in the realm of self-protection.

What is your favorite pocket pistol? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

5 Simple No-Till Methods That Will Change How You Garden

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5 Simple No-Till Methods That Will Change How You View Gardening

Planets partner with soil ecosystems to create conditions favorable to their growth. This includes everything from increasing organic matter in the soil, to creating soil structures ideal for holding water and exchanging nutrients, and making nutrients more bioavailable/useable to plants and animals.

Unfortunately, the common practice of tilling destroys that delicate balance of the soil ecosystem, and though it may provide a temporary boost in nutrients, what’s really happening (partly) is that the organisms in the soil are dying, releasing the nutrients held in their bodies, much of which will then wash away in the following rains, all the while oxidizing and solarizing (solar cooking) the soil to death. Of course, some organisms will always survive, but the more this is done, year after year, the more the soil suffers, and the more outside inputs of time and energy must be put into the garden to keep fertility and water content up.

Tilling also destroys the soil’s structure, which is built by earthworms, microbes, and other unseen garden helpers in the most active soil layer (the topsoil). Besides the soil life itself, this structure is partly what gives a soil its ability to hold nutrients and water.

This New All-Natural Fertilizer Doubles Garden Production!

In short, tilling creates structural and ecological devastation, leading to compaction (more on this below), erosion, nutrient leaching, oxidization, solarization (death by sun), and decreased organic matter. Add to that the fact that it stirs up weed seeds and encourages their germination, and hopefully by this point, you’re wondering what the alternatives are, and if they work.

No-Till Methods

Besides avoiding the pitfalls of tilling listed above, the methods below will increase bioavailability of nutrients, fertilize the soil, and increase nutrient cycling (reducing leaching and erosion).

1. Mulch, mulch, mulch

Mulch protects the soil and the soil food web from the drying winds, erosive rain and beating sun, among other things. It’s also a slow release fertilizer that breaks down into all important organic matter while providing food and habitat for your decomposer, predator (of pests), and microbe friends (especially fungi, which will greatly appreciate wood chips, leaves, and other mulch materials). Last but not least, mulch dramatically reduces water evaporation from the soil.

2. Diversify plants

Create more efficient nutrient cycling (with roots in all levels of the soil), while taking up all of the soil ecosystem niches that “weeds” would otherwise fill by simply adding more types of plants to the garden. Perennials and annuals can live quite harmoniously together, particularly when you don’t have to destroy the entire ecosystem every year, forcing it to rebuild from scratch time and time again. Perennials, with their deeper roots, will pull nutrients from deeper down, and will help cover and protect the soil with their bodies and their debris for all or much of the year. Make sure to throw in some nitrogen-fixing plants, as well (which literally extract the important nutrient out of thin air), and lots of flowers to encourage pollinators.

3. Till to prepare for no-tilling

Although ongoing tilling is unnecessary and destructive, it can be useful as a one-time method of preparing no-till beds. One method is to till, wait until a large number of weed seeds germinate and begin to grow, and then till again before they go to seed or have significant time to establish tap roots. This will deplete the seed bank, and after one or two times, it will be easier to establish no-till beds, particularly with the help of mulches and other methods. Adding organic fertilizers to the soil prior to the first till may encourage even more seeds to germinate.

4. Cover crops/green manures, living mulches/ground covers

5 Simple No-Till Methods That Will Change How You Garden

Image source: Pixabay.com

“Living mulches” (ground cover plants) have the benefits of mulch, but in the case of perennials, they never have to be reapplied. Cover crops or green manures, meanwhile, are plants that can be seeded, and once grown for sometime can be tilled into the soil during the initial (hopefully) one-time soil prep (along with the germinating weed seeds). This will add nutrients and organic matter to the soil. Good options include buckwheat, rye and legumes. Cover crops should be planted in the fall so that they are winter killed before seeding, or alternatively, you can use non-self-seeding annual plants, or till them in before they go to seed.

5. Permanent beds and paths to avoid soil compaction

Finally, since you won’t be continually tilling to give the soil the loft and aeration it needs, you must rely on natural means of maintaining this ideal soil structure for plant roots to thrive, and for new seeds to germinate. This simply means keeping off garden beds to allow the soil food web to do its work to create a healthy soil structure, with maximum water and oxygen infiltration. Meanwhile, simply sift mulch aside to plant your new seeds. If weed seed germination within your seed beds is an ongoing issue, you might try adding a layer of seed starting compost on top of the mulch (making sure it is well cooked seedless compost), along with some more mulch sprinkled lightly over the seeds, and more generously around the compost to contain it.

This is but a brief overview of some of the methods for no till gardening that in mine and many other peoples’ experience, can not only save you a significant amount of time in the garden, but will also create a more balanced and healthy soil ecosystem for your plants. If you liked this article, or have any other no till methods to share, please feel free to comment below!

What is your favorite no-till method? Share your advice in the section below: 

Manual counterparts

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You decide you are hungry, you get up from the couch, you pause your TV show on the way to the kitchen, you get a can of soup, you use the electric can opener, you pour the soup into a bowl, you pop it into the microwave for a couple of minutes, you get a soda from the fridge, pour it into a glass of ice from the freezer, you take everything back to the living room and resume watching your show as you enjoy your food…

Now lets assume the power has gone off for whatever reason, doesn’t matter if it’s a major power outage, or some drunk ran into the power pole at the end of your street, how would that scenario play out differently? Well, obviously you aren’t going to be watching TV, and when you get hungry, you still have everything in your kitchen, but you aren’t going to be using most of it.

How are you going to eat? If you are smart, you will plan ahead, long before you are sitting in the dark. Cans of food are great for blackouts, they don’t require refrigeration. But with a can, unless it’s a pop-top type, you will need to open it, that requires a can opener, hopefully you have a manual can opener in some forgotten drawer, hopefully you know how to use it, yes some can openers can be tricky to use. I only use a manual can opener, and as a backup, I have a P38, an old style Army can opener that works no matter what.

Now, how are you going to heat your food? Forget the microwave or electric stove, if you have a newer gas stove they usually have piezo electric lighters, but you can still light the top burners with a lighter or matches. If you don’t have a way of heating your food, then you can get a propane camp stove, they come as one burner all the way up to a regular stove top with an oven. Of course you can always use a grill (USE IT OUTDOORS!).

Hopefully your electricity isn’t out long enough that you run out of water, yes even your water tap will stop pumping water eventually, so you will need to have a source of water for drinking, cooking and cleaning.

It’s good to have some other manual tools for the kitchen, instead of using a food processor, you can use knives or even a manual chopper. A whisk will mix your food or drinks instead of a blender.

There are many foods you are probably keeping in your fridge that don’t really require the colder temps, things with vinegar in them, pickles, relish, ketchup, mustard and the such. Of course mayo doesn’t last long outside of the fridge. Butter and eggs will last a surprisingly long time outside of the fridge.

Having backups for the electrical items we use are not only handy but can help us get through in more comfort. What things can you think of that would have a manual counterpart that could be used?

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Common Infantry Tasks Testing-The Basic Requirements Applied To Survivalists

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  This is a follow up on a line I used in a recent post which was, “Are there Infantry skills that you should master? Hell Yes!” In the past, I posted about the Army’s Common Task Testing these are the standards every soldier has to perform and show proficiency in every year. This is an […]

Americans Are Suddenly Preparing Like Crazy for World War III and Nuclear Fallout

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Image: Americans are suddenly preparing like crazy for World War III and nuclear fallout

By   – Natural News

(Natural News) With the United States and North Korea inching toward war, millions of Americans are inundating prepper supply stores with orders even to the point where several of them are having difficulty keeping up with demand. And frankly, for those who are just now getting into prepper mode, it’s possible you’re too late.

As reported by CBS Detroit, a local shop manager, Ben Orr of Army Supply, said he’s been selling a ton of “prepper items” over the past week.

“We’ve been very busy. Unusually busy, I’d say,” Orr told the local affiliate WWJ. “It’s definitely an increase, just in selling all the normal prepper stuff, end of the world stuff. A lot of water prep stuff, food, MREs — the military meals.” (Related: Click here for The Health Ranger’s science-based preparedness guide for surviving nuclear fallout.)

In addition, because much of what is causing the friction between Pyongyang and Washington has to do with the former’s nuclear weapons program, Orr said sales of radiation antidote potassium iodide products have been especially heavy.

“It actually stops your thyroid from absorbing any radiation. So, it fills your thyroid with iodine, which it normally does anyways,” said Orr. “Your body can’t tell the difference between bad, radioactive iodine and acceptable iodine, so it actually will stop you from getting thyroid cancer.”

He added: “It’s supposed to work. It’s FDA approved. But they also recommend you don’t take it unless the government says to take it. Unless people are scared of something, we don’t really ever sell it.” [Natural News founder/editor Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, and inventor of Cesium Eliminator says iodine does not block radioactive cesium — check out the website here.]

Continue reading at NaturalNews: Americans are suddenly preparing like crazy for World War III and nuclear fallout

The post Americans Are Suddenly Preparing Like Crazy for World War III and Nuclear Fallout appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

Americans Are Suddenly Preparing Like Crazy for World War III and Nuclear Fallout

Image: Americans are suddenly preparing like crazy for World War III and nuclear fallout

By   – Natural News

(Natural News) With the United States and North Korea inching toward war, millions of Americans are inundating prepper supply stores with orders even to the point where several of them are having difficulty keeping up with demand. And frankly, for those who are just now getting into prepper mode, it’s possible you’re too late.

As reported by CBS Detroit, a local shop manager, Ben Orr of Army Supply, said he’s been selling a ton of “prepper items” over the past week.

“We’ve been very busy. Unusually busy, I’d say,” Orr told the local affiliate WWJ. “It’s definitely an increase, just in selling all the normal prepper stuff, end of the world stuff. A lot of water prep stuff, food, MREs — the military meals.” (Related: Click here for The Health Ranger’s science-based preparedness guide for surviving nuclear fallout.)

In addition, because much of what is causing the friction between Pyongyang and Washington has to do with the former’s nuclear weapons program, Orr said sales of radiation antidote potassium iodide products have been especially heavy.

“It actually stops your thyroid from absorbing any radiation. So, it fills your thyroid with iodine, which it normally does anyways,” said Orr. “Your body can’t tell the difference between bad, radioactive iodine and acceptable iodine, so it actually will stop you from getting thyroid cancer.”

He added: “It’s supposed to work. It’s FDA approved. But they also recommend you don’t take it unless the government says to take it. Unless people are scared of something, we don’t really ever sell it.” [Natural News founder/editor Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, and inventor of Cesium Eliminator says iodine does not block radioactive cesium — check out the website here.]

Continue reading at NaturalNews: Americans are suddenly preparing like crazy for World War III and nuclear fallout

The post Americans Are Suddenly Preparing Like Crazy for World War III and Nuclear Fallout appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

Will You Survive If You Have to Bug out to the Forest?

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Bugging out to the woods.

By The Prepper Journal

In a SHTF situation where you can’t stay in your own home, and moving in with a friend or relative is not an option, what will you do? If bugging out to the wilderness suddenly becomes your only option, will you survive? Probably not for very long, if you believe the experts. Nevertheless, if your survival plan doesn’t include a bug out to the forest option, it should, but coming up with a good plan might be more difficult that you think.

For starters, do you have a reliable bug out vehicle? If your bug out plan has you escaping the city or suburbs in a modern vehicle, you may be in for an unpleasant surprise. Most modern vehicles won’t survive a strong EMP event. You may find yourself traveling on foot, away from a major metropolitan area, in search of food and water. But at least you won’t be alone. When food and water run out, millions of others will be traveling, mostly on foot, away from large centers of population. Even if you have a working vehicle, it may be useless, due to the gridlock created by people and disabled vehicles, all on the same escape routes. You may avoid some of that if you get away quickly, but will you? How much time will pass before you’re packed, and ready to go? Will the roads already be jammed by the time you depart? As time passes, the situation will get worse. Can you imagine what starving, desperate, people are capable of doing? I’m thinking “zombie apocalypse”.

My Bug-out Plan

Understanding the predicament, I don’t have to look any farther than my garage for a solution. My bug out plan doesn’t depend on a full-size vehicle, but I won’t be bugging out on foot either. I suspect that I wouldn’t last very long, with just the items I can carry on my back. Instead, I’ve decided to use my garden tractor (riding lawn mower), pulling a small trailer. Don’t laugh, it’s more practical than it may seem.

  • It would probably survive an EMP event.
  • It can travel off-road, avoiding traffic jams and bypassing bottlenecks.
  • It can pull a small trailer, loaded with essential supplies.
  • I can avoid people who may want to harm me, or take what I have.
  • I’ll have a 360 degree view, helpful for situational awareness, and if I have to use a firearm.
  • I’ll be able to travel to places inaccessible by car, which in theory will make me more secure.
  • My getaway will be at a whopping 6 miles per hour, maximum, but it beats walking.

It’s not how fast you bug out, it’s how well you bug out fast

It’s not how fast you bug out, it’s how well you bug out fast

There are drawbacks, of course. I’ll have no shelter from the elements, as I would in a car or truck. My traveling companion will have to ride in the trailer, or walk along side. Perhaps the biggest drawback is that I won’t be able to outrun anyone. For that reason, it’s important to pack and leave quickly, before things get out of hand.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Will You Survive If You Have to Bug out to the Forest?

The post Will You Survive If You Have to Bug out to the Forest? appeared first on The Survival Place Blog.

Cooking with Cast Iron Cookware

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Today I’d like to discuss cooking pots, specifically cooking with cast iron cookware and why you should not only get some now but learn to use them properly. Your life could very well depend on it! Planning your strategy for long-term survival after the end of the world should begin well before the actual end. . . Read More

The post Cooking with Cast Iron Cookware first appeared on Backdoor Survival.

Gold & Silver Update (2017-8-13)

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In support of sound money, the following gold and silver update is sponsored by SD Bullion and Silver Doctors. The Silver Price has put in a higher-high, smashed through the 50-day moving average, and is now testing the 200-day. We said on Monday the white metal would either break-out or break-down, and it sure did break-out. We are above $17, and it looks like we can put our bullish wedge behind us as early as today depending on how silver performs: Volatility is the talk of the markets this week, especially after that 44% move yesterday, however, as we mentioned

The post Gold & Silver Update (2017-8-13) appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Civil War, EMP, or Cyberattack-Judgement is Coming Upon America- Part 1

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I had the honor of being a guest on The Prepper Website Podcast recently with Todd Sepulveda. We talked about the threat of EMP, Civil War, and Cyberattack. We also discussed the fact that while Republicans control the House, Senate, and Oval Office, no talk of overturning Roe vs Wade is coming from Washington. If we, as a nation, allow this opportunity to pass us by, the judgement we deserve is ten fold what it should have been during the Obama administration, when our hands were tied.

Since the EMP, Danny Walker’s compound has survived waves of violence and the death of many key members. When Danny gets an unexpected piece of news, he pledges to put an end to the persistent threat in Charlotte. He will kill Regent Schlusser and shut down his consortium of depravity, or he will die trying. Get your copy of Seven Cows, Ugly and Gaunt; Book Four: Vengeance today!

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I use JM Bullion because they have the lowest over-spot price of any dealer I have found for silver and gold bullion. JM Bullion now offers free shipping on every order!

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Trading Post in the Woods is ran by veteran crisis responders who know how important it is to be prepared. They specialize in comprehensive natural survival remedy kits, preparedness and homesteading supplies as well as skills training. Visit them online today at TradingPostInTheWoods.com.

Ready Made Resources is a trusted name in the prepper community, because they’ve been around for 18 years. They offer great prices on Night Vision, water filtration, long term storage food, solar energy components and provide free technical service. Get ready for an uncertain future at ReadyMadeResources.com!

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CampingSurvival.com has all of your preparedness needs including; bug out bags, long term food storage, water filters, gas masks, and first aid kits. Use coupon code PREPPERRECON to get 5% off your entire order at Camping Survival.

 

The post Civil War, EMP, or Cyberattack-Judgement is Coming Upon America- Part 1 appeared first on Prepper Recon.

The Building Of The Wood Fired Brick Pizza Oven – Part 2

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We can almost taste the first pizza from our wood-fired brick pizza oven right now! Well, almost. As we head into weekend #5 of the building process, this project by far has been our most labor intensive DIY effort ever.

The post The Building Of The Wood Fired Brick Pizza Oven – Part 2 appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Deer Hunting: Best Practices For The Novice

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Deer is one of the most commonly hunted animals within the United States. For good reason too, they’re the smallest and least elusive of the large game animals and the tags usually aren’t going to break the bank.

It’s not quite as simple as sitting in a stand waiting for them to walk under you though, many of those who oppose hunting have no idea just how much goes into properly filling the freezer with venison.

So let’s talk a little about some of the lesser known practices that can help you bag a buck.

Hunting Variations and Deer

There are, essentially, three types of deer hunting which are used. You don’t just walk into the woods with a rifle and find a deer, the way many people imagine.

The most common, undoubtedly, is that of blind hunting. It’s mostly used by rifle hunters and is the “good-ol-boy’s” favored method. If you’ve got access to the land for it, you’ll build a box blind in the off-season.

One of the main things people forget is that it is not the blind which needs to be hidden. It’s the movement within the blind while you’re lining up the shot. Ideally, you should have built it large enough you can rest your rifle and sandbag or bipod as you prefer without the barrel protruding. This is obvious to all but the most obvious of hunters, of course.

The second big thing which can go wrong with a blind is not painting the interior. You need an interior color which can hide you, because you’ll stick out like crazy moving against a plain wooden interior. If you wear old olive drab BDUs while hunting? Go with OD green and you can’t go wrong.

From here, you’ll need to be still and quiet and as long as you’ve set up in the right area you’ll be in good hands.

Stand hunting is often favored by bow hunters. In this case, you’ll find that safe construction of a stand and the ability to remain still for an extended period is your best friend. When it comes to this kind of hunting, your ability to choose a proper shooting lane is your best friend.

Stalk-and-spot hunting isn’t commonly used by many, rifle or bow. This will entail you moving very, very slowly through the woods. Remaining behind cover. Your glass will be your best friend in this case.

Did we mention moving slowly? Because a step every fifteen to thirty seconds isn’t uncommon once you’re in the right area. For bow hunters this is even more essential, due to the limited range of their weapon.

It’s an extremely difficult form of hunting to master. No hunting is really just walking into the woods with a weapon, but extremely rewarding. If you’re a complete novice to hunting, you may wish to try with less wary prey than deer, many of us started with small, fast game like rabbits and ground fowl before even attempting to move on to larger game.

Deer, in particular, are notoriously difficult to hunt in this way and success isn’t guaranteed for anyone but the virtual master.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Deer Behavior

Deer are commonly seen as peaceful, kind of docile animals.

This is a huge misconception in hunting season. A doe or buck that gets even an inkling of a human being can be gone before you can blink. While the does with young you see in more urban areas aren’t super human shy, during the hunting season in areas where you are allowed they are extremely alert.

Sight

The senses of deer are very finely tuned, but often in quite different ways than people assume.

The primary difference between being “sharp” and being different, however, lies within their sight. Their eyes see in a completely different spectrum than humans, many people think their cheap woodland camo is going to keep them hidden well.

It will… from other humans. Certain dyes used in manufacturing clothing are actually ultraviolet reactive, and it’s common for this to be seen in much of the “hunting” gear you see at large. Always test your camo.

Use a black light, if it fluoresces then you may as well be glowing to the animals while you’re hunting. This is especially important when you’re hunting from within a blind.

There are products available to kill the optical brightening of these dyes, and they can be found readily online, so test and treat your gear.

Deer vision, apart from this remarkable quality is still not great, but here’s the thing… they lack visual acuity. Movement sense and their field of vision is actually still remarkable, but they’re not as “sharp” as humans which makes it a bit easier to hide your human form.

Smell

Their hearing and sense of smell, on the other hand, are remarkable. A deer can smell you from half a mile away, they also process smells much differently than we do.

This is why it’s so important to cover your scent trail in any way possible. One of the best is simply to make sure that you go through the usuals of covering your scent.

Thankfully, in most areas this isn’t as large of an advantage as you might imagine. Deer are wary, but no one would be bagging them if they bolted at the first sign of human scent. Do your best using the traditional methods and you should be fine.

Hearing

Deer hearing actually isn’t much better than a humans. They just tend to be more wary than a human, after all… you’re a big predator. If you hear a stick crack, you’re not likely to jump while out in the woods unless you’re already aware there’s a bigger predator in the area.

Deer, on the other hand, are constantly on the look-out for their predators.

They do have one distinct advantage however: their directional hearing is much better than ours. They can hear slightly higher on the scale than humans. A noise you’re likely to barely notice, a knife being slid slowly out of a sheath or a quietly moved bolt on a rifle, is enough to set most deer off.

What all of this sensory information really brings us to is one thing, however.

Awareness

Humans live in noisy environments. Even the best of us aren’t likely to be spooked by a slightly off noise. A trained human might be able to discern something really off, around us. A knife clicking open, a pistol being cocked, or quickening foot steps behind us, but even the average “aware” person isn’t going to immediately react to this.

Deer, on the other hand, aren’t just being hunted by us. They live their lives surrounded by predators in an environment with predictable noises. This means that the slightest thing off makes a deer wary, and something being really off will set them running.

Keeping this in mind, in addition to the sensory information above, is your key to understanding their behavior.

Basic Scouting

Most hunters with private land have a fairly predictable method. You make a blind, you plant food plots around the area in order to ensure that you attract deer, and then you’ll spend some time waiting in a blind during deer season.

When you’re on public land, or land which is improperly prepared things are different. Even if you’re not going for proper spot-and-stalk style hunting you still need to know where to set up your pop-up or temporary stand.

This means locating animal trails, water sources, and likely food sources for the animals in question. You’ll likely be spending a good amount of time in the woods even in the off-season in a new area.

Frankly, some of us get bored doing this after five or six trips. Grab a decent Gamo and bag some rabbits or tree squirrels if they’re in season while you’re doing it if you find it too boring, but keep in mind you’re learning their habits not just small game hunting.

You need to know not just habits, but also shooting lanes if you’re a rifle hunter.

Making the Kill

Shooting lanes are possibly the most important part of your making the kill. Look, if you’re not competent enough to hit the deer in the first place, you should be at the range and not in the woods.

A shooting lane means an area where you’ll have the distance a deer can’t quite detect you without obstruction. Don’t trust “brush guns”, I’ve seen .45-70 rounds deflect by up to six inches from hitting light bushes. If your area is too densely overgrown, then you may have to make some or rely on shooting from height.

Once you have a few established shooting lanes, whether from your blind or stand, it’s time to discuss the actual kill shot.

The Best Place to Shoot a Deer

There is always going to be debate about this aspect. The obvious goal is always one-shot one-kill. However, there’s a certain level of marksmanship which will go into each and every shot that you’ll make.

At less than 150 yards a competent rifleman, shooting at a still deer, can be taken in the head. This offers the best chance of the deer dropping either instantly or within five to ten feet. There three accepted ways to do this:

  • Brain shots are very hard to pull off. You basically fire between the tear ducts, instantly destroying the animal’s brain.
  • Secondly, by shooting behind the eyes you can instantly destroy most of the brain, usually dropping the animal almost instantly.
  • Lastly, a shot into the top four pieces of the spine, just below the base of the skull has much of the same effect.

 Of course, not all hunters are expert riflemen, and I wouldn’t imply you need to be. The other commonly accepted shot is the “double-shoulder” shot. You are trying to shoot through the actual shoulder blade of the deer in question. This shot is usually done with a fairly large round, a .308 or .30-06 for example. In this case, the shot will generally lodge in the opposite shoulder blade, in effect this snaps the deer’s spine.

The typical “heart-lung” shot is perfectly viable as well. In this case you shoot through the front of the torso in the “boiler-room” area. This is perfectly viable, hard to miss, and with luck will drop the deer quickly enough you won’t have to give much chase.

As far as pros and cons go, it’s a pretty easy break down:

Head shots are an instant kill.A near miss can damage the jaw or miss the deer entirely, it’s only recommended for expert riflemen.

The shoulder shot is a big kill, and fairly easy to make. It does, however, damage a lot of meat since you’ll need to use a high caliber round to do it effectively.

The heart/lung shot is a reliable kill. It is not, however, always a fast kill and if only a single lung is damaged the deer may escape and even recover.

With a bow, you are nearly always best off taking the shot in a way that it goes through the heart and lungs. Arrows cause considerable tissue damage but lack the concussive force for a high shoulder kill and the probability of a head shot being both viable and accurate enough for it to matter is too risky to make it an ethical shot for anything but a chance encounter at fifteen yards or less with a powerful bow.

Common Mistakes

There are a lot of common mistakes that inexperienced hunters make, and to be honest most of them are drawn from misconceptions that people who’ve rarely been in the field make.

Not wearing blaze orange in deer season, especially on public land, is asking for trouble. Some hunters don’t follow safety rules, and taking a bullet wound is not worth the risk. Vests and hats should be a minimum, jackets are better.

Making tons of noise is also something common. Not just the obvious talking. Tighten knife sheathes in multiple areas to avoid “slapping.” Look for softer outer clothing to avoid scraping noises as well. Secure your pack as well as possible and if you must lean on something, then be careful getting off and on it in order to make sure you don’t make any “scraping” noises.

Always be aware of your surroundings.

And above all, this is the most common mistake I see people make: examine every piece of a failed hunt. Observe the routes you moved, the gear you used, and always question each and every possible misstep you made.

In many ways, a failed hunt can make you better at hunting than one where you got lucky.
That is what truly separates a good hunter from a failed one: the ability to analyze your mistakes. Hunting is an art, it is skill, and it is a constant learning process.

Learning to be a Better Hunter

Always learn about your quarry. Always sharpen your skills. Always examine your mistakes.

If you do all of these, you will find yourself progressing at a rate you never thought possible. You will fill tags season after season.

If you don’t, well, it’s no shame to just spend a couple of days in the woods with friends but don’t expect as much success as those who are constantly trying to better their skills.

Either way, happy hunting!

This article has been written as a guest author for Survivopedia by Kevin Steffey, the founder of Deer Hunting Field

Wonder Oven – Heat Retention Cooker

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Wonder Oven – Heat Retention Cooker A wonder oven is a heat retaining cooker for everyday cooking and emergency preparedness situations. The insulation of the wonder oven (also called a “wonder box”) will slow your food’s loss of heat keeping at cooking temperatures for hours. Using a wonder oven reduces the amount of fuel needed …

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The post Wonder Oven – Heat Retention Cooker appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

Could A Nuclear War In Asia Effect You? Absolutely

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Right now all eyes on North Korea, which is totally understandable. The rhetoric being exchanged between our government and theirs has never been so heated, and at this point it wouldn’t be a surprise if war broke out. However, while the media has been parading an endless stream of worrisome stories on this subject, they’ve neglected to keep tabs on another brewing conflict between China and India.

For weeks the two countries have been hashing out a war of words over a border dispute in Bhutan. The Chinese tried to build a road in disputed territory, and the Indian army was deployed to block them. Since then the Chinese have been threatening to annihilate the Indian soldiers if they aren’t removed.

Over the past month, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has been on the move. We believe that the PLA has made sufficient preparation for military confrontation.

It is a war with an obvious result. The government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi should be aware of the PLA’s overwhelming firepower and logistics. Indian border troops are no rival to PLA field forces. If a war spreads, the PLA is perfectly capable of annihilating all Indian troops in the border region.

And that isn’t just bluster. China and India have gone to war over border disputes as recently as the 1960s. The only difference now, is that these nations both have nuclear weapons.

While many Americans are now deeply concerned about the possibility of their country being embroiled in another world war, most haven’t considered the possibility that there could be a nuclear exchange that has nothing to do with us, in countries that are far away from us. Which has to make you wonder, should we be concerned? Would a war like this have a major effect on life in America?

The answer is yes. It absolutely would. It certainly wouldn’t be an apocalyptic event for us if America decided to stay out of the fray, but we’d have reason to be concerned. That’s because any nuclear weapons detonated in East Asia could produce a cloud of fallout that would reach us. It wouldn’t be cataclysmic, but it would be dangerous.

We know this because when China tested a nuke back in 1967, it produced fallout cloud that enveloped almost all of the United States. According to a book called Nuclear War Survival Skills (which is still a very relevant book that you should check out):

Trans-Pacific war fallout, carried to an America at peace by the prevailing west-to-east winds that blow around the world, could be several hundred times more dangerous to Americans than fallout from the worst possible overseas nuclear power reactor accident, and many times more dangerous than fallout from a very improbable U.S. nuclear power reactor accident as lethal as the disastrous Chernobyl accident was to Russians…

…Fallout from the approximately 300 kiloton Chinese test explosion shown in Fig. 1 caused milk from cows that fed on pastures near Oak Ridge, Tennessee and elsewhere to be contaminated with radioiodine, although not with enough to be hazardous to health. However, this milk contamination (up to 900 picocuries of radioactive iodine per liter) and the measured dose rates from the gamma rays emitted from fallout particles deposited in different parts of the United States indicate that trans-Pacific fallout from even an overseas nuclear war in which “only” two or three hundred megatons would be exploded could result in tens of thousands of unprepared Americans suffering thyroid injury.

It would take several days for the fallout to reach us, at which point most of the radiation would have decayed. But there would still be enough radioactive material in our food supply to cause thyroid damage to thousands of people.

The best thing you can do to prepare for a nuclear exchange in Asia, is have a supply of potassium iodide on hand, and to stock up on supplies that could remove radioactive materials from your body and the environment. It would also be wise to prepare yourself for a global financial crash that would inevitably follow the destruction of two countries with massive economies.

It’s unfortunate, but the bottom line is that nuclear weapons have a global effect, in one form or another. Even if you live far away from where these bombs land, they can still ruin your health.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Could A Nuclear War In Asia Effect You? Absolutely

Right now all eyes on North Korea, which is totally understandable. The rhetoric being exchanged between our government and theirs has never been so heated, and at this point it wouldn’t be a surprise if war broke out. However, while the media has been parading an endless stream of worrisome stories on this subject, they’ve neglected to keep tabs on another brewing conflict between China and India.

For weeks the two countries have been hashing out a war of words over a border dispute in Bhutan. The Chinese tried to build a road in disputed territory, and the Indian army was deployed to block them. Since then the Chinese have been threatening to annihilate the Indian soldiers if they aren’t removed.

Over the past month, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has been on the move. We believe that the PLA has made sufficient preparation for military confrontation.

It is a war with an obvious result. The government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi should be aware of the PLA’s overwhelming firepower and logistics. Indian border troops are no rival to PLA field forces. If a war spreads, the PLA is perfectly capable of annihilating all Indian troops in the border region.

And that isn’t just bluster. China and India have gone to war over border disputes as recently as the 1960s. The only difference now, is that these nations both have nuclear weapons.

While many Americans are now deeply concerned about the possibility of their country being embroiled in another world war, most haven’t considered the possibility that there could be a nuclear exchange that has nothing to do with us, in countries that are far away from us. Which has to make you wonder, should we be concerned? Would a war like this have a major effect on life in America?

The answer is yes. It absolutely would. It certainly wouldn’t be an apocalyptic event for us if America decided to stay out of the fray, but we’d have reason to be concerned. That’s because any nuclear weapons detonated in East Asia could produce a cloud of fallout that would reach us. It wouldn’t be cataclysmic, but it would be dangerous.

We know this because when China tested a nuke back in 1967, it produced fallout cloud that enveloped almost all of the United States. According to a book called Nuclear War Survival Skills (which is still a very relevant book that you should check out):

Trans-Pacific war fallout, carried to an America at peace by the prevailing west-to-east winds that blow around the world, could be several hundred times more dangerous to Americans than fallout from the worst possible overseas nuclear power reactor accident, and many times more dangerous than fallout from a very improbable U.S. nuclear power reactor accident as lethal as the disastrous Chernobyl accident was to Russians…

…Fallout from the approximately 300 kiloton Chinese test explosion shown in Fig. 1 caused milk from cows that fed on pastures near Oak Ridge, Tennessee and elsewhere to be contaminated with radioiodine, although not with enough to be hazardous to health. However, this milk contamination (up to 900 picocuries of radioactive iodine per liter) and the measured dose rates from the gamma rays emitted from fallout particles deposited in different parts of the United States indicate that trans-Pacific fallout from even an overseas nuclear war in which “only” two or three hundred megatons would be exploded could result in tens of thousands of unprepared Americans suffering thyroid injury.

It would take several days for the fallout to reach us, at which point most of the radiation would have decayed. But there would still be enough radioactive material in our food supply to cause thyroid damage to thousands of people.

The best thing you can do to prepare for a nuclear exchange in Asia, is have a supply of potassium iodide on hand, and to stock up on supplies that could remove radioactive materials from your body and the environment. It would also be wise to prepare yourself for a global financial crash that would inevitably follow the destruction of two countries with massive economies.

It’s unfortunate, but the bottom line is that nuclear weapons have a global effect, in one form or another. Even if you live far away from where these bombs land, they can still ruin your health.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition