American Homesteaders Are Growing Rice. Here’s How They Do It.

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American Homesteaders Are Growing Rice. Here’s How They Do It.

Image source: Pixabay.com

In the western part of the world when people consider growing their own staple grains, they generally think of wheat or oats. Rice is predominantly grown in eastern countries, but that’s largely due to historical preference. Rice can be easily grown on a small homestead, even in cold climates.

While rice is typically thought of as a tropical plant, there are actually two sub-species, one of which is hardy in cold climates. Long-grain rice varieties such as jasmine or basmati can only be grown in warm southern regions. Some varieties of short-grain rice, however, are cold tolerant and can be grown in short-season cold areas, all the way up to zone 4. It’s currently grown in cold climates such as northern Japan, Romania and the Ukraine.

Cold-climate rice strains thrive where average summer temperatures are as low as 68 degrees, though it’s ideal is 68 to 86 degrees. Still, farmers in areas where the average summer temperatures only hits the low 60s are having some success and harvesting adequate crops, even in the northernmost parts of New England.

This New All-Natural Fertilizer Doubles Garden Production!

Farmers in the Northeastern United States are beginning to cultivate rice on a small scale, and selecting for cold-tolerant strains.  At this point, the primary selection criteria are quick maturity and disease resistance. As more strains become available, farmers will eventually have the option to select for high yields and better taste.

To aid the plants’ survival, a few cold-climate adaptations have been developed, and cold-climate rice producers must take extra steps to ensure a harvest.  Rice is soaked to stimulate germination before being started in greenhouse flats well before the last frost date. At four weeks before the last frost, the rice is transplanted outside into paddies. Water levels are kept high during times of increased frost risk to provide extra protection for the plants.

While rice is grown semi-submerged in patties, it cannot be successfully grown in wetlands. Wetlands are protected areas in most places, and not available for cultivation. Beyond that, the water level needs to be carefully controlled, which is generally not an option in a wetland. The ideal soil is poorly drained, but not an actual wetland, like a soil that has a clay hardpan under layer that prevents full drainage. From there, runoff is controlled and a series of ponds are created to help manage water levels.

American Homesteaders Are Growing Rice. Here’s How They Do It.

Image source: Pixabay.com

Before the water gets to the paddy, it flows through a series of warming ponds that are shallow, dark bottomed and exposed to the sun. This pre-heated water prevents cold snow melt and rain runoff from cooling the growing ponds and helps accelerate the growth of the plants while at the same time buffering them for cold nighttime temperatures.

Quarter-Acre Patch Equals 1,000 Pounds Of Rice

Rice grown in marginal poorly drained agricultural soils that currently grow second-class hay can yield as much as two tons per acre. A small homestead quarter-acre patch could yield as much as 1,000 pounds of rice in a good year, or enough rice to supply a family of four with about half of their calories in a year.

In many parts of the world, rice is still tended and harvested by hand, making it ideal for a small homestead without specialized equipment. For harvest, the rice is cut and bundled by hand, and then threshed against logs to dislodge the grains.

Rice paddies also can be beneficial in other ways, by preventing flooding and managing runoff. With a series of ponds, water is held on the land, which prevents erosion, rather than quickly running off and damaging the topsoil.

Ducks are often incorporated into rice paddies to increase yields and add a harvest of meat and eggs from the same land. Ducks cannot consume rice or rice plants because they have too much silica for the ducks to digest. Ducks can, however, consume insects that infest the rice and weeds that compete with it in the paddy. Their droppings help to enrich the paddy and add fertility.

Most duck species are capable of feeding themselves and raising young independently in this environment, even without supplemental feed. By adding ducks to the operation, most farmers reduce their workload, increase their rice yields and add meat and eggs to their table. Ducks tend to fare better than chickens in cold climates, which is an added bonus.

If you want to grow rice on your land, try starting with a series of plants in 5-gallon buckets. This will allow you to monitor the progress of your rice and test viability before investing in creating a series of ponds and patties.

Have you ever grown rice? What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

Got some shop clean up done

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I was a bit peeved when Mom got some more pallets but it has helped getting stuff stored above the waterline if the shop gets flooded like it it did last winter.  I see how I can use the rest of the pallets as well as the broken down shelving from the basement demo to make the shop better for storage.  It has been difficult to redo the storage as neither Mom nor I anticipated two plus years of her storing stuff in the shop nor the shop getting flooded  this last spring.   Honestly, the cleanup we got done today and adding in more pallets we actually have more space to work with/in.  Of course I’ll need to set up a few more shelves and stuff to complete the project.

I got a couple of electric snow blowers this year and with the addition of the ice melting torch, we should be better prepared for this winter. I added a small 6 pound splitting  maul along with my ax for my fire wood cutting tools.   I need to build a cutting sawhorse for my chain saw for the larger chunks of wood.

Great news Mom’s knee is up to 45 degrees of movement in just two weeks working with the new physical therapist!   Between the new shoe inserts and the therapist, Mom is moving around much better than I have seen her walk in over two years.  Mom has finished up all the requirements of her Master Gardeners class.

I’ve hit my “time shift” thing again as I do, once or twice a year.  I tend to be a night owl and staying up till 3-5 am  playing on the PC is not a big deal but is not optimal, if I want to get stuff done during the day.  I’m trying to reset my body clock.

The eclipse “madness” has begun here in SW Idaho and SE Oregon.  I’m just going to set up a couple of lawn chairs a half block away with a semi clear skyline ( minimal trees) a thermos of coffee and just enjoy.   There is literally bumper to bumper traffic into Pineville Oregon today 17 August 2017.  I got my safety glasses and if I’m correct, we should see about 1 min. 45 seconds-2 minutes of totality locally.   The eclipse is a cool thing to see but getting crazy over it, is kind of silly.  I’m a bit peeved the local gas pumps are jacking up prices to “Profit” from all the people wanting to see the eclipse, but I don’t blame them either.  From my stand point it is just annoying not an “End of the World” rant.

Last but not least my kitchen fridge went wonky and the freezer did not keep things frozen.  This is an old fridge and I moved it around after I removed all freezer food it started working again! I’m going to switch fridges this weekend with my small new fridge that is in the shop. I have no idea why the fridge started working again so this fridge will become the new “beer fridge” in the shop.  Since we cleaned up the shop this should job should be simple if not easy.

 

 

 

Beyond Charlottesville: The choice between civil war and national salvation

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I have pondered the staged, revolutionary events in Charlottesville all week.  How to properly address the depth of dangers facing America has literally kept me up at night.  I could

OUCH? Dealing with Splinters!

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Written by John Hertig on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: THIS article is from John Hertig. As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly receive a $25 cash award as well as being entered into the Prepper Writing Contest AND have a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today

  

When out in the wilderness (as at home), splinters happen.  This is often from wood for fire or building shelter, or various man-made materials encountered.  In the southwest, we on occasion have close encounters with various spiny plants resulting in a similar condition.  As we all know, splinters are painful when you get them, and while they are embedded, and if not addressed, can work their way deeper and become more of a nuisance.  Removing splinters as soon as practical is the best course of action.  Thus, having splinter removal capability as part of your pocket or at least readily available first aid kit is usually a good idea.

There are many techniques which claim to remove splinters “naturally”, by “drawing it to the surface”.  Do you know how many of these I have tried?  Not one and I don’t currently plan to try any of them.  All sound messy and time consuming, and just a bit mystical.  After all, who would think that a slice of raw potato or the wet inside of an egg shell would coax a splinter out?  These methods do not seem fast enough or definite enough for me.  I’m old school; my methodology is to grab the offender and drag it out kicking and screaming.  It just makes no sense to mess around applying this or that, covering it and then waiting for that sliver to sneak out on its own.  Really, what is the point?  It might be “less painful” than the brute force methods, but come on.  Isn’t getting the splinter, and living with the splinter, more painful than digging it out and being done with it?

Furthermore, there are “splinters” which are not organic (wood or thorns).  Next most common is strands of wire, but shards of glass or chips of metal or plastic can behave in a splinter-like manner.

Brute Force Splinter Removal methods

There are two such schools of splinter removal:  Tweezers and Needle.  Tweezers (technically “thumb forceps”) are sort of like micro pliers you use to grab onto the splinter and pull.  Needles are a thin pointy tool which you use to impale the splinter and drag it out.  For splinters which have an end sticking out from the skin, tweezers are the most easy and reliable choice.  But if the splinter is below the surface of the skin, there is nothing to grab onto, and the “needle” comes into its own.  You can use an actual (sewing) needle for removing splinters; better is a splinter specific tool often known as a splinter “out”, “liberator”, “remover”, “pick”, “extractor” or “probe”.  The best ones are flat or triangular in cross section, with sharpened edges to help penetrate.  Such a cross section is less likely to slide off the splinter than the smooth round cross section of a needle.  The sharp edges also allow you to cut away surface skin which is covering the end of the splinter if necessary.  This is why one of the names for this tool is “liberator”.

Choosing Your Tweezers

There are an incredible variety of tweezers out there, and most are fairly useless for reliable splinter removal.  Any gripping tool or even fingers will do when there is some of the splinter protruding.  For those small, embedded splinters, the tweezers point must be thin enough to get into a small depression and clamp onto that tiny end of the splinter.  Yet the tips must be strong enough to grasp firmly and not slide off when you go to pull on the splinter.  The tips must be aligned well enough that they meet correctly and the arms must be sturdy enough that the tips don’t slip sideways from each other.  I’ve tried dozens of tweezers and the ones I like best are by Tweezerman.  They are a bit pricy, but are the only ones I’ve found which really do the job.  Their Ingrown Hair/SplinterTweeze has wonderfully fine precision tips.  But every time I’ve got that splinter end grabbed, it always slips free.  A better choice is their Point Tweezerette, which is shorter (easier to pack), a bit wider and something it grabs stays grabbed.  This model does not appear on their website, except as part of a men’s grooming kit, but is readily available from eBay by itself.

  

 

The Splinter Remover

These are available as sterile disposables or permanent instruments.  A top disposable is the Splinter Out and they are readily available, as are other similar products.  On the other hand, finding a permanent liberator can be challenging.  Often, they are paired with a sub-standard pair of tweezers and are fairly crude in quality themselves.  Although I am primarily a tweezers fan, there are times when the liberator is more effective, so I have some which are adequate; I only go for ones which have a tip which unscrews and screws in backwards to protect it, and the world around it.  Maybe some day I’ll break down and try some sterile prepackaged ones.

Other Needs

Having the tools to remove a splinter is great, and necessary for the task.  However, in order to remove a splinter, it kind of helps to be able to see it.  And some splinters can be very tiny, and some environments are rather low light.  Thus, the complete splinter kit includes sources of light and magnification.  Let’s see, one hand for the instrument, one hand for the light, and one hand for the magnifier.  And that assumes you are not working on your own hand, a common location for splinters.  It is helpful to consider light sources and magnifiers which do not need to be hand held.

  

I have two flashlight types I like.  One is an Olight S series “baton” light with a magnet in its tail cap.  Just set it against a magnetic surface and the light requirement is satisfied without hands.  These lights are small but not tiny, and are not cheap.  I carry one at all times, and for all purposes, so that is not a problem.  But when I am building a first aid or splinter specific kit, I go for the Photon Freedom Micro II.  This is tiny; hardly bigger than the quarter sized lithium batteries it uses for power.  And it is surprisingly bright at full brightness.  Best of all, it comes with a small mount which can clip to the bill of your hat, or your pocket or other thin upright.  And it is even magnetic for even more mounting options.

As for magnifiers, there are many; most are not “hands free”.  Hands free magnifiers tend to be too big and heavy to be considered “portable”.  I often use either a stand mounted assembly magnifier or a magnifying visor – at home.  For portable use, I depend on a nifty little gadget called a “thread counter” or sometimes “linen tester“.  This is a moderately high power lens mounted in a small folding stand.  And it is possible to clip the Photon Freedom to it, giving you a freestanding light and magnification solution.  There are thread counters which have built in lights, but I have not tried them since their batteries are tiny, so they probably are neither bright nor long lasting.

Afterwards

So you got the splinter out.  Whew, relief is at hand.  But wait; you are not done yet.  After all, that splinter punctured your skin, dragging who knows what with it.  The pain from the splinter may be gone, but is pain (or worse) from infection warming up in the bullpen?

You also need some basic skin puncture first aid.  That is, a cleansing pad such as Benzalkoniam Chloride to clean the area, an alcohol pad or lighter to sterilize your instruments, and a packet of antibiotic cream and a Band-aid for when the surgery is completed.

The Process

Ouch, you think you just got a splinter.  The first thing to do is to see if you can see it, and if it is big enough, grab it and pull it out.  Whether or not that is successful, carefully clean the area with your cleansing pad.  If not sterile packed, sterilize your tool(s) by wiping with alcohol or holding it in a flame.  Use your magnifying device to find the little dickens, and attempt to grab it with tweezers and pull it out, or drag it out with the tip of your liberator.  If this does not work, use the tips of the tweezers or the point of the liberator to pull back or cut a bit of skin from above the splinter, hopefully exposing enough to grab and pull, or drag.  Repeat until the splinter is out.

Once the splinter is out, wash the area with hot water if available, pack the wound with anti-biotic ointment and cover with a Band-aid.

 

The post OUCH? Dealing with Splinters! appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

New terror attack in Barcelona: 5 easy tips to Remember

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You probably know by now that a van plowed into the crowd on Las Ramblas avenue in Barcelona, killing 13 and injuring 100 people.

As soon as I heard about the attack I called my brother who was visiting family in Barcelona. Fortunately he left yesterday, a day earlier than expected. He had been thinking of staying another day. He easily could have been caught walking La Rambla if they had stayed another day.

Another terrorist attack, another lunatic picking a big vehicle and just mowing people.

What can you do?

You can’t do much to stop these events because cars are readily available and it takes very little research to figure out the most packed locations.

You can do something about letting known terrorist out and about. You can deport know radicals rather than give them some slack and just hope they don’t murder innocent people.

Above all, you can remove every single mosque that doesn’t publicly condemn these attacks and cooperates with authorities 100%. The number of imams that refuse to do so is astonishing and getting rid of those would be a big step forward in getting rid of their most visible and obvious indoctrination centres. It seems though that not enough blood has been spilled to overcome political correctness.

What can you do on a more personal level?

1)Know where they attack. They usually go for high profile targets. Large, emblematic cities, attacking in their centres.

2)Avoid these potential targets, especially at time of peak activity with target rich locations. Concerts, festivals, peak holyday season. Wherever you have a lot of people packed together, that’s an ideal target for a terrorist. I’m not saying not to live your life, just understand the risks when it comes to terrorists.

3)Awareness. Mind your surroundings. Look ahead of you and behind you. What’s going on 100 yards ahead and 100 yards behind. LISTEN. This is usually a great indicator of trouble. Shots fired, screams. In my experience you usually hear trouble before you see it.

4)Take action. Avoid being the deer caught in the headlights. When you see, listen or feel something is wrong, do something. In most cases that “something” should be start moving towards a safer direction, either getting behind cover, avoiding a speeding vehicle or attacker heading towards you.

5) Carry your EDC kit, especially a first aid kit in your EDC bag when at high risk locations as the ones mentioned above. Celox gauze, a tourniquet. Add a blow out kit if you got trainning on how to use it. Don’t forget your EDC, a knife can be used to cut open clothes, remove cords or clothes or seatbelts wrapped around people’s neck. Heck, I used my knife today to help out a baby girl in the street (more on this tomorrow) Where and when legal, you should carry your CCW too.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Summer Complacency

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Summer Complacency

The Idiot-Proof Guide To Making Mozzarella Cheese

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The Idiot-Proof Guide To Making Mozzarella Cheese

Image source: Pixabay.com

We don’t know who made the first cheese, but they managed to find some interesting ingredients along the way. One is rennet and the other is citric acid. You can assume that lemon juice is citric acid, but it doesn’t deliver the same outcome as powdered citric acid (although our ancient ancestors probably used good, old lemon juice). Citric acid for cheese making usually comes as a powder or in tablet form.

Rennet is an enzyme found in the stomachs of baby claves, goats and sheep that cause milk to curdle. This enzyme is what the immature animals use to digest their mother’s milk. This is probably how cheese was first discovered, considering that a sheep, calf or goat stomach was often used by ancient people as a container for liquids. All it took was someone to put some milk in this stomach container and have the courage to taste it after it curdled.

There are also vegetable-based rennets made from figs, thistles, safflower and dried caper leaves. And to no one’s surprise, we now have genetically modified rennets in addition to microbial rennets made from a form of mold. Don’t sweat the mold part. It’s what makes blue cheese, well, blue. The rennet you use is up to you and it often comes as a liquid in a small bottle.

Discover More Than 1,000 Off-Grid-Living Tricks!

Salt is also a common addition to many cheeses and offers preservative properties.

You can find rennets and citric acid powder on the Internet or at some specialty food stores. Don’t be surprised if you can’t find them at your everyday grocery store.

As to salt, sea salt or Kosher salt is usually the salt of choice.

The other key ingredient for any cheese is milk. Whole milk is usually the milk of choice, and many people prefer raw, unpasteurized milk for their cheese making. Of course, buying unpasteurized milk is very difficult in some states in the U.S., so you probably want to go the standard whole-milk, grocery store route.

You’re also going to need to do some precise cooking with low temperatures, so you’ll need a food thermometer to manage and control temps.

The Concept

The Idiot-Proof Guide To Making Mozzarella Cheese

Image source: Pixabay.com

Cheese making involves curdling milk and separating the whey or milky fluid that accompanies the curdled milk or “curds.”

The firm curds are the foundation for any cheese, and mozzarella is one of the simplest to make. So we’re going to explore that recipe as an introduction to cheese-making.

MOZZARELLA INGREDIENTS

  • 1 gallon of whole milk
  • 1 ½ teaspoons of citric acid powder (powdered or crushed tablets)
  • ¼ teaspoon of liquid rennet
  • 1 or 2 teaspoons of Kosher salt, depending on how salty you like your cheese
  • Ice water

EQUIPMENT

  • A large non-aluminum cooking pot
  • A spatula (I use a plastic spatula so it won’t scratch the pot)
  • A large slotted spoon
  • A colander
  • An instant-read food thermometer
  • A microwave oven (short bursts help remove the whey from the curd)
  • Microwave safe bowl

DIRECTIONS FOR MOZZARELLA CHEESE:

  1. Sprinkle 1 ½ teaspoons of the citric acid powder into a cool, large stainless-steel pot. Pour ¼ cup of cold water over the citric acid powder and stir until dissolved.
  2. Pour the gallon of milk into the citric acid solution in the pot and stir to combine.
  3. Over medium-low heat, bring the temperature to 90-degrees Fahrenheit using your cooking thermometer to measure the temp. When you reach the 90-degree mark, remove the pan from the stovetop and pour in the ¼ teaspoon of rennet liquid.
  4. Gently stir the solution with a circular up-and-down motion for about 30 seconds and then use your spoon to stop the stirred motion of the milk. You want it to stay still while the rennet interacts with the milk.
  5. Place a lid on the pot and let stand for 5 minutes.
  6. When the 5 minutes are up, you will notice a creamy almost custard-like appearance to the mix.
  7. Take your spatula and cut the curd down to the bottom of the pan in one-inch squares, forming a checkerboard.
  8. Return the pot to the stovetop over medium heat and stir gently until the temperature reaches 105-degrees Fahrenheit.
  9. Use your slotted spoon to remove the curd to a colander over a sink or bowl if you want to reserve the whey.
  10. Turn and spin the colander to drain off as much of the liquid/whey as possible.
  11. Grab the ball of mozzarella from the colander and gently squeeze with your hands over the colander to release more liquid. Work it like taffy and pull and stretch and form into a ball after each of the following steps.
  12. Now it’s microwave time. You can skip this step if you’re adverse to microwaves, but this will help to reduce the moisture level. Transfer the mozzarella to your microwave-safe bowl and microwave for 1 minute. Remove the bowl and pour off the liquid. Press the curd and drain off more liquid. And stretch and pull again. Microwave it again for 30 seconds and repeat. Pull and stretch the cheese and microwave one last time for 30 seconds and repeat.
  13. Spread the salt over the cheese and work and knead the salt into the cheese using your hands.
  14. Set the cheese ball into a bowl of ice water and let it rest for about 15 to 20 minutes.

Congratulations! You’re done. Mozzarella cheese is best stored in the refrigerator, either wrapped or in a bowl of water in the fridge with a tight-fitting lid. You also can break the large mozzarella ball into smaller balls and squeeze them into shape with your hands to form the ball shape and store them in the fridge in any size you like.

What tips would you add on making cheese? Share your tips in the section below:  

 

Reader’s Choice: High Value Knives Our Readers Recommend

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Reader’s Choice: High Value Knives Our Readers Recommend

A few weeks back, Thomas asked you guys which knives you found to be some of the highest value on the market. This article is the result of that question post. In it, I’ve taken the time to compile your responses, grouping your specific knife recommendations into fixed blade & folder categories. Knife value is […]

This is just the start of the post Reader’s Choice: High Value Knives Our Readers Recommend. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


Reader’s Choice: High Value Knives Our Readers Recommend, written by Elise Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

An Off-Grid Life Without Money

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Imagine living an off-grid life and needing cash only a few times a year – say, those handful of times when you go to town. For all but one day each month, you don’t even need your wallet.

That’s the life for off-gridder J. David Cox, who along with his wife Sally ditched the city about 15 years ago and moved to a remote island in beautiful British Columbia, hours from civilization. For him, a trip to the store involves a boat ride, a logging road … and lots of patience.

As he says, cash in such a setting is pointless. What are you going to do with it?

Cox is this week’s guest on Off The Grid Radio. He tells us:

  • How he and his wife built their home, by themselves, from scratch – when they were in their 50s.
  • Why he wanted to leave a well-paying job and move off-grid.
  • What he would tell anyone who is considering moving off-grid.

Cox – the author of “Choosing Off The Grid” and “Our Life Off The Grid” – also shares with us a few wildlife stories, including one involving whales!

If you’ve ever wanted to live in a scenic, remote off-grid home, then this week’s show is for you!

 

Storage-Friendly Survival Gardening

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Written by R. Ann Parris on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Apology: My bad as the article is from R. Ann Parris, it looks like her work, but was part of a set of articles that came bundled from Pat that I put in the wrong directory. 

 

Editors Note:   As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly receive a $25 cash award like R. Ann Parris as well as being entered into the Prepper Writing Contest AND have a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today

 

When we sit down with the goal to be prepared and self-sufficient, we have to balance a lot. We already walk tightropes between work and home life in many cases. Adding a pursuit that could really be its own full-time job only makes things harder. The self-sufficiency arm alone could occupy a full work week, and for some, the future looms as a period when we may have to increase our physical vigilance on top of producing our own food, medicine, and supplies.

    

There are methods we can use to make gardens maintenance friendly, and plant selections can ease it further. In some cases, there are plants that grow with few inputs and are specific to our regions. In other cases, we can also decrease our labors in a work-heavy and typically strength-sapping hot season by making selections that ease the other side of growing and harvesting.

Processing & Storage

Whether it’s annuals, an annual veggie garden, or perennials, whatever methods for production we choose takes time away from our daily lives. Then our produce needs to be processed, one way or another.

Even now when most lives are relatively easy due to power tools, refrigeration, and transportation, we tend to be pretty busy. I think most of us expect that even without the tug of paying jobs and some of the extracurricular activities that suck up our time, a life “after” will be just as busy and in some or many cases, even more labor intensive.

When we examine that “labor” word in regards to processing food, don’t forget that it’s not only the physical act of shelling beans and field peas, and our chosen method for threshing and winnowing grains or stripping corn cobs, or stewing tomatoes and slicing up zucchini. Most storage methods – even the truly historic methods – call for supplies: canners, jars, copious lids, a dehydrator or outdoor netted racks of some sort (and cooperative weather), a cold smoker, or things like salt, sugar, pectin and rennet we either have to stock or figure out how to produce.

When we process something, we also regularly have to provide fuel. Besides water and gardening, I think fuel consumption for household processes is one of the most underrated and underestimated aspects for preppers.

If we can eliminate some of the burden of processing foods for storage, we can eliminate not only some of the draw on our valuable time, but also limit some of the constant drains on supplies, and give us at least a little bit of backup in case our supplies are damaged or consumed.

  

Happily, we can create those backups pretty easily, by adding traditional storage or “cellar” crops https://morningchores.com/root-cellars/ to our garden and orchard plans. They basically go from field to storage, poof, done.

I’ll skip over beans and cereals this time, because they really need their own articles. Instead, I’ll stick with the veggies and fruits that are easiest to store without much if any processing.

    

Squashes

Squashes are among the best-known storage crops. Autumn or winter squashes are the longer-growing, thicker-skinned cucurbits http://www.rareseeds.com/store/vegetables/squash/winter-squash/. It’s those tough hides we have to work through that let us sit them on a shelf and walk away, for weeks or months on end. There’s a long, long list from all climates that includes kabocha, spaghetti, kuri, Hubbard squashes, the gourds, and pumpkins.

Squash are ready for storage when the rinds darken, and you can’t punch a fingernail through them. The plants sometimes cue us that they’re ready by yellowing and dying back a bit, and in many cases the vines will go woody. We then cut them off with a stub of stem attached, brush any soil or debris loose, and let those thick skins toughen up more with a 1-2 week cure in a 75-80 warm, somewhat dry space, up off the ground. They can be cured in the field, propped up, but there are risks there that a barn or crib can help eliminate.

Then they go into a slightly humid space – the average basement, household pantry, spare bedroom or office, and dry cellar is fine. Some will store for 6-8 weeks even at 60-75 degrees, while others will only store that long even at the ideal 45-60 degrees. Some like Hopi and fully-matured tromboncino will store for a full year or longer.

The downside to the winter squashes is that they tend to take a full season to grow, and only produce a few to a handful of fruits per plant, compared to the tender summer squashes that can be producing in 55-65 days and readily fill a laundry basket when they’re picked often and early.

  

Humid Sand-Box Crops

Some of our storage crops like it damp. It keeps them from shriveling up and browning, or wilting into rot. We can create humidity with damp sand or sawdust, layering in root veggies like rutabaga/sweedes, turnips, beets, parsnips, carrots, and celeriac. The root veggies are also ideal candidates for burying in a wooden crate outside once temperatures drop http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/garden-yard/root-cellars-zm0z11zkon.

We can also use damp boxes to store cabbage, celery and leeks.

For them, shallower trays work well, because we’re going to cut them with a section of their stems still attached, and “plant” those stems into the sand or sawdust. The veggies will then wick up moisture that lets them be stored for weeks or months.

They’ll store longer if we can keep them between about 35 and 45 degrees, but even 55-60 degrees can significantly extend their shelf lives. If we can’t come up with a damp box or pit for them, we can also individually wrap them in plastic to help hold in moisture. (And now you have a justification for keeping every plastic grocery bag that crosses your path.)

      

Tree Fruits

Nuts have to be the next-best known storage crops, and right there with them are apples and pears.

Modern supermarket apple varieties don’t store quite as long or as well in many cases, with the exception of Granny Smith that will sit on a counter for weeks and extend into a month and longer if we drop the temperatures.

There are still storage apples out there http://bighorsecreekfarm.com/apple-varieties/long-keeping-storage-apples/ although we have to work harder to find them. Braeburn and Pippin are examples of surviving apples that were actually intended to sit around in storage for a while, sweetening and softening over time https://www.thebalance.com/apple-varieties-that-keep-well-over-the-winter-1389329. We can also turn to the harder baking, cider and applesauce apples like Winesap.

We’ll have better luck storing the tart apples than the sweets, and the firm-crisp apples and pears over softer varieties. Mid-and late-season varieties are also more storage friendly, usually, and can provide us with fresh fruit later in the season.

Apples will do best in a cool, 40-65 degree storage space, and will do better yet if we save some newspaper and phone book pages to wrap them in and stick them on racks with 0.5-1” of air space between each fruit and each layer.

Pears will be even happier if they’re given the same treatment but an even colder space – just above freezing up to about 50 degrees. Pears will also commonly benefit from a cure period after they’re harvested.

Both pears and apples like storage with some humidity, which makes them good candidates for storage above some of our damp boxes, but only the leafy veg boxes. The root veggies are pretty sensitive to the ethylene released by fruits.

Medlars that “blat” (rot) are another example of a tree fruit that we don’t have to rush around processing during some of the busiest times of the year. It’s an acquired taste and texture, ever so slightly reminiscent of apple butter, but especially if we want to keep our food production hidden in plain sight, medlars may be a nice choice for us.

Nuts are pretty easy, even soft-shelled peanuts. Pick, brush, stack in a dry place, move on.

One thing to note is that walnuts that are removed from their husks will be less tart/bitter than those that aren’t processed at all. On the other hand, one of the “cheat” ways to remove that husk is to just stack them up in a bag until it rots and can just be scrubbed, or to leave them in water until the husk rots and drops away.

        

Potatoes & Sweet Potatoes

Potatoes and sweet potatoes need to make it through our winters and in many cases all the way through the earliest parts of spring, so we have even more reason to start practicing with them as soon as possible. See, they’re not really flowering seed producers at this stage in evolution, and it takes a while for seed starts to get going, just like tomatoes. We’re going to have to cut potatoes and let them callous, and-or grow starts from them if we want to continue reaping potatoes and sweet potatoes in a world without Tractor Supply and Baker Creek.

After harvest, both sweet potatoes and true potatoes are brushed off, then cured.

Potatoes cure best at 50-60 degrees for 2-4 weeks. To be at all soft and palatable, sweets need to cure in a warm but not too hot space, 80-85 degrees, and usually don’t need more than two weeks.

That’s similar with Asian and African yams for the most part, although some of those need a little longer or will tolerate hotter cure temps.

We’re typically harvesting sweets and yams when it’s still pretty warm, but if we need to heat space for them, we can use coolers or insulate small pantries or closets, and rotate in jugs and pots of hot water. We can also potentially use our vehicles or camper shells as a hot zone for curing sweets and yams, but we need to monitor the temps and be able to provide ventilation if it gets too hot during the day, and keep the temperatures up at night.

Once they’re cured, potatoes and sweet potatoes like the same moderate humidity we can find in most household basements, pantries, and spare rooms. Sweet potatoes really want to stay at 50-60 degrees for their storage, but potatoes will handle a dug-in pit that only gets as low as 45 or so, or can sometimes be stored in rooms adjacent to barns, greenhouses, or coops – reaping the body heat but not too much of it.

Storage Crops

Spring, summer, and autumn are already pretty busy seasons for a lot of us. Family obligations and things like fishing and hunting are already in competition with our gardens, orchards, crops, any livestock we own or other projects. They’re also the seasons we need to get buildings and power sources repaired, and wood cut and stocked.

Summer, and in many places autumn as well, are also our drought seasons, which means unless we have reliable water sources and backups for them, we can expect to do some heavy hauling – and some of us may already be filling barrels and buckets and tanks to haul for livestock and gardens.

Add in the mega-disasters and regional or wide-scale hungers some expect, or even the increased risks of garden and livestock threats from desperate humans a la Great Depression, Venezuela, and some of the dissolution and wars that have faced Europeans in the last century, and we can expect to spend more time on defense, as well.

Those are all factors that makes it worthwhile to consider crops that don’t need much processing. Autumn squashes, apples, carrots, nuts, and potatoes that need minimal work before being crated or stacked on shelves can save us valuable time. Maybe that’s time we’re harvesting livestock and grains, or maybe that’s time we’re shelling green peas, peeling tomatoes, and slicing crookneck for the dehydrator or pressure canner.

Even if our storage conditions aren’t ideal, the ability to produce crops that can sit for even just a few weeks can buy us time to get in precious hay and straw, and deal with the more perishable yields of our gardens and orchards.

While there are some drawbacks to various storage crops, there are also a lot of benefits – both now and “if/when”.

The post Storage-Friendly Survival Gardening appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Storage-Friendly Survival Gardening

Written by R. Ann Parris on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Apology: My bad as the article is from R. Ann Parris, it looks like her work, but was part of a set of articles that came bundled from Pat that I put in the wrong directory. 

 

Editors Note:   As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly receive a $25 cash award like R. Ann Parris as well as being entered into the Prepper Writing Contest AND have a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today

 

When we sit down with the goal to be prepared and self-sufficient, we have to balance a lot. We already walk tightropes between work and home life in many cases. Adding a pursuit that could really be its own full-time job only makes things harder. The self-sufficiency arm alone could occupy a full work week, and for some, the future looms as a period when we may have to increase our physical vigilance on top of producing our own food, medicine, and supplies.

    

There are methods we can use to make gardens maintenance friendly, and plant selections can ease it further. In some cases, there are plants that grow with few inputs and are specific to our regions. In other cases, we can also decrease our labors in a work-heavy and typically strength-sapping hot season by making selections that ease the other side of growing and harvesting.

Processing & Storage

Whether it’s annuals, an annual veggie garden, or perennials, whatever methods for production we choose takes time away from our daily lives. Then our produce needs to be processed, one way or another.

Even now when most lives are relatively easy due to power tools, refrigeration, and transportation, we tend to be pretty busy. I think most of us expect that even without the tug of paying jobs and some of the extracurricular activities that suck up our time, a life “after” will be just as busy and in some or many cases, even more labor intensive.

When we examine that “labor” word in regards to processing food, don’t forget that it’s not only the physical act of shelling beans and field peas, and our chosen method for threshing and winnowing grains or stripping corn cobs, or stewing tomatoes and slicing up zucchini. Most storage methods – even the truly historic methods – call for supplies: canners, jars, copious lids, a dehydrator or outdoor netted racks of some sort (and cooperative weather), a cold smoker, or things like salt, sugar, pectin and rennet we either have to stock or figure out how to produce.

When we process something, we also regularly have to provide fuel. Besides water and gardening, I think fuel consumption for household processes is one of the most underrated and underestimated aspects for preppers.

If we can eliminate some of the burden of processing foods for storage, we can eliminate not only some of the draw on our valuable time, but also limit some of the constant drains on supplies, and give us at least a little bit of backup in case our supplies are damaged or consumed.

  

Happily, we can create those backups pretty easily, by adding traditional storage or “cellar” crops https://morningchores.com/root-cellars/ to our garden and orchard plans. They basically go from field to storage, poof, done.

I’ll skip over beans and cereals this time, because they really need their own articles. Instead, I’ll stick with the veggies and fruits that are easiest to store without much if any processing.

    

Squashes

Squashes are among the best-known storage crops. Autumn or winter squashes are the longer-growing, thicker-skinned cucurbits http://www.rareseeds.com/store/vegetables/squash/winter-squash/. It’s those tough hides we have to work through that let us sit them on a shelf and walk away, for weeks or months on end. There’s a long, long list from all climates that includes kabocha, spaghetti, kuri, Hubbard squashes, the gourds, and pumpkins.

Squash are ready for storage when the rinds darken, and you can’t punch a fingernail through them. The plants sometimes cue us that they’re ready by yellowing and dying back a bit, and in many cases the vines will go woody. We then cut them off with a stub of stem attached, brush any soil or debris loose, and let those thick skins toughen up more with a 1-2 week cure in a 75-80 warm, somewhat dry space, up off the ground. They can be cured in the field, propped up, but there are risks there that a barn or crib can help eliminate.

Then they go into a slightly humid space – the average basement, household pantry, spare bedroom or office, and dry cellar is fine. Some will store for 6-8 weeks even at 60-75 degrees, while others will only store that long even at the ideal 45-60 degrees. Some like Hopi and fully-matured tromboncino will store for a full year or longer.

The downside to the winter squashes is that they tend to take a full season to grow, and only produce a few to a handful of fruits per plant, compared to the tender summer squashes that can be producing in 55-65 days and readily fill a laundry basket when they’re picked often and early.

  

Humid Sand-Box Crops

Some of our storage crops like it damp. It keeps them from shriveling up and browning, or wilting into rot. We can create humidity with damp sand or sawdust, layering in root veggies like rutabaga/sweedes, turnips, beets, parsnips, carrots, and celeriac. The root veggies are also ideal candidates for burying in a wooden crate outside once temperatures drop http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/garden-yard/root-cellars-zm0z11zkon.

We can also use damp boxes to store cabbage, celery and leeks.

For them, shallower trays work well, because we’re going to cut them with a section of their stems still attached, and “plant” those stems into the sand or sawdust. The veggies will then wick up moisture that lets them be stored for weeks or months.

They’ll store longer if we can keep them between about 35 and 45 degrees, but even 55-60 degrees can significantly extend their shelf lives. If we can’t come up with a damp box or pit for them, we can also individually wrap them in plastic to help hold in moisture. (And now you have a justification for keeping every plastic grocery bag that crosses your path.)

      

Tree Fruits

Nuts have to be the next-best known storage crops, and right there with them are apples and pears.

Modern supermarket apple varieties don’t store quite as long or as well in many cases, with the exception of Granny Smith that will sit on a counter for weeks and extend into a month and longer if we drop the temperatures.

There are still storage apples out there http://bighorsecreekfarm.com/apple-varieties/long-keeping-storage-apples/ although we have to work harder to find them. Braeburn and Pippin are examples of surviving apples that were actually intended to sit around in storage for a while, sweetening and softening over time https://www.thebalance.com/apple-varieties-that-keep-well-over-the-winter-1389329. We can also turn to the harder baking, cider and applesauce apples like Winesap.

We’ll have better luck storing the tart apples than the sweets, and the firm-crisp apples and pears over softer varieties. Mid-and late-season varieties are also more storage friendly, usually, and can provide us with fresh fruit later in the season.

Apples will do best in a cool, 40-65 degree storage space, and will do better yet if we save some newspaper and phone book pages to wrap them in and stick them on racks with 0.5-1” of air space between each fruit and each layer.

Pears will be even happier if they’re given the same treatment but an even colder space – just above freezing up to about 50 degrees. Pears will also commonly benefit from a cure period after they’re harvested.

Both pears and apples like storage with some humidity, which makes them good candidates for storage above some of our damp boxes, but only the leafy veg boxes. The root veggies are pretty sensitive to the ethylene released by fruits.

Medlars that “blat” (rot) are another example of a tree fruit that we don’t have to rush around processing during some of the busiest times of the year. It’s an acquired taste and texture, ever so slightly reminiscent of apple butter, but especially if we want to keep our food production hidden in plain sight, medlars may be a nice choice for us.

Nuts are pretty easy, even soft-shelled peanuts. Pick, brush, stack in a dry place, move on.

One thing to note is that walnuts that are removed from their husks will be less tart/bitter than those that aren’t processed at all. On the other hand, one of the “cheat” ways to remove that husk is to just stack them up in a bag until it rots and can just be scrubbed, or to leave them in water until the husk rots and drops away.

        

Potatoes & Sweet Potatoes

Potatoes and sweet potatoes need to make it through our winters and in many cases all the way through the earliest parts of spring, so we have even more reason to start practicing with them as soon as possible. See, they’re not really flowering seed producers at this stage in evolution, and it takes a while for seed starts to get going, just like tomatoes. We’re going to have to cut potatoes and let them callous, and-or grow starts from them if we want to continue reaping potatoes and sweet potatoes in a world without Tractor Supply and Baker Creek.

After harvest, both sweet potatoes and true potatoes are brushed off, then cured.

Potatoes cure best at 50-60 degrees for 2-4 weeks. To be at all soft and palatable, sweets need to cure in a warm but not too hot space, 80-85 degrees, and usually don’t need more than two weeks.

That’s similar with Asian and African yams for the most part, although some of those need a little longer or will tolerate hotter cure temps.

We’re typically harvesting sweets and yams when it’s still pretty warm, but if we need to heat space for them, we can use coolers or insulate small pantries or closets, and rotate in jugs and pots of hot water. We can also potentially use our vehicles or camper shells as a hot zone for curing sweets and yams, but we need to monitor the temps and be able to provide ventilation if it gets too hot during the day, and keep the temperatures up at night.

Once they’re cured, potatoes and sweet potatoes like the same moderate humidity we can find in most household basements, pantries, and spare rooms. Sweet potatoes really want to stay at 50-60 degrees for their storage, but potatoes will handle a dug-in pit that only gets as low as 45 or so, or can sometimes be stored in rooms adjacent to barns, greenhouses, or coops – reaping the body heat but not too much of it.

Storage Crops

Spring, summer, and autumn are already pretty busy seasons for a lot of us. Family obligations and things like fishing and hunting are already in competition with our gardens, orchards, crops, any livestock we own or other projects. They’re also the seasons we need to get buildings and power sources repaired, and wood cut and stocked.

Summer, and in many places autumn as well, are also our drought seasons, which means unless we have reliable water sources and backups for them, we can expect to do some heavy hauling – and some of us may already be filling barrels and buckets and tanks to haul for livestock and gardens.

Add in the mega-disasters and regional or wide-scale hungers some expect, or even the increased risks of garden and livestock threats from desperate humans a la Great Depression, Venezuela, and some of the dissolution and wars that have faced Europeans in the last century, and we can expect to spend more time on defense, as well.

Those are all factors that makes it worthwhile to consider crops that don’t need much processing. Autumn squashes, apples, carrots, nuts, and potatoes that need minimal work before being crated or stacked on shelves can save us valuable time. Maybe that’s time we’re harvesting livestock and grains, or maybe that’s time we’re shelling green peas, peeling tomatoes, and slicing crookneck for the dehydrator or pressure canner.

Even if our storage conditions aren’t ideal, the ability to produce crops that can sit for even just a few weeks can buy us time to get in precious hay and straw, and deal with the more perishable yields of our gardens and orchards.

While there are some drawbacks to various storage crops, there are also a lot of benefits – both now and “if/when”.

The post Storage-Friendly Survival Gardening appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Shoulder Dislocations

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SHOULDER DISLOCATIONS

Anterior shoulder dislocation accounts for 95-97% of cases

Of all the joints in your body, the shoulder has the greatest range of motion. This flexibility comes at the cost of low joint stability. 50% of all major joint dislocations seen in U.S. emergency rooms involve the shoulder joint.

A dislocation is an injury in which a bone is pulled out of its joint by some type of trauma. Dislocations commonly occur in shoulders, fingers, and elbows, but knees, ankles, and hips may also be affected.  The joint involved looks visibly abnormal and is unusable.  Bruising and pain often accompany the injury.

If the dislocation is momentary and the bone slips back into its joint on its own, it is called a subluxation. Subluxations can be treated the same way that sprains are, using the R.I.C.E.S. method.  It should be noted that the traditional medical definition of subluxation is somewhat different from the chiropractic one.

SHOULDER ANATOMY

Detailed shoulder anatomy (wiki)

First, a short anatomy lesson. Unlike the kids’ song, there is no “shoulder bone” connected to the “arm bone”. The shoulder actually consists of three bones: the upper arm bone (known as the “humerus“), the shoulder blade or “scapula“, and the collarbone, also called the “clavicle“. The head of the humerus fits into a socket in the scapula. This socket (the “glenoid cavity“) is stabilized by ligaments, strong connective tissues that keep the humerus centered in the socket. These connective tissues, along with muscles and tendons, form a capsule that keeps the joint stable. Significant weakening of the capsule can cause the humerus to be dislocated.

The patient with a shoulder dislocation will come, usually holding their forearm for support, with complaints of pain and an arm that will appear obviously out of place. Swelling is not unusual. You might notice that the shoulder appears “lower” than on the uninjured side.

Of course, if there is medical care readily available, the patient with a shoulder dislocation should go directly to the local hospital. Indeed, some dislocations may only be reduced surgically under general anesthesia. In an off-grid setting, however, you are on your own and will probably have to correct the dislocation yourself.  This is known as performing a “reduction”.

HOW TO REDUCE SHOULDER DISLOCATIONS

Reduction is easiest to perform soon after the dislocation, before muscles spasm and the inevitable swelling occurs.  Not only does reducing the dislocation decrease the pain experienced by the victim, but it will lessen the damage to all the blood vessels and nerves that run along the line of the injury.  The faster the reduction is performed, the less likely there will be permanent damage. Unfortunately, a joint that experienced a dislocation may have a tendency to go out of place again in the future.

If help is not forthcoming, expect significant pain on the part of the patient during the actual reduction procedure. Giving some pain relievers like ibuprofen or stronger might be useful before the procedure to decrease discomfort.  Prescription muscle relaxers such as Cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril) are also helpful.

The use of traction will greatly aid your attempt to fix the problem. Traction is the act of pulling the dislocated bone away from the joint in such a fashion as to give room for it to slip back into place. This goal can be accomplished in various ways, depending on the type of dislocation.

The following procedures for reducing a shoulder dislocation are just some of the techniques used in this excellent video from Larry Mellick, MD of the Medical College of Georgia:

Method 1: Have the patient lie face down on a surface high enough that the arm (including the shoulder joint) dangles without hitting the ground. Place the patient’s arm into position slowly for the least discomfort.

Wrap a 15-20 pound weight around the forearm and wrist (again, not hitting the ground). Although they could hold the weight in their hand, this may tense the muscles, and you need them to relax. Once the muscles are relaxed enough (maybe 10 minutes or so), the arm should pop back into place.

Method 2: Have the patient lie on their back. With their elbow at a 90-degree angle, slowly rotate the arm outward with the palm facing the sky. This should be a slow movement, and pain should be a sign to slow down.

Now, raise the arm so that the hand is behind their head, as if they were scratching the back of their neck. The action is similar to a baseball pitcher about to throw a ball. Once their hand is behind their head, slowly help them reach for the opposite shoulder. This motion should move the arm back into place.

Method 3: If you are alone with your patient, place your foot against the side of the patient’s chest and apply slow traction by pulling the arm while holding the wrist with the palm facing up. This, again, must be done slowly and gradually until the arm pops back into place.

If you’re fortunate enough to have an assistant, wrap a towel or sheet around the upper chest of the patient and have the assistant pull in the opposite direction to provide counter-traction. This avoids having to use your foot for that purpose.

If these procedures are successful, pain and movement should be immediately improved, although it is normal to have some continued discomfort in the injured shoulder. Your patient may benefit from the placement of ice packs to reduce swelling and a sling to immobilize the joint while it heals.

Full recovery will take about 4-12 weeks, depending on the age and physical condition of the patient. should be noted that the dislocation itself or the reduction procedure could possibly disrupt blood vessels or nerves, leading to circulation issues as well as effects to sensation and motor function.

Orthopedic injuries will be common in any austere setting. The medic has to be ready to take the initiative when the ambulance is not on the way if full use of an injured extremity is to be recovered.

Joe Alton MD

Joe Alton MD

 

Find out more about orthopedic injuries in remote settings (and much more) with the 700 page Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way. And don’t forget to fill those holes in your medical supplies by checking out Nurse Amy’s entire line of kits and supplies at store.doomandbloom.net.

Grab and Go Deluxe First Aid Trauma Kit

Our Grab N Go Medical Kit

Now They’re Removing Confederate Monuments in CEMETERIES

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Now They’re Removing Confederate Monuments in CEMETERIES

NBC Los Angeles

 

The attacks on monuments to the Confederacy and its leaders continued this week – even extending to a Los Angeles cemetery.

Under pressure, the Long Beach Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy removed Wednesday a six-foot granite monument to Confederate veterans from the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles, The Los Angeles Times reported. The monument has sat in the Confederate section of the cemetery since 1925.

“It was thought that it would become impossible for us to maintain an atmosphere of tranquility, harmony and inclusion for all of our families and all of our visitors with the monument present here,” cemetery spokesman Theodore Hovey told the newspapers.

The granite marker was emblazoned with three Confederate flags and two crosses. It also featured these words: “In memory of the soldiers of the Confederate States Army who have died or may die on the Pacific Coast,” and “Lord God of hosts, be with us yet, lest we forget — lest we forget.”

Put God Back Into History And Teach Your Kids What They Won’t Learn Anywhere Else!

“I don’t think a lot of people were aware of its presence,” Hovey said of the monument. A vandal wrote the word “no” in black on the monument on Tuesday.

‘Small Taste of Justice’

Earlier this week in in Durham, N.C., a mob pulled down a statue of a Confederate soldier. Video shows protesters putting a rope around the statue’s neck, pulling it off a pedestal and spitting on the statue’s remains.

“Today we got a small taste of justice,” protester Jose Ramos told CBS North Carolina.

The statue had stood in front of the Old County Courthouse since 1924 and was engraved with the words “The Confederate States of America” and “In Memory of the Boys Who Wore The Gray.”

It Needs to Be Removed

Police are now filing vandalism charges against some of the protesters identified through the video, The Hill reported.

The protest was apparently organized by leftist radicals on social media.

“It needs to be removed,” Loan Tran told the media. “These Confederate statues in Durham, in North Carolina, all across the country.”

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh ordered the removal of all statues dedicated to Confederate heroes Monday night, The New York Times reported. A crane and a work crew escorted by a contingent of polices started pulling down the statues in the dead of night.

“The mayor has the right to protect her city,” Pugh said. “For me, the statues represented pain, and not only did I want to protect my city from any more of that pain, I also wanted to protect my city from any of the violence that was occurring around the nation. We don’t need that in Baltimore.”

One group of Confederate monuments that will not be going anywhere: 10 statues in the U.S. capitol. There are no plans to remove the statues, which include one of Robert E. Lee, Politico reported.

Do you think Confederate monuments should be removed? Share your thought in the section below:

THE Best Outdoor Motion Light For Home Security

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I have no doubt whatsoever that the ‘RAB Super Stealth’ is absolutely the best outdoor motion light for home security. Remember, you get what you pay for. Despite the higher cost of this motion light, trust me – it’s worth it! Why do I say that? I have lots of them… I have been completely satisfied with their outstanding performance for years. RAB Lighting -Super Stealth 360 (bronze) RAB Lighting -Super Stealth 360 (white) I recently purchased and installed two more of these outdoor motion lights to beef up my home security. I had purchased RAB motion lights a number

The post THE Best Outdoor Motion Light For Home Security appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Video: Top Five Useful Ways to Coil and Stow Rope for Camping, Backpacking and Farming.

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Hello my friend and welcome back!  While there are a ton of videos out there for Preppers, covering many different aspects of Prepping, there really are not a lot which cover some of the…

The post Video: Top Five Useful Ways to Coil and Stow Rope for Camping, Backpacking and Farming. appeared first on American Preppers Online.

The 3 Most Common Fall Gardening Mistakes – And How To Avoid Them!

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One of the best ways to be sure to have a great garden next year is to avoid making fall gardening mistakes now! It’s hard to believe, but summer is coming to a close, and fall is right around the

The post The 3 Most Common Fall Gardening Mistakes – And How To Avoid Them! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

4 Simple Ideas For Back to School Prepping

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back to school preppingAmidst the joy of summer time swims, cold Popsicles, and sleeping in, the new school year sneaks up on us. I dread the whirlwind back to school shopping as advertisements plague the airways, and other media. I feel my wallet emptying before I even make the shopping list. Not to mention the kids exclaiming, “I want this one!”

Here are a few things I have learned to prep for back to school season. It will help save money, time, and some sanity.

School Supplies

Every year, we use the same basic school supplies. Most stores overstock these items. I’ve learned to wait until the end of the back to school rush, when the stores mark the items for clearance, then I stockpile crayons, ruled paper, printer paper, composition books, pencils, glue, etc.

Also, the teachers will love you in the middle of the year when they run out of some supplies. With the low cost, I never mind sharing from my stockpile.

My ongoing school supply stockpile also saves us a bit of money each year. With the savings, each child can pick out a few of their “must have” items without breaking the bank.

When picking out a back pack, I spend a little bit more money for one with a lifetime warranty. That way if it gets over filled and breaks a seam, I simply return it for a new one.

School Clothes

One way I save on school clothes is not to buy them only at the back to school sales. Instead I buy clothing year round. At the end of the seasons, when items are on clearance, I try to buy the next size up for the following year. This especially great for basic items like jeans, socks, undergarments, etc. (Side note on underwear: all tightie whities look the same; if you buy every male in the house a different brand, sorting laundry goes sooo much faster.)

On gift giving holidays, I buy each child a new outfit and shoes. I work it into the gift buying budget. This helps balance out the cost of clothing my ever growing brood during the year. Plus, it freshens up their wardrobe.

Online Shopping

Skip all the driving around and shop online. Scoping out deals is a click of the mouse and most websites offer free shipping over a certain amount spent.

I highly recommend Amazon Student. I sit down at the beginning of my college semester, and put in one big order for the kids and myself. With the student discounts and Amazon Prime shipping it is a double win. (Living overseas as a military wife, Amazon Prime has been a true life saver.) Another plus: I can find all my college books used and sell them back later, or I can simply rent and return books.

While online shopping I also use MyPoints.com, a free online points system resulting in gift cards, and RetailMeNot.com. You can look up any website you are shopping at and get online coupon codes. Both of these web sites yield a good return, $5-$25 on average.

Setting a Budget

The most important part of school shopping is setting a budget. Even more important is including the kids. I sit down with them, show them how a budget works, and what our plan of attack is.

They help me compile our supply list. When it comes to the actual shopping part, I usually give them a small budget of their own to buy their wants. The catch is they do the math, and I help them make conscious decisions on quality and usefulness. The rest of the list, which is mostly basics, comes from the stockpile.

Prepping for the school year can be a tedious repetitive task. Enter the new school year fully prepared by creating a small stock pile of the basic necessities. This will save you time, money, and some sanity.

back to school prepping

Survival Defense: How To Build Targets For Shooting Drills

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Membership at a shooting range, plus covering the cost of ammo if you have to purchase it from the facility instead of bring your own, can be pretty expensive these days.

If you want to practice surprise drills in the dark hours of the morning to help with managing adrenalin response, during bad weather, or low lighting, it may not be possible at the range.

On the other hand, if you expect to defend yourself efficiently with a gun, there is no substitute for practice, including live fire drills and situational drills that you would be able to carry out at a range.

But if you have enough land, it makes sense for you to build your own wooden targets for shooting drills, and use them whenever you want. 

Here are some tips for building wooden targets as well as getting the most out of them!

Best Materials for Building Targets

Depending on the design of the target, you can only make the frame from wood, or make some of the other parts. Using wood that is suitable for outdoor use would be best – cedar or pine – however you can expect them to split easily. Choose a soft, less dense wood that is already treated for outdoor use.

  • Most wooden frames for shooting targets can be built using 2 x 6 or 2 x 4 studs.
  • You can use old paneling, veneer, composite board, or even cardboard for the areas of the target that you plan to hit.
  • Try to limit the amount of metal used to hold the stand together because a bullet can ricochet off those areas if they are hit. Use PVC tubing or plastic collars to hold the wooden frame together and as a mounting for the actual target.

How to Choose a Stand Design

There are hundreds, if not thousands of wooden shooting target stands that can be built for home use. In most cases, you can separate the stand design into the target area and the support frame. There are literally millions of target images and materials that you can use (check the resources at the end of the article), the frame itself will usually be one of the following designs:

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

 

Square Frame

At the beginning, most shooters keep their practice stands as simple as possible. You can assemble a wooden stand in just a few minutes with little more than a two upright frames, a base, and one across the top of the stand to form a rectangle. Simply add an additional brace or an area to hold the actual target, and you will be ready to shoot.

Center Stand Frame

The second frame you can build is one that uses a wooden base and a pole or beam that extends from the center. You can use a triangular shape for the base, or use one similar what you might use for a square frame.

These frames can be used for more mobile targets such as ones that will pop up, or ones that will spin.

A Frame

The third frame type looks something like A frame saw horses that you might use to prop up large boards for cutting. You would use these for suspending rope or other materials that a target might move across from one end to the other. They can also be used for suspending other targets that swing back and forth or ones that might flip up or down.

Shooting accurately, efficiently, and with confidence is about far more than hitting a stationary target. As a result, you find that a simple stand will not be enough for your home practice needs. Even though you can still use it to break in new weapons or to work on getting rid of bad shooting habits, you will still need to develop more complex targets. Here are a few things you may want to incorporate into your stands if you are an intermediate or advanced shooter:

  • build a stand that accommodates a counterweight so that the stand will pop back up after it has been hit.
  • Build a stand with multiple shot areas, and then add smaller targets that will turn at random moments. You can easily turn these into “shoot don’t shoot” drills simply by putting different images on each side of the target. As these mini targets spin randomly in the wind, you would have to evaluate whether to shoot or not, and then do so accurately.
  • Make sure you can adjust the height of the stand so that you can put one or more targets at different heights.

Advantages of Pop Up and Pop Out Stands

Even though pop up and pop out stands are harder to build, they can help you develop muscle memory, teach you to pay attention to details before you pull the trigger, and also help you practice basic accuracy skills. Both designs are important to work with, even if you don’t have room for a Hogan’s Alley or cannot accommodate several stations.

To build a Pop Up stand, you can try building one that uses a cord as a trigger. For example, you can build a model where cord is pulled by someone standing behind the shooter. Since the shooter never knows when the cord will be pulled, there is an element of surprise that is not present when shooting at a stationary paper target.

If you want to practice shooting by yourself, you might want to try adapting this system so that a motor acts to pull the cord at random times, and then sets releases the cord so the target is pulled back down after a few seconds.

Pop out stands or ones that move across an area vertically or horizontally will always require a motor as part of the assembly. These stands are also useful for incorporating gunshot sounds, flashing lights, or something else that will startle you as the image pops or floats into view.

Build a timer system that may only produce sounds, but no image so that you do learn more about when to hold fire and when to pull the trigger.

Video first seen on m henry.

When building these designs, include targets that make you think about whether to shoot or not.

Remember that if you are in an active shooter situation, you’ll have to distinguish between innocent bystanders and a criminal threat in less than a second. Maybe another concealed weapon carrier is on the scene and making the same evaluation. Both of you will have to recognize that the other is no threat, and neutralize the criminal that created the situation in the first place.

Once you know how to shoot a gun and have practiced enough to get the feel of it, practice “shoot don’t shoot” scenarios. There are few things worse than that moment when you are in a situation, and everything leaves your mind but the understanding you must fire.

If you do not teach yourself from the beginning to evaluate the target, you may not know what you hit or why, even though you aimed and fired perfectly.

Four Essential Target Patterns

When building a target stand, you should keep the following shooting goals in mind:

  • improve basic shooting skills when standing, sitting, or laying down in stationary positions as well as when moving.
  • Ensure that you develop skills related to situation awareness.
  • Always be able to drill on “shoot don’t shoot” so that you do not hit an innocent bystander or someone else that is not the reason you drew the gun in the first place.
  • Once you get past basic shooting, you should also build stands with loud sounds, flashing lights, or anything else that will startle you and produce an adrenalin surge so that you can practice handling that aspect of a shootout.

Keeping these three goals in mind, here are four target patterns that you can use for your wooden platforms:

Dot Torture Targets

This target is ideal for stationary work, and can also be adapted later on for shoot don’t shoot. To adapt the target, make it larger, and then set the dots so that they can spin to reveal either targets to be shot at, or ones that you should refrain firing on. If you add drawing exercises and time the drills, it will add variety and dimension to your practice.

Silhouette Targets

Silhouette targets are very important for improving accuracy insofar as shooting at a critical area as well as making sure that you can cluster your shots in a critical area. These targets can also be easily adapted for “shoot don’t shoot” as well as added to different kinds of platforms.

They are also perfect if you expand to a Hogan’s Alley or decide to expand your range in other ways.

Bobber Targets

These are similar to pop-up targets in the sense that you will have to hit a moving target instead of a still one.

They are also easily adapted to shoot no shoot scenarios. For added complexity, try adding a second bobber so that you have to keep track of two moving targets, one of which may or may not be the one you should be shooting at.

Spinning Targets

As you can see in the video link, these targets are actually fairly easy to make from wood. You can also use wood to create the spokes and locations for the actual target that you intend to hit. This target can also lend itself well to shoot don’t shoot practicing as long as you are able to get the target itself to spin.

Adding a window so that you can only shoot one target at a time as it comes into view may also be useful. When building a spinning target, also try spinning the wheel in a horizontal plane and then hang the targets down at different lengths. As they come into view, you would have to adjust the height of your shots as well as the side to side motions.

If you are interested in an even more advanced target for a single station, take the center support and build it with a cam at the bottom that will cause the center pole to raise and lower. This will also adjust the height of the targets and ensure that you practice wider range of motion in the vertical plane.

Video first seen on Drew Fisher.

Safe Target Stands and Building a Safer Range

Wood is often a favored material for creating shooting stand frames because it is durable, cheap, and less inclined to produce a ricochet if the bullet hits it. That being said, there are some things that you must be especially careful of when building a wooden stand:

  • Always be careful about edges or corners that will produce a ricochet. This is especially important for any target with moving parts. It is best to build any moving area out of cardboard or paper so that the bullet will go through, even if it hits at an angle.
  • Use as little metal as possible when building the frame, and use plastic collars instead, wooden pins, or wood joint constructions that do not require a metal fastener. Even though these joints may take a bit more work to create, the stand may be safer in the long run.
  • Make sure that there is enough room between you and the target. If the bullet doesn’t hit the target, but hits the wooden frame or a base, there is a chance that splinters or other small pieces of wood will fly all over the place. While this is unavoidable, you should still have plenty of room between you and the target so that the debris doesn’t hit you.
  • Never construct a target without building a proper backstop and side stops to catch bullets and debris from the target. You will also be well served by creating a wall that you can stand behind while shooting. Aside from protecting you from debris, the wall can also serve as a place to practice taking cover and shooting from a concealed position.
  • When it comes to building a safer range, always make sure that you have a storage area for important safety equipment such as shooting glasses and ear protection. At the very least, if you have a space near the range to keep these items, you won’t be inclined to forget them while you are gathering up your other gear for the range. This is also a good place to keep a gun cleaning kit and other accessories that will be useful after you are done practicing.

Overall, you’ll find that building wooden targets for shooting practice isn’t especially difficult. You can save time, money, and also expand many other options when using these targets.

While you can start with simple, fundamental stationary targets, it is even more important to advance to designs that build “shoot don’t shoot” into muscle memory as well as practice shooting at different angles, heights, and positions.

If you are serious about defending yourself and your family with a gun, practicing with more complex wooden shooting targets can improve your skills, and make you a more efficient shooter when it comes to handling an encounter with a criminal. Keep practicing to improve your skills and survive any situation!

 

This article has been written by Carmela Tyrell for Survivopedia.

Resources:

myoutdoorplans.com/stand/target-stand-plans/

baconfatlabs.com/2012/10/steel-target-stands-for-the-dallas-area-blogshoot-2/

pistol-training.com/drills/dot-torture

Article – How To Wash Radioactive Material From Your Body After A Nuclear Blast

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This is what passes for news, I guess. I imagine somewhere in Yahoo’s offices and editor was desperate for some sort of NorK-themed article to use for clickbait and this is what they came up with. Is there anyone here who really didnt know that washing off radioactive fallout is a good idea?

Even though North Korean leader Kim Jong Un outlined his plans to rain “an enveloping fire” around the U.S. territory of Guam and then opted not to fire missiles at this point of time, Guam’s office of Civil Defence has still carefully laid out a new set of guidelines on Aug. 11, that teach how to take cover before an explosion along with facts like avoiding hair conditioner after a nuclear explosion.

I very much question the utility of this article. Nonetheless, I offer a link to it for those who might see it differently than I.

How To Survive On Freeze-Dried Vegetables

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Have you often wondered if you could survive on freeze-dried vegetables? Do you sometimes wonder how do they taste? What do they look like? Here’s the deal, with freeze-dried foods you can literally eat most of the vegetables right out of the can. Be sure and get a good can opener, friendly reminder. Yep, we need to be able to open those #10 cans. I think I have ten can openers stashed throughout my emergency preparedness stockpile. If you can cook from scratch you can cook with any of the freeze-dried vegetables. You don’t need a special food storage cookbook because these vegetables are just vegetables with the water removed. Dehydrated foods must be cooked, but I will talk about them another day. You don’t need a special cookbook for them either.

You can throw the freeze-dried vegetables in any soup base if you have rehydrated them with tepid water, you just drain them and add to your pot of soup. They cook faster than dehydrated vegetables, so therefore, we would use less power or zero power if we ate them directly from the can. If you are using a water-based soup you can just throw the veggies into the soup without having to rehydrate them in water first. If you use a cream-based soup you will want to rehydrate them or the soup may become too thick. Either way, they are easy to use and taste as close to fresh vegetables as you can imagine once we rehydrate them. They taste a lot better than canned vegetables, plus, the variety is endless.

Let’s be honest here, they are not exactly the same as fresh vegetables, but they taste great! Let me give you some ideas on the different ones I have and use regularly. The fabulous part about these is the fact we don’t have to wash the vegetables, cut, chop or slice them! Plus the companies like Augason Farms, Thrive Live and Honeyville freeze-dried vegetables have a shelf life of 20-25 years unopened in optimal storage conditions. Please do not store any food storage in your hot garage. I only store my food storage in my home, and it’s a small home.

My favorite soup bases:

Here again, you can always make it from scratch, but if I have to feed 30 people dinner after a disaster, I want a soup base that tastes good and I just have to add water and heat them through, and then add the veggies. This is one of my favorite soup bases, do I like all the ingredients in them, no, but beggars can’t be choosers after a disaster. One of the reasons I like to buy soup bases even though they have a short shelf life (5-8 years) is the fact I just have to add water and not use my dried butter or instant milk. The freeze-dried vegetables only have the vegetables in the cans, nothing else added in the brands I buy.

Augason Farms Beef Flavored Soup Base or Augason Farms Cream of Potato Soup Base

I have seen Augason Farms soups online and at Walmart in the food storage sections. All you do is add water and some vegetables and cook the soup.

Freeze-dried vegetables for soup:

The freeze-dried vegetables only have the vegetables in the cans, no other ingredients added in the brands I buy.

Pros to freeze-dried vegetables:

they have a long shelf-life, typically 20-30 years, depending on the temperature of the room where they are stored. You can eat them directly out of the can. They cook up faster than dehydrated veggies. They will use less fuel to cook.

Cons to freeze-dried vegetables:

they cost more than dehydrated ones, some people say are too expensive. I look at it this way, they use less fuel and last longer on my shelves.

My favorite freeze-dried vegetables:

Broccoli:

They are great for soups, omelets, and casseroles

Corn:

Kids love to eat this corn right out of the can, great as a side dish, in a soup, and in stews

Cauliflower:

They are fabulous in soups, you can make a skinny pizza crust with them, too

Celery:

I use these almost daily in stir fry dishes, soups, casseroles, and in stews

Green beans:

These taste great right out of the can, in casseroles, soups, as a side dish, great in stir fry dishes

Green bell peppers:

These are great in casseroles, soups, stews or omelets

Green peas:

They taste great right out of the can, great with creamed chip beef on toast or biscuits, great as a side dish

Green onions:

I use these all the time, in my homemade salad dressings and any casserole that calls for green onions

Mushroom pieces:

The first thing that comes to my mind is pizza, casseroles, mushroom soup, omelets

Onions (chopped):

I use these every day, in stir fry dishes, soups, casseroles, omelets

Potatoes (diced):

These are great fried in butter as a side dish, in soups, casseroles, cheesy potatoes and stews

Red Bell peppers:

These are great in casseroles, soups, stews or omelets

Spinach:

I don’t care for cooked spinach, but I use this in my spinach dip on the back of the Knorr’s Vegetable soup box.

Tomatoes diced:

These can be used in any omelet, casserole, soup, stew or salad dressing

I hope this gives you some ideas on how to use freeze-dried vegetables in your kitchen. I don’t use all my freeze-dried vegetables every day, but the ones I use the most are, onions, celery, green onions, green bell peppers, and red bell peppers. When I buy these they last longer than fresh and it keeps me out of the store, which I think saves me money in the long run since I’m not tempted to buy stuff at the store while there.

I’m surprised how much the cost of all food storage continues to escalate, but we don’t want to be dependent on others after a disaster. Please buy one #10 can a month, or more often, as your budget allows. May God bless our country and world at this time. I see some rough times coming and I want all of us to be prepared for the unexpected.

Dinner rolls by Linda

The post How To Survive On Freeze-Dried Vegetables appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Survival Life Article – SimpliSafe

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Over the last few years, I have become increasingly frustrated with my legacy security system. I’ve been looking for an alternative and found one in the form of Simplisafe. You’ve probably heard the ads for it on the radio over the last year or so, it’s been getting a lot of attention. So I decided […]

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Did You Know That 9 out of 10 Adults Have Gum Disease?

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“If you’re over 30 years old, chances are better than 90% that you have some form of gum disease.”
– David Kennedy, DDS – Past President of International Association of Oral Medicine and Toxicology

This is a pretty unsettling little fact, but it is a fact. Ninety percent of adults over 30 have active gum disease. That’s sad when you know that you can prevent gum disease. Signs range from swollen gums to bad breath and bleeding or receding gums to loose teeth. These symptoms are so common that most of us don’t even equate them with gum disease. We just think of it as business as usual in OUR mouth, and go about our daily brushing routines.  But if commercial toothpastes were really effective in preventing gum disease, would 90% of us be walking around with gum disease every day?  I don’t think so.

active-gum-disease

What is gum disease?

The bacteria in your mouth creates a sticky film called plaque that forms around your teeth and gums. If it isn’t removed daily, it will harden and become tartar. Plaque, tartar, and accumulating bacteria irritate and inflame the gums. This is known as gingivitis. When the plaque and tartar begin to form below the gumline your problem has progressed to periodontal disease. The bacterial infection spreads and destroys the gum, teeth, and bone structure. It could result in tooth loss.

Here is the path to prevent gum disease …

Your diet has a lot to do with your mouth health. If you eat acidic, junk, or sugary foods, your teeth and gums are going to have problems. When you eliminate processed foods and increase your oral health, your gums will begin to heal.

Some foods that cause acidity in the body:

  • grains (unsprouted or unfermented)
  • hydrogenated oils
  • sugar
  • some dairy products (low-fat yogurt, cheeses)
  • processed foods
  • Some fish (canned tuna, trout)
  • processed and fatty meats, salami, hot dogs, and corned beef
  • sodas, sweetened beverages, and fruit juices

Foods that help prevent gum disease:

  • Wild-caught fish (salmon, mackerel, and sardines, fish that is high in omega-3s)
  • Fresh veggie juice (helps reduce the inflammation in your body)
  • Chewing gum with Xylitol (xylitol helps prevent the build-up of bacteria)
  • Raw Vegetables and Apples (naturally clean your teeth)
  • Foods high in fat soluble vitamins (raw milk, coconut, beef liver, bone broth, grass-fed animal meat)

Other lifestyle choices to help prevent gum disease:

  • Don’t smoke
  • Chew on garlic (put it in your salads
  • Check your gut.
  • Oil pulling
  • Flossing
  • Make your own Toothpaste or Powder

Simple and Natural Tooth Powder

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons Bentonite Clay
  • 1 tablespoon Baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon Powdered cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon Xylitol powder
  • 2 tablespoon calcium and magnesium powder
  • 10 drops of thieves essential oil
  • 20 drops of peppermint essential oil

Directions:

  1. Mix all ingredients in a non-metallic bowl.
  2. Put your powder in a pint-size glass jar for storage. Use one jar per family member if you’re going to dip your toothbrush into it.

To use: Wet your toothbrush in hot water and dip it into your homemade powder. And BRUSH! Rinse with cool water. The powder can be used daily and is good for kids and adults.

If you’d rather have toothpaste, here is a Simple and Natural toothpaste Recipe.

 

What is your oral health regime? Do you use natural products, homemade, or commercial tooth care? We’d love to hear your story in the comments below.

 

Resources:

Gum Disease Natural Treatments & Causes. Dr. Axe.
Heal Gum Disease In A Week or Less. Natural News.

 

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The post Did You Know That 9 out of 10 Adults Have Gum Disease? appeared first on The Grow Network.

This Simple Tip Can Make Your Online Passwords Nearly Impossible To Hack

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If you’ve been using the internet since at least the mid-2000s, you’ve probably noticed a slow and inexorable change occur on almost all websites that ask for a password. Where once you could make your password anything you want, over time websites began to demand that you add capitalized letters, numbers, and symbols.

As frustrating as it may be, it seems to make sense. These websites want you to make a password that is more sophisticated, and thus more difficult to hack. The only problem, is that much of the advice we’ve been given on password security over the past decade is just plain wrong. But don’t take my word for it. Take it from Bill Burr, the guy who first introduced the idea that our passwords should have these characters.

Bill Burr worked for the National Institute of Standards and Technology in 2003, where he wrote a guide on password security that has since become the standard by which most websites set up passwords. Now he’s telling people to forget about everything he recommended.

Nearly 15 years ago, Mr Burr wrote guidelines for password security for the US National Institute of Standards and Technology. It included suggestions that passwords should be changed every three months and be made up of a range of different characters.

That document led to stipulations for computer and online accounts that require people to abide by the rules. But he said that they don’t work and people still pick terrible passwords – but now they’re just harder to remember.

“Much of what I did I now regret,” Mr Burr told the Wall Street Journal.

“It just drives people bananas and they don’t pick good passwords no matter what you do.”

The problem wasn’t that this advice was necessarily wrong. If you make a password that’s a random assortment of characters and change it every few months, it’s doubtful that anyone will guess your password. The problem is that it’s incredibly difficult for people to go through that procedure.

So they make passwords that are easy to remember, and incorporate a few numbers and symbols. As an example, a password like “bassfishing,” might be written up as “b@ssf!5h1Ng”. Then when they change their password, they only change it slightly so that again, it’s easy to remember.  Unfortunately what’s easy to remember is also very easy for hackers to guess, and since everyone uses this strategy it makes life even easier for hackers.

In other words, his original advice didn’t factor in human nature (or human laziness).

So how can we make a better password? According to Burr, “It’s probably better to do fairly long passwords that are phrases or something like that that you can remember than to try to get people to do lots of funny characters,”

As for why that’s a better way to set up a password, ever since Burr came out with his apology and revised recommendations, there’s been a comic strip floating around the internet that perfectly explains why simple long phrases make better passwords. It shows how Burr’s original advice led us all to adopt passwords that are a pain to remember, but easy to hack.

In a nutshell, a password that is a phrase consisting of a random, nonsensical assortment of words, is many times more difficult for a computer or a human to guess than a password that is just one word, and consists of a random assortment of capitalizations, symbols, and numbers. That’s because in the latter case, it’s not really all that random. The former, which really is random, is also far easier to remember.

So the next time you need to change a password, it would be wise to take this advice. Obviously you’ll still need to incorporate a few numbers and symbols since that’s what most websites these days force you to do, and they’ll probably continue with that policy for a few years. But you can still make lengthy phrase based passwords that will do a far better job of protecting your information online.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

5 Ways to Contact Loved Ones After the Grid Goes Down

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“Once upon a time” is a great way to start a fairy tale, but not an article on emergency communications, because once-upon-a-time was a really lousy place to be when it came to communication. In those fabled times, there was nothing except what you could transmit on foot or horseback or by boat. Maybe there […]

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Nukes, National Debt and North Korea

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Nukes, National Debt and North KoreaLooking back to just a year ago, my main preparedness concerns were an economic collapse, and this country slowly becoming a socialist state. While these are still high on the list, there are a couple of disaster scenarios that have moved up on my list.

A couple of the threats that have moved up on my list are a North Korean conflict, the possibility of an EMP, and the repercussions thereafter. Both could have long term consequences, and both are very real possibility’s.

SPP215 (Part 1) Nukes, National Debt and North Korea

This weeks show turned out to be a long one, so we split it into 2 parts. This week we talked mainly about how seriously we should take the North Korea threat, and the affects an EMP might have on us. At the end, Lisa went off a little bit talking about secret space programs, and what might be out there.

In next weeks show, Lisa and I will be talking about our national debt, and how it seems like there is a silent coup to unseat a duly elected president. Both of these could have serious long, and short term consequences that could turn our lives upside down.

The North Korea Threat

With all the big talk coming from Kim Jong-un’s pie hole these days, it’s hard to figure out what he could actually do, and how much we should be concerned. Couple that with our media’s propensity to over hype everything, It’s almost impossible to figure out what’s really going on.

The Media Hype Machine

These days, reporting the news is secondary to getting ratings. And getting ratings sometimes means creating news, or spinning news to make it interesting to their audience. This is true on both sides of the isle.

I’m not saying we should just ignore what is going on, it’s our responsibility to be prepared regardless. It’s important that we think with a level head, and not take everything the media says as fact.

Remember the Scud?

I hesitate to not give this the credit it deserves, but this North Korea situation reminds me of the Iraq war, and those feared scud missiles. In the days and weeks leading up to the Iraq war, we heard the same rhetoric, and heard the same media hype. We all know how that turned out.

The difference that has me concerned is that we are not talking about scud missiles, we’re talking about nuclear weapons. A nuclear war head launched for North Korea may not hit it’s target, but it will land somewhere.

False Flag and Distraction?

2 questions I always ask myself when something like this happens are, is this being hyped for a reason? And what are they distracting us from? In the show Lisa mentioned the latest Bilderberg meeting, and how they were discussing “population Control.”

I don’t get too deep into the tinfoil hat stuff, but when a bunch of rich people get together to decide our fate, or decide what is best for us, I get a little concerned. There is no better way of decreasing the population than WW3.

While opinions differ on whether or not WW2 ended the great depression, the timing is hard to ignore. My fear is that if the economy went into the tank, they would use that as an excuse or false flag event. History has shown that human life is secondary to the elites maintaining their power.

The Possibility of WW3

Any situation like North Korea makes me think about things escalating into WW3. While I don’t think this is likely, because they wouldn’t have many allies, it is a possibility. A conflict between North Korea, Iran, Russia and even China could be the catalyst to WW3.

The chain of events surrounding WW1 & 2 started with Austria and Serbia. Serbia was an ally with Russia, and Austria with Germany. Hitler’s rise to power was a direct result of WW1, and his promises to rebuild Germany.

Hitler and Kim Jong-un have very few similarities. Hitler was charismatic, a great speaker and lied to his people to get their buy in, while Kim Jong-un cares only about his survival. My point is, we never know what the catalyst for WW3 will be until we have the hindsight of history to layout the timeline for us.

The Bigger Picture

WW3 would look a lot different that WW1 and 2 because the weapons and tactics are so different. Nuclear weapons and ICBM’s (Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles) have changed the game.

The only time we have had enemy troops on U.S. soil was way back in the 1700’s when we kicked England out. While it would still be difficult for an enemy to get boots on the ground in the U.S., nuclear weapons mean they can bring war to our front door step.

The EMP Threat

I am not going to go into too much detail about preparing for an EMP because I have written extensively about it in the past. This article here explains how devastation an EMP could be, and this article goes over some of the precautions you should take.

There is no real consensus on what an EMP would actually do, but we can get an idea from the Carrington Event, which was a CME (Coronal Mass Ejection) which causes the same type of damage.

Will cars be affected? Will our electronics be affected? Will the power grid be affected? All of these are questions that can’t be definitively answered because there are too many variables. Just like anything with preparedness, it’s best to prepare for the worst, and hope for the best.

Stepping Up My Game…

So what have we been doing differently? And how has our preparedness change? We haven’t exactly put our preparedness plans into overdrive, but we are making sure we are as prepared as we can be. At times like these, we can’t afford to take a week off.

We have purchased some extra long tern food storage, fuel, and increased our water storage, because regardless how likely, or unlikely a situation is, we want to be ready. I am also setting up a couple of trashcan Faraday cages, and making sure the family knows what to do in the case of an EMP or nuclear attack.

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To bray and to act no different!

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To bray and to act no different! James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio player below! I haven’t seen such weakness in a long time. The faces carrying the torches were among the saddest and most predictable creatures I have seen in all of America. The same type that would bray about ISIS but they looked … Continue reading To bray and to act no different!

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