How To Survive On Freeze-Dried Vegetables

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Have you often wondered if you could survive on freeze-dried vegetables? Do you sometimes wonder how do they taste? What do they look like? Here’s the deal, with freeze-dried foods you can literally eat most of the vegetables right out of the can. Be sure and get a good can opener, friendly reminder. Yep, we need to be able to open those #10 cans. I think I have ten can openers stashed throughout my emergency preparedness stockpile. If you can cook from scratch you can cook with any of the freeze-dried vegetables. You don’t need a special food storage cookbook because these vegetables are just vegetables with the water removed. Dehydrated foods must be cooked, but I will talk about them another day. You don’t need a special cookbook for them either.

You can throw the freeze-dried vegetables in any soup base if you have rehydrated them with tepid water, you just drain them and add to your pot of soup. They cook faster than dehydrated vegetables, so therefore, we would use less power or zero power if we ate them directly from the can. If you are using a water-based soup you can just throw the veggies into the soup without having to rehydrate them in water first. If you use a cream-based soup you will want to rehydrate them or the soup may become too thick. Either way, they are easy to use and taste as close to fresh vegetables as you can imagine once we rehydrate them. They taste a lot better than canned vegetables, plus, the variety is endless.

Let’s be honest here, they are not exactly the same as fresh vegetables, but they taste great! Let me give you some ideas on the different ones I have and use regularly. The fabulous part about these is the fact we don’t have to wash the vegetables, cut, chop or slice them! Plus the companies like Augason Farms, Thrive Live and Honeyville freeze-dried vegetables have a shelf life of 20-25 years unopened in optimal storage conditions. Please do not store any food storage in your hot garage. I only store my food storage in my home, and it’s a small home.

My favorite soup bases:

Here again, you can always make it from scratch, but if I have to feed 30 people dinner after a disaster, I want a soup base that tastes good and I just have to add water and heat them through, and then add the veggies. This is one of my favorite soup bases, do I like all the ingredients in them, no, but beggars can’t be choosers after a disaster. One of the reasons I like to buy soup bases even though they have a short shelf life (5-8 years) is the fact I just have to add water and not use my dried butter or instant milk. The freeze-dried vegetables only have the vegetables in the cans, nothing else added in the brands I buy.

Augason Farms Beef Flavored Soup Base or Augason Farms Cream of Potato Soup Base

I have seen Augason Farms soups online and at Walmart in the food storage sections. All you do is add water and some vegetables and cook the soup.

Freeze-dried vegetables for soup:

The freeze-dried vegetables only have the vegetables in the cans, no other ingredients added in the brands I buy.

Pros to freeze-dried vegetables:

they have a long shelf-life, typically 20-30 years, depending on the temperature of the room where they are stored. You can eat them directly out of the can. They cook up faster than dehydrated veggies. They will use less fuel to cook.

Cons to freeze-dried vegetables:

they cost more than dehydrated ones, some people say are too expensive. I look at it this way, they use less fuel and last longer on my shelves.

My favorite freeze-dried vegetables:

Broccoli:

They are great for soups, omelets, and casseroles

Corn:

Kids love to eat this corn right out of the can, great as a side dish, in a soup, and in stews

Cauliflower:

They are fabulous in soups, you can make a skinny pizza crust with them, too

Celery:

I use these almost daily in stir fry dishes, soups, casseroles, and in stews

Green beans:

These taste great right out of the can, in casseroles, soups, as a side dish, great in stir fry dishes

Green bell peppers:

These are great in casseroles, soups, stews or omelets

Green peas:

They taste great right out of the can, great with creamed chip beef on toast or biscuits, great as a side dish

Green onions:

I use these all the time, in my homemade salad dressings and any casserole that calls for green onions

Mushroom pieces:

The first thing that comes to my mind is pizza, casseroles, mushroom soup, omelets

Onions (chopped):

I use these every day, in stir fry dishes, soups, casseroles, omelets

Potatoes (diced):

These are great fried in butter as a side dish, in soups, casseroles, cheesy potatoes and stews

Red Bell peppers:

These are great in casseroles, soups, stews or omelets

Spinach:

I don’t care for cooked spinach, but I use this in my spinach dip on the back of the Knorr’s Vegetable soup box.

Tomatoes diced:

These can be used in any omelet, casserole, soup, stew or salad dressing

I hope this gives you some ideas on how to use freeze-dried vegetables in your kitchen. I don’t use all my freeze-dried vegetables every day, but the ones I use the most are, onions, celery, green onions, green bell peppers, and red bell peppers. When I buy these they last longer than fresh and it keeps me out of the store, which I think saves me money in the long run since I’m not tempted to buy stuff at the store while there.

I’m surprised how much the cost of all food storage continues to escalate, but we don’t want to be dependent on others after a disaster. Please buy one #10 can a month, or more often, as your budget allows. May God bless our country and world at this time. I see some rough times coming and I want all of us to be prepared for the unexpected.

Dinner rolls by Linda

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