5 DIY Chicken Tractors That Will Revolutionize Your Homestead

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5 DIY Chicken Tractors That Will Revolutionize Your Homestead

When it comes to housing poultry, your options are truly limited only by your imagination. Most poultry, chickens especially, are hardy and readily adapt to a variety of housing setups.

All coops will fall into two major categories: the permanent structure or the tractor. By definition, a chicken tractor is any bottomless pen or cage that can be moved from one area to another. This allows the poultry to eat things on the ground, such as vegetation and bugs, while still keeping them contained. Chicken tractors may have wheels or skids to be pulled along the ground, and are an excellent alternative to free-ranging if you live in an urban/suburban setting or an area with a large number of predators.

There are several good reasons to think about adding a chicken tractor to your homestead. Here are a few of the best reasons:

  • Allowing the birds ground access cuts feed costs. Every blade of grass and every grasshopper is just that much less feed you must provide.
  • Droppings fertilize the ground. Just remember to move your pen often enough to prevent manure build-up.
  • Saves on gas for the mower. We spent an entire summer moving bird pens around one one-acre section of lawn at our last house. We used three tractors and mowed the whole thing twice in six months.
  • Tractors can be moved to new property or sold if you don’t need it anymore. This is not always the case with a permanent structure.
  • No ugly, bare chicken run.

Tractors can be made of just about anything. On our homestead, we have used five different styles, and all of them were made from recycled/upcycled materials. To inspire your own chicken tractor ideas, let’s look at the ones we have used.

The Cattle Panel Hoop

This was our first design for tractors, and is the one we still prefer. We’ve made them in 8-foot and 12-foot lengths, with an 8-foot width. We have housed everything in them, from chickens to ducks, geese, turkeys and yes, even a goat or two. The premise is fairly simple. It’s just a framework with cattle panels bent from one side to the other to create a tunnel, ends finished with plywood or netting, and a tarp over the top for a roof.

Discover More Than 1,000 Off-Grid-Living Tricks!

Hoops are fairly quick and easy to create, and I have built quite a few in just a couple of hours. They are lightweight enough that one person, attaching a rope from one skid to the other, can move it. They also can be moved quite easily with a quad or even a riding lawnmower.

There are a few things to consider before using this style of pen. Strong winds can move or even flip them over. Additionally, because of the raised cross pieces, small predators such as skunks, weasels and even smaller raccoons are more likely to try and get into the pen.

The Upcycled Dog House

We had an acquaintance contact us about a doghouse they needed to get rid of as they were planning a move. It was a cute little thing, and had actually been used as a house for ducks. We built a skid framework, added a floor and mounted the house on skids, then added a simple run along the front. I did a little work to the roof, added a nest box and perch, plus built a new closing door and cut a smaller door to the run. I had the whole project done in just a few hours, and we’ve used it successfully for two years.

My biggest regret with this one is simply that I didn’t put a door into the run for us! This has been inconvenient on the two occasions that the birds have managed to get their feed bowls outside. Fortunately, it is lightweight enough to be lifted fairly easily.

The Little Red Coop and The White Hen House

The next two tractors we built were made from a couple of small hen houses we picked up off of Craigslist for next to nothing. The Red Coop had a detachable yard made left over interior house trim and covered with rusty pieces of assorted wire. The White Hen House had a lovely set of yard panels that were only two-feet tall so the chickens kept hopping over the panels and destroying the owner’s garden! Both of these little coops were made to be permanent structures.

Essentially, we did the same thing as with the Dog House. We built a skid system and just mounted the houses on the skids, then built a yard. I was fortunate with the White Hen House that when arranged carefully, the yard pieces actually made a contained box! With some hinges added to the top panels and a hook to close it, the yard is accessible if we need to open it up for any reason. With the Red Coop, I made the same mistake as with the Dog House and didn’t add a door to the run for us to be able to access it. Again, the pen is very light and can be lifted up if we need in it.

The Shipping Crate House

This is by far the heaviest of the houses we’ve built, and it’s the only chicken tractor that cannot be moved by hand.

The house frame itself is made of a shipping crate that was used to send in a special order tub surround. Basically, we just added some OSB scrap to make a floor, sided it with leftover plywood siding, built a roof and a nest box and cut in a couple doors. The whole thing is mounted on skids, and the yard is made of PVC pipe with some used plastic chicken netting attached to it via zip ties.

The roof doesn’t have much pitch, but was built to be strong. We’ve had a foot of snow on it and never a problem!

The faults with this pen are pretty minimal, the biggest being the weight. As with some of the other pens, I do wish I had added a door to the run. I’m also not sure I would use the plastic netting again, as it does rip after three summers in the sun, and will most likely need to be redone in the next year.

Final Thoughts

The options for building tractors really are endless. I have seen some very ingenious ideas on Google and other sites using old swing-set frames, units made entirely of PVC and wire, and even out of an old lawn cart. With the versatility of these great pens and the benefits they provide to the small homestead, we are sure you’ll want to add one or two of these to your own setup.

Do you have any unique chicken tractor ideas? Share your tips in the section below:

Stockpiling for Survival Gardening: 7 Things You Better Store

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Stockpiling for Survival Gardening: 7 Things You Better Store

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If a major disaster were to happen which shut down the food supply chain, I think we’d suddenly find ourselves motivated to make the most of our gardens — and that would start with making our gardens the most that they can be. In other words, turning our entire backyard into a garden.

There’s a difference though, between needing to do something and being ready to do it. Just because we’re going to be motivated to turn our backyards into a huge vegetable garden, doesn’t mean that we’re going to be ready to do so. That transformation is going to take a lot of work and we’re going to need a lot of supplies. If we don’t have them, we’re not going to accomplish much.

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So, what are we going to need to turn our little gardens into a much more massive operation?

1. Good Soil

The average home isn’t built on land with outstanding soil, and developers don’t bother bringing in the best topsoil they can find. That’s your job, if you want it. Of course, bringing in enough topsoil to go over your entire backyard and turn it into an excellent garden is a major job, as well as being pretty costly. So, this is something that we will probably avoid. But we should consider what our soil might need to make it better for our gardening (see below). Then we should make sure we have a good stock of it on hand, either piled up in a corner of our yard, or spread across the lawn for the grass to enjoy.

2. Gasoline (if you till) 

That not only means having a rototiller sitting in your garden shed, but enough gasoline to run it for a good long while. Gasoline is hard to store, even if you buy the extenders that are available on the market. But if you only store it for a few months, then burn it in your car, it’s not a problem. Then all you have to do is take your gas cans back to the corner station to refill them.

3. Fertilizers

I like to keep things as natural as I can in my garden. That means that most of the time, I prefer to use fish emulsion and compost, both of which you can make yourself. Fish emulsion is probably one of the best fertilizers out there, as it contains all the key nutrients your garden needs. Compost is a great way to make use of the parts of the plants you don’t use, returning the nutrients back to the soil.

4. Edging for raised beds

I’m a firm believer in raised garden beds, as they are much more efficient and will usually result in greater yields, with less wasted seed. Therefore, my garden is all raised beds. But expanding that to fill my whole back yard? That’s going to take a lot of material.

Fortunately, you can use just about anything to edge a raised bed. My stockpile for this is actually a stack of salvaged wood, which came from a number of different places. While not pretty, it was free and will give me a start on getting my new beds in place. I’ll probably have to replace it a couple of years later, as it rots, but that’s something I can think of when the time comes.

5. Means of watering

Everyone thinks that water will be at a premium in the wake of a disaster. This means that watering your garden is going to be a challenge, unless you live in an area where it rains enough to eliminate the need for watering. I don’t happen to live in such a place.

Since there will be no water pressure, sprinklers won’t work at all; so that plan is out. Besides, sprinklers are notoriously wasteful of water, something that you’ll want to avoid. Your best bet is to either use underground soaker hoses or drip sprinklers. Run off a small pump, these will provide water directly to your plants, without wasting any.

Interestingly enough, drip irrigation was developed by the Israelis, who needed something that could be used in a desert environment. Since most of Israel’s water comes from seawater desalination, they can’t afford to waste it, spraying it into the air. Drip irrigation allows them to put the water right where it’s needed, getting the most out of it.

6. Insecticides (organic preferably) 

The last thing you’ll need to see happening to your garden is insects eating it up, destroying all your hard work and denying your family the food it needs. So you’d better have a good stock of insecticides on hand.

While I seriously doubt that there will be a run on your local garden center after a disaster hits, there won’t be any more shipments, restocking them. So what you stock will be all that you have. So it would be a good idea to find natural recipes for your own insecticides, as well.

7. Seeds, lots of seeds

It’s going to take a huge amount of seed to get your garden going in a large scale like that. So you’ll need to stock up heavily on seed. I recommended making a drawing of your garden earlier. This is the other purpose for it. You can use that drawing to plan what you’re going to plant where, and figure out how much seed you’ll need.

Buy only heirloom seeds for your survival garden, as they are the only ones which will allow you to harvest the seeds and replant the next year. GMOs and hybrids won’t give you seeds that will produce the same plants. Freezing your seed allows it to keep longer, so that you won’t lose that investment while waiting until you need it.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

I Store My Home-Defense Guns In 5 Different Rooms. Here’s Why.

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I Store My Home-Defense Guns In 5 Different Rooms. Here’s Why.

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While I may be a bit over the top with my home defense preparation, I would rather be way overprepared than underprepared.

I’ve put a lot of thought into where weapons should be placed throughout my house. Each one is in a very specific location, and serves its own distinct purpose. The way that I have placed my weapons was based on a few different threat levels that I assessed. All total, I store weapons in five rooms.

The first threat level that I considered was an immediate threat. To me, an immediate threat constitutes someone actively breaking into my house. In this situation, I would like a firearm easily accessible and ready to rock. The most important weapon that I consider to be used against an immediate threat is a shotgun in the bedroom. My reasoning: I view the most dangerous situation to be someone breaking into my house in the middle of the night. I generally still have my daily carry weapon in my nightstand, so it’s easy to grab on the way out the door, but a shotgun permanently lives on the wall above my nightstand in a custom concealed weapon case. The reason that I decided to go with a shotgun in the bedroom is that I’m a pretty heavy sleeper, and in the event that someone is actively breaking into my house, I like the point-and-shoot ease-of-use of a shotgun.

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The next weapons that I considered for use against an immediate threat are handguns in the rooms that I am most frequently in. For this reason, I’ve got a revolver tucked away in my living room and in my kitchen. Similar to my shotgun, these are all concealed in some type of box or case that is easy to open.

To me, a secondary threat constitutes someone lingering suspiciously around my house or poking around my vehicles too much. It’s a situation where I’m not planning on immediately engaging a threat, but I’m getting the feeling that something is wrong and I want to be ready in the event the unpredictable happens. For a secondary threat, I want a handgun with a higher ammunition capacity near the back door and the garage door of my house, so that I can easily grab it and throw it in a sweatshirt pocket or the waist of my pants to see what’s going on. These are concealed in boxes on shelves.

The last threat level that I considered is the extremely unlikely chance that I’m engaged in some type of firefight or a gunfight that moves out of the house. To me, these are the kind of weapons that can be tucked away in a closet or in a safe, because it’s unnecessary for me to have them immediately accessible. In my situation, I have my AR-15 with three loaded magazines in my closet.

Lastly, I will touch on safety. A headline we see all too frequently involves young children getting a parent’s weapon and accidentally harming or killing someone – perhaps themselves. Since I don’t have any children, I have absolutely no qualms leaving my weapons completely ready to go. Every single weapon in my house has a round in the chamber, with the exception of the AR, as I don’t classify that threat level as requiring immediate action. However, as soon as I do have kids, things will be different. I’ll still keep the magazines loaded, but I will refrain from keeping a round in the chamber. A habit that I will have to break is simply leaving my daily carry weapon on my nightstand. I also will have to make sure all of my weapons are up high and even locked away where a young child can’t reach.

Like I said, I am probably over the top on home defense, but I feel that being overprepared is far superior to being underprepared. My biggest concern when it comes to home defense is being adequately prepared to engage any threat that may face me or my family.

Where do you keep your guns in your home? And if you have children, how do you keep your weapons out of reach? Share your home-defense tips in the section below:  

Horseradish: The 1800s Sinus Remedy That Still Works Today

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Horseradish: The 1800s Sinus Remedy That Still Works Today

Sinus headache giving you the summertime blues? Instead of taking another aspirin or ibuprofen tablet, dig into the garden for a popular old-timer’s cure: horseradish.

Horseradish, or Cochlearia armoracia, is a bitter vegetable that has been around for hundreds of years. It’s believed to have originated somewhere in eastern Europe as a medicine, and then emerged as a popular condiment. As a sinus pressure treatment, it is highly effective for both its anti-inflammatory and antibiotic properties. It has a high volume of sulfur, which creates its pungent, powerful taste.

Because the plant can be grown virtually anywhere (it is not impacted by the cold and can be harvested for several years after an initial planting), it’s a smart choice for frequent sinus pain sufferers. Horseradish is a perennial plant that is hardy in zones 2-9, but it can be grown as an annual in other climates where it doesn’t get cold enough for the plant to achieve winter dormancy. It is easy to grow and proliferates wildly, making it a great choice for a gardener looking for a low-maintenance plant.

Get All-Natural Headache Relief With No Nasty Side Effects!

Although horseradish was commonly used in the 1800s and early 1900s, it gradually faded from common use as it was been replaced by various pharmaceutical drugs. However, unlike the vast majority of prescription or over-the-counter treatments, horseradish has no side effects and tastes significantly better than your average decongestant syrup! In fact, studies have even proven that horseradish is just as effective as most chemical antibiotics (and sometimes even more so).

It can be used in a variety of ways. Take a half teaspoon of freshly grated horseradish root and hold it in your mouth for several minutes. This will help to cut the mucus in the sinuses and to allow them to drain down your throat. This treatment also works well for coughs, asthma and various allergies, such as hay fever. It serves as a general expectorant, meaning that any respiratory congestion or breathing difficulty can be improved or eliminated with the use of this powerful herb.

Fresh or grated horseradish can also be placed in a bowl with several cups of hot water. Hold your head over the bowl and place a towel over your head. Be sure to close your eyes, and inhale the steam from the dish until your sinus congestion begins to loosen. This remedy works best in the early stages of sinus infection or colds, but provides no side-effects or medical hazards.

Horseradish also has diuretic properties that can be used to treat kidney stones, bladder infections, and urinary tract problems. It helps stimulate the flow of urine and can be safely used for long-term treatment of these problems. To use, mix four tablespoons of grated root and combine it with your favorite beverage to decrease the intensity of the flavor. Using horseradish in this way also can improve digestion processes and overall health.

It should be noted that fresh horseradish always works best at treating these conditions, as it loses potency as it sits over time or is cooked. Horseradish provides many medical benefits when eaten raw as part of any culinary dish, too; add it to your wasabi or cocktail sauce for an extra nutritive kick! You’ll begin to feel the health benefits almost immediately.

Have you ever used horseradish medicinally? Share your tips on it in the section below:

What Did You Do To Prepare This Week? Ammo Cans and BOB Reorganization

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It was a pretty good week here in preparedness. Jiu Jitsu, PT and dry fire were good.

I got a deal on a bunch of ammo cans I have been sorely needing. Had a couple cases of 5.56 and some various other ammo that needed to get properly stored in cans. I had to dig around to find it all. Still fairly certain there is a case or two floating around somewhere that needs to go into cans but oh well.

Today I reorganized my bug out bag and assault pack. I worked on this recently. The resulting bag was good but the overall plan somewhat lacking. For most of my local situations I do not need a full up BOB. Having a full up 40 LB ish BOB to get me a few miles home is unnecessary and even counter productive. I need some of that stuff though.

Often survivalists end up with 2 totally separate systems. A get home bag and a bug out bag. I wasn’t in love with this idea. Basically it leaves you with 2 really redundant systems. Also the BOB really needs an assault pack anyway.

The idea I had was to shift items between the BOB and Assault Bag to make it so each is useful on its own. We want redundancy in essential items anyway right? So putting one item in one bag and another in the other leaves you with 2 relatively useful kits.

I rebalanced my BOB to 2 bags. Both come in around 20 pounds so 40 total. I will likely add a few things to the BOB since it has space now but the whole thing staying well under 50 total is very realistic.

There is some playing to do between them still and I can use a few more things. Specifically I can use another sawyer water filter, a flashlight and another poncho (my last one went into a cache). Also I wish I could find my darn Ontario Rat 3 knife an the pouch it is on.

Generally I am happy with this set up. Once I get it fully sorted out maybe I’ll take pictures and do an inventory. Fundamentally though I think the plan is a winner.

What did you do to prepare this week?

Europe must ‘wake up’ to ‘clash of civilizations’ – Polish minister after Catalonia attacks

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See:  https://www.rt.com/news/400207-europe-clash-civilizations-poland/ Previously, I have written that it won’t be the first time Western Europe has allowed itself to be overrun my Islam and just as before, it will be

Civil War, EMP, or Cyberattack-Judgement is Coming Upon America- Part 2

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This is Part 2 of my  guest appearance on the Prepper Website Podcast  with Todd Sepulveda. We talked about the threat of EMP, Civil War, and Cyberattack, We also discussed the fact that while Republicans control the House, Senate, and Oval Office, no talk of overturning Roe vs Wade is coming from Washington. If America allows this opportunity to pass us by, the judgement we deserve is ten fold what it should have been during the Obama administration when our hands were tied.

Since the EMP, Danny Walker’s compound has survived waves of violence and the death of many key members. When Danny gets an unexpected piece of news, he pledges to put an end to the persistent threat in Charlotte. He will kill Regent Schlusser and shut down his consortium of depravity, or he will die trying. Get your copy of Seven Cows, Ugly and Gaunt; Book Four: Vengeance today!

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The post Civil War, EMP, or Cyberattack-Judgement is Coming Upon America- Part 2 appeared first on Prepper Recon.

Water Storage Tips and Techniques

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I typically store my water off of the ground, whether it be in the basement or garage.  The main reason I do so (no matter the type of actual storage device) is primarly to avert the leaching process: concrete to plastic to water.  If you search the internet there is no shortage of folks who believe in mitigating the leaching process and others who say it’s not true, in any event it doesn’t take much to elevate storage containers off of the ground like so.

Method 1: Wood.

I like to cut 2×4’s for my large 55 gallon drum containers, usually 4 per container.  The wood is obviously very sturdy and helps to distribute the weight of the drum which can come in around 380 lbs (each).

Method 2:  Foam Boards.

Local big box improvement stores have foam project boards which can be purchased for cheap, I use these primarily for water bottles, jugs and water bricks.  Truth be told there could be chemicals leaching from the foam boards into the chemicals from the plastic into the water, I try to mitigate all of this by simply cycling through my water storage supply.

I recently had an experience which made me very thankful that my items were up off of the ground.  We had a clog in our septic system which resulted in a backup and rather disgusting overflow in our garage.  While it flowed out of the garage and into the rocks outside it passed right under my water storage.  All of the items which held the water bottles / jugs etc became rather soaked with the nasty liquid but the bottles remained unscathed.  I was able to toss out all of the nasty stuff, clean the floor up with bleach and put the storage items back in place.

If I had to wager a guess I probably have around 600 gallons of water stored on site, while I do have a well if the power goes out and the generator runs out of fuel we’re screwed.  I cycle through my water and also protect it by keeping it up off of the ground using two methods.  Think about this when you address your own storage needs.

For more tips on food and water storage for emergencies check out the FEMA website here.

 

Feeding People in the Era of Corporate Farming

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This post is part my wandering thought process about food production/distribution during a large-scale societal collapse and part a request for feedback/ideas. This is one of the benefits of writing to an audience such as this – free advice. I’m generally more of an opinion and thought-based writer than I am an advice-giving writer. For. . . Read More

Feeding People in the Era of Corporate Farming

This post is part my wandering thought process about food production/distribution during a large-scale societal collapse and part a request for feedback/ideas. This is one of the benefits of writing to an audience such as this – free advice. I’m generally more of an opinion and thought-based writer than I am an advice-giving writer. For. . . Read More

Feeding People in the Era of Corporate Farming

This post is part my wandering thought process about food production/distribution during a large-scale societal collapse and part a request for feedback/ideas. This is one of the benefits of writing to an audience such as this – free advice. I’m generally more of an opinion and thought-based writer than I am an advice-giving writer. For. . . Read More

Gold & Silver Update (2017-8-20)

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Americans have been living under the illusion consumption produces jobs. And the financial sector has been artificially inflated. Dr. Jim Willie reveals the United States is seeing the climax of collapse of the financial sector and consumer economy. Also in this interview, Willie reveals the Chinese are working on a major deal to pay for crude oil in Yuan. Other countries are moving away from the Dollar. He predicts the Dollar won’t collapse. Instead, it will rise, then simply vanish.   Sponsored in part by SDBullion.com

The post Gold & Silver Update (2017-8-20) appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Vehicle Key Safe

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Vehicle Key Safe There are a number of reasons why I am bringing this build to you. It has a video which is not that common for these types of builds but that’s not the only reason. The key safe is a very important piece of security for your daily life and that is just …

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The post Vehicle Key Safe appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Our Basic Sanitation and Hygiene Preps

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Our Basic Sanitation and Hygiene Preps Any article that offers up an outlook on the idea of sanitation and hygiene after the collapse is an important one. This is going to be a killer in the fallen world. I see a lot of videos and articles about the many things that will kill preppers. The …

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The post Our Basic Sanitation and Hygiene Preps appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

The Easiest Animals to Hunt for Meat When the SHTF

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The Easiest Animals to Hunt for Meat When the SHTF Do you want to know what are the possible options to hunt for meat when the SHTF? No? Here I am going to introduce you with the best possible solution out there! But before I start, you will be wondering who I am? And why … Continue reading The Easiest Animals to Hunt for Meat When the SHTF

The post The Easiest Animals to Hunt for Meat When the SHTF appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

The Easiest Animals to Hunt for Meat When the SHTF

The Easiest Animals to Hunt for Meat When the SHTF Do you want to know what are the possible options to hunt for meat when the SHTF? No? Here I am going to introduce you with the best possible solution out there! But before I start, you will be wondering who I am? And why … Continue reading The Easiest Animals to Hunt for Meat When the SHTF

The post The Easiest Animals to Hunt for Meat When the SHTF appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Planting A Fall Garden Cover Crop – An Inexpensive Way To An Incredible Garden!

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Without a bit of hesitation, I can tell you our fall garden cover crop is the single most important factor in the overall success of our garden every single year. It simply delivers on so many levels! Want more fertile

The post Planting A Fall Garden Cover Crop – An Inexpensive Way To An Incredible Garden! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

10 Essentials For Surviving In The Wilderness At Night

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You are convinced that it could never happen to you, don’t you? But there is no escaping the fact that you might be stuck out in the wilderness at night.

If you have no experience with camping, or have spent little time in the woods, this can be a frightening and dangerous experience.

Even if you are completely alone, knowing how to do these ten things can keep you safe and in good condition.

If you ever have to survive some sort of disaster and decide to stay in a wooded area, you will be much closer to being able to stay in this setting for weeks, or even months if needed.

Be Mentally and Emotionally Prepared

You emotional and mental preparedness for surviving in the wild should start before you find yourself in the woods and have to face the experience.

Remember, nature is not your enemy. The woods and its inhabitants usually kill or maim only in the course of trying to survive, defend themselves from predators, and raise their young. As long as you do not interfere, you can live comfortably in the woods regardless of the time of day.

If you are reading this and know nothing of living in or traveling through the wilderness, start learning from now. Read articles, go camping with experienced groups of people, and do all you can to gather factual and accurate information on how to live in the woods and understand its inhabitants.

The more you know about living in these conditions, the less you will fear them. The less fear you have, the easier it will be to go about taking care of basic needs if you must stay in a wilderness setting at night.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Maintain Appropriate Body Temperature

As with any other place, temperatures are apt to drop at night. If you did not bring extra clothing, or the right kinds of clothes, you will need to find some other way to keep warm. Here are a few things that can save you:

Plastic Bags

Always keep a construction grade plastic bag with you, it will be large enough to line with leaves or other insulating material to sleep in.

Remember to leave some room open even around your body so that sweat evaporates properly and air continues to circulate around your skin. In extreme cold temperatures, moisture near your skin can cause your core temperature to drop to dangerous levels.

Build a Fire

Learn how to build a fire safely and effectively, including how to build a fire in the rain. Pack a tea light, and remember to search for pine cones. Both will make excellent tinder material.

Don’t forget to bring along a fire starter such as waterproof matches or some other type of fire starter that you feel comfortable with.

Cover Yourself with Leaves

As long as the leaves aren’t damp and are free of bugs, mold, and mildew, they will keep you warmer than not covering with anything at all.

Find and Purify Water to Stay Hydrated

Maybe you aren’t lost, and still expect to arrive back in a populated area in a few hours. Even though you may not think much about water, it is still need it on hand and to stay hydrated all the time.

When you are stressed out, engaging in more intense physical activities, or dealing with increased temperature changes, your body will release more sweat, and also use more water for other vital processes.

So you need clean water on hand and use it when you are trying to survive in the wilderness especially if overnight. Ideally, you should be able to purify at least ½ to one gallon of water for your overnight needs.

Here are some things you can keep with you as well as skills to develop:

  • Know how to capture water from leaves, earth, and rainfall.
  • Keep a long tube sock, bone char, some sand, and activated carbon in your travel gear at all times. You can use them to make a filter to remove chemical contaminants and debris from the water. It is also important to have some kind of vessel to boil the water in so that you can kill off any pathogens that may be in the water.
  • There are also filtering water straws available that come with a complete water cleaning system. Just make sure you drink through the straws, and you will have clean water.
  • Carry water purifying tablets. Be sure to always know the limitations of these tablets so that you can use other systems if needed.
  • Learn how to make charcoal and bone char.
  • Contrary to popular belief, boiling water alone will not produce clean water. It will only concentrate heavy metals and other poisons, making the water more dangerous to drink. If you are concerned about removing pathogens from the water, it is better to put the water in a clear plastic bottle and let it sit in the sun for a few hours. UV from the sun will kill the pathogens without causing water to evaporate.

Obtain Food

You might be too stressed to eat, but it have to know how to get food in the wilderness during the night hours. Since many animals are more active at night, you can try hunting them, or set traps.

If you happen to be near a pond, you can set traps for fish, or try to hunt for frogs.

When hunting at night, always be aware that the animals you are hunting may also be prey for another animal in the woods. That animal, in turn, may decide you are competition and hunt you instead.

Before you go into any wilderness setting, always know how the local food chain works so that you can steer clear of predators and still take the game you need for survival.

As with any other time of day, lichens, moss, berries, and fruit will still be available. Learn the Universal edibility test, and practice using it so that you can avoid being poisoned.

If you decide to carry food with you, choose high calorie items that do not require heating. You can also bring along a few ready to eat meals that come with warming packets if you want a more complete meal. Even if you only have enough packets to last for two or three days, it will be enough until you are able to gather food on your own.

Shelter From Storms, Wind, and Other Bad Weather

Aside from being colder, you may also wind up dealing with rain, wind, or other weather elements that you will not want to be out in.

As long as you have a knife (or a sharp edge on a rock) branches, vines (or long stemmed plants), leaves available you can make a shelter that will keep you dry and warm.

Here are some other things you can try:

Look for a Cave

Caves offer plenty of protection, however they are also likely to be dens for bats, bears, and other animals that won’t want you spending the night with them.

If you do decide to spend the night in a cave, make sure you check all passages and all areas of the cave to make sure you aren’t taking up space in another animal’s territory. This includes snakes, spiders, and other animals that can hide easily under rocks and in shaded areas that you might overlook.

Dig a Hole in the Ground

Dig a small hole or depression in the ground, and then put leaves over it. Try to build up the sides a bit to prevent rain from flowing in. This makeshift shelter will not last more than a few hours, but it will get you through the night.

Tree Trunk Protection

Look for a hollow in a tree trunk, or at the base of an uprooted tree. These areas will shelter you from the wind and rain, depending on the direction it is coming from.

As with caves, make sure there are no animals and insects already living there that might cause you problems. In this case, you would be looking for squirrels, raccoon, snakes, and biting insects known to live in or near rotting wood or in tree trunks.

Discourage Predatory Animals and Prevent Insect Bites

For the most part, if you know how to build a fire and can keep it going through the night, predatory animals will stay away from you.

On the other side the equation, many insects are drawn to light, and will gravitate to the fire. You will need to experiment to find the best distance from the fire to avoid falling outside its light, be close enough to stay warm, and still not be swarmed by insects (that will be killed off eventually by the flames).

Insofar as discouraging predatory animals, you will need to know which ones are usually in the area, and also how best to deter them if they appear. Some animals may run away if you yell, while others may decide to attack. A good understanding of animal psychology is essential.

In order to prevent insect bites at night, your best option will be to wear long sleeved shirts and pants. Make sure that all cuffs are sealed off with rubber bands and that the hems of your pants are also tucked into your socks.

To protect your face and neck from insect bites, take a wide brimmed hat and attach some fine webbed fabric over it. Let the fabric drape down to just below your neck, and then make sure it seals to your shirt. Do not put the fabric too close to your face or neck, or the insects will just find a way to bite through it.

Manage Hygiene and Sanitation

Even though you can washing your hands and face with wet wipes, it never hurts to carry a small bar of lye soap and some towels with you.

In particular, if you are spending the night in the woods because of a nuclear disaster, you will need the lye soap for washing off any dust or debris from your skin.

Managing sanitation is also very important because predators can find your urine and stool even if you bury them. Make sure you stay away from areas where water and food are likely to be found, as predators will check there first for prey.

Take Care of Routine and Emergency Medical Needs

Even if you don’t have any injuries, or don’t feel sick, it is still important to know what to do and have some tools on hand. Here are some things you should carry and skills you should learn:

  • know the signs of food poisoning or allergy. Keep Benadryl with you and an epi pen. If you suspect you ate something poisonous, make sure you know how to vomit it back out if it is still in your stomach, or use activated charcoal to try and absorb it and move it out of your system.
  • Always know how to make a tourniquet, splints, and wraps for joint support.
  • Keep essential oils, herbs, and at least a week’s supply of any medications you may be taking onhand. It also never hurts to know what plants in the woods might be useful for taking the place of your medications if the need arises.
  • Know how to perform the Heimlich maneuver on yourself, just in case you are alone and swallow something the wrong way.
  • Understand water safety and know how to build a flotation device so that you don’t wind up drowning.

Be Able to Signal for Help

If you were traveling, got lost, and left travel plans, there is a chance searchers will be looking for you. Depending on the weather conditions, rescuers may or may not try to look for you at night. If you built a fire (use a triangle shape), knowing how to create a smoke signal may be of some help.

In addition, if you happen to hear a random chopper overhead, you can try to get their attention with the fire, a flashlight, red laser, or flares if you have them.

Remain Concealed if Needed

During a state of emergency or some kind of major social disruption, you may decide that you’d prefer to avoid the attention of rioters or anyone else that could hurt you. Under these circumstances, building a fire for any reasons is not likely to be an option.

By the same token, sheltering on the ground is also apt to be a problem. Try concealing yourself in a tree or some other location where people aren’t likely to look. If you must stay on the ground, make it a point to cover yourself with leaves or stay in a bunch of brambles so that you are harder to see.

Here are some other things to consider:

  • know how to stay perfectly quiet. People pursuing you may have dogs or other tracking animals trained to pick up on even the slightest sound that you make.
  • Tracking animals can also pick up on your scent. Never pick a place to rest near where you have buried waste, eaten, or carried out some other task.
  • Learn how to use backtracks and other tricks to ensure an animal following your scent cannot pick up your trail.
  • People tracking you may also use thermal profile systems or metal finders to locate you and anything you are carrying. It is very important to know how to break up your thermal profile. Try to avoid lumping all metal objects together in your camping gear, or carry as few metallic objects as possible to keep avoid being detected.

Much of surviving in the wilderness at night is about common sense. You will still need some basic tools such as a knife, fire starting gear, heavy plastic bags, and drinking water bottles to make things a bit easier.

As with anything else, even if you start off with a few tools that you know how to use, and then build on your skill and knowledge levels, it will be easier to spend a night in the wilderness, and come to enjoy the experience as many hikers and campers do.

This article has been written by Carmela Tyrell for Survivopedia.

10 Essentials For Surviving In The Wilderness At Night

You are convinced that it could never happen to you, don’t you? But there is no escaping the fact that you might be stuck out in the wilderness at night.

If you have no experience with camping, or have spent little time in the woods, this can be a frightening and dangerous experience.

Even if you are completely alone, knowing how to do these ten things can keep you safe and in good condition.

If you ever have to survive some sort of disaster and decide to stay in a wooded area, you will be much closer to being able to stay in this setting for weeks, or even months if needed.

Be Mentally and Emotionally Prepared

You emotional and mental preparedness for surviving in the wild should start before you find yourself in the woods and have to face the experience.

Remember, nature is not your enemy. The woods and its inhabitants usually kill or maim only in the course of trying to survive, defend themselves from predators, and raise their young. As long as you do not interfere, you can live comfortably in the woods regardless of the time of day.

If you are reading this and know nothing of living in or traveling through the wilderness, start learning from now. Read articles, go camping with experienced groups of people, and do all you can to gather factual and accurate information on how to live in the woods and understand its inhabitants.

The more you know about living in these conditions, the less you will fear them. The less fear you have, the easier it will be to go about taking care of basic needs if you must stay in a wilderness setting at night.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Maintain Appropriate Body Temperature

As with any other place, temperatures are apt to drop at night. If you did not bring extra clothing, or the right kinds of clothes, you will need to find some other way to keep warm. Here are a few things that can save you:

Plastic Bags

Always keep a construction grade plastic bag with you, it will be large enough to line with leaves or other insulating material to sleep in.

Remember to leave some room open even around your body so that sweat evaporates properly and air continues to circulate around your skin. In extreme cold temperatures, moisture near your skin can cause your core temperature to drop to dangerous levels.

Build a Fire

Learn how to build a fire safely and effectively, including how to build a fire in the rain. Pack a tea light, and remember to search for pine cones. Both will make excellent tinder material.

Don’t forget to bring along a fire starter such as waterproof matches or some other type of fire starter that you feel comfortable with.

Cover Yourself with Leaves

As long as the leaves aren’t damp and are free of bugs, mold, and mildew, they will keep you warmer than not covering with anything at all.

Find and Purify Water to Stay Hydrated

Maybe you aren’t lost, and still expect to arrive back in a populated area in a few hours. Even though you may not think much about water, it is still need it on hand and to stay hydrated all the time.

When you are stressed out, engaging in more intense physical activities, or dealing with increased temperature changes, your body will release more sweat, and also use more water for other vital processes.

So you need clean water on hand and use it when you are trying to survive in the wilderness especially if overnight. Ideally, you should be able to purify at least ½ to one gallon of water for your overnight needs.

Here are some things you can keep with you as well as skills to develop:

  • Know how to capture water from leaves, earth, and rainfall.
  • Keep a long tube sock, bone char, some sand, and activated carbon in your travel gear at all times. You can use them to make a filter to remove chemical contaminants and debris from the water. It is also important to have some kind of vessel to boil the water in so that you can kill off any pathogens that may be in the water.
  • There are also filtering water straws available that come with a complete water cleaning system. Just make sure you drink through the straws, and you will have clean water.
  • Carry water purifying tablets. Be sure to always know the limitations of these tablets so that you can use other systems if needed.
  • Learn how to make charcoal and bone char.
  • Contrary to popular belief, boiling water alone will not produce clean water. It will only concentrate heavy metals and other poisons, making the water more dangerous to drink. If you are concerned about removing pathogens from the water, it is better to put the water in a clear plastic bottle and let it sit in the sun for a few hours. UV from the sun will kill the pathogens without causing water to evaporate.

Obtain Food

You might be too stressed to eat, but it have to know how to get food in the wilderness during the night hours. Since many animals are more active at night, you can try hunting them, or set traps.

If you happen to be near a pond, you can set traps for fish, or try to hunt for frogs.

When hunting at night, always be aware that the animals you are hunting may also be prey for another animal in the woods. That animal, in turn, may decide you are competition and hunt you instead.

Before you go into any wilderness setting, always know how the local food chain works so that you can steer clear of predators and still take the game you need for survival.

As with any other time of day, lichens, moss, berries, and fruit will still be available. Learn the Universal edibility test, and practice using it so that you can avoid being poisoned.

If you decide to carry food with you, choose high calorie items that do not require heating. You can also bring along a few ready to eat meals that come with warming packets if you want a more complete meal. Even if you only have enough packets to last for two or three days, it will be enough until you are able to gather food on your own.

Shelter From Storms, Wind, and Other Bad Weather

Aside from being colder, you may also wind up dealing with rain, wind, or other weather elements that you will not want to be out in.

As long as you have a knife (or a sharp edge on a rock) branches, vines (or long stemmed plants), leaves available you can make a shelter that will keep you dry and warm.

Here are some other things you can try:

Look for a Cave

Caves offer plenty of protection, however they are also likely to be dens for bats, bears, and other animals that won’t want you spending the night with them.

If you do decide to spend the night in a cave, make sure you check all passages and all areas of the cave to make sure you aren’t taking up space in another animal’s territory. This includes snakes, spiders, and other animals that can hide easily under rocks and in shaded areas that you might overlook.

Dig a Hole in the Ground

Dig a small hole or depression in the ground, and then put leaves over it. Try to build up the sides a bit to prevent rain from flowing in. This makeshift shelter will not last more than a few hours, but it will get you through the night.

Tree Trunk Protection

Look for a hollow in a tree trunk, or at the base of an uprooted tree. These areas will shelter you from the wind and rain, depending on the direction it is coming from.

As with caves, make sure there are no animals and insects already living there that might cause you problems. In this case, you would be looking for squirrels, raccoon, snakes, and biting insects known to live in or near rotting wood or in tree trunks.

Discourage Predatory Animals and Prevent Insect Bites

For the most part, if you know how to build a fire and can keep it going through the night, predatory animals will stay away from you.

On the other side the equation, many insects are drawn to light, and will gravitate to the fire. You will need to experiment to find the best distance from the fire to avoid falling outside its light, be close enough to stay warm, and still not be swarmed by insects (that will be killed off eventually by the flames).

Insofar as discouraging predatory animals, you will need to know which ones are usually in the area, and also how best to deter them if they appear. Some animals may run away if you yell, while others may decide to attack. A good understanding of animal psychology is essential.

In order to prevent insect bites at night, your best option will be to wear long sleeved shirts and pants. Make sure that all cuffs are sealed off with rubber bands and that the hems of your pants are also tucked into your socks.

To protect your face and neck from insect bites, take a wide brimmed hat and attach some fine webbed fabric over it. Let the fabric drape down to just below your neck, and then make sure it seals to your shirt. Do not put the fabric too close to your face or neck, or the insects will just find a way to bite through it.

Manage Hygiene and Sanitation

Even though you can washing your hands and face with wet wipes, it never hurts to carry a small bar of lye soap and some towels with you.

In particular, if you are spending the night in the woods because of a nuclear disaster, you will need the lye soap for washing off any dust or debris from your skin.

Managing sanitation is also very important because predators can find your urine and stool even if you bury them. Make sure you stay away from areas where water and food are likely to be found, as predators will check there first for prey.

Take Care of Routine and Emergency Medical Needs

Even if you don’t have any injuries, or don’t feel sick, it is still important to know what to do and have some tools on hand. Here are some things you should carry and skills you should learn:

  • know the signs of food poisoning or allergy. Keep Benadryl with you and an epi pen. If you suspect you ate something poisonous, make sure you know how to vomit it back out if it is still in your stomach, or use activated charcoal to try and absorb it and move it out of your system.
  • Always know how to make a tourniquet, splints, and wraps for joint support.
  • Keep essential oils, herbs, and at least a week’s supply of any medications you may be taking onhand. It also never hurts to know what plants in the woods might be useful for taking the place of your medications if the need arises.
  • Know how to perform the Heimlich maneuver on yourself, just in case you are alone and swallow something the wrong way.
  • Understand water safety and know how to build a flotation device so that you don’t wind up drowning.

Be Able to Signal for Help

If you were traveling, got lost, and left travel plans, there is a chance searchers will be looking for you. Depending on the weather conditions, rescuers may or may not try to look for you at night. If you built a fire (use a triangle shape), knowing how to create a smoke signal may be of some help.

In addition, if you happen to hear a random chopper overhead, you can try to get their attention with the fire, a flashlight, red laser, or flares if you have them.

Remain Concealed if Needed

During a state of emergency or some kind of major social disruption, you may decide that you’d prefer to avoid the attention of rioters or anyone else that could hurt you. Under these circumstances, building a fire for any reasons is not likely to be an option.

By the same token, sheltering on the ground is also apt to be a problem. Try concealing yourself in a tree or some other location where people aren’t likely to look. If you must stay on the ground, make it a point to cover yourself with leaves or stay in a bunch of brambles so that you are harder to see.

Here are some other things to consider:

  • know how to stay perfectly quiet. People pursuing you may have dogs or other tracking animals trained to pick up on even the slightest sound that you make.
  • Tracking animals can also pick up on your scent. Never pick a place to rest near where you have buried waste, eaten, or carried out some other task.
  • Learn how to use backtracks and other tricks to ensure an animal following your scent cannot pick up your trail.
  • People tracking you may also use thermal profile systems or metal finders to locate you and anything you are carrying. It is very important to know how to break up your thermal profile. Try to avoid lumping all metal objects together in your camping gear, or carry as few metallic objects as possible to keep avoid being detected.

Much of surviving in the wilderness at night is about common sense. You will still need some basic tools such as a knife, fire starting gear, heavy plastic bags, and drinking water bottles to make things a bit easier.

As with anything else, even if you start off with a few tools that you know how to use, and then build on your skill and knowledge levels, it will be easier to spend a night in the wilderness, and come to enjoy the experience as many hikers and campers do.

This article has been written by Carmela Tyrell for Survivopedia.

29 Items You Need To Be Prepared For Survival

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I’m sharing 29 items you need to be prepared for survival, at the very least. Here’s the deal, this is just a start and you may or may not have any of this, or you may have a whole lot more in your preparedness preps. I don’t know about you, but the world is getting crazier each day. I teach classes about food storage and emergency preparedness to churches, subdivisions, businesses and other groups and I get booked up pretty quick. When I go teach a class, if 20 or 300 people attend and I get just one person to “get it”, I have done my job.

I really feel God has directed me to teach the world one family at a time to be prepared for the unexpected. The picture above is an empty grocery store I haves seen one similar to it after a disaster, the government may take weeks, months or more to help us. Please plan on taking care of your family, no one else will.

It’s getting harder and harder for me to drag my emergency preparedness stuff to show people at the classes I teach. I hired a friend to take professional pictures of many of my critical preparedness and storage items, and she had them mounted on 18-inch by 24-inch sturdy foam boards. I’m going to show you some of the pictures and talk about each one. If you can use this information to teach others, I thank you from the bottom of my heart. So let’s get started.

29 Items I Recommend:

1. Water

25 items

In the picture above from left to right, I have the following items.

2. Blue Cans:

The best-tasting water ever, ready to drink right out of the can, and can be stored up to 145 degrees, they are engineered to last 50 years, expensive but worth it.

3. 30 Year Cans of Water:

The water lasts 30 years, tastes like the can.

4. Lead-Free Hose to Fill Water Storage Containers:

An absolute must if you are filling your 55-gallon or barrels or any water container you need to fill outside.

5. Big Berkey:

This one purifies the water, I recommend the black filters. I quote Big Berkey Water Filter:

“Max Filtration Flow Rate:

  • Configured with 2 Black Berkey Purification Elements, the Big Berkey system can purify up to 3.5 Gallons per hour.
  • Configured with 4 Black Berkey Purification Elements, the Big Berkey system can purify up to 7 Gallons per hour.”

6. WaterBricks 3.5-gallons:

They weigh approximately 26-27 pounds each depending on how full you fill them with water. I use 1/2 teaspoon of Water Preserver for this size container. You can use the water to drink or for the preparation of food. Ten WaterBricks equals 35 gallons of water.

7. WaterBricks 1.6-gallons:

They weigh approximately 12-13 pounds each depending on how full you fill them. They come with a handle and I add 1/4 teaspoon of Water Preserver to this size. These can also be stacked up to four feet high. 1.6-gallon WaterBrick

8. WaterBrick spigot:

It works great for dispensing water from the WaterBricks. WaterBrick Spigot

9. Water Preserver:

I prefer this brand because it’s recommended by the EPA and I only have to rotate my water every 5 years instead of six months if bleach is what I’d used. Water Preserver

10. Berkey Sports Water Bottles:

I gave every family member one of these for Christmas one year.

11.FOOD

25 items

In the picture above I have the following items to show people they do not have to have all canned food or just #10 cans.

12. Can opener:

This is certainly a must-have item in order to open any cans of food.or some water cans.

13. Canned Meat:

This one is pretty easy, buy some cans of chicken and cooked hamburger. Remember, tuna goes mushy, so be careful about stocking up too many cans of tuna.

14. Small jars of Mayonnaise:

I buy small jars of mayo and Miracle Whip since we only have two people living in our home, but also because I can use up small jars after a disaster by making sandwiches on bread or crackers for neighbors.

15. Crackers:

If you don’t want to make bread you can certainly buy crackers to spread a meat mixture or peanut butter and jam on them. Pretend like you are at Costco and giving out samples, people will love it!

16. Pancake Mix:

I love to make pancake mix from scratch, but I also love to buy big bags of pancake mix where you just add water. If we have a disaster, I will need to be prepared to cook breakfast for many people. I will need the “just add water” kind.

17. Syrup:

I love syrup, yes it has high fructose sugar, but after a disaster, we will need to fill our bellies.

18. Canned fruits:

It’s great to have a few cans of fruit we can just open them and eat the contents with those pancakes or sandwiches I mentioned above.

19. Canned vegetables:

Do I love fresh vegetables or canned, yep! But after a disaster, I will be serving some of these with chili, soup or adding some to a soup base.

20. Freeze-dried apples:

These are delicious eaten right out of the can.

21. Freeze-dried onions:

These are great because I don’t have to peel, chop or slice onions. I can make soup, or just about any casserole with these.

22. Freeze-dried corn:

This corn tastes good eaten right out of the can. I must admit, I look at corn a lot differently since I have been researching about saved seeds. If you know what I am talking about you understand. It’s called GMO corn.

23. Soup Base:

Now, of course, we can make our own soup base, but remember, I am teaching classes and trying to teach how easy it is to store a few food items. All you do is add water and a few veggies and you have a meal.

24. Instant milk:

All you do is add water. Hot chocolate comes to my mind after a disaster, what about you? Yep, add some instant milk to your stash.

25. Applesauce:

I wanted these because they come in a small container, do not need to be refrigerated, and who doesn’t love a little applesauce, right?

26. Jam:

I buy small jars of jam so they will not go to waste if we lose power. I love peanut butter and jelly or jam sandwiches. You can cut the sandwiches into heart shapes or spaceships, the kids will love it. Just eat the scrap, that’s what I do for my grandkids.

27. Peanut butter:

I started buying smaller jars of peanut butter because they go rancid fairly quickly at our house. Here again, who can pass up a peanut butter and jelly sandwich made on homemade freshly ground whole wheat bread?

28. Chili:

The thing that’s good about chili is just about everyone loves chili with crackers on the side. Great food storage item.

29. Soups:

I bought the soups that do not need water added to them. If we had to we could eat them cold right out of the can. Make sure you buy the kinds you will eat. You can donate all canned items to the food bank if you don’t use them and they have not expired.

I hope this gives you 29 items or ideas for storing water and purchasing food storage. You don’t have to buy a pallet of food storage and have it delivered to your house. This list is short because I’m only talking about the items in my pictures. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless this world.

Survival food storage by Linda

The post 29 Items You Need To Be Prepared For Survival appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

45 Essential Tools for Living Off the Grid

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If you’re like most preppers, your day-to-day life is probably very similar to that of a non-prepper’s. You have electricity, running water, and a vehicle that you drive to work. You probably even spend a good portion of your spare time watching TV or browsing the Internet. The only difference is that you spend some […]

The post 45 Essential Tools for Living Off the Grid appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Should I Bug In or Out

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Should I Bug In or Out. Bob Hawkins “The APN Report“ Audio player provided! That statement is actually too simple to be accurate, there’s way too many variables that weigh in, but the gist of it rings true… If given a choice of bugging out or bugging in, I’d bug in, knowing I should go. … Continue reading Should I Bug In or Out

The post Should I Bug In or Out appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.