Kitchen Secrets That Extend The Life Of Fresh Tomatoes

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Kitchen Secrets That Extend The Life Of Fresh Tomatoes

Image source: Pixabay.com

You may have heard that it’s not a good idea to store tomatoes in the fridge. And, in fact, the optimal storage temperature for tomatoes is 55-70 degrees Fahrenheit. Colder temps damage both the aroma molecules and the texture of tomatoes, which affects their palatability.

However, room temperature in many of our homes is higher than 55-70 degrees, particularly in the warm summer months when we’re picking garden-fresh tomatoes. Unless you’re fortunate enough to have a wine cooler or wine fridge (which, optimally, should be set to 55 degrees Fahrenheit), you need to pick between the lesser of the two evils: the too-cold fridge or the too-warm countertop.

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The best thing to do is strike a balance. Start by checking for ripeness. When lightly squeezed, a perfectly ripe tomato should give very lightly to the touch. If it doesn’t give at all, it’s not ripe yet; if it’s quite soft, it’s overripe.

Underripe and ripe tomatoes are best kept on the countertop as long as possible. As well, it’s best to store them stem- or scar-side down. There are several websites that discuss the stem-side down storage method, and some sites have done their own experiments to prove that it increases shelf life. It does work, but everyone seems unsure of the science behind it. It’s speculated that there are one of two things going on.

First, while the skin of a tomato is effective at keeping out bacteria, cracks in the scar can let bacteria in. When a tomato is stored upside down, the liquid inside the fruit moves to the top of the tomato, which provides a sort of seal to the cracks in the scar and a barrier to bacteria. The other possibility is that storing a tomato upside down somehow affects the way ethylene gas is transmitted. Fruits naturally create ethylene, which aids in the ripening process. When the production or transmission of ethylene is slowed, the ripening process slows as well.

Tomatoes stored at room temperature should be checked regularly, particularly if your home is on the warm side. The warmer it is, the more quickly tomatoes will ripen and subsequently mold or rot. Any tomatoes that are past optimal ripeness should be tossed in the fridge. Some spots in the fridge are slightly warmer than others, such as on the top shelf and near the door, and those are the ideal spots for tomatoes. But, in the end, while they may lose some palatability in the fridge, they will definitely lose palatability if they start to go bad on the countertop. Bottom line: Refrigerate when necessary.

Do you have any advice for extending the life of tomatoes? Share your tips in the section below:

I Was In Law Enforcement. Believe Me, You Need To Carry A Firearm Every Day

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I Was In Law Enforcement. Believe Me, You Need To Carry A Firearm Every Day

Image source: Alien Gear Holsters

It’s very simple: The police usually will not be able to save you. Don’t get me wrong, as I have been a law enforcement officer for many years. Police want to get to you, but the majority of the time the incident is over by the time police arrive.

That’s one reason I believe in my right, and your right, to protect ourselves and those around us. But do not take your decision to carry lightly. Once you have made this decision, stay well prepared and confident with your firearm and carry system. A fellow instructor once told me “it has to become a lifestyle” when it comes to your personal defense, and by necessity your own well-being and preparedness. I couldn’t agree more.

So, what do I carry? It depends on many factors. When I teach concealed carry classes, I talk to students about tradeoffs when they begin carrying a concealed firearm. Considerations include concealability of your handgun, single-vs.-double-stack magazine models, caliber, ease of operation, dependability and comfort.

If your carry handgun and carry system are not comfortable, then you will not carry for long. This brings to mind the quote, “The gun you have on you is better than the one left at home.”

You Don’t Need A Firearms License For This Weapon!

My selection for carry on any particular day is driven by such factors as weather (hot or cold outside?), activities and location planned for the day, and attire.

The following comprise my concealed carry selection 98 percent of the time:

Smith & Wesson Shield in 9mm. I like the feel of this pistol; it’s streamlined and easily concealable. I shoot it well and have found it to be very reliable. It comes with eight- and seven- round magazines, plus one in the chamber, and it is a reasonable carry gun. I most often carry this pistol in an appendix position. I like the Guardian Angel holster system that provides a leather or soft back with a firm Kydex outer portion. I most often carry a spare magazine, too.

Glock 19, 9mm. Likely one of the most common handguns for concealed carry. Very reliable with good accuracy and a great mid-size carry gun with a magazine capacity of 15. I will carry in a Guardian Angel or SpetzGear appendix or belt-mounted Kydex, pancake-style holster.

Glock 42, 380 Auto.  When I need to go small with a high degree of concealability, this is my choice. I carry in the appendix or pocket position via a BladeTech or Sticky holster. The Glock 42 is very reliable and suitable for those attire-limiting occasions. The Glock 42 comes standard with a six-round magazine, but plus-two extensions are available for the magazine.

Ruger LCR, 38 Special. Very concealable and problem-free from an operational standpoint. The 38 Special cartridge has taken care of its share of “bad guys” over the years, and there is a wide variety of good defensive ammo available for this caliber. I often carry in the appendix position in a soft-sided Sticky Holster.

I have no opposition to larger caliber handguns, such as the 40S&W or the 45ACP. I have and will carry these caliber guns on occasion. It all boils down to your comfort and ability to shoot and handle the gun well.

Other EDC items I am seldom without include; a spare magazine or ammo source for my carry gun du jour, a flashlight (most often a Steamlight ProTac-2L), a good blade (or two), and a tourniquet (CAT, SWAT or comparable).

If you’re a person who has a high degree of concern over the caliber issue, perhaps keep in mind the following: Carry the largest caliber handgun you can shoot well and will commit to carrying every day. And then train well, train often. After all, you are carrying to protect yourself and those you care about.

What are your favorite EDC guns? Share your thoughts in the section below:

5 ‘Ancient Remedies’ For Gout Pain

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5 ‘Ancient Remedies’ For Gout Pain

Image source: Pixabay.com

Our ancestors used to call gout “The Disease of Kings.” That’s because in ancient times, gout was thought to be the punishment of a lifetime spent overeating rich meats and wine.

Today, we know that this disease is a form of arthritis, caused by high levels of uric acid. Although our kidneys normally remove uric acid, for those afflicted, the acid does not dissolve properly and forms large crystals which build up in the joints.

If you have experienced this or have seen a loved one with those red, swollen joints, then you know just how painful it can be. While we now have modern medicine to help relieve pain and inflammation, as well as medications that block the production of uric acid, you have to wonder: What did our ancestors do before pharmaceuticals? And what could we use if — one day — pharmacies are closed?

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Our ancestors relied on herbs and foods to help reduce the symptoms of gout, as well as to work as preventatives against future attacks.

1. Cherries

Here is a sweet “cure” to be sure! There is research showing that they lower inflammation and uric acid levels. One study found that just 48 bing cherries a day lowered uric acid, and therefore the symptoms of gout, in just two weeks! Other studies show similar results — one with results in just 2 days. It’s worth noting that dried cherries or cherry juice works as well as fresh fruit.

2. Celery seed

Celery seed has long been used as a healing herb, as it has powerful anti-inflammatory compounds, but modern research shows that celery seeds flush out urates from the kidneys. This lowers acid levels, including uric acid, in the body.

3. Burdock root

This is another ancient herb, used for centuries to treat a variety of conditions due to its anti-inflammatory compounds. The interesting thing about this root is that it can be used both internally and externally to help fight gout symptoms. Consumed as a tea, burdock root removes uric acid from the body and topically, it can be ground into a poultice and applied to the feet or other joints to help relieve pain.

4. Ginger

Like burdock root, ginger also can be consumed as a tea or applied as a compress to help relieve gout symptoms. Ginger has long been known to have anti-inflammatory compounds that help a variety of symptoms, including gout and arthritis. One study found that one of the active compounds found in ginger, 6-shogaol, lowered levels of urate crystals.

5. Nettles

Each time I even see the name of this plant, my fingers start itching from the memory of my one encounter with it. But fear not — you don’t have to handle the plant! Nettles are really powerful anti-inflammatory plants that can help stop the pain of gout. You can consume this as a supplement or buy dried leaves that have the stinging part removed so you can drink it as a tea.

There are other ways to help reduce inflammation in the body, such as fish oil supplements, pineapple and turmeric, but some of these items might be hard to find in difficult times. Consider stocking up on some canned cherries or ginger root and adding them to your pantry in case gout decides to make an unwanted appearance.

*This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or cure any particular health condition. Please consult with a qualified health professional first about this method.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

Birth Pangs of Tribulation

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Bob Griswold of ReadyMadeResources.com joins me today to talk about the increase in frequency and intensity of natural and man-made disasters in recent times.

 

Since the EMP, Danny Walker’s compound has survived waves of violence and the death of many key members. When Danny gets an unexpected piece of news, he pledges to put an end to the persistent threat in Charlotte. He will kill Regent Schlusser and shut down his consortium of depravity, or he will die trying. Get your copy of Seven Cows, Ugly and Gaunt; Book Four: Vengeance today!

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I use JM Bullion because they have the lowest over-spot price of any dealer I have found for silver and gold bullion. JM Bullion now offers free shipping on every order!

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Trading Post in the Woods is ran by veteran crisis responders who know how important it is to be prepared. They specialize in comprehensive natural survival remedy kits, preparedness and homesteading supplies as well as skills training. Visit them online today at TradingPostInTheWoods.com.

Ready Made Resources is a trusted name in the prepper community, because they’ve been around for 18 years. They offer great prices on Night Vision, water filtration, long term storage food, solar energy components and provide free technical service. Get ready for an uncertain future at ReadyMadeResources.com!

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CampingSurvival.com has all of your preparedness needs including; bug out bags, long term food storage, water filters, gas masks, and first aid kits. Use coupon code PREPPERRECON to get 5% off your entire order at Camping Survival.

The post Birth Pangs of Tribulation appeared first on Prepper Recon.

Bang, bang, click

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Took my DMR-style AR to the range today. Fired about 10 rounds through it and started having problems. Failure to extract/eject. In fact, in many cases the bolt didnt even unlock. Hmmm.

Ok, unload and let’s see whats going on. Pulled the bolt carrier and thought that, since it was new, I hadn’t really lubed it up. So, a quick couple of sprays of CLP and put it back in the gun. No joy.

Disassemble bolt. Aha! Gas rings!

20170903_130229Stagger them properly, re-assemble, no joy.

Alright, now I’m really curious. My buddy is shooting an AR that is also virtually new (less than 50 rounds) so we went ahead and swapped bolt carriers and bolts (yeah, yeah, I know….) Same result. My carrier/bolt worked fine in his gun. Ok, try the ammo. His ammo failed in my gun, my ammo worked fine in his.

Ok, clearly the issue is not in the receiver (upper or lower). It’s gotta be something in the gas system. Couldn’t really do much at the range without proper tools. Came back to the house and took off the forend. Please note this:

20170903_154204Those two screws keep the gas block in place. See how that one is backed out? The other one is also loose. How loose?

20170903_154115.That loose.

“Well there’s yer problem!”

:::sigh::: You know, I have been shooting AR rifles for over thirty years and this is the first time I have ever had anything like this happen. Solution? A dose of Loctite and some torque.

And, really, if I had the proper hex wrenches with me at the range I could have taken care of this right there…so, lesson learned. I’ll head to the range tomorrow to confirm that, indeed, was the problem.

 

Pueblo Farming Methods For Your Resilient Garden

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I spent the morning in Albuquerque, New Mexico at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center’s Resilience Garden learning about the history of Pueblo Farming Methods. There are 19 Pueblos of New Mexico represented at the center.

The Resilience Garden tells the story of pre-contact foods and traditional farming methods all the way to modern plants and gardening methods for urban communities.

Watch the Interview (15:49 minutes):

Irrigation

The Zuni Pueblo is highly represented in the Resilience Garden because of its unique irrigation method, called a waffle garden. It is a brilliant technique to harvest and conserve water and is several thousand years old.

Zuni Pueblo Waffle Garden

Without a permanent water source, you can’t water a large area of crops. The waffle garden acts like a puddle. You hand-carry water to the beds and make sure the water stays concentrated where you put it.

The walls of the waffle bed are hand formed to catch any rainfall and focus that precious water around seeds and the roots of plants. It keeps the soil damp during the weeks of the dry season.

Water is a vital, life-giving element, especially in this desert climate. Pueblo cultures honor water through sustainable practices, as well as seasonal dances praying for generous rains, healthy plants, and a bountiful harvest.

pueblo-farming-methods

Acoma and Laguna Flood Garden

Seasonal rains were crucial in Pueblo agriculture. Many of the Pueblos are located near plateaus. When the seasonal rains come, the rain runs off of the plateaus and into the flood gardens.

A wall around the flood garden holds the water in a particular area to water their crops. There were often multiple flooding areas, so if one area filled up with water, a wall would be removed so the water flowed into the next area and so on.

Pueblo crops planted in these types of gardens

The waffle and flood gardens were planted with melons and squash. The heavy amount of water would undermine a corn plant’s root system causing it to fall over.

Plants

The Pueblos are scattered throughout the state of New Mexico with a wide-variety of climates, from mountains to desert and plateaus to scrub. However, the Pueblo People concentrate their gardening around the Three Sisters (Corn, Beans, and Squash).

Community food production

Most of the crops grow in communal plots. Land was not owned, making it easy to move your garden each year. You weren’t planting in the same place (preventing pest and disease issues, and giving the land time to rest). By the time you got back to your original growing space, nature had time to rebuild healthy soil.

Want to know more about community food production? Click here to watch I Don’t Want to Grow All My Own Food. 

Prior to European Contact

Prior to contact with Europeans, there were many berries and different types of shrubs that were wild harvested.

Other pre-contact plants:

  • Mint
  • Cotton
  • Strawberries
  • Raspberries
  • Wild Spinach
  • Yucca
  • Wild Celery
  • Tea (a tall grass)
  • Chokecherries
  • Wild plums
  • Wild mushrooms

Traditional herbs and many plants were not cultivated but harvested where they grew naturally.

Learning through history

Lessons were learned throughout history in places like Mesa Verde and Bandolier. These sites were built into cliffs with little or no space for agriculture to support such a larger community.

Corn is one of the oldest plants, which came from Mexico. The Pueblos have had corn for many thousands of years.

It is unknown when or how Beans and Squash came into Pueblo agriculture. There isn’t an exact story of where these plants came from.

The stories that have been handed down through the history of Pueblo culture speak to why they garden as they do and the way plants are cultivated or not.

When the Spanish came to the New Mexico, the pueblos were thriving. They had seven years-worth of food stored. The stored food kept the Spanish from conquering the Pueblos. It was the generosity of the Pueblo people that helped the Spanish survive in this harsh environment.

The Spanish, in turn, brought sheep, horses, chickens, and even the fruit trees that are grown today.

There are still families at the Pueblos who grow in the traditional methods and incorporate modern plants. Even the younger generations are becoming interested in the agricultural traditions once again.

Pueblo Ceremonies

Pueblos have many ceremonies throughout the year. The dances and songs vary from Pueblo to Pueblo. The reason many dances are not open to the public is because they are sacred. The dance and song are prayers to the soil, the plants, the pollinators, and gratitude for the harvest.

The season starts in the spring with ceremonies for preparing the soil and starting seeds. The ceremonies also bless the land with songs and dances.

Then throughout the summer, there are many dances that bless the field and crops, bring in the pollinators like the butterflies, and for a good harvest.

All of the dances, songs, preparations, plantings, and seasons lend themselves to the story of living life close to nature and gardening in a sustainable way.

Your Resilient Garden

At the Resilience Garden, they’re inspiring modern gardeners. Their methods are thousands of years of trial and error.

If you got out in your garden for the first time today, you would still come up with these methods on your own. Learning some of the best methods right away and adapting them to where you live will only help you create an abundant harvest.

The Resilience garden shows what gardeners have learned over the years:

  1. Preparing the soil is the foundation to sustainable gardening
  2. Planting the right plant in the right place
  3. Harvesting with gratitude
  4. Sharing knowledge with others

Resilience is a common theme for the Pueblos throughout history. They have survived contact with many nations and still remain humble, loving, and incredibly generous. The Pueblo agricultural methods and seeds are still alive after thousands of years. That’s pretty amazing!

The name of the garden is powerful and inspiring for the Indigenous people of the area, and anyone who comes to this space. There is even a Seed Bank, where the Pueblo people drop off seeds that have been in their family for many generations. That’s better than money!

If you’re in Albuquerque, please stop by and learn more about Pueblo Culture and the Resilience Garden. Click here for more information.

Resources:
Historic Images: Library of Congress
Dance footage courtesy of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center

 

Click here to get your FREE pass

The post Pueblo Farming Methods For Your Resilient Garden appeared first on The Grow Network.

Solar Panels …….

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This week we are going to get out all of the solar panels that my dad had and figure out how to use them. Have a perfect place to put them. South facing and on top of a hill. I cannot wait to get them installed and get off the grid. This homestead has been so nice and calming. I sleep so great here. To get off grid would be perfection.

Cryptocurrencies and Preppers – a Match Made in Heaven?

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Cryptocurrencies are taking off! Values for many cryptocurrencies have skyrocketed this year. You will be hearing about them more and more so you had might as well begin understanding them now. Disclaimer: I own some Ethereum and Ripple cryptocurrencies. Before I begin diving into this subject, let me give a very brief overview of cryptocurrencies.. . . Read More

Petro Dollar Checkmate – Gold Backed Yuan For Oil

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China plays the long game and they have seemingly played masterfully. The question is, “Will this be Checkmate for the petro dollar?” China is readying their Yuan (currency) crude oil benchmark and it will be backed by gold — as de-dollarization accelerates. Zerohedge reports via the Nikkei Asian Review, “The world’s top oil importer, China, is preparing to launch a crude oil futures contract denominated in Chinese yuan and convertible into gold, potentially creating the most important Asian oil benchmark and allowing oil exporters to bypass U.S.-dollar denominated benchmarks by trading in yuan.” Simply put, it enables the circumvention of

The post Petro Dollar Checkmate – Gold Backed Yuan For Oil appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Closing a Window

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Technology can be a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it gives regular people access to information and provides countless communications channels to convey it. On the other hand, Big Tech installs various tracking tools to gather data on what users are looking for. It’s a bit Orwellian and provides tech criminals with a big […]

The post Closing a Window appeared first on Smart Suburban Survival.

Guest Post: 5 Tips On Raising A German Shepherd and Pitbull Puppy Mix

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A German Shepherd and Pitbull hybrid is one of the favorites of dog lovers across the world. They have various names such as Shepherd Pit, German Sheppit, and German Pit. It is one of the highly popular cross breeds recognized by the Dog Registry of America (DRA). The average lifespan is about 10 to 12 […]

The post Guest Post: 5 Tips On Raising A German Shepherd and Pitbull Puppy Mix appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Bullpups vs. Conventional Rifles: The Ultimate Debate

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It’s an age-old question: are bullpups better than conventional rifles? Or is it visa versa? I have previously talked to a lot of friends about this, and many asked if I was more for bullpups or conventional rifles. To help readers determine the answer, I have included information on both and what my opinion is […]

The post Bullpups vs. Conventional Rifles: The Ultimate Debate appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Top Survival Gear From The Pros

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Top Survival Gear From The Pros via The Survival Mom

Have you ever wondered what survival gear the pros have and recommend? I have put together a list of items from some of the top survival pros. Their recommendations are a great place start if you are new to prepping. If you have been long time prepper, check if you have these items as part of your survival gear. Many of these may be “new and improved” compared to what you currently have stored.

Jim Cobb
Author and Disaster Readiness Consultant

Author of Prepper’s Home Defense,
Urban Emergency Survival Plan,
and Prepper’s Long-Term Survival Guide http://www.SurvivalWeekly.com
http://www.DisasterPrepConsultants.com

Streamlight ProTac 1AAA Flashlight
This is my favorite flashlight and is at the top of every list I make for
recommended gear and equipment. I’ve carried this flashlight for over a year now and I use it quite literally every single day for one thing or another. From checking out a noise in the backyard to looking for a dropped toy under the seat in our van, this little light has been quite handy. My wife liked it so much I had to get her one, too. It is small enough to ride in a pants pocket without discomfort or you can use the pen clip to keep it secure in a shirt pocket. The battery is even included!

Sawyer Mini Water Filtration System
In many disasters or emergencies, ready access to clean water is often one of the first things to disappear. Having a good water filter is just common sense. The Sawyer Mini is easy to use, portable, and just plain works! This system comes with everything you’ll need to turn questionable water clean and potable. While it isn’t an ideal filter for cleaning large quantities of water at once, at about $20 each you might consider buying one for each member of the family.

CRKT Ignitor Knife
CRKT has a long-standing and well-deserved reputation for providing extremely well-made knives at affordable prices. The Ignitor is a relatively new offering from CRKT. It is an assisted-open pocket knife with a built-in safety feature. The thumb stud must be depressed and then the blade rotated open about 30°. Only then will the patented OutBurst assisted opening feature engage and swing the blade fully open. The blade simply will not move without the thumb stud being pressed. Closed, the knife is 4.25″ long and it has a 3.38″ blade, so when fully open it runs about 7.5″. It is robust enough to handle any daily chore and small enough not to scare coworkers. At about $30, it is a lot of knife for a very reasonable price.

Gerber Dime Multi-Tool
A good multi-tool is one of those things every prepper should have, right? Here’s the thing, though. They can get really expensive really quickly and, honestly, most people aren’t going to use a multi-tool every single day. The Gerber Dime will do most of the same jobs a larger and pricier multi-tool will do, at a fraction of the price. At 2.75″ closed and only 2.2oz, it is small enough to fit in a pocket or purse without adding weight or bulk. You won’t be performing extensive engine repairs with a Gerber Dime, of course, but few multi-tools would be any better on that score. At far less than $20, this is a great prepper-related gift idea, too.

InstaFire Granulated Fire Starter
There are dozens of different fire starters available on the market today, not to mention homemade versions like dryer lint stuffed into egg cartons and covered in wax. For my money, nothing beats InstaFire. It is a granulated substance that looks sort of like kitty litter with small sticks scattered about. One pouch is enough to start 3-4 fires. You pour out the amount you wish to use and light it with a match, lighter, or spark. It lights fast and easy and will burn long and hot enough to get the rest of your tinder and kindling going. InstaFire lights in any weather conditions and will even burn while floating on water!

Dr. Joe & Amy Alton, ARNP

Joe and Amy Alton are the authors of the 3 category #1 Amazon Bestseller “The Survival Medicine Handbook”.  See their articles in Backwoods Home, Survival Quarterly, and other great magazines. For over 900 articles on medical preparedness in wilderness, disaster, or other austere settings, go to their website at www.doomandbloom.net. The opinions voiced by Joe Alton, M.D., and Amy Alton, A.R.N.P. are their own and are not meant to take the place of seeking medical help from a qualified healthcare provider.

Twitter:  @preppershow
Facebook:  drbonesand nurseamy                                              Facebook Group: Survival Medicine Group                                Youtube: DrBonesNurseAmy channel                                    iTunes:Survival Medicine Hour iTunes Link
American Survival Radio on GCNLive.com, KPJC 1220 AM

Solar Cooking Product: All American Sun Oven Dehydrating and Preparedness Accessory Package

In our early days of prepping we made lists of critical areas to cover and non-electric or solar cooking products were near the top of our list. The first, and turns out to be the best, solar oven we bought is called The Sun Oven. Learning how to cook all kinds of food with only the sun is not only cost saving, it’s fun! Let your family help you set it up, which is super easy, and have the kids help check on it with you. They will be amazed and excited about dinner.

The full package comes complete with lots of extras like an amazing cookbook with 600 recipes, pots and pans, and even a baking rack. It is easy to open up and get cooking when you are ready, no complicated bolts or screws for assembly. I’m so happy we own this Sun Oven full package and I think you can’t go wrong filling your preparation needs with this excellent solar oven.

Solar Powered Lighting:

MPOWERD Luci EMRG – 3-in-1 Emergency Inflatable Solar Light 

MPOWERD Luci Original – Inflatable Solar Light

Who doesn’t worry about being in the dark without any lighting options? As a Mom and a prepper, this has been something that is not only on my mind for the future, but a need everyone should solve asap. Just yesterday our lights went out for a couple of hours because a tropical storm came through South Florida. It had gone out the day before several times also. Instead of having to look for our batteries and flashlights, we had a quick action LED solar light, called Luci Original. Thankfully, we also have the sister light, the Luci Emrg.

These inflatable, lightweight solar lanterns are small enough to store in many locations around your home and in cars. I actually left mine outside in the hot South Florida sun for 6 months to see how the plastic tolerated the rain and searing heat. Wow! After I cleaned them up, they look like new and the lights were as bright and long lasting as the day we got them. They really are 100% water-proof.

I have to say I was totally blown away. The Luci Original and Luci Emrg both turned on quickly and lasted hours, and all three settings worked. They both have bright, super bright and 1 second flashing for emergencies. The Luci Original lasts 12 hours, and the Luci Emrg up to 7 hours. To charge, just place the built in solar panel in the sun for a few hours. The Luci Original is clear and larger, and the Luci Emrg is frosted and slightly smaller, but both provide strong lighting.

Dehydrator and Jerky Maker:

Excalibur 3526TB 5 Tray Dehydrator with Timer Black

5 Premium 14″ X 14″ Non-stick Dehydrator Sheets

Mary Bell’s Complete Dehydrator Cookbook by Mary Bell Hardcover

I never thought I would be excited about dehydrating food and even making beef jerky, but here I am. When I thought about how I could store food longer and make nutritious snacks for my family, an Excalibur Dehydrator was my first choice after extensive research and reviews. I made a great decision, and you should too.

So what have I made with my awesome Excalibur dehydrator? My most recent recipe was Honey-dipped Banana Chips. Since I live in South Florida we get a harvest of fresh bananas from our backyard on a fairly regular basis. When the full stalk ripens we have about 50 bananas that are all ready to eat at about the same time. We don’t own a monkey zoo, so I needed to create something that lasts.

The Honey-dipped Banana Chips were made by first creating a honey, sugar and warm water solution. I sliced the peeled bananas thinly and used a strainer to dip the slices in the honey solution then strained them (some recipes recommend washing off this dip, I did not) and patted them dry. The slices were placed on the non-stick tray liners with a little space between each. The temperature was 145 for 24 hours (my slices were thicker than you should cut them, lesson learned). Rotate the trays every few hours for even drying.

I have used The Excalibur Dehydrator 5 Tray unit to dry strawberries, blueberries, candied orange slices, peas, carrots and a few tasty beef jerkies. The list of what you can dehydrate is nearly endless. The 26 hour timer makes it great for the busy person and I suggest Mary Bell’s Complete Dehydrator Cookbook for creative ideas.

The Survival Medicine Handbook: THE essential guide for when medical help is NOT on the way Paperback (June 7, 2016)

If you had to deal with an injury or illness in a disaster, would you know what to do? My husband and I had to put this handbook together so others would have the answers. We spent day and night for months putting together strategies for the average family. It is a 670 page detailed guide for those who want to be medically prepared for any disaster where help is NOT on the way.

The expanded third edition is geared to enable the non-medical professional to deal with all the likely issues they will encounter in catastrophic short or long-term scenarios. It is not your standard first aid book: Unlike other, it assumes that a disaster, natural or man-made, has removed all access to hospitals or doctors for the foreseeable future; you, the average person, are now the highest medical resource left to your family.

The Survival Medicine Handbook will give you the tools, in plain English, to competently handle injuries and illness for any situation that leaves you as the end of the line with regards to your family’s medical wellbeing.

Water Filtration System: Big Berkey BK4X2 Countertop Water Filter System with 2 Black Berkey Elements

Who knew the very first article my husband, Dr. Joe Alton wrote in 2010 for SurvivalBlog.com (about Fish Antibiotics and Expiration Dates for emergency and disaster storage) would win us prizes, which included a Big Berkey water filtration system. I admit, that many years ago, I had no idea what qualities a good water filter should possess. Since then I have researched and tested many filters, and I am even happier we ended up with our first Big Berkey.

Living in South Florida means we live with the possibility of power outages from summer afternoon thunderstorms, hurricanes, and flooding. Too many scenes have played out in real life after disasters leaving people without water simply because they were not prepared. Commercial water filtration is usually fairly simple to perform, but without a system, people could get sick if they are unaware of proper water purification.

The Big Berkey purifies water from many sources, including water that looks contaminated. It removes bacteria, parasites and cysts 100%. I know I’m concerned about my daily drinking water containing fluoride, herbicides, pesticides and other contaminates, which Big Berkey extracts. It makes water clean without removing the beneficial minerals that are good for us. A Big Berkey can filter 7 gallons an hour, so a family will have plenty of water during emergencies. Be prepared.

Linda Loosli

Author of Prepare Your Family for Survival & blogger at Food Storage Moms

My favorite 5 survival products I highly recommend are the following:

Sports Berkey Bottle– purifies water whether you are camping, traveling or a disaster hits your community. I gave one of these to every member of my family for Christmas a few years ago.

A few years back, I had to wait three months for a gas line to be installed in my kitchen for a new gas stove

I used this Butane Stove with one butane canister because I did not have a stove or oven in my house for three months.

In that same period of three months waiting for the gas line, I used a Sun Oven to bake meals outside.

I am a big survival fan and therefore every Christmas I give my four daughters something that is needed for survival. I gave each family a Lodge Dutch Oven they are able to boil water, bake bread, or make just about every meal they want to make outside with the charcoal they have stored.

My son-in-law requires a CPAP for sleep apnea nightly, and if the power goes out he needs a backup plan. I purchased a Goal Zero Yeti 400 complete with solar panels to save his life if the power goes out.

Daisy Luther

The Organic Prepper & author of 6 books for preppers

EverBrite Headlamp: We keep several of these headlamps on hand. They’re useful for any kind of hands-free nighttime activities, from wrangling chickens to walking outside in the dark, or reading. Don’t let the low price fool you. We’ve had our for 2 years and never needed a replacement.

RAVPower Pocket Knife: I love the screwdriver bits that come with this knife. It’s a bit lighter than my Leatherman multi-tool so it doesn’t further weigh down my bag that also has a gun and extra magazines in it.

Sawyer Mini: This is probably on everyone’s list and for very good reason. It’s simple to use, filters a LOT of water, and is quite compact.

SAS Survival Manual: Even though this is isn’t gear, it is knowledge. It isn’t in-depth but it has a little bit of information about a lot of different topics. You can use it as a reference in almost any situation.

Swedish Fire Steel: This is a no-fail method for starting a fire. It’s rated for 12,000 starts.

Lisa Bedford- The Survival Mom

Author of Survival Mom How to Prepare Your Family for Everyday Disasters and Worst-Case Scenarios

An ETON emergency radio — I like this radio because it’s easy to operate, has emergency channels pre-set, so I didn’t have to track down the frequencies myself, and has multiple ways to keep it charged.

I own many flashlights, but when we were in Iceland this fall, my handy Pelican LED flashight outshone them all. I couldn’t believe the broad spread of light from this tiny unit. It’s solid, sturdy and small. One of my very favorites out of my large flashlight collection. (I’m a flashlight hoarder.)

Mini Leatherman Tool — I slip this into an inner pocket in my purse or backpack, forget about it because it’s so small and lightweight, but it’s there when I need it.

AeroGarden — I was so skeptical of this but it has been such a handy source of fresh herbs that I have to recommend it. Easy to set up, it monitors its own water and fertilizer and provides just the right amount of herbs I usually need.

Battery Powered Fans. We have 4 of these and they were battery’d up and ready for Hurricane Harvey. My worst fear was that our power would be out for an extended period during some very hot weather. These small fans can be taken anywhere, and are lightweight.

Top Survival Gear From The Pros via The Survival Mom

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Food Storage Recipe – Ham with Potato au Gratin (crock pot)

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NEED:

Nonstick cooking spray

2 cups of cubed cooked ham (about 10-ounces)

2 packages (4.9-ounces) dry au gratin potato mix

1/4 cup roasted red sweet pepper, chopped and drained 3 cups water

1 can (10-3/4-ounces) condensed cheddar cheese soup

Take the nonstick cooking spray and lightly coat the inside of a 3-1/2 or 4-quart slow cooker.

Combine the cubed cooked ham, packages of dry au gratin potato mix and the roasted red sweet pepper in the prepared cooker.

In a medium sized bowl, gradually stir the water into the cheddar cheese soup then pour over the mixture in the slow cooker.

Cover and cook on LOW for 7 to 8 hours or on HIGH for 3-1/2 to 4 hours.

Farm To Table Dinner Photos – A Night To Remember!

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What a night to remember! Even a little bit of off and on drizzle couldn’t stop 40 of our followers from coming to the farm to enjoy a night of friendship and food at our first ever Farm To Table

The post Farm To Table Dinner Photos – A Night To Remember! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

9 Reasons That Make Straw Bale Gardening Fit For Survival

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Straw bale gardening is becoming a pretty big deal in some circles for several reasons. It’s essentially a form of container gardening, except the “container” is the bale of straw.

For those of you who don’t know, bales of straw are held together with two pieces of twine wrapped around it endways.

The gist of it is that you condition the bales, that is, you ready it for planting, then you put the plants in it. The straw does a couple of things.

First, it acts as an organic fertilizer, and it also gives the roots of the plant something to anchor to as they grow.

These Are The Ingenious Recipes That Helped Our Ancestors Stay Alive!

9 Reasons to Keep in Mind

Now, why is this such a good idea for survival and homesteading? Great question. Let’s take a closer look.

You Can Do Straw Bale Gardening Anywhere

Just like most container gardening, you can make a straw bale garden anywhere. Even if you live somewhere that has extremes in temperature or poor soil, (or rocks!) this method makes things easier.

Also, because it’s breaking down and decomposing inside of the bale, there’s going to be a certain amount of heat so even if you have a little bit of cold weather, your roots aren’t going to freeze as quickly as they would if they were in dirt. It’s probably not much of a difference but it’s something.

Great Growing Medium

If you listen to fans of straw gardening, they’ll tell you the little hollow tubes of straw are designed by nature to wick up and hold moisture and the decomposing straw inside creates a rich environment to nourish the vegetable plants.

You can set it up anywhere that gets 6-8 hours of sun and since the bales heat up quicker than soil, it’s great for growing in colder climates with short growing seasons because the warmth stimulates early root growth.

Portability

This is an area where straw bale gardening falls a bit short compared to other types of container gardening such as 5-gallon buckets.

If you plant it on the ground, that’s pretty much where you’re going to have to leave it because once the bale starts to decompose, it will fall apart when you pick it up. If you put it on a pallet or plant it in a decorative wheelbarrow, you’ll be able to move it, but not if you just plant it as-is.

Space

Compared to other types of container gardening, straw bale gardening is efficient because it maximized the use of space. Whereas you may only be able to put one or two plants in a pot, you can easily do three or four, depending on what you’re planting and the size of the bale, in a bale of straw. Plus, you can set it up anywhere that gets 6-8 hours of sun.

Versatility

Another advantage of straw bale gardening is that you can configure it as a small, single-bale mini-garden or you can put bales together and make it similar to a raised bed. Since you have that option, you can stack it a couple of bales high if you have problems bending over so that you won’t have to risk falling or getting stuck.

Cost

If you live near a farm, chances are good that you’ll be able to get straw for less than $10/bale even if you live in an area where prices are crazy high. Here in Florida, a bale goes for $8 or so. I have friends in WV that pay $5/bale for it.

Hint: If the place has a few bales that are loose or started to break open, you may even get it for free, or next to nothing. If you handle them with kid gloves on your way home until you get them into position, they’ll be just fine. Even if you pay full price, that’s cheaper than the same amount of planting soil.

 

Effort

Have you ever built a raised bed? I have, and trust me: although I consider it well worth the effort because it’s beautiful, it was also a back-breaking, PITA project that cost quite a bit of money to get started, even doing things one the cheap.

There was the initial building, then we had to tote the bags of soil and mix it one bag at a time with the sand, which we had to dig and transfer, then of course there was the planting.

In comparison to bags of soil and digging sand, carrying a few bales of straw was nothing. Even a compact, heavy bale of straw is only going to weigh around 50 pounds, and most of them are half that.

Plus, you can roll it most of the way so that you don’t have to do much, if any, lifting after you get it out of the truck. And there is no framework to build. Oh, and it’s cheap.

Easy Preparation and Planting

You can’t just use a bale of straw as-is. You have to condition the bales for a couple of weeks in order to get the decomposition process started. To do this, it’s easiest to buy your straw when it’s most readily available – in the fall. Then let it sit all winter and come spring, it will be conditioned.

If you don’t have that kind of time and you just bought it so that you can grow something this season, you still need to let it condition for at least a couple of weeks. That’s okay though, because you need to start your plants and get them to seedlings anyway so just get your straw when you get your seeds.

Or, if you’re buying the plants, well, make two trips – one for the straw and another a couple of weeks later for the plants!

Conditioning

This is a critical step. You can’t skip it. Put your bales where you want them because after day 1, they’re going to be too heavy to move. Once they’re situated, soak them with water and do this once a day for the first three days.

On days 4, 5, and 6, you’ll still water, but you’ll also add one cup of ammonium sulfate (12-0-0) or half a cup of urea (46-0-0). These are nitrogen-rich fertilizers that will help the bales start to decompose and will also make a rich growing medium.

On days 7, 8, and 9, cut the fertilizer back to half of what you were using and continue to water the bale after adding the fertilizer.

On day 10, stop adding fertilizer, but keep watering so that it stays moist. On the 11th day, check the bale and if it feels warm to the touch – about the same temperature as your hand – then it’s ready to use. If it feels hotter than that, give it another day, and keep checking it until the temperature has dropped to where it should be. Then it’s ready to plant.

Hay vs. Straw

Though they’re both in bales and look extremely similar to an untrained eye, hay and straw are not the same.

Hay is cut grasses and grains made to feed horses, cows, and other livestock. It has seeds in it and will gladly start growing new grass and grain wherever you plant it. It may also have briars in it. Obviously, that’s a bad thing.

Straw, on the other hand, is a by-product of the wheat industry and doesn’t have seeds or briars. It’s made for mulching.

As you can see, straw-bale gardening is a great alternative to planting in the ground or even to using raised beds or containers. If you’re looking for a great growing medium that costs very little money, is convenient, and won’t take up much space, then this method is for you!

It’s an easy way to become self-sufficient and give up relying on bought foods that harm you and your family!

 

 

Have you planted in straw bales or have any advice to offer? If so, please share with us in the comments section below!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia.

9 Reasons That Make Straw Bale Gardening Fit For Survival

Straw bale gardening is becoming a pretty big deal in some circles for several reasons. It’s essentially a form of container gardening, except the “container” is the bale of straw.

For those of you who don’t know, bales of straw are held together with two pieces of twine wrapped around it endways.

The gist of it is that you condition the bales, that is, you ready it for planting, then you put the plants in it. The straw does a couple of things.

First, it acts as an organic fertilizer, and it also gives the roots of the plant something to anchor to as they grow.

These Are The Ingenious Recipes That Helped Our Ancestors Stay Alive!

9 Reasons to Keep in Mind

Now, why is this such a good idea for survival and homesteading? Great question. Let’s take a closer look.

You Can Do Straw Bale Gardening Anywhere

Just like most container gardening, you can make a straw bale garden anywhere. Even if you live somewhere that has extremes in temperature or poor soil, (or rocks!) this method makes things easier.

Also, because it’s breaking down and decomposing inside of the bale, there’s going to be a certain amount of heat so even if you have a little bit of cold weather, your roots aren’t going to freeze as quickly as they would if they were in dirt. It’s probably not much of a difference but it’s something.

Great Growing Medium

If you listen to fans of straw gardening, they’ll tell you the little hollow tubes of straw are designed by nature to wick up and hold moisture and the decomposing straw inside creates a rich environment to nourish the vegetable plants.

You can set it up anywhere that gets 6-8 hours of sun and since the bales heat up quicker than soil, it’s great for growing in colder climates with short growing seasons because the warmth stimulates early root growth.

Portability

This is an area where straw bale gardening falls a bit short compared to other types of container gardening such as 5-gallon buckets.

If you plant it on the ground, that’s pretty much where you’re going to have to leave it because once the bale starts to decompose, it will fall apart when you pick it up. If you put it on a pallet or plant it in a decorative wheelbarrow, you’ll be able to move it, but not if you just plant it as-is.

Space

Compared to other types of container gardening, straw bale gardening is efficient because it maximized the use of space. Whereas you may only be able to put one or two plants in a pot, you can easily do three or four, depending on what you’re planting and the size of the bale, in a bale of straw. Plus, you can set it up anywhere that gets 6-8 hours of sun.

Versatility

Another advantage of straw bale gardening is that you can configure it as a small, single-bale mini-garden or you can put bales together and make it similar to a raised bed. Since you have that option, you can stack it a couple of bales high if you have problems bending over so that you won’t have to risk falling or getting stuck.

Cost

If you live near a farm, chances are good that you’ll be able to get straw for less than $10/bale even if you live in an area where prices are crazy high. Here in Florida, a bale goes for $8 or so. I have friends in WV that pay $5/bale for it.

Hint: If the place has a few bales that are loose or started to break open, you may even get it for free, or next to nothing. If you handle them with kid gloves on your way home until you get them into position, they’ll be just fine. Even if you pay full price, that’s cheaper than the same amount of planting soil.

 

Effort

Have you ever built a raised bed? I have, and trust me: although I consider it well worth the effort because it’s beautiful, it was also a back-breaking, PITA project that cost quite a bit of money to get started, even doing things one the cheap.

There was the initial building, then we had to tote the bags of soil and mix it one bag at a time with the sand, which we had to dig and transfer, then of course there was the planting.

In comparison to bags of soil and digging sand, carrying a few bales of straw was nothing. Even a compact, heavy bale of straw is only going to weigh around 50 pounds, and most of them are half that.

Plus, you can roll it most of the way so that you don’t have to do much, if any, lifting after you get it out of the truck. And there is no framework to build. Oh, and it’s cheap.

Easy Preparation and Planting

You can’t just use a bale of straw as-is. You have to condition the bales for a couple of weeks in order to get the decomposition process started. To do this, it’s easiest to buy your straw when it’s most readily available – in the fall. Then let it sit all winter and come spring, it will be conditioned.

If you don’t have that kind of time and you just bought it so that you can grow something this season, you still need to let it condition for at least a couple of weeks. That’s okay though, because you need to start your plants and get them to seedlings anyway so just get your straw when you get your seeds.

Or, if you’re buying the plants, well, make two trips – one for the straw and another a couple of weeks later for the plants!

Conditioning

This is a critical step. You can’t skip it. Put your bales where you want them because after day 1, they’re going to be too heavy to move. Once they’re situated, soak them with water and do this once a day for the first three days.

On days 4, 5, and 6, you’ll still water, but you’ll also add one cup of ammonium sulfate (12-0-0) or half a cup of urea (46-0-0). These are nitrogen-rich fertilizers that will help the bales start to decompose and will also make a rich growing medium.

On days 7, 8, and 9, cut the fertilizer back to half of what you were using and continue to water the bale after adding the fertilizer.

On day 10, stop adding fertilizer, but keep watering so that it stays moist. On the 11th day, check the bale and if it feels warm to the touch – about the same temperature as your hand – then it’s ready to use. If it feels hotter than that, give it another day, and keep checking it until the temperature has dropped to where it should be. Then it’s ready to plant.

Hay vs. Straw

Though they’re both in bales and look extremely similar to an untrained eye, hay and straw are not the same.

Hay is cut grasses and grains made to feed horses, cows, and other livestock. It has seeds in it and will gladly start growing new grass and grain wherever you plant it. It may also have briars in it. Obviously, that’s a bad thing.

Straw, on the other hand, is a by-product of the wheat industry and doesn’t have seeds or briars. It’s made for mulching.

As you can see, straw-bale gardening is a great alternative to planting in the ground or even to using raised beds or containers. If you’re looking for a great growing medium that costs very little money, is convenient, and won’t take up much space, then this method is for you!

It’s an easy way to become self-sufficient and give up relying on bought foods that harm you and your family!

 

 

Have you planted in straw bales or have any advice to offer? If so, please share with us in the comments section below!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia.

Emergency Car Kit-What You Need In Your Vehicles

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I have written about an emergency car kit and what you need in your vehicles before, but I’m adding more things this time. Please keep in mind I have one small car, a Honda CRV. After watching The Weather Channel non-stop for the last few days and the devastation that Hurricane Harvey has done to Texas, Louisiana, and surrounding areas, I realize I need more in my car. Here are my thoughts. I know what Mark and I would need, but if for some unforeseen reason we need to evacuate, my supplies need to be expanded to help others. I have always planned on helping others, but this 500-year storm has opened even my eyes to severe devastation. I personally have seen a roof torn off a home in Illinois, as well as headstones pushed over by a tornado coming through the town I was living in at the time.

This Hurricane Harvey situation has brought me to my knees, who can plan for this type of devastation? I have been through a 100-year storm in Farmington, Utah in 1983. Yes, it was catastrophic, but nowhere near the level of Hurricane Harvey. I’m very emotional as I write this post because I have so many readers in Texas and Lousiana. The world is praying for all involved in the evacuation, clean up, and the rescue efforts like people bringing boats to get people out of their homes and to safety.

One thing that has come to my mind is my car is too small to take enough stuff to evacuate for an extended period of time. I’m working on a plan which will take me months to put together because I have limited funds to purchase what I would need. These items are not a want but a need. I’m one of the most qualified people in my neighborhood to get us through a major disaster. Of course, I wish more were prepared, but I know who is and who is not prepared in my neighborhood.

I’m teaching a class this week to a large subdivision here in Southern Utah who are really in tune with understanding the need to be prepared for the unexpected. Keep in mind that September is National Preparedness Month. I am usually booked to speak one year in advance in September. I am honored to be asked to speak to this large group.

After watching The Weather Channel the last few days, I realize I need to up my game for evacuations. In my home, I have all the tools such as food, water, cooking devices, fuel, first aid kits, etc. This is a keyword, in my home, I am totally prepared. Here’s the deal, I do not have a truck and trailer to take all of the preparedness items needed to survive. So, I’m going to compromise just a little.

One thing I am going to do is buy a larger, I should say a much larger Husky bag or another brand. I prefer the Husky brand bags because they are extremely sturdy and well made. Here is my original list I designed.

Emergency Car Kit

Emergencies or disasters/events can strike at any time, so having certain items in your vehicle can be lifesaving. Place items in a backpack, gym bag, or another container. Be careful about storing items that may be damaged or compromised in extreme heat situations.

  • Names and phone numbers of who to contact in an emergency.
  • Pictures of family members (2 sets) one for an emergency board and one picture to keep in your possession
  • Pictures of pets (2 sets), one for an emergency board and one picture to keep in your possession.
  • Medical records of your pets, this is critical if you find a shelter that will accept pets, many will not (unless you have a pet for medical reasons).
  • Pet 72-hour kit with an extra leash, water/food dishes, and food.
  • Pet crate or cat litter box with extra bags to dispose of waste.
  • Emergency toilet with toilet paper, 10-gallon bags, and kitty litter.
  • Battery/crank powered portable radio/extra batteries.
  • Flashlight/preferably one with solar/crank/LED.
  • Compass and maps; not everyone has GPS in their car or on their phones.
  • Can of motor oil.
  • Fire Extinguisher(5 pound ABC type).
  • Flares and/or orange cones.
  • Jumper cables.
  • Rags/paper towels.
  • Shovel.
  • Pocketknife.
  • Tire gauge.
  • Tool box.
  • Window scraper for ice.

Necessities for survival:

  • Water
  • Food
  • Blankets
  • Jackets/sweaters
  • Emergency cash: approximately $200.00 in small bills
  • First Aid Kit
  • Baby Wipes
  • Hand Sanitizer/bars of hand soap
  • Toothbrushes, deodorant (non-meltable type)
  • Scissors/pens/pencils (not crayons-they melt)
  • Emergency snack food and/or MRE meals (items may need to be replaced more frequently if stored in extreme heat conditions)
  • Whistles
  • Umbrella
  • Hand warmers
  • Extra blankets

Additional Items for my Emergency Car Kit:

  • Underwear for adult men and women, children’s sizes too. I think we would all love a new pair or two of underwear if we were stuck in a shelter for weeks. Bonus, would lots of children’s sizes.
  • Diapers, every size if possible, not a whole box but split a box with neighbors so we all have items to share if we must evacuate to a shelter.
  • Throw in a couple of extra shirts, t-shirts roll up really well. All sizes, trust me, people will be happy to put on a clean shirt after a few days.
  • Blankets, if people are cold in a shelter we could pass out an extra blanket or two to people who have nothing to stay warm.
  • N-95 or N-100 Masks and latex free gloves.
  • Water, I am putting more water in my car, I will not pay $20.00 for a case of water. I will share what I have with others.
  • Food, I am now going to add a duplicate of my emergency food bag to my car.
  • Kelly Kettle uses only twigs and pine cones, I could boil water with it. My post showing how to use a Kelly Kettle.

Please let me know what you would add to this list and I will add it. My car is small but I want to be prepared to help others. Of course, I will throw in my 72-hour bags we talked about yesterday if Mark and I are asked to evacuate. I have said this before, I am not “bugging out”, I will evacuate if need be, but I am not going to be a target. My home is safe and secure and I have everything we need to be prepared for the unexpected. May God bless our world.

Evacuation plan by Linda

Husky Bag

Kelly Kettle

The post Emergency Car Kit-What You Need In Your Vehicles appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How to Make Your Own Pectin

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How to Make Your Own Pectin Homemade pectin is usually made from apples or crab apples, both of which have an abundance of pectin.  Making homemade pectin is one of those things you can do to save some money and to learn as a self-reliance skill.  If there was ever a time when the stores …

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The post How to Make Your Own Pectin appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

How To Freeze Fresh Eggs The Right Way

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How To Freeze Fresh Eggs The Right Way If you own chickens you will know that they can produce more eggs that you can eat on a daily basis. Even more so when it’s warmer out. In the winter they lay less but you can still end up with a lot of eggs sitting around …

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The post How To Freeze Fresh Eggs The Right Way appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

30 Survival Skills Modern People Have Forgotten

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Every generation is skilled at using the technology of its era. For example, people today are very good at driving cars, using smartphones, setting up home entertainment systems, and so forth. The problem is, if the end of the world as we know it ever happens, all those skills will be useless. The skills of […]

The post 30 Survival Skills Modern People Have Forgotten appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Texas and the Catastrophes

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Texas and the Catastrophes Bob Hawkins “The APN Report“ Audio player below! Hurricane season still hasn’t hit it’s peak and already it has laid at our feet a huge amount of devastation, delivered in one storm into the Gulf coast of Texas & Louisiana. It gives one pause to wonder just what more lies ahead. … Continue reading Texas and the Catastrophes

The post Texas and the Catastrophes appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.