A Review of OTC Meds for Your Kit

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To recap the medications I believe you should have, unless of course you are allergic to any of the elements, are:   This is a review:

You need medications in suitable form (tablet, chewable or liquid) for each of the persons in your family of the following medications:  These medications are available ” Over the Counter” (OTC) in the US and in Canada.

1.Acetaminophen   (aka tylenol)
2.Aspirin   (Give no aspirin to children without a specific physician’s order, as aspirin products and other salicylates are implicated in something called Reye’s Syndrome which is a devastating illness in children and those under 18.)
3.Loperamide (Imodium AD)  Available OTC in the US and in Canada.
4.Pepto-Bismol  (This is a salicylate, check with your pediatrician as to whether in an emergency, or when he/she is unreachable, whether they wish your child to have pepto-bismol, in view of Reye’s potential)
5.Diphenhydramine  (aka Benadryl)   (Please have in capsular and in liquid form, and in chewable if you have children.
6.Iosat (for all family members)  One source is www.nukepills.com   I will discuss at length later and
there is detailed information on the site also.
7. Omeprazole     Try to get brown oval tablets rather than capsules because they can be cut in half as needed.
8. Loratadine (aka Claritin, or Alavert) tablets and rapidly dissolving variety also.
     (You may substitute Cetirizine should it be more effective for you.)
9. Ibuprofen 200mg. tablets, and liquid should you have children.  (Clear this drug in advance with your pediatrician)
10.Ipecac syrup
11. Simethicone liquid for children, and capsules or tablets for adults.

You may also wish to add Mucinex tablets.  These are glyceryl guaicolate in Canada, ask your pharmacist for guidance.

 Generic medicines for these supplies are just fine. Try to find meds with expiration dates marked on the package that are as far in the future as possible.  Wal-Mart, because they tend to move a lot of generic product, often has lots of medicines which have an expiration date farthest in the future.

Always keep 30 days ahead on prescription medications if you can, 90 days if you are able..

Of course, OTC and any drug is dangerous to children, and so these need to be packed away or in a locked cabinet that you, the adult can quickly access.
I will speak of these at length in the future.