VA reinspection done, added another pressure treated wood rack

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I have a good feeling about the reinspection as the VA guy took only basic photos to show paint work that was done and did not go all “anal retentive” about looking for paint chips or doing a close inspection of the “problem areas” paint job.   Hopefully I will get back a good inspection report in a week or two and then the loan will be approved soon after that report.  I want to get started on all the work by the end of September first part of October during so the contrator has good weather to do the work.

Finished up a new pressure treated wood rack.  Now I have  wood racks that will hold about a cord and half of wood above the concrete.  Those racks should help keep my firewood dry, especially if we don’t get 18 + inches of  standing snow and runoff melt.  My wood guy will be delivering a load of wood this next week and it will be great to have racks all filled up and have a system in place for the wood to dry.   I have some leftover fire wood from last year that is very dry, so I’m restacking the wood, cutting some of the big chunks to stove length and trying to get ahead on the needed “kindling” for winter.  My splitting axe is sharpened up but the new 6 pound splitting maul needs a little sharpening as it bounced off a couple of knotty logs.  I know that some people will disagree with me but I think all cutting tools should be as sharp as possible, not just good enough to get the job done.  I’d rather bury my axe in my cutting stump, rather than have the axe glance off and hit my leg.

I’m still learnining to use the Splitting maul but it works great on those job when you need a bigger hammer!  I know 6 pounds does not seem like much but that is about as much as I can do to swing that maul to get the job done.

I bouught a snow blower in order to deal with a heavy snow.  With any luck, getting the snow blower will mean I will not need to use a snow blower this year.  I’m adding  more sand, salt  and a propane torch (melt ice)  to get ready for a hard winter like last year.  Much better to have stuff ready and not need it rather than need stuff and not have it on hand.  I think we are facing another snowy and cold winter here in SW Idaho.  My planning is based for the worst winter this year compared to last year.

FYI: Don’t buy cheap LED bulbs.  I have had 3 “cheap “bulbs  fail in less than a year.  What scares me is the LED bulbs cracked at the base and might pose a fire hazard.  Spend the extra money and buy LED bulbs from a solid company.

 

I think that is about all I have for this week.  With a bit Of luck in a couple of weeks I’lll have new pics of the siding and replacing windows project.

Is Krypton-85 (Radioactive) Causing More Extreme Weather, Lightning, Hurricanes?

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stock here– I haven’t run down the K85 rabbit hole at all.    I have noted in my personal life of observation a massive amount of “cloud to cloud” lightning, which I cannot remember ever experiencing before.    Also seems like more jet planes are getting hit.

TY to HoTaters for putting this all together at ENENEWS
————————————————————————-

HoTaters

Hello, Code. I have posted the link for a scholarly paper linking the presence of atmospheric releases of Krypton-85 to storm activity.
Will either get the link and .pdf source from my library, or will try to re-post it. Too bad we don’t have ready access to archived material. Personally try to save these links.
There was a good one that was easily found in 2011. Posted the link several times in 2011-2012.
Hopefully will be able to retrieve the entire article as it was published w/o restriction in the past.

It’s probably on my desktop computer but will try to find it for you. The main focus of the article I found (and likely a few others here way back when) was the effect of Krypton 85 on storm activity, specifically.
Don’t recall seeing any inference or statement though in relation to the formation of hurricanes. Don’t know if that’s what Dr. A. might have said….

Here is more here:
https://www.google.com/search?q=metereological+consequences+of+k-85&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
I also have a file which I have posted previously on enenews.com, but I’m really busy right now. The thorium industry wants to allow more K-85 into the atmosphere because they can’t operate on the present EPA restrictions.
There was a letter to the EPA saying that they needed to have the restrictions lifted for allowable K-85.
The sad thing is that they will keep reprocessing uranium, etc., and using nuclear technology until a storm will come along and melt down all the reactors.
Trump is wanting small nuclear “tactical” weapons. The destruction of the earth is. in my opinion, almost complete because too many politicians around the world have no knowledge of the horrible consequences of radiation to all life.


  • CodeShutdownCodeShutdown

    stock, for understanding the effect of krypton, read this paper on the influence of cosmic rays modulated by the suns magnetic field on earths climate via nucleation of low level clouds. The main thing required to understand the role of krypton is to compare the ionization potential of cosmic rays, and krypton, maybe look at carbon 14 and radon too. This SHOULD give a relative perspective.
    You would like the paper because most of the climate change observed can be ascribed to modulation of cosmic rays by the sun and subsequent variation in cloud cover which has forcing potential of 20 to 25 watts/m2
    http://www.earthscienceindia.info/pdfupload/tech_pdf-9.pdf
    solar effect on cloud nucleation at lower altitudes is an order of magnitude larger than previously assumed
    http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/9/4/045004/pdf
    another interesting paper on the association of cosmic ray nucleation of clouds and its effect on climate
    http://insa.nic.in/writereaddata/UpLoadedFiles/PINSA/2017_Art41.pdf
    My first inclination would be to think krypton could cool the climate. But the situation is complex with latent heat moving with winds and the time delay brought by nucleation changing the regions where energy flow and shading may occur. Clouds over mid latitudes have a different effect on climate than at the poles


Dr. Anne Lee Tomlinson MaziarDr. Anne Lee Tomlinson Maziar

On another note, I am reading a book on organic vegan farming. According to the laws of energy, the means to replenish farming all comes from plant based sources. Humans and other animals are consumers of that energy, not producers.
Animal manure works only because the animals have eaten plants, but with a huge loss of the original energy by the time it has been used to fertilize fields. Modern farming also uses fossil fuels which also is a waste of energy and destructive to the environment.

HoTatersHoTaters

Ref. below is fr. footnotes at Wikipedia. Need to find the scholarly paper discussing how Kr-85 is specifically linked to increased storm activity. That does exist. It’s easier to find studies discussing atmospheric conductivity.
Winger; et al. (2005). “A new compilation of the atmospheric 85krypton inventories from 1945 to 2000 and its evaluation in a global transport model”. Jrnl of Envir Radioactivity. 80: 183–215. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2004.09.005.
Might be stuck w. Elsevier references & need to purchase the article. (It was avail. for free.) Linking to DOE Technical Paper from 1978; poss. the most credible source readily available. Some anti-nuclear critics link the presence of Krypton 85 to climate change. (That’s a stretch & poss. a bogus argument). Full texr of paper avail. in .pdf format here:
https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7076284
Basically the hypothesis tested was: does presence of Kr-85 in the atmosphere alter the natural ionization background? Explores potential consequences of an altered electrical state of the atmosphere.
Estim. levels of atmospheric Kr-85:
https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-011-0982-6_26?no-access=true
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/1352231094900418
Article above discusses environmental radioactivity
air conductivity.


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  • HoTatersHoTaters

    This one might be the one discussing weather and climate effects:
    Kollert, R. and Bitzin, M.: 1989, ‘Climatic Aspects of Radioactive Gases, in Particular Krypton-85’, Kollert-Donderer, Bremen.
    (Will see if it’s avail. w/o doing the “Google Scholar” bit.)
    https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-011-0982-6_26
    From this preview .pdf: As of publication date in 1989 (and things may have changed dramatically since then), the…
    “estimated air load of Kr-85 is eight orders of magnitude larger than the natural Kr-85 radiation background of 100 nBq/m3 corresponding to a total natural Kr-85 inventory of 400 GBq (NCRP, 1975)…. This is the KR-95 inventory shown in Figure 1 as the natural background existing before 1945.”
    This is interesting, from Wikipedia:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krypton-85
    “However, as of 2009 the total amount in the atmosphere is estimated at 5500 PBq due to anthropogenic sources.[5] At the end of the year 2000, it was estimated to be 4800 PBq,[4] and in 1973, an estimated 1961 PBq (53 Megacuries).[6] The most important of these human sources is nuclear fuel reprocessing. Nuclear fission produces about three atoms of krypton-85 for every 1000 fissions; i.e. it has a fission yield of 0.3%.[7] Most or all of this krypton-85 is retained in the spent nuclear fuel rods; spent fuel on discharge from a reactor contains between 0.13-1.8 PBq/Mg of krypton-85….”
    Stats from prior to 2011 and Fukushima accident.


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    • HoTatersHoTaters

      Code, what do you think of the following?
      The following is interesting. “HoTaters” gets plastered all over the internet. Hmmn, in association with the alleged climate change effects of Kr-85. (Sigh.) Guess that happens if you comment a lot, and people talk (which they do).
      The original post quoted is from an intelligent & thoughtful post from Horse, in response to one of our earlier discussions here re: Kr-85.
      “RE: Krypton-85 & Climate – Horse – 03-24-2017
      @ HoTaters, Noticed your interest in Kr-85 and extreme storms, one of my interests too.
      Quote:Lescaudron, Pierre; Knight-Jadczyk, Laura (2014-05-22). Earth Changes and the Human-Cosmic Connection (The Secret History of the World) (Kindle Locations 2031-2035). Red Pill Press. Kindle Edition.
      http://www.redpillpress.com/shop/earth-changes-human-cosmic-connection-secret-history-world-series-volume-3/
      Nuclear plants exhibit similar properties. They emit ionizing radiation which ‘scrape away’ electrons from molecules, creating positive and negative ions. [307]
      In the conductive plume, the negative ions are attracted to the top of the plume by the positive ionosphere, while the positive ions are attracted to the bottom of the plume by the Earth’s negative surface. The fact that nuclear plant plumes are mostly composed of water vapor, a good electric conductor, eases the ionic movement described above and the upward flow of free electrons from the ground to the top of the plume….”


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    • HoTatersHoTaters

      from comment by Horse and quotation, (cont.)
      Very interesting!
      “On April 18th, 2013 the LaSalle nuclear plant in Illinois experienced an unusual incident: two of its reactors shut down and a radioactive venting procedure was carried out when it was struck by lightning. However, from 1992 to 2003, U.S. nuclear plants were struck by lightning 66 times, yet none of those strikes caused equipment damage or radioactive leakage. [309]
      [attachment=1179]
      So, what really happened in LaSalle? Was the accident simply due to an insulator defect, as claimed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), [310] or was the source of this ‘lightning’ something out of the ordinary? Nuclear plants are very well protected with lightning prevention equipment, [311] but cometary discharges exhibit two major differences when compared to ‘normal’ lightning bolts: their polarity is reversed [312] and their intensity can be much higher. The steady increase in cometary activity may cause more such events in the near future.”
      From Horse:
      “Good book with more on the Electric Universe theories, I bought the kindle version. Plumes of water vapor are a good conductor; Krypton is an even better conductor. Most lightning is negative but some lightning can be positive and 10X stronger than the negative. Krypton-85, with its 10.8 year half-life, wasn’t in the atmosphere until the Atomic Age….”


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      • HoTatersHoTaters

        Horse, cont.
        “Bomb testing 60 years ago, most of it had beta decayed into stable rubidium. Industrial NPP releases have been steadily increasing as more were put online and numerous accidents along the way were dumping this in the lower atmosphere instead of blowing it up into the upper atmosphere where it would spend some time decaying before falling on our heads.
        Fuku was four big accidents and fuel melt blobs are still in an uncontained and unknown state. In the early years I noticed lots of intense storms on the tepcams; fog, rain, and lightning. Remember the red lightning; that was positive lightning. As the plume spread over the northern hemisphere other areas began experiencing more extreme weather events. The plume acts as a radioactive cathode to deliver a stronger charge to ground. Charged particles from solar wind and upper atmospheric cometary dust loading find an amplified path to ground in the plume.”
        From personal observation (HoTaters), the atmospheric effects of the Fuku releases in March and April, 2011 were massive. We had rainouts in N. California of nearly Biblical proportions; massive storm cells such as I had NEVER seen. Everyone (inc. all the “old timers” 80-90 years old) said the storms were unprecedented.
        So on some level, we may have to talk about anecdotal reports. But the link to the increased storm activity exists.
        Just have to find that derned reference again!


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      • HoTatersHoTaters

        Code, what do you think of the discusson re: Kr-85, positive and negative lightning polarity, red lightning, Tepcam observations, and the presence of Kr-85 having a cathode-like effect?
        I’m not up to speed on electrical energy and its behavior.
        What do you make of this? You are better able to analyze the data in interpret it.
        And Jebus, you, too, might understand this and be well qualified to comment.
        Anyone else care to chime in?
        My personal research on the weather in N. California and Oregon, parts of Washington State showed lots of heavy rain activity in March and April, 2011. Would have to check the rainfall data (precip. figures) for accurate info. I did check the rainfall for N. Cali. on the approximate date the plume might have made landfall after Reactor 3 detonated/got wrecked. There was a very intense rainstorm around Marysville and Yuba City the date the plume likely arrived. Wind and jet stream patterns showed the precip. for No. Calfornia was pushed into that area, where there was heavy rainfall.
        Commenting on some of this pushes me back to trying to recapture data I’d studied back in 2011-2012. Some of the data is hard to find again.


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  • HoTatersHoTaters

    Wikipedia article cont.
    “The average atmospheric concentration of krypton-85 was approximately 0.6 Bq/m3 in 1976, and has increased to approximately 1.3 Bq/m3 as of 2005.[4][10] These are approximate global average values; concentrations are higher locally around nuclear reprocessing facilities, and are generally higher in the northern hemisphere than in the southern hemisphere.
    For wide-area atmospheric monitoring, krypton-85 is the best indicator for clandestine plutonium separations.
    Krypton-85 releases increase the electrical conductivity of atmospheric air. Meteorological effects are expected to be stronger closer to the source of the emissions.”
    Wondering what accidents like WIPP, Hanford incidents, other, may have done to the total atmospheric loading.
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6044655_Meteorological_Consequences_of_Atmospheric_Krypton-85
    Can download abstract in Excel. Must join ResearchGate to get full article access (or find it somewhere else).
    Majia is cited here:
    http://caferadlab.com/printthread.php?tid=168
    Majia cited the possible effect of the Fukushima accident on atmospheric Kr-85 levels.

    • OK, practically wrote a novel here, LOL. Don’t want to wallpaper. Will post further discussion at the Nuclear Issues Forum so I don’t go too far afield. This is what happens when I more or less take a week off from reading here! Down the rabbit hole I go!
      Would just like to suggest to others who do research here, try to capture your data & citations. It is very useful later on and keeps ya from having to re-invent the wheel.
      That being said, I really appreciate the posts from Hillbilly, roger that, Jebus, Code, stock, Drs. G and A, Majia (whom I miss), and so many others….

911 Attacks Were an Ouside and Inside Job — Crossing the Rubicon

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Crossing the Rubicon — Internalizing the Knowledge that 911 Attacks were carried out by factions of the US government is a tough one for many  to wrap their heads around.    It is almost the magnitude of being to horrible to believe.    Once you make this mental jump, crossing the Rubicon so to speak, it is sure hard to go back to your old comfortable ways of thinking you knew enough about how the world really worked.

So in the winter of 49BC Caesar decide to take his army across the Rubicon and start a civil war. By crossing the Rubicon he had passed the point of no return, committed everything and gambled all. As he crossed the Rubicon he turned to his men and shouted the immortal words, “The die is cast.”
 
On January 10th, Caesar, with his faithful 13th Legion marched on Rome. Over the next five years he fought, bribed and negotiated his bloody way to the top.

I did not “cross this Rubicon” until last year.    I found a source to USGS debris testing, and being an
expert in radiation, immediately noticed radio-isotopes that were present in ratios of hundreds of times more than would just be normal.

The evidence below indicates that micro-nuke bombs were used.     Think of the sociopathic attitudes that came up with that plan.    Some would question, do micro-nukes even exist, and indeed they do, since 1962 or earlier.    Watch the video at the far bottom that was declassified in 1997.

See my full article here:

http://www.nukepro.net/2016/09/was-9-11-actually-nuclear-explosion.html

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ssDzMg-31s8/V9SuWPMymHI/AAAAAAAASRQ/d4fLuZNpx3QSHIeNlebwAYo7X-nHmvSbgCLcB/s1600/list%2Bof%2BWTC%2Belement%2Bfound.png

Meet The Changemakers: 13 People Inspiring & Leading Change In Sustainable Farming

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It’s no secret that industrial agriculture is wreaking havoc on our planet. But, in a world of seven billion people, can alternative growing strategies really feed everyone?

In truth, sustainable agriculture is the ONLY option for adequately feeding the world. While conventional strategies steal fertility from the future by relying on synthetic fertilizers and pesticides at the expense of soil health, organic methods leave the earth better after every season.

There are thousands of people working hard to promote alternative agricultural techniques around the world today, and together they are slowly changing the conversation around food.

This week, to kick off our Four-Part Global Changemakers articles series, we’ve chosen to celebrate 13 individuals who are transforming how we all get our food — educating others about how we can eat well and still leave the planet healthier in the process.

We hope these individuals will inspire YOU to find NEW WAYS to improve the sustainability of your own diet.

Listed in no particular order (because each of these folks deserves to be celebrated and honored in their own right):

Sustainable farming changemaker - Howard Garrett

#1 – Howard Garrett
Radio Show Host, “The Dirt Doctor”

As one of the legends of organic gardening, Howard Garrett (the ‘Dirt Doctor’) has long been a leader in the movement in the United States. Throughout his career, Howard has worked in greenhouses, as a landscape contractor, golf course planner and organic product developer, and he is the chairman of the Texas Organic Research Center (TORC).

Born in Pittsburgh, Texas, Howard served in the Marines from 1970 to 1977 after graduating from Texas Tech University. The birth of his daughter in 1985 was a turning point in Howard’s life, and concerns about the world she was going to grow up in caused him to commit his career to the education, research, and the promotion of organic gardening practices.

Howard is the author of over a dozen books based on gardening, lawn care and natural wellness for the planet, including Marjory Wildcraft’s personal favorite, Bugs: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

Today, Howard hosts the Organic Gardening Show as the Dirt Doctor, a nationally-syndicated radio show that airs each weekend on the Salem Radio Network. You can learn from Howard Garrett by checking out his radio show live from 8 to 11 am CST on Sundays, or by listening to his weekly radio show as a podcast through the Dirt Doctor App.

Sustainable farming changemaker - Joel Salatin

#2 – Joel Salatin
Sustainable Grass Farmer Extraordinaire

As the persona behind Polyface Farms, Joel Salatin needs little introduction in the world of natural farming. Salatin got his start in agriculture when his parents moved to an abused, worn-out farm in the Shenandoah Valley. As a family, they began to heal the landscape and restore fertility through innovative farming techniques that relied on nature as a guide.

Today, Salatin still farms that same plot of land and continues to improve it by planting trees, digging ponds, and building fertility through compost piles. He is famous for his rotational grazing strategies that move animals around his property through portable electric fences, and his ‘pastured poultry’ strategies for producing meat that’s raised entirely on his property’s fertility. For this reason, Joel considers himself first to be a grass farmer, as a healthy prairie system is a key to the functioning of every aspect of his farm.

Today, Polyface feeds hundreds of people and is considered to be a premier non-industrial production oasis. Beyond working his farm, Joel seeks to educate the world about the benefits of natural farming through numerous books and a lecture series that takes him throughout the country. In this way, Salatin works endlessly to make environmentally- friendly agricultural practices more accessible to people everywhere.

 

Sustainable farming changemaker - Hank Will

#3 – Hank Will
Molecular Geneticist turned Magazine Editor

From molecular geneticist to editor for eight national magazines, Hank Will’s career path has hardly been typical. Forever in love with the prairies of the Midwest, Hank became a professor of molecular genetics while still dabbling in the world of heritage livestock and unconventional farming as much as he could. His parent’s seed company was a major inspiration throughout his life and was the primary reason why he studied genetics in school.

After two decades as a professor, Hank transitioned his career and became a freelance journalist while working at his home farm, Cottonwood Creek Farms. His farm experience has allowed him to be an educational voice for small-scale, sustainable agriculture around the world. Today, he is the Editor in Chief of Mother Earth News Magazine and Heirloom Gardener Magazine, as well as the editorial director for all other brands from Ogden Publishing.

Hank’s personal farming experience spans more than four decades and is predominately focused on small-scale, high-cash flow operations, as well as maintaining perennial plants and raising heritage chickens. Today, he has written multiple books about natural farming while living in Kansas with his wife at their home on Prairie Turnip Farm.

#4 – John Dromgoole
Organic Gardening Radio Talk Show Host

His south Texas roots might account for John Dromgoole’s passion for southwest plants, but John has kept his passion for organic agriculture alive for over three decades. He is the host of America’s longest running organic gardening radio talk show (Gardening Naturally with John Dromgoole) and was the host of the first natural gardening series on PBS, called “The New Garden.”

John is also the owner of The Natural Gardener, an award-winning organic garden center in Austin, TX that is considered one of the top five garden centers in the United States. His main passion is finding better ways to bring professional and novice gardeners alike information about organic gardening techniques and resources so that they can personally experience how easy and beneficial following sustainable practices can be. Dwelling in the desert southwest, John is primarily concerned with the increasing scarcity of water resources and focuses his efforts on educating gardeners on water conservation efforts.

Thanks to his work for the organic farming movement, John has won local, state and regional awards, including the “Texas Legendary Promotor of Organics.”

#5 – Roger Doiron
Replanter of the White House Garden

Considered to be one of the “10 Most Inspiring People in Local Food”, Roger Doiron has made a significant impact on the planet in surprising ways — including through starting the campaign to replant the kitchen garden at the White House. Most notable, Roger is the founder and director of Kitchen Gardeners International, a nonprofit based in Maine that today includes over 35,000 individuals from 120 countries who are making a conscious effort to grow their own food at home.

Roger is also a freelance food and gardening writer, and his efforts to promote local, slow food has been featured in numerous news sources, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, Mother Earth News Magazine and more.

By combining his passion for supporting his own local food system and the state of slow food at large, Roger has helped bring the issues of sustainable food to the global stage — one kitchen garden at a time.

Sustainable farming changemaker - Sustainable farming changemaker - Dan Bussey

#6 – Dan Bussey
Seed Savers Exchange’s Heirloom Apple Enthusiast

As a longtime apple lover, perhaps only Johnny Appleseed has more passion for this classic fall fruit than Dan Bussey. Dan is the author of a 7-volume set titled The Illustrated History of Apples in North America, which is an encyclopedia collection that documents all 17,000 apple varieties that have grown in America between 1623 and 2000, making it the most complete collection of its kind.

Currently, Dan works as the orchard manager for the Seed Savers Exchange’s Heritage Orchard in Iowa. There, he tends to over 1,100 apple trees to preserve rare varieties so that they can be propagated and sold to customers of the exchange.

Founded in Missouri in 1975, Seed Savers Exchange started with two heirloom seed varieties from Bavaria and has since expanded to include over 20,000 plant varieties and 13,000 members. Almost every variety of apple is included in the Exchange’s collection, and if you choose to plant an heirloom apple tree, you might have Dan Bussey to thank.

Sustainable farming changemaker - John Jeavons

#7 – John Jeavons
Grow More Food With Less Water,
While Boosting Soil Fertility

As the Executive Director of the global non-profit Ecology Action, John Jeavons has long been a leader in the field of bio-intensive agriculture. His passion for developing small-scale, high-yield farming systems led to the development of the GROW BIOINTENSIVE Sustainable Mini-Farming method, which is an approach to farming that allows small farmers to increase their yields while using two-thirds less water and building up their soil fertility up 60 times faster than nature can manage. This technique has been used for over four decades and has been successfully implemented in almost every climate system of the world, including 143 different countries.

John has also authored a book about his techniques, titled How to Grow More Vegetables and Fruits, Nuts, Berries, Grains and Other Crops Than You Ever Thought Possible on Less Land Than You Can Imagine. Now translated into eight languages, this book is considered the primer on sustainable mini-farming.

Sustainable farming changemaker - Paul Gautschit

#8 – Paul Gautschi
Back to Eden Soil Star

Known throughout northern Washington as a master arborist, Paul Gautschi has been puttering in his backyard soil for over 55 years. Though he rarely raises food to sell, Paul has been feeding friends and his seven children off his garden for decades. Over the years, he has also given tours of his orchards and gardens to groups that sometimes range to over 400 people.

When Paul first moved to Washinton, he struggled to make plants grow in the heavy clay soil. However, he slowly started modifying his techniques to mimic the ways plants grow in the natural world with much more success.

This achievement made Paul the star in the popular film Back to Eden, which has been viewed online over 50 million times. The film shares Paul’s lifelong journey as a gardener, his relationship with God, and the simple, sustainable growing methods he incorporates into his garden to achieve impressive results. Through this film, you can gain inspiration from the life of a man who has devoted himself to organic growing and better understand what you can do to your own garden to increase yields simply and sustainably.

Sustainable farming changemaker - Ron Finley

#9 – Ron Finley
Los Angeles’s ‘Gangsta Gardener’

A lifelong South Los Angeles resident, Ron Finley knew firsthand what the consequences of living in a food desert were when he set out to make a change for his community. Today, Ron is working to create urban food forests that can provide food to urban residents.

In 2010, Ron planted a small garden in a dirt strip near his home and started giving away the produce it delivered to his neighbors. Despite the value he was adding to the neighborhood food system, Ron was cited by the City of Los Angeles for illegally using the city’s property. Rather than let the government shut down his garden, Ron fought back with other green activists and demanded the right to grow food in his neighborhood. The city eventually backed off, and Ron has been expanding his operation to the surrounding communities ever since.

Thanks to his popular TED talk, Ron’s mission gained mainstream attention, and today he is supported by a team that knows him as the ‘Gangsta Gardener.’ Together, they are working to turn Los Angeles into a place where communities come together to create gardens and kids can grow up with more options for healthy food, sustainably grown food.

 Sustainable farming changemaker - Allan Savory

#10 – Allan Savory
Rotational Graving Pioneer

Born in Zimbabwe, Allan Savory has long held a passion for managing ecosystems. He studied botany and zoology in South Africa and pursued a career as a research biologist. In the 1960s, Allan had a breakthrough about the cause of deforestation around the globe when he realized how important grazing animals were for preserving the African Savannahs. These observations led him to the conclusion that rotationally graving cattle on degraded land could improve grasslands and keep desertification at bay while promoting a more sustainable food source than tilling up soil to plant crops.

In 2003, he was the recipient of Australia’s International Banksia Award “for the person or organization doing the most for the environment on a global scale.” A TED talk he gave in 2013 has since gotten over 3.4 million views, earning it recognition as one of the top fifty most intriguing TED talks of all time.

Though his views on increasing cattle around the globe have been controversial, Allan Savory’s organization continues to promote the idea that bunching and moving livestock in ways that mimic nature is good for the environment. Savory’s book, Holistic Management: A New Framework for Decision-Making is a record to his effort to find ways for regular people to find the means to combat the ecological damage of the modern age by implementing strategies that mimic how nature naturally works.

Sustainable farming changemaker - Maheswar Khillar

#11 – Maheswar Khillar
Rooftop Gardener Inspiring His Indian Neighborhood

Mahesward Khillar is a retired OAS officer in India who is making rooftop gardening trendy in his community. His love of homegrown vegetables inspired him to start producing his own, despite severe space limitations. He has maintained his impressively diverse rooftop garden for the past 25 years and has inspired others around him to do the same.

Though Mahesward has been interested in plants since he was a kid, his house in Bhubaneswar had no space for anything but potted plants on the roof. Not one to back away from a challenge, he gradually began experimenting with putting different plants and fruit trees on the rooftop. Now, his collection has taken over the entire roof and takes him roughly three hours each day to maintain. The produce he grows regularly winds up in the meals that his wife cooks and the excess is often given to local friends that appreciate the ability to eat food that hasn’t been tainted with synthetic chemicals.

Now, roughly 300 other families in the region have been inspired enough by Mahesward’s rooftop garden to start their own, making him the leader of a gardening movement in his community that shows no sign of slowing down.

Sustainable farming changemaker - Echo International

#12 – Echo International
Development Hub for Sustainable Agriculture

For the world’s most at risk-farming communities, surviving the crisis of climate change will come down to cultivating robust seed varieties, utilizing appropriate technology, and having the knowledge to implement it- three missions that ECHO has taken to heart for decades.

ECHO is an information hub for development practitioners that strives to find agricultural solutions to feed the world’s most vulnerable populations. ECHO maintains a demonstration farm in southern Florida as well as retreats for development organizers and an annual conference on sustainable farming for impoverished communities.

The organization began in the early 1970s when Indiana businessman Richard Dugger took a group of high school students to Haiti and saw firsthand how difficult farming could be for people in developing countries. ECHO (Educational Concerns for Haiti Organization) was formed to address the problem, and since then ECHO has grown its involvement to include countries throughout Central America, Africa, and Asia.

Today, the organization operates as an experimental farm for low-tech agricultural solutions and as a pipeline for sharing information, ideas, methods, techniques and even seeds that have potential to lessen the impacts of world hunger.

Sustainable farming changemaker - Biodiversity International

#13 – Bioversity International
Supporting Farmers In Developing Countries

Bioversity International is a global research and development organization that strives to support smallholder farmers in developing countries. The organization provides resources for sustainable agriculture techniques that improve harvests while promoting resource conservation around the planet.

By partnering with low-income countries, the organization is working from the soil up to improve agricultural sustainability and global food security for the world’s most vulnerable populations. The organization works to deliver scientific evidence and policy options that fit the unique conditions of each community to ensure that farmers have the resources they need to make improvements that increase their yields and profit margins.

In this way, Bioversity farmers are taught techniques for harvesting and using rainwater, creating on-farm fertility and rotational grazing techniques that enhance pastureland. The program specifically works to improve the range of appropriate technology options in regions where large-scale agriculture isn’t possible.

Want To Meet Even MORE Changemakers…? 

Here at The Grow Network, we’re dedicated to connecting Changemakers from around the globe, to extend the reach of these visionaries to spread their messages and teachings.

Because while the Changemakers on this list are accomplishing incredible things for the planet’s food system, most of them started  small. In fact, many of the leaders on this list began by keeping a simple garden that let them discover the joy of feeding themselves real food for the first time.

Want to spend more time learning from and supporting the work of Changemakers?   Consider becoming a member of The Grow Network here. 

And stay tuned… because this article is #1 of 4 in this series, highlighting the important work of Changemakers from around the world.

The post Meet The Changemakers: 13 People Inspiring & Leading Change In Sustainable Farming appeared first on The Grow Network.

Irma, last update 9-11-17

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Well it’s over, goodbye Irma. We were very lucky, again!
The motel lost its power about 8:00pm last night and didn’t come back on until we were checking out Monday about 10:30am, it was windy but no rain. At home, I had one big tree 20-inch diameter down and one next to it about 16-inch diameter leaning and ready to go. None hit the house just a bunch of branches all over the yard and there was no flooding.

Also no power at home, the power company says maybe a week or more before power is restored. So the Honda gets to earn its keep.

My front yard before clean-up.

Neighbors yard, lost two trees.

My front yard tree. Lucky all trees down fell into the street!

Neighbors cutting it up so not to block the road.

Another view of it.

My side yard.

The other side yard.

My winters firewood stack blown over.

A house a couple yards away. Could have been bad if it fell on the house.

Let’s Go To The Fair! The Mother Earth News Fair

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Let’s go to the fair!

Remember the excitement of going to the State Fair? This is no different! At the Mother Earth News Fair, you’ll find amazing workshops and lectures to help you on your path to independence and self-reliance.  

So many things to do and see

Whether you want to learn how to grow and raise your own food, build a root cellar, create a green dream homestead, or see what new products are on the market, this is the fair for you. 

There is a whole selection of vendors and a bunch of hands-on workshops. There were too many great booths and exhibitions to list. The place was buzzing with alternative energy vehicles, traditional folk arts and crafts, heritage and landrace livestock, homestead-scale saw mills, and so much more.

Would you like to test drive a tractor? I think I could do some damage with the front-end loader.

Sawmill? If you want to fell trees from you land, the sawmill area is the place for you!

Livestock area

In the livestock area, you’ll find heritage breeds, like Rosie and her calf. They are Dexter cows, which are miniature cattle. I love this breed!

Inside there were hundreds of vendors with all kinds of things to see and do. It’s a great place to do a lot of shopping!

Expert Speakers

The speaker lineup is awesome, and I’m sure everyone who attended will agree that there wasn’t enough time to take in all of the information that was flying around. There were great talks on sustainability, herbal medicine, vegetable gardening, raising and processing livestock, alternative energy… you name it.

Joel Salatin was there talking about chickens, pigs, and cattle and how to create the deepest and best soil by choreographing the movement of ancient herds.

You even get to talk with these experts!

There is so much going on at these amazing events. I really encourage you to visit one.

These fairs are all over the U.S., so there should be one near you. If not, it is well worth the drive.

See you at a Mother Earth News Fair.

Did you see this Homesteading Basics? Keep your special plants close!

Have you been to a Mother Earth News Fair? Tell us about your experience in the comments below.

 

Click here to get your FREE pass!

Save

The post Let’s Go To The Fair! The Mother Earth News Fair appeared first on The Grow Network.

Let’s Go To The Fair! The Mother Earth News Fair

Let’s go to the fair!

Remember the excitement of going to the State Fair? This is no different! At the Mother Earth News Fair, you’ll find amazing workshops and lectures to help you on your path to independence and self-reliance.  

So many things to do and see

Whether you want to learn how to grow and raise your own food, build a root cellar, create a green dream homestead, or see what new products are on the market, this is the fair for you. 

There is a whole selection of vendors and a bunch of hands-on workshops. There were too many great booths and exhibitions to list. The place was buzzing with alternative energy vehicles, traditional folk arts and crafts, heritage and landrace livestock, homestead-scale saw mills, and so much more.

Would you like to test drive a tractor? I think I could do some damage with the front-end loader.

Sawmill? If you want to fell trees from you land, the sawmill area is the place for you!

Livestock area

In the livestock area, you’ll find heritage breeds, like Rosie and her calf. They are Dexter cows, which are miniature cattle. I love this breed!

Inside there were hundreds of vendors with all kinds of things to see and do. It’s a great place to do a lot of shopping!

Expert Speakers

The speaker lineup is awesome, and I’m sure everyone who attended will agree that there wasn’t enough time to take in all of the information that was flying around. There were great talks on sustainability, herbal medicine, vegetable gardening, raising and processing livestock, alternative energy… you name it.

Joel Salatin was there talking about chickens, pigs, and cattle and how to create the deepest and best soil by choreographing the movement of ancient herds.

You even get to talk with these experts!

There is so much going on at these amazing events. I really encourage you to visit one.

These fairs are all over the U.S., so there should be one near you. If not, it is well worth the drive.

See you at a Mother Earth News Fair.

Did you see this Homesteading Basics? Keep your special plants close!

Have you been to a Mother Earth News Fair? Tell us about your experience in the comments below.

 

Click here to get your FREE pass!

Save

The post Let’s Go To The Fair! The Mother Earth News Fair appeared first on The Grow Network.

Seriously, Why Are We Still Having Runs On Water Prior To Hurricanes?

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Recently, due to the onslaught of Hurricane Irma I read an article titled Is Hurricane Irma causing too much panic over water, and other preparedness supplies? Of course, it’s not just water that people rush out to buy at the last minute, people buy batteries, gasoline, and apparently pop tarts to name a few items … Continue reading “Seriously, Why Are We Still Having Runs On Water Prior To Hurricanes?”

Survival Water Filter by Survival Hax

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Drinkable water is going to be on the top of the survival priority list in any situation. Whether you are stranded on the road for three days, evading a natural disaster for three weeks, or dealing with TEOTWAWKI for the next three decades, without having enough clean drinking water to stay alive, all of your other preps will not matter. There are a number of ways to treat water to make it drinkable. Having a personal water filter is one of those ways, and has a number of tactical advantages. They are light weight, and inexpensive so each person in your group can have and carry at least two. I see these as reserve items. You should have as much stored water as possible at your main location, as well as larger family sized filters. But these are useful especially if you are on the go and bugging out on foot. Water weighs a lot, and you won’t be able to carry a lot with you. Boiling takes time, requires you stay in one place long enough to do it, and requires fuel. The advantage to portable personal water filters is that you can drink on the go, as you find water.

Survival Hax is a company that imports a line of inexpensive but well made survival items. I have written about their survival shovel,  as well as their EDC keychain

According to the manufacturer, this water filter has the following characteristics:

  • Filter up to 400 gallons (1,500 liters) of drinkable water with one straw. (30% more efficient than standard portable filters.)
  • Advanced filter purifies at .1 microns and removes 99.9% of waterborne protozoan parasites.
  • Chemical Free technology for healthy water intake.
  • Lightweight and easy to store (3oz, 7.5in long, 1in diameter). Perfect for Bug Out Bags.

There are a number of portable water filters on the market, and honestly, all about equally as good.  The particular filter has a number of add ons, including a small compass, small mirror,  and the end cap is a whistle.  Cute, but to me, probably not that all useful. A well-built carabiner allows it to be attached easily on the outside of your gear if you want. But it DOES have a couple features that I consider very useful. If you look at the picture above of the woman drinking, notice how close down to the water she has to get. This filter comes with a length of surgical tubing which will fit on the end to allow you more stand-off from the water.  This allows you to keep your head up higher and to be able to look around while drinking, enhancing your security. The tubing could also be used as an emergency tourniquet.

But the one feature that really stands out for me on this particular filter, is that the end cap is threaded so that you can screw on a standard 28mm plastic water bottle. This has a number of advantages. Water locations can be dangerous places in a serious situation, attracting all kinds of two and four-legged critters. With a couple spare empty bottles, you can fill them up quickly and move on to drink the water away from the water source. I see this as a definite advantage.  You can get one from Survival Hax or from Amazon Prime

Filed under: Azweaponcraftprepper, Equipment Reviews, Survival and Prepping, Water and hydration Tagged: Beggining preppers, Bug Out Bag, Survival and Prepping, Survival water filters

Caribbean Anarchy: Looters armed with guns and knives terrorize hurricane-hit islands; Military Called in to Restore Order

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Escaped prisoners and hundreds of looters armed with guns and knives are terrorizing the British Virgin Islands. […]

The post Caribbean Anarchy: Looters armed with guns and knives terrorize hurricane-hit islands; Military Called in to Restore Order appeared first on Off Grid Survival – Wilderness & Urban Survival Skills.

7 Delicious Things To Do With Cherries

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things to do with cherriesWhen 30 pounds of fresh cherries from Northwest Cherry Growers arrive at your doorstep, it’s hard not to begin eating them one cherry, one pound at a time. Juicy and perfectly ripe, these cherries were welcomed by my family and soon we were researching new and creative recipes for things to do with cherries so we could enjoy them now and months later as sweet preserves. One resource I enjoyed for both information, recipes, and even cute labels to print out for my preserves can be found on this Northwest Cherry Growers page

My daughter requested homemade maraschino cherries, and since we all love those on our ice cream sundaes, she went to work making a healthy version with no sugar added. As these cherries marinated in the sweetened vodka mixture, I discovered the richly flavored vodka was perfect for a little nip every now and then, like, whenever I opened the refrigerator door!

These maraschino cherries are not the artificially bright red cherries from the grocery store but will definitely be an adult-friendly mix in with vanilla ice cream or eaten on their own.

Sugar-Free Maraschino Cherries

  • 5½ cups (1.5lbs) Fresh Cherries, pitted with stems removed
  • 1¾ cups Water
  • 1 cup Vodka
  • 1 tbs Stevia Extract
  • 1 tbs Natural Cherry Flavor — We used the alcohol free brand from Frontier co-op, although with all this vodka, it didn’t make a difference.
  • ½ tsp Almond Extract

DIRECTIONS:

Our first task was to pit all of these cherries. Rather than do this by hand, I purchased a cherry pitter that can handle 6 cherries at once. This is the one I chose. With as many cherries as we had, we needed to get through this task quickly, and this little gadget lived up to our expectations.

For more details about this particular recipe and complete instructions, click here.

Russian Pickled Cherries

Different and tasty!

  • 4 cups sweet cherries I prefer dark, stems removed but pits left intact
  • 2 cups raw apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup raw sugar
  • 2/3 cup water
  • 2 cardamom pods lightly crushed with the side of a knife or a heavy pan to expose the seeds
  • half of a cinnamon stick
  • 8 scrapes of whole nutmeg on a rasp grater or fine microplane
  • 2 whole allspice berries
  • Optional, but tasty, 2 t. kirsch (cherry brandy)

 

DIRECTIONS:

In our research to find different ways to use cherries, besides the preserves detailed in this article, we came across this very unusual recipe. It takes a full month or so to let the cherries pickle, so be patient. It’s worth it.

Go to Foodie With Family for complete instructions. If you make these, my hunch is that you’ll be glad you did.

 Homemade Cherry Ripe Bites

  • 1/2 pounds pitted, fresh cherries
  • 2 T. dry-roasted strawberry powder* or 2 T. goji berries
  • 3/4 c. coconut flakes
  • 1 T. coconut oil, melted
  • 6 ounces dark chocolate, melted

DIRECTIONS:

Once more, my creative and Google-savvy daughter tracked down another winning recipe. We still have a few of these left in the freezer, and every once in a while the cold chocolate/cherry combination is just the perfect treat.

You’ll notice that dry-roasted strawberry powder is called for in this recipe. This, apparently, is something to be found on the grocery store shelves in Australia, where this recipe originates, but fortunately, we have freeze dried strawberries, which we put in a blender for a few seconds to make our own powder. If you don’t have freeze-dried strawberries, you can dehydrate your own and then blend to powder. Either way, this is a healthy, sugar-free recipe, which also happens to be a nicely sweet treat.

Get full instructions and more details here.

 

Spiced Cherry Amaretto Jam

Without a doubt, this was our very favorite cherry recipe out of everything we tried. It’s from The Prepper’s Canning Guide by Daisy Luther, and that book is worth every penny. If you don’t have a copy yet, then today is the day to pick it up. It contains simple instructions for getting started with both water bath canning and pressure canning, but the real treasure you’ll find between the covers are the recipes.

 

Spiced Cherry Amaretto Jam calls for 4 pounds of 4 pounds of sweet cherries, sugar, amaretto, and a few spices, including cloves, that will make your tastebuds sing. We canned 8 jars of this and actually ended up making a second batch using kirsch in place of amaretto. That version was tasty, but we voted and the big winner was the amaretto version.

A few of the other recipes we’ve tried from Daisy’s book turned out just as good — Slow Cooker Plum Butter and Brown Sugar Peach Preserves with jalapenos, in particular. Daisy’s book is simple enough that my daughter picked up on canning quickly, and she is now the “Family Canning Queen.”

 

Brandied Cherry Jam

  • 5 cups sweet or sour cherries, pitted
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2-3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice, approximately 1 large lemon
  • 2-3 tablespoons cherry brandy, such as Kirsch
DIRECTIONS:
This recipe allowed us to put our favorite Dutch oven to use. We combined the cherries and sugar in it and stirred over low heat until sugar was dissolved in the juice of the cherries and the cherries themselves were fully softened. This jam was very easy to make and was the perfect topping for a slightly boozy topping over vanilla ice cream.
The original recipe for this jam can be found at Savory Simple.

Cherry Chocolate Muffins

There’s a funny story behind these muffins and it has to do with The Great British Baking Show. Are you familiar with this series? My family fell in love with the quirky, every day bakers, the even quirkier hosts and the 2 judges, Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry. Strangely, the biggest fan of the show is my husband! He said, “I don’t even know why, but I could sit and watch that show all day long!” So, when his birthday came around, our daughter bought for him Paul Hollywood’s cookbook, How to BakeThen she challenged her dad to begin baking, which he has! He now bakes Paul’s recipes for challah, White Cobb Loaf, and wholemeal bread.

With all those many pounds of fresh cherries from Northwest Cherry Growers, we wanted to make a couple of baked recipes that were out of the ordinary. The Cherry Chocolate Muffins turned out to be one of our favorite baked goodies in a long while. Very rich and buttery.

  • 200 grams unsalted butter, softened
  • 150 g caster sugar
  • 4 medium eggs
  • 200 g strong white bread flour
  • 1 1/2 t. baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • Splash of milk
  • 150 g good-quality dark chocolate, chopped
  • 470 g jar pitted morello cherries, drained

DIRECTIONS:

As a U.S. baker using our standard measuring units, you’ll need to convert grams into ounces using this Cooking Ingredients Conversion website. Be sure to jot down the U.S. measurements in your cookbook, so you can skip this time consuming step next time around.

Caster sugar is simply granulated sugar that has been ground to a super-fine consistency in a blender. Here are instructions for making your own caster sugar.

If you want to be 100% in compliance with Paul’s recipe and cannot find a jar of morello cherries, you can buy them on Amazon. However, we just used pitted fresh cherries and really liked the results. For full instructions, and because copying and pasting someone’s baking instructions isn’t kosher, you’ll find Paul’s recipe for Cherry Chocolate Muffins in his cookbook.

Clafoutis Monique

A second recipe from How to Bake by Paul Hollywood introduced our family to a fancy French word, clafoutis. I can tell you this, it’s not pronounced kluh-foo’-tiss.

A clafoutis is an egg-based recipe that would be perfect for a brunch. Of all the recipes we made with our shipment of cherries, this one was our least favorite, but I think it’s because we used too large of a baking dish and the final result was on the thin side. For a slightly sweet, elegant dish, it’s worth making.

  • Large knob of unsalted butter for greasing
  • 75 g plain flour
  • 75 g caster sugar
  • 300 ml full-fat milk
  • 2 medium eggs, separated
  • 2 T. kirsch
  • 400 g ripe black cherries, pitted
  • Powdered sugar for dusting

 

The next time you are looking for a special dish to bring to a potluck or breakfast/brunch, a clafoutis is eye-catching and just exotic enough to enhance your reputation as a chef par excellence.

 

We used up those 40 pounds of cherries!

When I first opened that huge box of cherries, I was a little dismayed. How on earth were we going to put them to good use? It didn’t take long at all to find amazing recipes of every kind. I want to thank Northwest Cherry Growers for providing me with the cream of the crop when it comes to fresh cherries.

things to do with cherries

 

Ask Tess: Can I Give My Cat Dog Food in a Disaster?

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Hi Tess,

We are in the hurricane (Irma) right now and I ran out of cat crunchies and wanted to know if I could give my cats some pedigree small dog crunchies until I can get to a store in a few days?

A Reader

 

——————————————————————————————————-

Hello Reader,

First of all, I hope you stay safe during this awful storm. For a few days, you could probably get away with giving your cat a small sized dog food, but understand that the nutritional requirements may be off. Cats require more protein than dogs and do not digest corn or grains well.  If you plan on giving your cat the small dish of cat food until you can make it back to the store, I think that’s fine. But if you have some cat food alternatives handy, you could try and provide your pet some of these alternatives.

Meat is the number one element of homemade cat food. Bones are also a very important addition to the feline diet – this is how your cat gets enough calcium. Liver is an excellent addition to your homemade cat food but should not make up more than 10% of their intake. Much of the waste that you would throw out when preparing a whole chicken for your family would be a welcome addition to the cat food dish.

Use this ratio to create your own cat food, based on the items you have on hand.

  • Meat:  3 parts
  • Organs: 1 part
  • Grain: 1 part
  • Veggies: ½ part

Some cat approved vegetables include: lightly steamed broccoli, carrots, zucchini, caulifower, or any other vegetables that your cat happens to enjoy. Some cats even like the taste of fruit such as melon, mango or apple, and if your cat enjoys these healthy treats it is fine to supplement their diet this way.

The meat in this mixture can either be lightly cooked or raw.

 

I hope this helps ~ Stay dry and safe!

 

Tess

 

 

 

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Ask Tess: Can I Give My Cat Dog Food in a Disaster?

Hi Tess,

We are in the hurricane (Irma) right now and I ran out of cat crunchies and wanted to know if I could give my cats some pedigree small dog crunchies until I can get to a store in a few days?

A Reader

 

——————————————————————————————————-

Hello Reader,

First of all, I hope you stay safe during this awful storm. For a few days, you could probably get away with giving your cat a small sized dog food, but understand that the nutritional requirements may be off. Cats require more protein than dogs and do not digest corn or grains well.  If you plan on giving your cat the small dish of cat food until you can make it back to the store, I think that’s fine. But if you have some cat food alternatives handy, you could try and provide your pet some of these alternatives.

Meat is the number one element of homemade cat food. Bones are also a very important addition to the feline diet – this is how your cat gets enough calcium. Liver is an excellent addition to your homemade cat food but should not make up more than 10% of their intake. Much of the waste that you would throw out when preparing a whole chicken for your family would be a welcome addition to the cat food dish.

Use this ratio to create your own cat food, based on the items you have on hand.

  • Meat:  3 parts
  • Organs: 1 part
  • Grain: 1 part
  • Veggies: ½ part

Some cat approved vegetables include: lightly steamed broccoli, carrots, zucchini, caulifower, or any other vegetables that your cat happens to enjoy. Some cats even like the taste of fruit such as melon, mango or apple, and if your cat enjoys these healthy treats it is fine to supplement their diet this way.

The meat in this mixture can either be lightly cooked or raw.

 

I hope this helps ~ Stay dry and safe!

 

Tess

 

 

 

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

So Many Images

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Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

On yet another anniversary of 911, the 16th, the images from that day are still haunting and still heart breaking.

    

Those lost, lives forever changed, bravery on a scale that can’t be measured…

  

and yet uplifting as well….

        

Civil servants, airline employees, “average” citizens if there is such a thing, the people you pass everyday without giving a second thought stepped up. We saw then what we saw in Texas a couple of weeks ago, what we are seeing now throughout the northern Caribbean, and the Florida Peninsula.

  

People doing their jobs, people surviving, people reaching out and helping others. People picking themselves and others up and moving on. A favorite quote attributed to Winston Churchill “When You are Going Through Hell, Keep Going!

As Preppers this is what we prepare for, why we plan and why we know that we will keep going and hope we will be able to assist others when the need arises. Please take a moment and reflect on the true human spirit, not the one painted with a broad brush of hate driven by a selfish agenda.

NYC set the bar high, Texas stepped up and now we are watching Florida pick up the torch.

The Prepper Journal would like to hear from preppers in Texas and Florida as to how their plans worked, and more importantly what may not have worked as planned.

Please continue to be safe out there.

 

The post So Many Images appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Rained Out: 3 Ways To Prepare For Inclement Weather During Outdoor Activities

If you love to spend your free time outdoors hunting, fishing, camping and more, you may be well-aware of how quickly weather conditions can change. A single cold front can blow through the area, dropping temperatures by 15 or 20 degrees or more within a very short period of time. Strong winds, heavy rain, hail or snow can also move into the area quickly. If you are caught off-guard for rapidly changing weather conditions, your outdoor adventure may be ruined, and you may find yourself quickly heading back home. These tips can help you to more easily manage any weather conditions that you may face while outdoors.

Invest in the Right Gear and Equipment

From boots and jackets to sunglasses, flashlights, waterproof tents and more, you must have access to the right gear in order to stay safe and remain comfortable while outdoors. It is wise to review your current equipment and gear to determine which items are no longer in good condition. Then, review the options available online from retailers like Kidron Sports Center or in local stores well before your next trip. Make plans to upgrade any items that are in poor condition so that you can enjoy reliable functionality on your trip.

Dress for the Forecasted Weather Conditions

When you are caught outdoors during strong storms or during times of rapidly changing temperatures, you need to be able to protect and cover yourself as well as moderate your temperature. You must have the right combination of clothes and shoes available with you, and this includes everything from a hat and sunglasses to a jacket, multiple changes of dry clothes and more.

Know When to Reschedule Your Plans

With some changing weather conditions, you can quickly adapt to the new environmental factors by altering your clothes or using some of the equipment that you have brought along. However, there are times when it may be best to simply reschedule your outdoor adventure for another day. Consider how long the conditions may persist and how extreme the conditions may be. Pay close attention to the amount of precipitation that may fall as well as to the strength of the winds.

In some cases, preparing for inclement weather can make your time outdoors more comfortable. In other cases, it is best to simply stay home and plan a trip on a day when the weather conditions are improved. As you prepare for your next trip, focus on the weather conditions, and use these tips to stay safe and comfortable.

About the Author:
Brooke Chaplan
is a freelance writer and recent graduate of the University of New Mexico. She writes for many online publications and blogs about home improvements, family, and health. She is an avid hiker, biker and runner. Contact her via twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Making Firewood – Wood Batoning Using A Knife

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In a survival scenario, when the stress levels are high and time is against you, even a simple action can pose serious problems. Splitting firewood to make a fire is an easy task when you have an axe, but you might not be lucky enough to have one. If that’s the case, wood batoning is … Read more…

The post Making Firewood – Wood Batoning Using A Knife was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

What We’ve Learned From 9-11, In Sixteen Years

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Sixteen years ago, a group of radicalized Islamic terrorists hijacked four airliners and committed the most horrific act of terrorism in American history.

Two of those planes were flown into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City and the third was flown into the Pentagon. The passengers of the fourth courageously wrested control of their airplane from the terrorists, preventing it from reaching its target. But they paid for their heroism with their life, as the jet crashed in the Pennsylvania countryside.

A total of 2,996 people died in the attacks on 9-11, with another 6,000 wounded. Both of the towers of the World Trade Center, which were 110 stories tall, crashed to the ground, as the heat from the burning jet fuel weakened the structural beams in the towers’ cores.

The only saving grace was that the attack occurred early enough in the morning, that only a couple of thousand of the 50,000 workers and 200,000 daily visitors were in the towers at the time of the attack. Had the event happened midday, when the towers were filled, the travesty would have been much worse.

This event was a game changer for then-President Bush and for the nation as a whole. The War on Terror sprung from the ruins of those towers, as the government sought those responsible, especially Osama bin Laden, the leader of the terrorist organization al-Queda.

 

The SEAL Survival Guide to Staying Alive in the War Zone Called “New America”

 

Enough time has passed, that many have forgotten the lessons of that dreadful day, especially those on the left.

But while the liberal left is ready to forgive and forget, all but giving our country to the dangerous people that hurt our nation, there were many lessons to be learned that day; lessons that can be all too easily forgotten.

1. Terrorism is Alive and Well in the World Today

Before 9-11, terrorism wasn’t an American problem. Rather, it was something that happened in other countries around the world. But we were untouched by it. Oh, we heard the occasional story about some horrific attack overseas, but we weren’t all that concerned. After all, they weren’t bothering us.

9-11 woke up our collective consciousness to the reality of international terrorism, especially terrorism fueled by radical Islam. No longer was it something that only happened to other people, it was something that happened here at home.

We had the proof. The twin towers were down, there were almost 3,000 people dead.

2. Radicalized Islam is the Most Dangerous Human Force there is

More than a realization of terrorism, we gained a realization of just how dangerous a religion Islam actually is. Up to that point, it was merely a quaint religion that was practiced by the Arab countries.

But 9-11 thrust Islam before our eyes, not as a world religion, but as a force for destruction. We had seen the evidence; Muslims killed.

If anything, radicalized Islam is more dangerous today, 16 years later. Islamic terrorist groups abound, growing every day. There is even what is claimed to be a Muslim caliphate, created by a terrorist organization, ISIS. Muslims are on the march and their clearly stated goal is to take over the world.

3. We Are Not Safe

Much of our collective complacency came from our belief that we were too big to fall, or rather, we’re too big and too powerful for anyone to attack. But that proved to e a false hope, as al-Queda used our own arrogance against us.

The conventional wisdom of military planning doesn’t apply to terrorism. They don’t fight stand-up battles, army against army. Rather, they sneak around in the shadows, attacking civilians when they are unprepared to be attacked and avoiding a confrontation with police, military and any other armed force.

This means that none of us are safe, no matter where we are. It was proven on 9-11 and it’s been proven over and over since then; the government can’t protect us.

We have to be ready to protect ourselves, or there won’t be any protection to be found. Even then, protecting ourselves from something like 9-11 is beyond what anyone can do.

4. We Can Still Come Together and Support One Another

A few weeks before 9-11 I was watching a World War II documentary. Amongst the many thoughts that paraded through my mind was the question of whether the nation could ever pull together again, like we did during that war, with people reaching across political lines to support each other and the country. I concluded that we couldn’t do it again.

But I was glad to see that I was wrong. 9-11 pulled the nation together, in support of the victims, their families and the need to start the War on Terror. Never before had I seen Americans come together in such a way, standing for a common cause.

That question has reared its ugly head once again. Our political divide is greater than ever. Yet I have to believe that if our country were ever attacked in such an outrageous manner again, we would all come together, putting aside our differences in the common cause of healing our nation’s wounds.

5. There Are Still Plenty of Heroes Around

If there was one thing that stood out on 9-11, it was the heroes that rushed to the tower, trying to save people’s lives.

These public servants, in the police and fire departments, gave sacrificially of their time, their effort and in some cases, even of their lives, in order to save others. Firemen and other rescue workers from around the nation congregated on the Twin Towers, helping local emergency crews to dig through the rubble and save as many lives as possible.

While the thought of heroes has become obsolete in some people’s minds, the need for heroes has not. The world we are living in isn’t getting any safer, and as long as it is unsafe, there will be a need for heroes who are willing to put their lives on the line, in order to protect others.

Some of those heroes wear Army green, others wear police blue and still others drive around in big red trucks. But they are all heroes equally; people who put the lives of others before their own.

6. Anything Can Become a Weapon

In the hands of a killer, anything can become a weapon. In this case, jet aircraft became weapons. Not military aircraft, armed to the teeth, but everyday airliners, used to haul people from point A to point B. But when those aircraft were in the hands of terrorists, they became weapons of mass destruction.

While terrorists and other killers are willing to use just about anything to wreck mayhem and death, the rest of us tend to play by the rules. This gives them a distinct advantage. A willingness to break the rules allows one to take ordinary objects and use them to kill and destroy.

Part of that is because they aren’t concerned about getting innocent people killed; so they use innocents as human shields, hiding behind women and children to kill. When we try to retaliate, it’s almost impossible to kill them, without killing those innocent victims.

In doing this, terrorists attempt to steal the moral high ground from those they are attacking. In many cases, it works, especially considering that the majority of the mainstream media supports the terrorists. So, they report the human shield being killed, while willfully ignoring the civilian casualties that caused us to retaliate in the first place.

7. Air Travel is Essential to Modern Society and Must be Protected

For about a week after the attack, all aircraft, except military aircraft, were grounded, putting a complete stop to air travel and air shipments. This left people stranded all over the country, as well as putting a large dent in companies being able to conduct normal business operations.

Yet that really wasn’t an unreasonable reaction to the attack. Before the government could allow airlines to resume their normal schedule, they needed to ensure that there weren’t more terrorists trained and waiting to conduct a follow-on attack. Had they not put a stop to air travel, it would have been irresponsible and put the lives of countless more people at risk.

One of the results of this attack was in increase in airport security, especially in preventing people from entering concourses, unless they had a valid boarding pass and identification. While this has been an inconvenience, it has reduced the likelihood of a repeat attack.

But there’s another part of this that is important, and that is the protection of the aircraft’s cockpit. The passengers of United Airlines flight 93 showed us the way. That is, the passengers and crew took it upon themselves to fight the terrorists, literally sacrificing their own lives to protect others.

Granted, they would have died either way, but in this way, they made their deaths worthwhile, rather than merely being more victims.

Video first seen on Real Stories.

8. We Must Give Our Military and Police Whatever Support they Need to Stamp Out Terrorism

Terrorism is very much a part of the global landscape today. To protect ourselves, we must give our government and especially our military, the tools and support it needs to stamp out this global blight. The only other option is to allow the terrorists to win, and that clearly isn’t an option worth considering.

The men and women of our military forces put their lives on the line for us, in order to protect our lives, our homes and our country. Each and every one of them has written a check to the government for their own lives, declaring that they are willing to lay down their own lives, if necessary, to ensure that others might live. How can we not support them?

Some have said that violence never solved anything; but they are wrong. Violence has solved many things throughout history. But sadly, many of those were solved in the negative, with evil people using violence to their own ends.

This is exactly what terrorists are trying to do. They won’t stop because we speak nicely to them. They won’t stop if we give them money. They will only stop when our military forces hunt them down and destroy them. Evil such as this must be stamped out, not tolerated.

9. Additional Police Forces, Homeland Security and Stealing Our Privacy isn’t the Solution

It is impossible to create a perfectly foolproof security network, no matter how hard we try. There will always be holes that terrorists and other criminals can capitalize on. Even in the old Soviet Union, which was oppressive of their own citizens, a very active criminal element existed. Smugglers were common, often buying off the border guards who were supposed to stop them.

Criminals will always find a way through security. So giving up our freedom in order to buy security is nothing more than a placebo. It might make some people feel more secure, but they aren’t. Terrorists can still get through.

The only true security we can have is an armed population, trained and prepared to counter any terrorist activity on our soil. The sheriff’s department where I live puts it this way; they aren’t worried about having to respond to a terrorist attack, because they are sure that those of us who carry concealed will end the attack, before any of them can respond.

10. We Can’t Let the Terrorists Win

If there’s anything the United State of America stands for, it’s freedom. We have been the light of freedom in the world for over 200 years, exporting our brand of government to other countries. While we are not perfect, we are the best hope of mankind. That cannot be lost.

While Muslim extremists are not the only terrorists out there, they make up more than 90% of the active terrorist organizations in the world. As such, they are clearly responsible for the vast majority of terrorist incidents. That is the terrorism we must fight against. It’s not the only terrorism we face, but it is the largest threat.

Islam is totally contrary to freedom; it is all about submission to their god. Anyone who does not submit is to be killed or enslaved. Allowing the terrorists to win, condemns us and our children to these two possible fates.

Our freedom is hard bought, with the blood of patriots. Some of them died in the twin towers, 16 years ago. We must not let the freedom they bought us go.

Lest we forget.

 

This article has been written by Bill White for Survivopedia.

5 Things to Know about Apartment Flooding

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This post is by Bernie Carr, apartmentprepper.com Over 100,000 apartment units were flooded during Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath.   With Hurricane Irma now approaching Florida, many apartments are at risk for wind damage and flooding. Here are five things to know about what you can do if your apartment becomes flooded. Rent Hurricane Harvey drenched Houston on August 27th.  In the ensuing days, an unprecedented amount of rainfall caused massive flooding, rendering many displaced residents. The 1st of September arrived […]

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13 DIY Projects Using Cinder Blocks

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Concrete and cement are the building blocks of humanity. When you take concrete and make it into a literal block, though, what you’re left with is a cinder block – an item with almost unlimited DIY potential. To help spark your imagination about how to best make use of cinder blocks, we’ve put together a […]

The post 13 DIY Projects Using Cinder Blocks appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

A Crash Course in Preparedness – Week 2 – Medicine, Sanitation, and Surviving Disaster Diseases

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Welcome back to week 2 in our Crash Course into Preparedness. Last week we discussed the basics of survival and gear needed for a short-lived event. One of the comments from last week’s class mentioned that it isn’t hard to prepare, you just have to start. I couldn’t agree more! My only addition I would make to this comment is in order to start you must prioritize your needs and know what you’re planning for. This week, we are taking the same concept from last week – prioritizing, planning and preparing to another facet of disaster planning and highlighting the more dirty side of preparedness – medical and sanitation needs.

Some of the greatest threats in an emergency occur after the disaster. Lack of accessible clean water following major disasters can quickly escalate and create secondary problems in a post SHTF situation. Additionally, those unsanitary conditions can exacerbate the spreading of diseases, infections and health risks. In this preparedness course, we will cover the most common issues that occur following a disaster that relates to hygiene, sanitary and medical condition.

Sanitation, good hygiene, and medical preparedness all go hand-in-hand. But as you will see after reading this guide, it takes a lot of planning and a lot of preparation. Simply put, there are many wrong turns a person could take in the aftermath of a storm and their health could suffer as a result. Therefore it is paramount that you understand the magnitude of these types of disasters and how to avoid them. As Ready Nutrition writer, Jeremiah Johnson noted in a recent article, “hygiene protects you from germs and diseases, as well as preventing the body from falling apart.” In the aftermath of disasters, this needs to stay at the forefront of our priorities.

In this week’s course, I have compiled lists of preparedness items you may need for these types of disasters, but in no way is this list comprehensive. There is always some other items that someone will need. Therefore, remember to prioritize your household’s needs! If someone in your home has a preexisting condition – prepare for that. If someone in the household has mobility issues – make sure they have supplies to help them get around, or if someone has a suppressed immune system – prepare accordingly.

We have a lot of ground to cover, and a lot of prepper lists to review, so let’s get started.

Why your water sources become contaminated after a disaster and why you should avoid them

Water is one of the most necessary elements to sustain life, but when that water is dirty, it can quickly become one of the most dangerous. Following a disaster, municipal water lines will more than likely be damaged and can become contaminated with sewage, chemicals and, in particular, may also contain a number of pathogens that can cause illness. These contaminated waters harbor bacteria, different viruses, and fungi – all of which can make people very sick.

Diseases can be present in the water. Most notably, cholera, hepatitis A, typhoid fever, and Leptospirosis. If massive flooding occurs in the area and homes are damaged as a result, mold could also pose a serious health problem and exacerbate asthma, allergies, or other respiratory diseases like COPD. Mold can appear in as little as 24 to 48 hours after flood waters recede. Experts suggest not to touch it. Wear rubber gloves, wear a mask when handling it and if you are in a dwelling where there is mold, you should leave.

Those who have open wounds or rashes should also avoid the flood waters as they can quickly become infected. If the water lines are damaged, or if the damage is suspected, do not use municipal water sources for cleaning or drinking. Likewise, throw out any food that has come in contact with contaminated water.  Avoiding contaminated water is your best bet, but at times unavoidable. Maintaining proper sanitation and hygiene will ensure your overall health and safety.

Fly infestations also pose a problem, and if the waste is left out in the open, then it will only lead to the susceptibility of epidemics such as Hepatitis A, cholera, typhoid or diphtheria. Having a means dispersing of human waste will ensure that in times of disaster, your family and neighbors will stay healthy.

As well, mosquitoes are notorious for harboring diseases. Some of which are:

  • Dengue
  • West Nile
  • Zika
  • Chikungunya
  • St. Louis Encephalitis
  • La Crosse Encephalitis

As well as a few others that mainly affect animals:

  • Western Equine Encephalitis
  • Dog Heartworm

So it’s important for homeowners in disaster affected regions to take certain measures to prevent the proliferation of mosquitoes. This requires keeping an eye out for things on your property that might contain even the smallest puddles of water. As well, experts are recommending that homeowners drain pools and if you see mosquitoes in larger areas of standing water to alert authorities.

Make sure you clear any trash or debris in your yards such as tires or cans and don’t leave any water out in flower pots or water bowls. It’s also a good idea to secure any leaky pipes you might have outside of your home, and clear out any leaves in your gutters. In some cases, you may need to fill or drain spots that tend to collect water on your property.  As an added defense, build traps that will cull the local mosquito population.

If you are cleaning your home after a flood, make sure you follow these steps from the EPA on flood-related cleaning.


Sanitation

No one really wants to discuss sanitation because it’s… well, an unpleasant and dirty subject. However, it is one of the most important areas to focus on when preparing for a disaster.

Most disasters cause sanitation nightmares simply because following a disaster, there is a lack of sanitation facilities or water lines have been damaged or crossed with sewage lines. This can bring on serious health risks.

Here are a couple of necessary facts you need to keep in mind.

  • In the aftermath of a disaster where water sources are compromised, people within a 50-mile radius could be adversely impacted by illness and disease just if one person handled the trash improperly. Let that sink in.
  • If the you-know-what has hit the fan, you must be aware that more people die after a disaster due to poor sanitation than from the disaster itself. This is due to individuals not knowing where or how to properly expel waste.
  • Infectious diseases from contaminated water can make certain groups very vulnerable – the very young, the elderly and people suffering from diseases that lower their immune resistance.

How to prepare for sanitation disruptions

When the trash cannot be picked up, it must be burned or buried by you; however, municipalities cannot risk contamination to the water source or soil from people who incorrectly bury their debris, so it is important to know how to properly dispose of your waste products and stay clean, as well. Typically, city officials will provide information on this after a disaster occurs.

One of your first lines of defense is to keep hands clean during an emergency to prevent the spread of germs. If your tap water is not safe to use, wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected. If needed, a temporary hand washing station can be created by using a large water jug that contains clean water.

How to clean water

Bring your drinking water to a rolling boil for 15 to 20 minutes before consumption or for cleaning purposes. At altitudes above one mile or 2,000 meters, you should increase the rolling time to three minutes. For an added measure, after boiling, you can chemically disinfect the water with chlorine bleach (minus additives). Use 16 drops of chlorine bleach per gallon, or 4 drops per quart of water.

The reason for taking added measures after you boil your water is that many water-borne diseases like giardia and cryptosporidium tend to encyst and can survive a chemical disinfection, especially with chlorine.  Most of your one-celled creepy-crawlies will bite the big one with it, but boiling is the only surefire method when you don’t have an advanced water filtration system available.

Calcium hypochlorite (HTH, also known as “pool shock”) is another method to use.  The concentrations are different per the manufacturer, but you can reconstitute it and make a slurry with a one-liter bottle and a teaspoon of the HTH. Then you follow the ratio for chlorine drops as provided above, keeping aware that it will deteriorate over time. Source

Wash your hands

Now that the water is clean, washing hands with soap and water are the best way to reduce the number of germs on the skin. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs. According to the CDC, you should wash your hands after the following:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • Before and after caring for someone who is sick
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal or animal waste
  • After touching garbage
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound

Make a sanitation kit

As well, you want to ensure your house has a way of dealing with sanitation issues. Having a sanitation kit that is ready in times of disaster is essential to keeping your family and neighbors healthy. These kits can fit comfortably into a bucket, are affordable, and will not take up much space. Additionally, being educated on how to properly dispose of waste is a key factor in keeping everyone healthy during a disaster.

Some suggested sanitation supplies should be added to any short or long-term emergency kits are:

  • Disposable bucket or luggable loo
  • Toilet paper (two weeks worth)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Garbage bags with twist ties (for liners of toilets or luggable loo)
  • Bathroom cleaner
  • Cat Litter or absorbent material such as saw dust or dirt
  • Baby wipe
  • Soap
  • Baking soda can be used to help eliminate odors
  • Vinegar
  • Bleach
  • Shovel
  • Women’s sanitary needs

Dispose of Waste

Properly disposing of waste products keeps water sources clean and cuts down on illness and disease.  If city water is still available, flush conservatively.  Grey water such as used dish water, bath water or water for cooking can be used to flush the toilet.  If water lines are damaged, or if the damage is suspected, do not flush the toilet.

If water services are interrupted, an easy way to utilize the toilet and keep it clean is to:

  • Clean and empty the water of the toilet bowl out.
  • Line the bowl with a heavy-duty plastic bag.
  • Once the bag has waste inside, add a small amount of deodorant such as cat litter, as well as disinfectant and securely tie the bag for disposal.
  • A large plastic trash can (lined with a heavy duty bag) can be used to store the bags of waste.
  • Once trash services begin, the city will come and collect these.

If a portable camp toilet is used, the above mentioned can also be used. However, if the trash crews are coming, carefully secure the waste bag and store in a designated trash can to be collected. If the trash crews are not coming in a given amount of time, the bag of waste will need to be buried (see the proper way to bury waste below).

Officials say to avoid burying your waste, but sometimes it is necessary. However, if the waste is not properly taken care of, pollution of water sources will lead to illness and disease. It also attracts flies and insects which will spread the disease further. Understand that burying feces takes up to a year to decompose. Therefore, finding the right spot to bury your feces is crucial. There are biodegradable bags that a person can put their waste into. These can usually be found in the camping department of outdoor stores, or on the Internet. The bags assist the waste in decomposing faster and assists in preventing the waste from hitting major water sources. If a person does not have one of these handy bags available, the feces should be buried in “catholes” far away from water sources, campsites and a communal spot where there are a lot of humans. If you find yourself in a situation where toilet paper is not available, you may have to resort to a more natural method of staying clean. Below is a list of toilet paper alternatives for an emergency situation.

Toilet Paper Alternatives

  • Leaves
  • Phone books
  • Unused coffee filters
  • Corn cobs (That’s right- Corn Cobs)
  • Dilapidated kitchen towels (no longer used for cleaning).
  • Bed linen strips
  • Mail order catalog

Hygiene

It is important to continue regular hygiene habits during an emergency. As well, a woman’s personal hygiene and ensuring children are clean is essential in making sure sanitation-related illnesses do not occur.Habits such as brushing your teeth, washing your face, combing your hair and even washing your body with a wet washcloth. This will provide a sense of normalcy, help prevent the spread of disease, as well as help to relieve the stress brought on by the disaster.

In a pinch, water can be heated outside using a sun visor for a vehicle or a sun oven. Use filtered potable water or fresh rainwater during times of emergencies. To prevent sanitation-related diseases, do not use standing water.

SHTF laundry

If your home was damaged by flood water, you will need to disinfect your washing machine. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Set the washer to the largest load capacity and fill with hot water
  2. Add one cup chlorine bleach
  3. Set the washer to a full cycle with a hot water rinse. Allow washing machine to run through the entire cycle.
  4. Clean the exterior of the washer – top, front and sides – and all other surfaces in the laundry room with a solution of chlorine bleach and hot water. Rinse with clean water.

Additional Maintenance Tips:

  • If the washer has been through a flood, have a technician check the appliance before cleaning and using.
  • If a dryer has been contaminated by flood water, have it checked by a technician and then wipe down the drum and outside of the dryer with a solution of chlorine bleach and hot water. Always rinse well with a cloth dipped in clear water.

Once your washer is clean and ready for use, it’s time to get that laundry going.

  1. Sort clothes into appropriate piles.
  2. Check your care label to make sure garments are washable.
  3. If labeled hand washable only, then hand wash—do not put into the washing machine.
  4. If the garment is dry, brush off loose dirt and residue. Rinse in clean, cool water to remove mud and flood water. This will take several rinses until rinse water is clear. Work a heavy duty detergent (liquid) or paste of granule detergent into all stained areas. Let stand 30 minutes.
  5. Work a heavy duty detergent (liquid) or paste of granule detergent into all stained areas. Let stand 30 minutes.
  6. Follow care labels and wash in hottest water safe for the garment with detergent. Use bleach if recommended for the garment.
  7. Sanitize with a disinfectant. Always test on an inconspicuous seam to be sure it does not harm the garment. Add to washing machine before adding clothing.

Some disinfectants to try are:

  • Liquid chlorine bleach (Clorox, Purex) if safe. Do not use on washable wools and silks. Follow directions carefully.
  • Pine oil (Pine-O-Pine, Fyne Pine) is safe for most washable garments. Do not use on washable wools and silks since the odor will remain.
  • Phenolic (Pine-Sol, Al-Pine) is safe for most washable garments. Do not use on washable wools and silks since the odor will remain. 1 Hang garments to dry.

Off-grid laundry is another option to consider

As well, you need to consider some off-grid laundry sources if your home has no power. Some items you will need are:

First, gather your supplies.

  • Laundry soap of choice (liquid is easier to use in this case)
  • Borax
  • Baking Soda
  • Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Sturdy scrub brush
  • Small bucket (I use a clean plastic kitty litter bucket)
  • Good quality janitor’s mop bucket with a press wringer
  • Large basin or clean bathroom
  • Drying rack and clothespins (or method of choice)
  1. Separate clothing into small piles.
  2. In a large basin, add laundry soap and begin filling with water with the hottest water. Mix the soap into the water until incorporated.
  3. As water is still filling up in the basin, add laundry. Turn off the water when water covers the soiled laundry.
  4. Add any disinfectants and mix to incorporate.
  5. Allow laundry to sit for 30 minutes to an hour to soak.
  6. When ready to clean clothes, fill the second basin up with water and set aside.
  7. Using an agitator, scrub clothes to get all stains off.
  8. Rinse clothes in the second basin to remove soap.
  9. Ring out clothes and set on dryer rack to dry.

Prevention is the key to spreading communicable diseases, so prepare appropriately.


Medical

Short-term disasters can bring on a myriad of medical situations and they can occur very quickly. Because of the disaster, roads may be impassable, or in some cases, the hospitals may be at capacity and cannot take in any more patients. With that in mind, it is important to know what the most common medical emergencies are and prepare accordingly for them.

In short-term disasters, prepare for water-related illnesses. This will be very common given the close proximity to contaminated water sources.

In The Prepper’s Blueprint, it states, “The relationship between communicable diseases and disasters exist and merits special attention. When there is a short-term emergency, there is an increased number of hospital visits and admissions from common diarrhea-related diseases, acute respiratory infections, dermatitis, and other causes. These type of medical issues are due to those coming in direct contact with flood waters contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage. These contamination factors will cause irritation to skin and a host of other medical conditions.”

In longer-term disasters, burns, cuts, rashes and secondary infections will also be very common medical emergencies to prepare for. Folks, these are the disasters you will likely face and it is imperative that you prepare for this with proper medical supplies and knowledge.

I realize that there are a lot of medical conditions to think about. The best approach is to look at the basics and prepare for those. Many medical items can be used for multiple disasters, so take comfort in this and prepare accordingly.

Build the Ultimate 1 Year Medical Supply with These First Aid Basics

Experts suggest that each home have a basic medical supply that is unique to your family’s needs. Therefore, keep any pre-existing conditions and allergies any family members may have, as well as the above list of the most common medical conditions that hospitals see. It is within your best interest to ensure that you have any and all necessary medications that require prescriptions before an emergency happens.We all have our fair share of band-aids and antibiotic ointment, but do you have medical supplies that can help with true medical emergencies?

The following list is your basic medical preparations broken into sections of the need to help in your organization.


Hygiene

  • Laundry detergent
  • Disinfectant (bleach, pine-sol, etc.)
  • Soap
  • Shampoo
  • Liquid antibacterial hand soap – 20
  • Disposable hand wipes – 20
  • Antibacterial hand sanitizer – 20
  • Feminine items – 12 packages
  • Extra baby needs (diapers, wipes, pacifiers, bottles, medicine, etc.) – in quantity
  • Exam gloves – 5 boxes
  • Rubber cleaning gloves
  • Extra mops and brooms
  • Large plastic bins (for doing laundry, clearing away debris or packing precious items in a pinch)

Essential Medical Tools

  • Trauma shears
  • Pen light or small flash light
  • Scalpel with extra blades
  • Stethoscope
  • Irrigation syringe
  • Tweezers
  • Thermometer
  • Foam splint – 2 per family member
  • Thermometer

Over-the-Counter Products

  • Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever (for adults and children) – 5 bottles
  • Stool softener – 5 bottles
  • Electrolyte powder – 3 boxes
  • Cold/flu medications – 2 boxes per family member
  • Expectorant/decongestants – 3 per family member
  • Hydrocortisone – 3
  • Miconazole/anti-fungal – 3
  • Syrup of Ipecac and activated charcoal – 2
  • Eye care (e.g., contact lens case, cleansing solution, eye moisture drops) – 3 per family member

Natural Supplements

Wound Care

  • Disinfectant (Betadine, isopropyl alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, etc.) – 2 per family member
  • Band-aids – 3 large boxes in assorted sizes
  • Antibiotic ointment – 5
  • Instant cold and hot packs – 10
  • 1 week of prescription medications – as many as you are able to get with your prescription
  • Ace bandages – 10
  • Non- stick gauze pads in assorted sizes (3×3 and 4×4) – 10 boxes
  • Sterile roller bandages – 5
  • Surgical sponges – 5
  • Adhesive tape or duct tape – 5
  • Steri-strips – 5
  • Moleskin – 3
  • Respirator masks – 4
  • CPR micro shield – 1 per family member
  • Suture kit – 3 per family member
  • QuikClot® compression bandages – 2 per family member
  • Tourniquet – 2
  • Thermal Mylar blanket – 1 per family member
  • Antibiotics

*These are your minimum quantities. If you are able to do so, prepare for more.

One cannot become proficient at something without study and application. Going as far as to take medical courses in community colleges, local county extension offices, local fire departments, and with veterans groups, along with other civic clubs and organizations can give you a great edge on acquiring knowledge on medical emergencies and how to treat them. It should go without saying, but stock up on medical manuals like:

Taking medical courses would be very beneficial in preparing for this type of emergency. The Fire Department, American Red Cross or Medical Centers are local resources that offer classes to assist in medical emergencies. To further prepare, find websites online that deal with first aid care and go through each injury to see what medical instruments and items are needed.

Customize Your Supplies

Many believe that a basic store-bought medical kit will provide for all of their medical needs, but these kits tend to be overloaded with unneeded items (i.e., 500 band aids). Buying your own medical supplies allows you to customize your kit to fit your family’s unique needs and is more economical. In fact, you can purchase many of these items at your local Dollar Store to save money.  Customizing your family’s medical supply gives your family members the best chance at being cared for when a medical emergency arises. Further, take your preparedness a step further and organize your medical preps and create medical response packs for quick acting.

Store a first aid kit in the car (being careful with heat sensitive items) and also tuck some medical supplies into your 72-hour bag as well as at work. This way, you can be ready to deal with medical emergencies wherever they happen to occur.

Storing Medical Supplies

How you store your first aid supplies is every bit as important as having the supplies in the first place. Medicines can lose potency or spoil if they are subject to moisture, temperature fluctuations, and light.  For example, aspirin begins to break down when it is exposed to a slight amount of moisture.

Unless the instructions indicate otherwise, store medications in a cool, dark place that is out of the reach of children.   However, you still want to store the medical supplies in a place that is easily accessible to adults, who may need to respond very quickly in the event of a medical crisis.

Check expiration dates periodically to ensure the medicines are still good to use.  While most medicines lose potency once they’re past the expiration date, there are a few that will actually make a person extremely ill if taken after it spoils.  For example, tetracycline antibiotics that have spoiled can cause a severe, sometimes deadly, kidney ailment.

Signs of Expired Medicines

Although there is data that states most medicines can last longer than their expiration dates, it is important to understand that using medicine years past its expiration date can lose effectiveness and in some cases, change its chemical makeup. If you are in a survival situation where your life depended on an outdated drug, then it is wise to follow the cliché “better safe than sorry”.

Knowing the signs of expired medicine can help indicate when new items are needed.

  • Creams or ointments which are discolored or have changed in texture.
  • Creams or ointments which have cracked or separated.
  • The medicines smell has changed since it was opened.
  • Tablets are broken or chipped and have changed color

Bear in mind, there are some medications that should never be used after their expiration and could have severe consequences for patients. These include:

  • Anticonvulsants – narrow therapeutic index
  • Dilantin, phenobarbital – very quickly lose potency
  • Nitroglycerin – very quickly lose potency
  • Warfarin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Procan SR – sustained release procainamide
  • Theophylline – very quickly lose potency
  • Digoxin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Thyroid preparations
  • Paraldehyde
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Epinephrine – very quickly lose potency
  • Insulin – very quickly lose potency
  • Eye drops – eyes are particularly sensitive to any bacteria that might grow in a solution once a preservative degrades.

Source

What if you don’t have enough medical supplies?

Now, let’s take this a step further. What if you prepared your food and water for an emergency, but completely forgot about getting medical supplies? (It’s hard to remember everything when you’re planning for a disaster) There are some alternatives that you may be lucky enough to have in your pantry to use.

Some of your kitchen staples may have some medicinal value. For instance, did you know you can make an antiseptic (first discovered during World War I) made of a diluted solution of baking soda and bleach? It’s called Dakin’s Solution and has been proven to kill most bacteria and viruses. As well, vinegar, baking soda, baking powder and salt have medicinal values.

Honey has become a poster child for an alternative to antibiotics can fight multiple species of bacteria, fungi, and superbugs, making it a viable alternative to antibiotics.

As Ready Nutrition writer, Jeremiah Johnson recently wrote, “Honey is also good for wounds/abrasions/cuts of the mouth, as it is a demulcent that soothes abraded tissues, and it also is a medium that microbes do not live in.  Who doesn’t remember the time-honored honey and lemon mixture for a sore throat?  The thing of it is: it works, and if it works it should be employed. Read more on how to use honey to treat wounds.

Having access to health-inducing herbs is another essential for wound care. Herbs such as oregano, garlic, lavender, and thyme can help protect a wound from infection and promote healing. Along those lines, writer, Jeremiah Johnson recommends every prepper have the Three G’s: Ginger, Garlic, and Ginseng in their natural medicine cabinet. Further, knowing which herbs can be used for natural pain killers is also paramount in your medical preparedness knowledge. Some pain reducing herbs to add to your herbal first-aid kit are:

  • Aloe (Aloe vera)
  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
  • Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)
  • Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica)
  • Tea (Camellia sinensis)
  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Common pantry items can also be used to help bleeding wounds clot. Many have found that cayenne pepper is an effective alternative and natural version of QuikClot. Cayenne pepper contains an active ingredient, called capsaicin, which has analgesic (pain relieving) properties and various other medicinal uses.

As well, boiled and sanitized torn sheets can be used as bandages. Or, if the cuts are minor and you have access to an herb garden, consider placing a sage leaf or lamb’s quarters on the cut as a natural bandage.

In an extended disaster, bacterial infections and viruses are likely to be one of the reasons that people will die.

Historically, essential oils have been used as a natural therapy to relieve symptoms when modern-day medicine was not available. The most amazing aspect of essential oils lies in their ability to effectively kill bad bacteria while leaving good bacteria alone! Rather than targeting one symptom, as Western medicine does, it targets multiple symptoms.

There are two types of essential oils you should stock up on for SHTF planning:

Antibacterial – Due to the increase of antibacterial resistant illnesses, many are turning to essential oils such as basil, cassia, cinnamon, clove, cypress, eucalyptus, geranium, lavender, lemon, marjoram, melaleuca, myrrh, orange, oregano, peppermint, rosemary, tea tree, and thyme.

Antiviral – Oils that have been studied to help control viral infections include: basil, cassia, cinnamon, eucalyptus, frankincense, lemon, lemongrass, marjoram, Melaleuca, myrrh, oregano, and thyme.

I started out with a simple beginner’s essential oil kit and have found it of great use! Some more popular ways of using essential oils are aromatherapy, herbal soaks, compresses, tinctures, and salves.

Surviving Disaster-Related Diseases

In reality, the aftermath of a disaster is always to hardest to survive. We tend to find ourselves in third-world living conditions – off-the-grid, poor water conditions, lack of proper sanitation and poor diet.

Those conditions can create the perfect storm for outbreaks of disease and infection. And if you find yourself living in close proximity to others, those diseases can quickly spread, thus setting the stage for an epidemic.

Outbreaks

Let’s cut to the chase, epidemics are quite common following certain disasters. According to this publication, these are the most common diseases that follow a disaster:

  • Diarrhea-related illness (cholera, dysentery)
  • Leptospirosis
  • Hepatitis
  • ARI (pneumonia/influenza)
  • Measles
  • Meningococcal meningitis
  • TB
  • Malaria
  • Dengue fever
  • Tetanus

Many believe the misuse of antibiotics in the past has led to the dangers of super bugs such as the spread of MRSA and MERS virus. In fact, nearly all significant bacterial infections in the world are becoming resistant to commonly used antibiotics. This means that our current medical safety nets will be much smaller in the near future. Even the smallest cuts could pose a danger to our health.

To add insult to injury, the disease typhoid which is spread from contaminated food and water is also becoming resistant to antibiotics and could soon become an out of control nightmare. Why am I telling you this? Because superbugs are everywhere now and experts warn that “it’s almost too late.” In the wake of a disaster, we immediately fall back on medicines that have worked in the past. If we find ourselves with an infection and antibiotics don’t work, then a secondary infection will set in and your fate is sealed.

Phases of outbreak and classification of infectious disease

Infectious disease transmission or outbreaks may be seen days, weeks or even months after the onset of the disaster. Three clinical phases of natural disasters summarize the chronological public health effects on injured people and survivors:

Phase (1), the impact phase (lasting up to 4 days), is usually the period when victims are extricated and initial treatment of disaster-related injuries is provided.

Phase (2), the post-impact phase (4 days to 4 weeks), is the period when the first waves of infectious diseases (air-borne, foodborne, and/or water-borne infections) might emerge.

Phase (3), the recovery phase (after 4 weeks), is the period when symptoms of victims who have contracted infections with long incubation periods or those with latent-type infections may become clinically apparent. During this period, infectious diseases that are already endemic in the area, as well as newly imported ones among the affected community, may grow into an epidemic.

Source

When an outbreak occurs, those living in cities or in close proximity to others will be more at risk of contracting illnesses and spreading them. Any pregnant women, infants, elderly people, or those with chronic medical conditions are also at risk and could be the first of the population to contract the contagious illness. If an epidemic approaches, there could be long-lasting repercussions of such a disaster. The worst-case scenario in all of this is if the outbreak is widespread and extremely contagious drastic changes could be made to isolate the outbreak itself.

  • Challenges or shut downs of business commerce
  • Breakdown of our basic infrastructure: communications, mass transportation, supply chains
  • Payroll service interruptions
  • Staffing shortages in hospitals and medical clinics
  • Interruptions in public facilities – Schools, workplaces may close, and public gatherings such as sporting events or worship services may close temporarily.
  • Government mandated voluntary or involuntary home quarantine.

While these are extreme points, I want to make sure you are prepared for a worst-case scenario and knowing what to expect will help you in your efforts. As I have mentioned, with any type of disaster or emergency, the responsibility falls more heavily upon our shoulders to ensure you can meet our needs. Instituting preventative measures in the home could also help you better prepare for injured or infectious family members.

  • Taking proper illness precautions – avoid touching your mouth, nose, and eyes during any pandemic.
  • Create a sick room for the home.
  • Keep your immune systems up by getting lots of sleep, having a good diet, exercising and taking vitamins and antioxidants to protect your health.
  • Stay inside and avoid contact with others.
  • Get pandemic supplies to have on hand at a moments notice.

Some items to consider when stocking a sick room are:

  • Tyvek protective suit and shoe covers
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Bed with linens, pillow, and blanket
  • Small wastebasket or a bucket lined with a plastic garbage bag.
  • Gallon-sized zip-loc bags
  • Pitcher or large bottle for water
  • Large plastic dishpan
  • portable toilet and human waste bags
  • Clipboard with paper and a pen for writing in the daily log.
  • Clock
  • Hand crank or battery-powered radio
  • Good source of light
  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • 1 clothing hamper or a garbage can that is lined with a plastic garbage bag used to collect soiled clothing and bedding items before they are washed.
  • A bell or a noisemaker to call for assistance.
  • Thermometer
  • Tissues
  • Hand wipes or a waterless hand sanitizer
  • Bleach or disinfectant
  • Cotton balls
  • Rubbing alcohol, disinfectant or bleach
  • Measuring cup capable of holding 8 ounces or 250 ml
  • Over-the-counter medications for use in the sick room
  • Protective eye gear
  • Protective clothing
  • Disposable aprons or smocks (at least 2 cases)
  • Duct tape for sealing off doorways and vents
  • Latex household disposable cleaning gloves
  • Disposable nitrile gloves (2-3 boxes)
  • Garbage bags
  • Trash can
  • N95 masks or N100 respirator masks for use when the sick person is coughing or sneezing

To conclude, there will always be the threat of completely unanticipated disasters, but your overall understanding of the disasters we face and the dangers that lie in the aftermath will help you maneuver through these types of emergencies.

 

Course Discussion

We all have a way to help others prepare. One of the most wonderful things you can do is to help someone prepare. New preppers, if you have questions, leave them in the comment section and as a community, we can help to answer them. You’re not in this alone. I know this information provided is a lot to take in, just pace yourself and we are all here for you if you need it.

 

Sign Up For This Week’s Giveaway!

To help some readers get prepared for sanitation-related emergencies, we’re giving away a copy of The Prepper’s Blueprint – widely popular and highly rated preparedness manual and a sanitation kit.

All you have to do is sign up for our newsletter and leave a comment in one of our weekly National Preparedness articles about what you feel the most important aspect of being prepared is in the bottom of the article. Good luck everyone!

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

A Crash Course in Preparedness – Week 2 – Medicine, Sanitation, and Surviving Disaster Diseases

 

Welcome back to week 2 in our Crash Course into Preparedness. Last week we discussed the basics of survival and gear needed for a short-lived event. One of the comments from last week’s class mentioned that it isn’t hard to prepare, you just have to start. I couldn’t agree more! My only addition I would make to this comment is in order to start you must prioritize your needs and know what you’re planning for. This week, we are taking the same concept from last week – prioritizing, planning and preparing to another facet of disaster planning and highlighting the more dirty side of preparedness – medical and sanitation needs.

Some of the greatest threats in an emergency occur after the disaster. Lack of accessible clean water following major disasters can quickly escalate and create secondary problems in a post SHTF situation. Additionally, those unsanitary conditions can exacerbate the spreading of diseases, infections and health risks. In this preparedness course, we will cover the most common issues that occur following a disaster that relates to hygiene, sanitary and medical condition.

Sanitation, good hygiene, and medical preparedness all go hand-in-hand. But as you will see after reading this guide, it takes a lot of planning and a lot of preparation. Simply put, there are many wrong turns a person could take in the aftermath of a storm and their health could suffer as a result. Therefore it is paramount that you understand the magnitude of these types of disasters and how to avoid them. As Ready Nutrition writer, Jeremiah Johnson noted in a recent article, “hygiene protects you from germs and diseases, as well as preventing the body from falling apart.” In the aftermath of disasters, this needs to stay at the forefront of our priorities.

In this week’s course, I have compiled lists of preparedness itemsyou may need for these types of disasters, but in no way is this list comprehensive. There is always some other items that someone will need. Therefore, remember to prioritize your household’s needs! If someone in your home has a preexisting condition – prepare for that. If someone in the household has mobility issues – make sure they have supplies to help them get around, or if someone has a suppressed immune system – prepare accordingly.

We have a lot of ground to cover, and a lot of prepper lists to review, so let’s get started.

Why your water sources become contaminated after a disaster and why you should avoid them

Water is one of the most necessary elements to sustain life, but when that water is dirty, it can quickly become one of the most dangerous. Following a disaster, municipal water lines will more than likely be damaged and can become contaminated with sewage, chemicals and, in particular, may also contain a number of pathogens that can cause illness. These contaminated waters harbor bacteria, different viruses, and fungi – all of which can make people very sick.

Diseases can be present in the water. Most notably, cholera, hepatitis A, typhoid fever, and Leptospirosis. If massive flooding occurs in the area and homes are damaged as a result, mold could also pose a serious health problem and exacerbate asthma, allergies, or other respiratory diseases like COPD. Mold can appear in as little as 24 to 48 hours after flood waters recede. Experts suggest not to touch it. Wear rubber gloves, wear a mask when handling it and if you are in a dwelling where there is mold, you should leave.

Those who have open wounds or rashes should also avoid the flood waters as they can quickly become infected. If the water lines are damaged, or if the damage is suspected, do not use municipal water sources for cleaning or drinking. Likewise, throw out any food that has come in contact with contaminated water.  Avoiding contaminated water is your best bet, but at times unavoidable. Maintaining proper sanitation and hygiene will ensure your overall health and safety.

Fly infestations also pose a problem, and if the waste is left out in the open, then it will only lead to the susceptibility of epidemics such as Hepatitis A, cholera, typhoid or diphtheria. Having a means dispersing of human waste will ensure that in times of disaster, your family and neighbors will stay healthy.

As well, mosquitoes are notorious for harboring diseases. Some of which are:

  • Dengue
  • West Nile
  • Zika
  • Chikungunya
  • St. Louis Encephalitis
  • La Crosse Encephalitis

As well as a few others that mainly affect animals:

  • Western Equine Encephalitis
  • Dog Heartworm

So it’s important for homeowners in disaster affected regions to take certain measures to prevent the proliferation of mosquitoes. This requires keeping an eye out for things on your property that might contain even the smallest puddles of water. As well, experts are recommending that homeowners drain pools and if you see mosquitoes in larger areas of standing water to alert authorities.

Make sure you clear any trash or debris in your yards such as tires or cans and don’t leave any water out in flower pots or water bowls. It’s also a good idea to secure any leaky pipes you might have outside of your home, and clear out any leaves in your gutters. In some cases, you may need to fill or drain spots that tend to collect water on your property.  As an added defense, build traps that will cull the local mosquito population.


Sanitation

No one really wants to discuss sanitation because it’s… well, an unpleasant and dirty subject. However, it is one of the most important areas to focus on when preparing for a disaster.

Most disasters cause sanitation nightmares simply because following a disaster, there is a lack of sanitation facilities or water lines have been damaged or crossed with sewage lines. This can bring on serious health risks.

Here are a couple of necessary facts you need to keep in mind.

  • In the aftermath of a disaster where water sources are compromised, people within a 50-mile radius could be adversely impacted by illness and disease just if one person handled the trash improperly. Let that sink in.
  • If the you-know-what has hit the fan, you must be aware that more people die after a disaster due to poor sanitation than from the disaster itself. This is due to individuals not knowing where or how to properly expel waste.
  • Infectious diseases from contaminated water can make certain groups very vulnerable – the very young, the elderly and people suffering from diseases that lower their immune resistance.

How to prepare for sanitation disruptions

When the trash cannot be picked up, it must be burned or buried by you; however, municipalities cannot risk contamination to the water source or soil from people who incorrectly bury their debris, so it is important to know how to properly dispose of your waste products and stay clean, as well. Typically, city officials will provide information on this after a disaster occurs.

One of your first lines of defense is to keep hands clean during an emergency to prevent the spread of germs. If your tap water is not safe to use, wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected. If needed, a temporary hand washing station can be created by using a large water jug that contains clean water.

How to clean water

Bring your drinking water to a rolling boil for 15 to 20 minutes before consumption or for cleaning purposes. At altitudes above one mile or 2,000 meters, you should increase the rolling time to three minutes. For an added measure, after boiling, you can chemically disinfect the water with chlorine bleach (minus additives). Use 16 drops of chlorine bleach per gallon, or 4 drops per quart of water.

The reason for taking added measures after you boil your water is that many water-borne diseases like giardia and cryptosporidium tend to encyst and can survive a chemical disinfection, especially with chlorine.  Most of your one-celled creepy-crawlies will bite the big one with it, but boiling is the only surefire method when you don’t have an advanced water filtration system available.

Calcium hypochlorite (HTH, also known as “pool shock”) is another method to use.  The concentrations are different per the manufacturer, but you can reconstitute it and make a slurry with a one-liter bottle and a teaspoon of the HTH. Then you follow the ratio for chlorine drops as provided above, keeping aware that it will deteriorate over time. Source

Wash your hands

Now that the water is clean, washing hands with soap and water are the best way to reduce the number of germs on the skin. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs. According to the CDC, you should wash your hands after the following:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • Before and after caring for someone who is sick
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal or animal waste
  • After touching garbage
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound

Make a sanitation kit

As well, you want to ensure your house has a way of dealing with sanitation issues. Having a sanitation kit that is ready in times of disaster is essential to keeping your family and neighbors healthy. These kits can fit comfortably into a bucket, are affordable, and will not take up much space. Additionally, being educated on how to properly dispose of waste is a key factor in keeping everyone healthy during a disaster.

Some suggested sanitation supplies should be added to any short or long-term emergency kits are:

  • Disposable bucket or luggable loo
  • Toilet paper (two weeks worth)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Garbage bags with twist ties (for liners of toilets or luggable loo)
  • Bathroom cleaner
  • Cat Litter or absorbent material such as saw dust or dirt
  • Baby wipe
  • Soap
  • Baking soda can be used to help eliminate odors
  • Vinegar
  • Bleach
  • Shovel
  • Women’s sanitary needs

Dispose of Waste

Properly disposing of waste products keeps water sources clean and cuts down on illness and disease.  If city water is still available, flush conservatively.  Grey water such as used dish water, bath water or water for cooking can be used to flush the toilet.  If water lines are damaged, or if the damage is suspected, do not flush the toilet.

If water services are interrupted, an easy way to utilize the toilet and keep it clean is to:

  • Clean and empty the water of the toilet bowl out.
  • Line the bowl with a heavy-duty plastic bag.
  • Once the bag has waste inside, add a small amount of deodorant such as cat litter, as well as disinfectant and securely tie the bag for disposal.
  • A large plastic trash can (lined with a heavy duty bag) can be used to store the bags of waste.
  • Once trash services begin, the city will come and collect these.

If a portable camp toilet is used, the above mentioned can also be used. However, if the trash crews are coming, carefully secure the waste bag and store in a designated trash can to be collected. If the trash crews are not coming in a given amount of time, the bag of waste will need to be buried (see the proper way to bury waste below).

Officials say to avoid burying your waste, but sometimes it is necessary. However, if the waste is not properly taken care of, pollution of water sources will lead to illness and disease. It also attracts flies and insects which will spread the disease further. Understand that burying feces takes up to a year to decompose. Therefore, finding the right spot to bury your feces is crucial. There are biodegradable bags that a person can put their waste into. These can usually be found in the camping department of outdoor stores, or on the Internet. The bags assist the waste in decomposing faster and assists in preventing the waste from hitting major water sources. If a person does not have one of these handy bags available, the feces should be buried in “catholes” far away from water sources, campsites and a communal spot where there are a lot of humans. If you find yourself in a situation where toilet paper is not available, you may have to resort to a more natural method of staying clean. Below is a list of toilet paper alternatives for an emergency situation.

Toilet Paper Alternatives

  • Leaves
  • Phone books
  • Unused coffee filters
  • Corn cobs (That’s right- Corn Cobs)
  • Dilapidated kitchen towels (no longer used for cleaning).
  • Bed linen strips
  • Mail order catalog

Hygiene

It is important to continue regular hygiene habits during an emergency. As well, a woman’s personal hygiene and ensuring children are clean is essential in making sure sanitation-related illnesses do not occur.Habits such as brushing your teeth, washing your face, combing your hair and even washing your body with a wet washcloth. This will provide a sense of normalcy, help prevent the spread of disease, as well as help to relieve the stress brought on by the disaster.

In a pinch, water can be heated outside using a sun visor for a vehicle or a sun oven. Use filtered potable water or fresh rainwater during times of emergencies. To prevent sanitation-related diseases, do not use standing water.

SHTF laundry

If your home was damaged by flood water, you will need to disinfect your washing machine. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Set the washer to the largest load capacity and fill with hot water
  2. Add one cup chlorine bleach
  3. Set the washer to a full cycle with a hot water rinse. Allow washing machine to run through the entire cycle.
  4. Clean the exterior of the washer – top, front and sides – and all other surfaces in the laundry room with a solution of chlorine bleach and hot water. Rinse with clean water.

Additional Maintenance Tips:

  • If the washer has been through a flood, have a technician check the appliance before cleaning and using.
  • If a dryer has been contaminated by flood water, have it checked by a technician and then wipe down the drum and outside of the dryer with a solution of chlorine bleach and hot water. Always rinse well with a cloth dipped in clear water.

Once your washer is clean and ready for use, it’s time to get that laundry going.

  1. Sort clothes into appropriate piles.
  2. Check your care label to make sure garments are washable.
  3. If labeled hand washable only, then hand wash—do not put into the washing machine.
  4. If the garment is dry, brush off loose dirt and residue. Rinse in clean, cool water to remove mud and flood water. This will take several rinses until rinse water is clear. Work a heavy duty detergent (liquid) or paste of granule detergent into all stained areas. Let stand 30 minutes.
  5. Work a heavy duty detergent (liquid) or paste of granule detergent into all stained areas. Let stand 30 minutes.
  6. Follow care labels and wash in hottest water safe for the garment with detergent. Use bleach if recommended for the garment.
  7. Sanitize with a disinfectant. Always test on an inconspicuous seam to be sure it does not harm the garment. Add to washing machine before adding clothing.

Some disinfectants to try are:

  • Liquid chlorine bleach (Clorox, Purex) if safe. Do not use on washable wools and silks. Follow directions carefully.
  • Pine oil (Pine-O-Pine, Fyne Pine) is safe for most washable garments. Do not use on washable wools and silks since the odor will remain.
  • Phenolic (Pine-Sol, Al-Pine) is safe for most washable garments. Do not use on washable wools and silks since the odor will remain. 1 Hang garments to dry.

Off-grid laundry is another option to consider

As well, you need to consider some off-grid laundry sources if your home has no power. Some items you will need are:

First, gather your supplies.

  • Laundry soap of choice (liquid is easier to use in this case)
  • Borax
  • Baking Soda
  • Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Sturdy scrub brush
  • Small bucket (I use a clean plastic kitty litter bucket)
  • Good quality janitor’s mop bucket with a press wringer
  • Large basin or clean bathroom
  • Drying rack and clothespins (or method of choice)
  1. Separate clothing into small piles.
  2. In a large basin, add laundry soap and begin filling with water with the hottest water. Mix the soap into the water until incorporated.
  3. As water is still filling up in the basin, add laundry. Turn off the water when water covers the soiled laundry.
  4. Add any disinfectants and mix to incorporate.
  5. Allow laundry to sit for 30 minutes to an hour to soak.
  6. When ready to clean clothes, fill the second basin up with water and set aside.
  7. Using an agitator, scrub clothes to get all stains off.
  8. Rinse clothes in the second basin to remove soap.
  9. Ring out clothes and set on dryer rack to dry.

Prevention is the key to spreading communicable diseases, so prepare appropriately.


Medical

Short-term disasters can bring on a myriad of medical situations and they can occur very quickly. Because of the disaster, roads may be impassable, or in some cases, the hospitals may be at capacity and cannot take in any more patients. With that in mind, it is important to know what the most common medical emergencies are and prepare accordingly for them.

In short-term disasters, prepare for water-related illnesses. This will be very common given the close proximity to contaminated water sources.

In The Prepper’s Blueprint, it states, “The relationship between communicable diseases and disasters exist and merits special attention. When there is a short-term emergency, there is an increased number of hospital visits and admissions from common diarrhea-related diseases, acute respiratory infections, dermatitis, and other causes. These type of medical issues are due to those coming in direct contact with flood waters contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage. These contamination factors will cause irritation to skin and a host of other medical conditions.”

In longer-term disasters, burns, cuts, rashes and secondary infections will also be very common medical emergencies to prepare for. Folks, these are the disasters you will likely face and it is imperative that you prepare for this with proper medical supplies and knowledge.

I realize that there are a lot of medical conditions to think about. The best approach is to look at the basics and prepare for those. Many medical items can be used for multiple disasters, so take comfort in this and prepare accordingly.

Build the Ultimate 1 Year Medical Supply with These First Aid Basics

Experts suggest that each home have a basic medical supply that is unique to your family’s needs. Therefore, keep any pre-existing conditions and allergies any family members may have, as well as the above list of the most common medical conditions that hospitals see. It is within your best interest to ensure that you have any and all necessary medications that require prescriptions before an emergency happens.We all have our fair share of band-aids and antibiotic ointment, but do you have medical supplies that can help with true medical emergencies?

The following list is your basic medical preparations broken into sections of the need to help in your organization.


Hygiene

  • Laundry detergent
  • Disinfectant (bleach, pine-sol, etc.)
  • Soap
  • Shampoo
  • Liquid antibacterial hand soap – 20
  • Disposable hand wipes – 20
  • Antibacterial hand sanitizer – 20
  • Feminine items – 12 packages
  • Extra baby needs (diapers, wipes, pacifiers, bottles, medicine, etc.) – in quantity
  • Exam gloves – 5 boxes
  • Rubber cleaning gloves
  • Extra mops and brooms
  • Large plastic bins (for doing laundry, clearing away debris or packing precious items in a pinch)

Essential Medical Tools

  • Trauma shears
  • Pen light or small flash light
  • Scalpel with extra blades
  • Stethoscope
  • Irrigation syringe
  • Tweezers
  • Thermometer
  • Foam splint – 2 per family member
  • Thermometer

Over-the-Counter Products

  • Aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever (for adults and children) – 5 bottles
  • Stool softener – 5 bottles
  • Electrolyte powder – 3 boxes
  • Cold/flu medications – 2 boxes per family member
  • Expectorant/decongestants – 3 per family member
  • Hydrocortisone – 3
  • Miconazole/anti-fungal – 3
  • Syrup of Ipecac and activated charcoal – 2
  • Eye care (e.g., contact lens case, cleansing solution, eye moisture drops) – 3 per family member

Natural Supplements

Wound Care

  • Disinfectant (Betadine, isopropyl alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, etc.) – 2 per family member
  • Band-aids – 3 large boxes in assorted sizes
  • Antibiotic ointment – 5
  • Instant cold and hot packs – 10
  • 1 week of prescription medications – as many as you are able to get with your prescription
  • Ace bandages – 10
  • Non- stick gauze pads in assorted sizes (3×3 and 4×4) – 10 boxes
  • Sterile roller bandages – 5
  • Surgical sponges – 5
  • Adhesive tape or duct tape – 5
  • Steri-strips – 5
  • Moleskin – 3
  • Respirator masks – 4
  • CPR micro shield – 1 per family member
  • Suture kit – 3 per family member
  • QuikClot® compression bandages – 2 per family member
  • Tourniquet – 2
  • Thermal Mylar blanket – 1 per family member
  • Antibiotics

*These are your minimum quantities. If you are able to do so, prepare for more.

One cannot become proficient at something without study and application. Going as far as to take medical courses in community colleges, local county extension offices, local fire departments, and with veterans groups, along with other civic clubs and organizations can give you a great edge on acquiring knowledge on medical emergencies and how to treat them. It should go without saying, but stock up on medical manuals like:

Taking medical courses would be very beneficial in preparing for this type of emergency. The Fire Department, American Red Cross or Medical Centers are local resources that offer classes to assist in medical emergencies. To further prepare, find websites online that deal with first aid care and go through each injury to see what medical instruments and items are needed.

Customize Your Supplies

Many believe that a basic store-bought medical kit will provide for all of their medical needs, but these kits tend to be overloaded with unneeded items (i.e., 500 band aids). Buying your own medical supplies allows you to customize your kit to fit your family’s unique needs and is more economical. In fact, you can purchase many of these items at your local Dollar Store to save money.  Customizing your family’s medical supply gives your family members the best chance at being cared for when a medical emergency arises. Further, take your preparedness a step further and organize your medical preps and create medical response packs for quick acting.

Store a first aid kit in the car (being careful with heat sensitive items) and also tuck some medical supplies into your 72-hour bag as well as at work. This way, you can be ready to deal with medical emergencies wherever they happen to occur.

Storing Medical Supplies

How you store your first aid supplies is every bit as important as having the supplies in the first place. Medicines can lose potency or spoil if they are subject to moisture, temperature fluctuations, and light.  For example, aspirin begins to break down when it is exposed to a slight amount of moisture.

Unless the instructions indicate otherwise, store medications in a cool, dark place that is out of the reach of children.   However, you still want to store the medical supplies in a place that is easily accessible to adults, who may need to respond very quickly in the event of a medical crisis.

Check expiration dates periodically to ensure the medicines are still good to use.  While most medicines lose potency once they’re past the expiration date, there are a few that will actually make a person extremely ill if taken after it spoils.  For example, tetracycline antibiotics that have spoiled can cause a severe, sometimes deadly, kidney ailment.

Signs of Expired Medicines

Although there is data that states most medicines can last longer than their expiration dates, it is important to understand that using medicine years past its expiration date can lose effectiveness and in some cases, change its chemical makeup. If you are in a survival situation where your life depended on an outdated drug, then it is wise to follow the cliché “better safe than sorry”.

Knowing the signs of expired medicine can help indicate when new items are needed.

  • Creams or ointments which are discolored or have changed in texture.
  • Creams or ointments which have cracked or separated.
  • The medicines smell has changed since it was opened.
  • Tablets are broken or chipped and have changed color

Bear in mind, there are some medications that should never be used after their expiration and could have severe consequences for patients. These include:

  • Anticonvulsants – narrow therapeutic index
  • Dilantin, phenobarbital – very quickly lose potency
  • Nitroglycerin – very quickly lose potency
  • Warfarin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Procan SR – sustained release procainamide
  • Theophylline – very quickly lose potency
  • Digoxin – narrow therapeutic index
  • Thyroid preparations
  • Paraldehyde
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Epinephrine – very quickly lose potency
  • Insulin – very quickly lose potency
  • Eye drops – eyes are particularly sensitive to any bacteria that might grow in a solution once a preservative degrades.

Source

What if you don’t have enough medical supplies?

Now, let’s take this a step further. What if you prepared your food and water for an emergency, but completely forgot about getting medical supplies? (It’s hard to remember everything when you’re planning for a disaster) There are some alternatives that you may be lucky enough to have in your pantry to use.

Some of your kitchen staples may have some medicinal value. For instance, did you know you can make an antiseptic (first discovered during World War I) made of a diluted solution of baking soda and bleach? It’s called Dakin’s Solution and has been proven to kill most bacteria and viruses. As well, vinegar, baking soda, baking powder and salt have medicinal values.

Honey has become a poster child for an alternative to antibiotics can fight multiple species of bacteria, fungi, and superbugs, making it a viable alternative to antibiotics.

As Ready Nutrition writer, Jeremiah Johnson recently wrote, “Honey is also good for wounds/abrasions/cuts of the mouth, as it is a demulcent that soothes abraded tissues, and it also is a medium that microbes do not live in.  Who doesn’t remember the time-honored honey and lemon mixture for a sore throat?  The thing of it is: it works, and if it works it should be employed. Read more on how to use honey to treat wounds.

Having access to health-inducing herbs is another essential for wound care. Herbs such as oregano, garlic, lavender, and thyme can help protect a wound from infection and promote healing. Along those lines, writer, Jeremiah Johnson recommends every prepper have the Three G’s: Ginger, Garlic, and Ginseng in their natural medicine cabinet. Further, knowing which herbs can be used for natural pain killers is also paramount in your medical preparedness knowledge. Some pain reducing herbs to add to your herbal first-aid kit are:

  • Aloe (Aloe vera)
  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
  • Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)
  • Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica)
  • Tea (Camellia sinensis)
  • Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

Common pantry items can also be used to help bleeding wounds clot. Many have found that cayenne pepper is an effective alternative and natural version of QuikClot. Cayenne pepper contains an active ingredient, called capsaicin, which has analgesic (pain relieving) properties and various other medicinal uses.

As well, boiled and sanitized torn sheets can be used as bandages. Or, if the cuts are minor and you have access to an herb garden, consider placing a sage leaf or lamb’s quarters on the cut as a natural bandage.

In an extended disaster, bacterial infections and viruses are likely to be one of the reasons that people will die.

Historically, essential oils have been used as a natural therapy to relieve symptoms when modern-day medicine was not available. The most amazing aspect of essential oils lies in their ability to effectively kill bad bacteria while leaving good bacteria alone! Rather than targeting one symptom, as Western medicine does, it targets multiple symptoms.

There are two types of essential oils you should stock up on for SHTF planning:

Antibacterial – Due to the increase of antibacterial resistant illnesses, many are turning to essential oils such as basil, cassia, cinnamon, clove, cypress, eucalyptus, geranium, lavender, lemon, marjoram, melaleuca, myrrh, orange, oregano, peppermint, rosemary, tea tree, and thyme.

Antiviral – Oils that have been studied to help control viral infections include: basil, cassia, cinnamon, eucalyptus, frankincense, lemon, lemongrass, marjoram, Melaleuca, myrrh, oregano, and thyme.

I started out with a simple beginner’s essential oil kit and have found it of great use! Some more popular ways of using essential oils are aromatherapy, herbal soaks, compresses, tinctures, and salves.

Surviving Disaster-Related Diseases

In reality, the aftermath of a disaster is always to hardest to survive. We tend to find ourselves in third-world living conditions – off-the-grid, poor water conditions, lack of proper sanitation and poor diet.

Those conditions can create the perfect storm for outbreaks of disease and infection. And if you find yourself living in close proximity to others, those diseases can quickly spread, thus setting the stage for an epidemic.

Outbreaks

Let’s cut to the chase, epidemics are quite common following certain disasters. According to this publication, these are the most common diseases that follow a disaster:

  • Diarrhea-related illness (cholera, dysentery)
  • Leptospirosis
  • Hepatitis
  • ARI (pneumonia/influenza)
  • Measles
  • Meningococcal meningitis
  • TB
  • Malaria
  • Dengue fever
  • Tetanus

Many believe the misuse of antibiotics in the past has led to the dangers of super bugs such as the spread of MRSA and MERS virus. In fact, nearly all significant bacterial infections in the world are becoming resistant to commonly used antibiotics. This means that our current medical safety nets will be much smaller in the near future. Even the smallest cuts could pose a danger to our health.

To add insult to injury, the disease typhoid which is spread from contaminated food and water is also becoming resistant to antibiotics and could soon become an out of control nightmare. Why am I telling you this? Because superbugs are everywhere now and experts warn that “it’s almost too late.” In the wake of a disaster, we immediately fall back on medicines that have worked in the past. If we find ourselves with an infection and antibiotics don’t work, then a secondary infection will set in and your fate is sealed.

Phases of outbreak and classification of infectious disease

Infectious disease transmission or outbreaks may be seen days, weeks or even months after the onset of the disaster. Three clinical phases of natural disasters summarize the chronological public health effects on injured people and survivors:

Phase (1), the impact phase (lasting up to 4 days), is usually the period when victims are extricated and initial treatment of disaster-related injuries is provided.

Phase (2), the post-impact phase (4 days to 4 weeks), is the period when the first waves of infectious diseases (air-borne, foodborne, and/or water-borne infections) might emerge.

Phase (3), the recovery phase (after 4 weeks), is the period when symptoms of victims who have contracted infections with long incubation periods or those with latent-type infections may become clinically apparent. During this period, infectious diseases that are already endemic in the area, as well as newly imported ones among the affected community, may grow into an epidemic.

Source

When an outbreak occurs, those living in cities or in close proximity to others will be more at risk of contracting illnesses and spreading them. Any pregnant women, infants, elderly people, or those with chronic medical conditions are also at risk and could be the first of the population to contract the contagious illness. If an epidemic approaches, there could be long-lasting repercussions of such a disaster. The worst-case scenario in all of this is if the outbreak is widespread and extremely contagious drastic changes could be made to isolate the outbreak itself.

  • Challenges or shut downs of business commerce
  • Breakdown of our basic infrastructure: communications, mass transportation, supply chains
  • Payroll service interruptions
  • Staffing shortages in hospitals and medical clinics
  • Interruptions in public facilities – Schools, workplaces may close, and public gatherings such as sporting events or worship services may close temporarily.
  • Government mandated voluntary or involuntary home quarantine.

While these are extreme points, I want to make sure you are prepared for a worst-case scenario and knowing what to expect will help you in your efforts. As I have mentioned, with any type of disaster or emergency, the responsibility falls more heavily upon our shoulders to ensure you can meet our needs. Instituting preventative measures in the home could also help you better prepare for injured or infectious family members.

  • Taking proper illness precautions – avoid touching your mouth, nose, and eyes during any pandemic.
  • Create a sick room for the home.
  • Keep your immune systems up by getting lots of sleep, having a good diet, exercising and taking vitamins and antioxidants to protect your health.
  • Stay inside and avoid contact with others.
  • Get pandemic supplies to have on hand at a moments notice.

Some items to consider when stocking a sick room are:

  • Tyvek protective suit and shoe covers
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Bed with linens, pillow, and blanket
  • Small wastebasket or a bucket lined with a plastic garbage bag.
  • Gallon-sized zip-loc bags
  • Pitcher or large bottle for water
  • Large plastic dishpan
  • portable toilet and human waste bags
  • Clipboard with paper and a pen for writing in the daily log.
  • Clock
  • Hand crank or battery-powered radio
  • Good source of light
  • Flashlight with extra batteries
  • 1 clothing hamper or a garbage can that is lined with a plastic garbage bag used to collect soiled clothing and bedding items before they are washed.
  • A bell or a noisemaker to call for assistance.
  • Thermometer
  • Tissues
  • Hand wipes or a waterless hand sanitizer
  • Bleach or disinfectant
  • Cotton balls
  • Rubbing alcohol, disinfectant or bleach
  • Measuring cup capable of holding 8 ounces or 250 ml
  • Over-the-counter medications for use in the sick room
  • Protective eye gear
  • Protective clothing
  • Disposable aprons or smocks (at least 2 cases)
  • Duct tape for sealing off doorways and vents
  • Latex household disposable cleaning gloves
  • Disposable nitrile gloves (2-3 boxes)
  • Garbage bags
  • Trash can
  • N95 masks or N100 respirator masks for use when the sick person is coughing or sneezing

To conclude, there will always be the threat of completely unanticipated disasters, but your overall understanding of the disasters we face and the dangers that lie in the aftermath will help you maneuver through these types of emergencies.

 

Course Discussion

We all have a way to help others prepare. One of the most wonderful things you can do is to help someone prepare. New preppers, if you have questions, leave them in the comment section and as a community, we can help to answer them. You’re not in this alone. I know this information provided is a lot to take in, just pace yourself and we are all here for you if you need it.

 

Sign Up For This Week’s Giveaway!

To help some readers get prepared for sanitation-related emergencies, we’re giving away a copy of The Prepper’s Blueprint – widely popular and highly rated preparedness manual and a sanitation kit.

All you have to do is sign up for our newsletter and leave a comment in one of our weekly National Preparedness articles about what you feel the most important aspect of being prepared is in the bottom of the article. Good luck everyone!

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition