FD box meals

Click here to view the original post.

You guys familiar with ‘box meal’ services like Blue Apron and similar outfits? You ‘subscribe’ and every week they send you a box in the mail with a recipe and all the ingredients you need to create that recipe. I think it’s a tad silly and expensive, but some people enjoy it.

I’m amused that the folks at Thrive storage food have used the ‘Blue Apron’ model to create a make-it-yourself meal service using, unsurprisingly, their freeze dried foods.

I have to admit, it’s a pretty clever way to tap into an entirely new market. However, even top of the line freeze-drieds are still a bit lacking compared to fresh vegetables and fruits that you get at the grocery store. But, one interesting aspect is that by checking out their menus you can come up with ideas on how best to utilize their selection of freeze dried foods.

Anyway, I thought it was rather amusing. Personally, while I have a really good stock of freeze drieds in storage, I think I’d rather eat the wet-pack canned stuff. Given my druthers between canned pineapple or freezedried pineapple, I’ll use the canned stuff every time…my pina coladas deserve no less.

 

FD box meals

You guys familiar with ‘box meal’ services like Blue Apron and similar outfits? You ‘subscribe’ and every week they send you a box in the mail with a recipe and all the ingredients you need to create that recipe. I think it’s a tad silly and expensive, but some people enjoy it.

I’m amused that the folks at Thrive storage food have used the ‘Blue Apron’ model to create a make-it-yourself meal service using, unsurprisingly, their freeze dried foods.

I have to admit, it’s a pretty clever way to tap into an entirely new market. However, even top of the line freeze-drieds are still a bit lacking compared to fresh vegetables and fruits that you get at the grocery store. But, one interesting aspect is that by checking out their menus you can come up with ideas on how best to utilize their selection of freeze dried foods.

Anyway, I thought it was rather amusing. Personally, while I have a really good stock of freeze drieds in storage, I think I’d rather eat the wet-pack canned stuff. Given my druthers between canned pineapple or freezedried pineapple, I’ll use the canned stuff every time…my pina coladas deserve no less.

 

Las Vegas Shooter’s Brother In a Wacky Interview Calls Paddock An Arms Dealer

Click here to view the original post.

Las Vegas Shooter’s Brother In a Wacky Interview

Calls Paddock An Arms Dealer

Go to 14:45

What do you think?

And he wants to retract it…but realizes is can’t be done. And then he says he was speaking in a Colloquial Term. I had to Google it, but it basically means “common language”

This is

He speaks using some unusual phrases and words.

“my Diatribe of the day….”

When someone like Steve can do this….we are in deep blanking trouble.

He must have said that his brother acted alone, half a dozen times. 
—————————————————————————-

The Vegas Plot Thickens: The Connection Between The Shooter And An Intelligence Agency

http://www.thedailysheeple.com/the-vegas-plot-thickens-the-connection-between-the-shooter-and-an-intelligence-agency_102017

————————————————————-

  

Las Vegas Shooter’s Brother In a Wacky Interview Calls Paddock An Arms Dealer

Las Vegas Shooter’s Brother In a Wacky Interview

Calls Paddock An Arms Dealer

Go to 14:45

What do you think?

And he wants to retract it…but realizes is can’t be done. And then he says he was speaking in a Colloquial Term. I had to Google it, but it basically means “common language”

This is

He speaks using some unusual phrases and words.

“my Diatribe of the day….”

When someone like Steve can do this….we are in deep blanking trouble.

He must have said that his brother acted alone, half a dozen times. 
—————————————————————————-

The Vegas Plot Thickens: The Connection Between The Shooter And An Intelligence Agency

http://www.thedailysheeple.com/the-vegas-plot-thickens-the-connection-between-the-shooter-and-an-intelligence-agency_102017

————————————————————-

  

The Situation in Catalonia 101

Click here to view the original post.

Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro with the Catalan “estelada” independence flag.

Hello Fernando –

As an avid reader of your blog I am curious about your opinion regarding the news from Spain and the possibility that Catalonia will declare itself a separate country.  Any SHTF advice regarding this at all?  Would love to see you blog about it.

-Tim

Hi Tim.

What you see happening in Cataluña is simply an attempt to overthrow the government.

The recent referendum, which was illegal both according to Cataluña law and the Spanish constitution agreed by all Spaniards, including Catalans, in 1978.

Spain has always been far more complex than what most people think. For example, Spanish, although the official language of Spain for obvious reasons, is not the only language across the country. In Galicia there’s Gallego. In Basque country here’s Euskera and in Cataluña there’s Catalan, a Spanish dialect with a few bits of French here and there.

For centuries, these autonomous regions have mostly lived in peace but there have been sporadic attempts to secede from Spain. Given that common sense generally prevails, these rarely have much support from a majority of the population. You probably remember the ETA terrorist group. A perfect example of trying to achieve through violence what is impossible through democratic means.

In the case of Cataluña, rather than using terrorism, separatists took their time and used a far more effective tactic: Attacking children. Taking advantage of the independence they had as an autonomous region in control of the education, they started brainwashing the very young. Although legally obligated to teach children Spanish, it was limited to 1 hour a week. Children were in fact punished by their teachers for speaking Spanish, even during break time. An alternative version of history was taught, one in which Cataluña was violently annexed to Spain. The idea was to plant an anti-Spanish, anti-monarchy sentiment in children and in due time across society in general. After 30 years, it was time to reap what they had sowed.

Who did this, who are the separatists? A complex group, but mostly its left, far-left, anti-capitalist, anti-system, anarcho-communists and liberals. There are of course very rich people, with a liberal speech and agenda but an aristocrat’s bank account, that have been promoting separatism as well. This would be the very rich, very corrupt Catalan elite (Pujols for example). Their main concern is creating a separate State so as to avoid going to jail given the many corruption scandals they have been involved in over the years. Politically speaking the Spanish right, called the PP(People’s Party) is very much against separatism, while traditional the further left you go (PSOE socialist party, Podemos left wing populism) , the more sympathetic they are with these separatist, anti Spain agendas.

Communists and Antifacists in Spain have been strong allies of Cristina Kirchner in Argentina and Hugo Chavez and then Nicolas Maduro in Venezuela… and they are strong supporters of Cataluña independence. In my book, that tells me all I need to know about these people.

After the failed referendum attempt, illegal, with no national or international monitors and ballot boxes full of votes even before people started voting, the powerful Catalan press is at it again and the mainstream liberal media eats it up.

You’ve probably heard that there’s been 900 wounded. But Cataluña hospitals only report treating four people in relation to the protests that day. A woman supposedly had all her fingers broken by the Spanish police… turns out she was only treated for a luxation… in one finger…

CNN will not tell you that Spanish police has been attack for upholding the law and entering illegally occupied schools. I doubt they’ll report that in public schools children of police officers have been singled out by commie separatist teachers and verbally abused.

The situation now is tense in Cataluña to say the least. The rest of Spain watches with attention as the situation over there develops.

Legally speaking The Spanish government has every right to charge the Cataluña government for attempting to overthrow the government. At this point I believe they are trying to jail these criminals with as minimum negative press as possible. This will be difficult to say the least since they have to support of significant part of the society. It may not be the majority, but as you know they can be loud and rebellious while the silent majority goes unnoticed.

At this point I would simply recommend to stay calm and prepared as we always do. For those is Cataluña, avoid the urge of going to the streets and engaging with troublemakers. That’s precisely what they want. I believe stores are closed in many places across the territory so you better have your supplies sorted out.

It’s a serious crisis and it is worth watching carefully. I wouldn’t bug out of the place just yet, but then again I would have never lived in a place that even years ago was clearly overrun by a left wing mafia.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

The Situation in Catalonia 101

Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro with the Catalan “estelada” independence flag.

Hello Fernando –

As an avid reader of your blog I am curious about your opinion regarding the news from Spain and the possibility that Catalonia will declare itself a separate country.  Any SHTF advice regarding this at all?  Would love to see you blog about it.

-Tim

Hi Tim.

What you see happening in Cataluña is simply an attempt to overthrow the government.

The recent referendum, which was illegal both according to Cataluña law and the Spanish constitution agreed by all Spaniards, including Catalans, in 1978.

Spain has always been far more complex than what most people think. For example, Spanish, although the official language of Spain for obvious reasons, is not the only language across the country. In Galicia there’s Gallego. In Basque country here’s Euskera and in Cataluña there’s Catalan, a Spanish dialect with a few bits of French here and there.

For centuries, these autonomous regions have mostly lived in peace but there have been sporadic attempts to secede from Spain. Given that common sense generally prevails, these rarely have much support from a majority of the population. You probably remember the ETA terrorist group. A perfect example of trying to achieve through violence what is impossible through democratic means.

In the case of Cataluña, rather than using terrorism, separatists took their time and used a far more effective tactic: Attacking children. Taking advantage of the independence they had as an autonomous region in control of the education, they started brainwashing the very young. Although legally obligated to teach children Spanish, it was limited to 1 hour a week. Children were in fact punished by their teachers for speaking Spanish, even during break time. An alternative version of history was taught, one in which Cataluña was violently annexed to Spain. The idea was to plant an anti-Spanish, anti-monarchy sentiment in children and in due time across society in general. After 30 years, it was time to reap what they had sowed.

Who did this, who are the separatists? A complex group, but mostly its left, far-left, anti-capitalist, anti-system, anarcho-communists and liberals. There are of course very rich people, with a liberal speech and agenda but an aristocrat’s bank account, that have been promoting separatism as well. This would be the very rich, very corrupt Catalan elite (Pujols for example). Their main concern is creating a separate State so as to avoid going to jail given the many corruption scandals they have been involved in over the years. Politically speaking the Spanish right, called the PP(People’s Party) is very much against separatism, while traditional the further left you go (PSOE socialist party, Podemos left wing populism) , the more sympathetic they are with these separatist, anti Spain agendas.

Communists and Antifacists in Spain have been strong allies of Cristina Kirchner in Argentina and Hugo Chavez and then Nicolas Maduro in Venezuela… and they are strong supporters of Cataluña independence. In my book, that tells me all I need to know about these people.

After the failed referendum attempt, illegal, with no national or international monitors and ballot boxes full of votes even before people started voting, the powerful Catalan press is at it again and the mainstream liberal media eats it up.

You’ve probably heard that there’s been 900 wounded. But Cataluña hospitals only report treating four people in relation to the protests that day. A woman supposedly had all her fingers broken by the Spanish police… turns out she was only treated for a luxation… in one finger…

CNN will not tell you that Spanish police has been attack for upholding the law and entering illegally occupied schools. I doubt they’ll report that in public schools children of police officers have been singled out by commie separatist teachers and verbally abused.

The situation now is tense in Cataluña to say the least. The rest of Spain watches with attention as the situation over there develops.

Legally speaking The Spanish government has every right to charge the Cataluña government for attempting to overthrow the government. At this point I believe they are trying to jail these criminals with as minimum negative press as possible. This will be difficult to say the least since they have to support of significant part of the society. It may not be the majority, but as you know they can be loud and rebellious while the silent majority goes unnoticed.

At this point I would simply recommend to stay calm and prepared as we always do. For those is Cataluña, avoid the urge of going to the streets and engaging with troublemakers. That’s precisely what they want. I believe stores are closed in many places across the territory so you better have your supplies sorted out.

It’s a serious crisis and it is worth watching carefully. I wouldn’t bug out of the place just yet, but then again I would have never lived in a place that even years ago was clearly overrun by a left wing mafia.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

The Situation in Catalonia 101

Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro with the Catalan “estelada” independence flag.

Hello Fernando –

As an avid reader of your blog I am curious about your opinion regarding the news from Spain and the possibility that Catalonia will declare itself a separate country.  Any SHTF advice regarding this at all?  Would love to see you blog about it.

-Tim

Hi Tim.

What you see happening in Cataluña is simply an attempt to overthrow the government.

The recent referendum, which was illegal both according to Cataluña law and the Spanish constitution agreed by all Spaniards, including Catalans, in 1978.

Spain has always been far more complex than what most people think. For example, Spanish, although the official language of Spain for obvious reasons, is not the only language across the country. In Galicia there’s Gallego. In Basque country here’s Euskera and in Cataluña there’s Catalan, a Spanish dialect with a few bits of French here and there.

For centuries, these autonomous regions have mostly lived in peace but there have been sporadic attempts to secede from Spain. Given that common sense generally prevails, these rarely have much support from a majority of the population. You probably remember the ETA terrorist group. A perfect example of trying to achieve through violence what is impossible through democratic means.

In the case of Cataluña, rather than using terrorism, separatists took their time and used a far more effective tactic: Attacking children. Taking advantage of the independence they had as an autonomous region in control of the education, they started brainwashing the very young. Although legally obligated to teach children Spanish, it was limited to 1 hour a week. Children were in fact punished by their teachers for speaking Spanish, even during break time. An alternative version of history was taught, one in which Cataluña was violently annexed to Spain. The idea was to plant an anti-Spanish, anti-monarchy sentiment in children and in due time across society in general. After 30 years, it was time to reap what they had sowed.

Who did this, who are the separatists? A complex group, but mostly its left, far-left, anti-capitalist, anti-system, anarcho-communists and liberals. There are of course very rich people, with a liberal speech and agenda but an aristocrat’s bank account, that have been promoting separatism as well. This would be the very rich, very corrupt Catalan elite (Pujols for example). Their main concern is creating a separate State so as to avoid going to jail given the many corruption scandals they have been involved in over the years. Politically speaking the Spanish right, called the PP(People’s Party) is very much against separatism, while traditional the further left you go (PSOE socialist party, Podemos left wing populism) , the more sympathetic they are with these separatist, anti Spain agendas.

Communists and Antifacists in Spain have been strong allies of Cristina Kirchner in Argentina and Hugo Chavez and then Nicolas Maduro in Venezuela… and they are strong supporters of Cataluña independence. In my book, that tells me all I need to know about these people.

After the failed referendum attempt, illegal, with no national or international monitors and ballot boxes full of votes even before people started voting, the powerful Catalan press is at it again and the mainstream liberal media eats it up.

You’ve probably heard that there’s been 900 wounded. But Cataluña hospitals only report treating four people in relation to the protests that day. A woman supposedly had all her fingers broken by the Spanish police… turns out she was only treated for a luxation… in one finger…

CNN will not tell you that Spanish police has been attack for upholding the law and entering illegally occupied schools. I doubt they’ll report that in public schools children of police officers have been singled out by commie separatist teachers and verbally abused.

The situation now is tense in Cataluña to say the least. The rest of Spain watches with attention as the situation over there develops.

Legally speaking The Spanish government has every right to charge the Cataluña government for attempting to overthrow the government. At this point I believe they are trying to jail these criminals with as minimum negative press as possible. This will be difficult to say the least since they have to support of significant part of the society. It may not be the majority, but as you know they can be loud and rebellious while the silent majority goes unnoticed.

At this point I would simply recommend to stay calm and prepared as we always do. For those is Cataluña, avoid the urge of going to the streets and engaging with troublemakers. That’s precisely what they want. I believe stores are closed in many places across the territory so you better have your supplies sorted out.

It’s a serious crisis and it is worth watching carefully. I wouldn’t bug out of the place just yet, but then again I would have never lived in a place that even years ago was clearly overrun by a left wing mafia.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Analysis of the “Narrative” on LV Shooter Stephen Paddock

Click here to view the original post.

New Information

The Vegas Plot Thickens: The Connection Between The Shooter And An Intelligence Agency

http://www.thedailysheeple.com/the-vegas-plot-thickens-the-connection-between-the-shooter-and-an-intelligence-agency_102017

I woke today determine to ignore the LV incident and focus on “my real life”.    But out of the gate, I saw headlines on “The Girlfriend landed in LA” and was “met” by officials.   Reading the story, disappointed as usual.   No reporting was done, no specifics.   No Who, What, Where, When, Why.

I figured out how he concealed the rifles over three days by finding some pictures of the entire suite type that he was in.
New Interview with the Brother Eric, odd interview, again.

WARNING at the far bottom of this page is picture of the supposed shooter.    Its pretty gross, so if you don’t like that, don’t go all the way down……….I space it down 20 lines so you can read the whole story and still miss that if you wish.    Note the location of the pistol, far above his head, odd location being that he shut upward into his mouth towards the brain.   And the unusual small and hard to see line of blood from the main puddle to the revolver.   

Probably part of the narrative, or at least in acting politically correct, is that focusing too much light “brown female” would be racist and misogynistic.    I think it quite likely that she was aware of Paddock’s drug and alcohol problems, his abusive nature, and his stockpile of weapons and training with them.    Islam is large in the Philippines.     Maybe she encouraged him.   To not chase this down all the way would be negligent. 
on this

But instead, they started to mold the narrative, which ultimately is gun control, take away guns from Americans, at least for now, have every gun registered under severe penalty for not reporting your guns.  Then they know where and what to confiscate.    Then the roll-out of the Centralized World Governance by the uber rich.

So ears perk up.

One narrative they are trying to push, is that the authorities did a great job in shutting down the shooter quickly.    Nothing is further from the truth.

What I saw was cowardice,

  1. officers running away and not directing people, 
  2. officers trying to convince a citizen first responder that the reason they turned the field lights off was because “everyone was dead” whilst he was actively coordinating the saving of people’s live who were still alive on that field.   
  3. I saw piss poor communications, 
  4. I saw focusing on details that didn’t matter, 
  5. I saw them ignoring reports from an Iraq vet who had pinpointed the shooter in the first minutes.  
  6. I saw officers cowering behind a wall even though they should have known in full auto mode the shooter could not readily  target them and would not likely target them as the shooters “logical” target would be center of crowd mass.   
  7. I saw younger cops ready to be more aggressive and being reigned in by the order guys.   
  8. I saw rifles not being used.    
  9. I saw no suppression fire.   
  10. I saw NONE of the 20 off duty police that were hired by the event.
  11. I saw video evidence of flashes from the 4th floor just left of the center column.   I heard police stating shots coming from middle height of the building.    None of these were ever argued or explained, but the “one crazy white guy narrative” was sure pushed.

Per the USA today timeline, selling a “great response meme”, at 10:24 about 3 minutes after the last heard shot, the police have a hotel security guard go to the door.   Note—they don’t shoot off the locks and charge in.    They have the security guard go to the door and what, knock?   He gets shot through the door.   

So it took 16 minutes to get a security in front of the room door, to get shot.   Then another 26 minutes later they were still “converging” on the 32nd floor.   And what kind of “confrontation” do they speak of “Hey come on out, give yourself up”, Seriously did they even try such a vacuous thing?  It could have spurred him to start shooting again.

They state that Paddock killed himself when the FBI SWAT finally blew open the door with explosives.     But they provide no proof, and the “breech, breech, breech” tape gives no hint of a gunshot after the door blast.    Very likely, he killed himself after the security guard was shot, otherwise, why did he not go back to firing?

So if they would have just gun blasted through the door at that time, it could have been known that the danger was over.   People could have stopped panicking below and getting hurt.    Medical aid and lighting could have been given freely and without caution.   And maybe 30 lives could have been saved.    I will say it….the slow acting, the non-courageous and poorly coordinated efforts cost probably 30 human lives.    

Another narrative is that Paddock was a highly trained shooter and that if he flinched even 1 degree
the shots would have missed the crowd.    stock here—not sure the “point” of this narrative, but he had a huge “view angle” on the crowd, and the dispersing crowd.    No massive skill was needed.

One question I posed to the Las Vegas Police, which they have not responded to directly, was on

psychoactive drugs.   The answer is yes, kind of, I didn’t know Valium was that bad

https://www.reviewjournal.com/local/the-strip/las-vegas-strip-shooter-prescribed-anti-anxiety-drug-in-june/ 

The same Doctor also prescribed Valium in 2016.   Doctor is from Henderson NV, 463 miles away from Reno, where Paddock picked up the prescription the same day.

Was this a proper medical review, or perhaps Paddock is a Drunkard with a drug problem and a personal connection.

Also noted another story in which Starbucks employees report that Paddock was often abusive to GF Marylou
http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-las-vegas-shooting-live-updates-at-his-local-starbucks-vegas-shooter-1507060195-htmlstory.html

The same Starbucks story said how she stood just only up his elbow.   She was short, but she did in fact stand up to his shoulder, quite a bit different image than his “elbow”.     Why the narrative to go out of the way, to paint him as a huge guy abusing a little immigrant brown female?

Also curious, is how when the media that be doesn’t like the story being written, they censor it with various methods, as severe as deletion of account.   Blogger (Google) started spamming nukepro.net with a  series of spammy comments that effectively discredit the site…make anyone visiting not take things seriously.

I did a gamma correction to the image to bring out more detail

No Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars Recipe – A Delicious, Easy To Make Dessert

Click here to view the original post.

If you are looking for an easy to make, delicious dessert, then you must try No Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars.   I needed to make a dessert last week but didn’t have a lot of time to spend in the

The post No Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars Recipe – A Delicious, Easy To Make Dessert appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Best Battery Charger Set Ups For Preppers

Being able to charge batteries is an important part of prepping. Batteries can mean the difference between comfort and convenience during a SHTF situation. Here are a few reasons why you need to be thinking about your battery charging situation and some suggestions for creating a battery system that works for you. Lights Make It. . . Read More

School Bans Cartwheels Because Kids Could Get Hurt

Click here to view the original post.
School Bans Cartwheels Because Kids Could Get Hurt

Image source: Wikipedia

Schools throughout North America are banning cartwheels and even balls as threats to children’s safety.

“The activity can cause concussions, and neck and wrist injuries,” Principal Todd Gribbon told The North Bay Nugget, referencing cartwheels.

New playground rules at M.T. Davidson Public School in Callander, Ontario, ban cartwheels, even though no injuries have occurred.

Put God Back Into History And Teach Your Kids What They Won’t Learn Anywhere Else!

The rules are in a new school handbook that is scheduled for approval this week.

M.T. Davidson is far from alone in going to great lengths to protect kids from ordinary activities.

Cartwheels have been banned at some schools in the United Kingdom and Australia. Earl Beatty Public School in Toronto banned all hard balls in 2011, the CBC reported. That ban included soccer balls, which are considered hard.

“Kids were coming in complaining of injury, or being scared,” Principal Alicia Fernandez said of the ban.

What is your reaction? Share your thoughts in the section below:

School Bans Cartwheels Because Kids Could Get Hurt

School Bans Cartwheels Because Kids Could Get Hurt

Image source: Wikipedia

Schools throughout North America are banning cartwheels and even balls as threats to children’s safety.

“The activity can cause concussions, and neck and wrist injuries,” Principal Todd Gribbon told The North Bay Nugget, referencing cartwheels.

New playground rules at M.T. Davidson Public School in Callander, Ontario, ban cartwheels, even though no injuries have occurred.

Put God Back Into History And Teach Your Kids What They Won’t Learn Anywhere Else!

The rules are in a new school handbook that is scheduled for approval this week.

M.T. Davidson is far from alone in going to great lengths to protect kids from ordinary activities.

Cartwheels have been banned at some schools in the United Kingdom and Australia. Earl Beatty Public School in Toronto banned all hard balls in 2011, the CBC reported. That ban included soccer balls, which are considered hard.

“Kids were coming in complaining of injury, or being scared,” Principal Alicia Fernandez said of the ban.

What is your reaction? Share your thoughts in the section below:

School Bans Cartwheels Because Kids Could Get Hurt

School Bans Cartwheels Because Kids Could Get Hurt

Image source: Wikipedia

Schools throughout North America are banning cartwheels and even balls as threats to children’s safety.

“The activity can cause concussions, and neck and wrist injuries,” Principal Todd Gribbon told The North Bay Nugget, referencing cartwheels.

New playground rules at M.T. Davidson Public School in Callander, Ontario, ban cartwheels, even though no injuries have occurred.

Put God Back Into History And Teach Your Kids What They Won’t Learn Anywhere Else!

The rules are in a new school handbook that is scheduled for approval this week.

M.T. Davidson is far from alone in going to great lengths to protect kids from ordinary activities.

Cartwheels have been banned at some schools in the United Kingdom and Australia. Earl Beatty Public School in Toronto banned all hard balls in 2011, the CBC reported. That ban included soccer balls, which are considered hard.

“Kids were coming in complaining of injury, or being scared,” Principal Alicia Fernandez said of the ban.

What is your reaction? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Asparagus Beetles: All You Need To Know About The Crioceris Species

Click here to view the original post.

The post Asparagus Beetles: All You Need To Know About The Crioceris Species is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Asparagus is a great crop to grow. This perennial produces delicious spears every year in the spring. But there is a down side to growing this phenomenal edible… the asparagus beetle. You might not be alarmed when you see the first couple asparagus beetles, but if they’re not dealt with quickly, you will have a … Read more

The post Asparagus Beetles: All You Need To Know About The Crioceris Species is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Perfect little fixer-upper – $13,000

Click here to view the original post.

Room with a view, a home for two

It’s an historic cottage in Wales, a listed building, that will make an ideal, tiny off-grid home for someone who is very handy with DIY.  The fixer-upper £10,000 UK pounds, about $13,000 at today’s rates, and despite its downtown location it truly has no Utility power or water. This is very rare in the UK, because the European Union has done its best to bring Utility power to every nook and cranny.

The one room building in Menai Bridge, with a view of the local Suspension Bridge, is about the size of three king-size beds. But that is plenty of room if you are clever – put your bed on a platform, and underneath it could be your well, either fed from a spring if you are lucky , or else from the roof into an underground tank you could dig easily,

Menai Bridge is a small town and community on the Isle of Anglesey in north-west Wales. It overlooks the Menai Strait and lies by the Menai Suspension Bridge, built in 1826 by Thomas Telford, just over the water from Bangor.  Guess the average price for a home in this delightful part of Wales?…..Over £230,000 ($300,000).

The white walled house actually has an electricity supply at the moment – a cable from a next door property – but that will be cut off upon sale.

No matter. You can run a few solar panels from the roof, feeding into a small car battery. A ground source heat pump will warm your cockles.  The listed building status might cause a few headaches however as the panels will have to be cunningly disguised, or placed temporarily each day.

 

 

The post Perfect little fixer-upper – $13,000 appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Perfect little fixer-upper – $13,000

Room with a view, a home for two

It’s an historic cottage in Wales, a listed building, that will make an ideal, tiny off-grid home for someone who is very handy with DIY.  The fixer-upper £10,000 UK pounds, about $13,000 at today’s rates, and despite its downtown location it truly has no Utility power or water. This is very rare in the UK, because the European Union has done its best to bring Utility power to every nook and cranny.

The one room building in Menai Bridge, with a view of the local Suspension Bridge, is about the size of three king-size beds. But that is plenty of room if you are clever – put your bed on a platform, and underneath it could be your well, either fed from a spring if you are lucky , or else from the roof into an underground tank you could dig easily,

Menai Bridge is a small town and community on the Isle of Anglesey in north-west Wales. It overlooks the Menai Strait and lies by the Menai Suspension Bridge, built in 1826 by Thomas Telford, just over the water from Bangor.  Guess the average price for a home in this delightful part of Wales?…..Over £230,000 ($300,000).

The white walled house actually has an electricity supply at the moment – a cable from a next door property – but that will be cut off upon sale.

No matter. You can run a few solar panels from the roof, feeding into a small car battery. A ground source heat pump will warm your cockles.  The listed building status might cause a few headaches however as the panels will have to be cunningly disguised, or placed temporarily each day.

 

 

The post Perfect little fixer-upper – $13,000 appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

6 Survival Lessons From Puerto Rico’s Crisis

6 Survival Lessons From Puerto Rico’s Crisis

Photo by Sgt. Jose Ahiram Diaz-Ramos

Oct. 4, 2017

The recent one-two punch of Hurricane Irma passing north of Puerto Rico and then Hurricane Maria crossing over the island has given us a rare opportunity to witness about as serious a crisis situation as one can imagine.

While you and I are not on the ground in Puerto Rico to gain first-hand knowledge about what the people are going through, there have been enough reports come out of the island to give us a pretty clear picture of what is happening.

Even the worst-case disaster — an EMP — wouldn’t leave the people any worse off than Hurricane Maria has left them. In fact, they would probably be better off, simply because the EMP wouldn’t flatten buildings or tear their roofs off like the hurricane did.

1. Protect your backup power

Probably the biggest problem the citizens of Puerto Rico are facing is the loss of electrical power. Our modern society is dependent on electricity for pretty much everything. Without it, civilization, as we know it, comes to a standstill.

One hundred percent of the Puerto Rican grid was taken down in the hurricanes. So, while the electrical power plants are still operational, having suffered very little damage, they can’t transmit that electrical power to the end users. The entire grid must be rebuilt, which they are projecting will take up to six months (which probably means longer).

Few people in Puerto Rico have any means of producing their own electricity, such as solar panels or wind turbines.

Here in Texas, there was one point in time when Hurricane Harvey was headed right for my home, before it turned and headed for Corpus Christi, missing us. Because of that, I took down my wind turbine and the solar panels, which were easily moved. While the hurricane ended up missing us entirely, had I not taken them down and the hurricane hit our area, I am certain that they would have been destroyed, too.

Get Free Backup Electricity — That Works Even During Blackouts!

This has caused me to rethink my power production. As I remount my equipment, I am looking for ways to make it easy to take down, should another hurricane come my way. Having emergency power production on hand, which can’t survive the emergency, isn’t going to do me the least bit of good.

2. It’s difficult to prep a home

Many thousands of homes were totally destroyed by Puerto Rico, along with whatever property the people had inside their homes.

American home construction methods are not effective for surviving hurricanes and flooding. We not only see this in Puerto Rico, but in Houston and Florida, as well. Every home that was flooded has major damage, requiring removal of drywall, insulation, carpeting and underlayment. Since many of those homeowners did not have flood insurance, they’re going to have to foot the bill for those repairs themselves. Even government aid won’t be enough.

By comparison, homes built of cement blocks, like they are in much of Latin America (including Puerto Rico), survive flooding and high winds much better. I have friends in southern Mexico who have had their homes flooded. All they had to do was clean them up, dry them out and paint. While that took time and effort, it was much easier than repairing a wood home would be.

3. Don’t forget water purification

6 Survival Lessons From Puerto Rico’s CrisisWater was shut down for more than 98 percent of Puerto Rico, mostly due to the lack of electrical power. During the first few days, the Red Cross delivered more than 5 million liters of water. But considering the population of Puerto Rico, that wasn’t even enough for two liters per person, a minimal daily intake.

This was a situation where rainwater capture would have been highly valuable. The ability to capture some of the water from a hurricane or major storm and make it usable is something that none of us should overlook. I’m not just talking about a few barrels attached to our gutters and downspouts, either, but rather the ability to store large quantities of water, such as in a swimming pool.

The problem wasn’t so much water, as the means to purify it. Puerto Rico has lakes and rivers, just like other places do, over and above the massive amount of rainwater that fell on the island. But few people had any means of purifying that water. Most were resorting to boiling it, which isn’t as effective.

This is one area where we, in the preparedness community, should look at being an asset to our communities. Rather than just thinking of water purification for ourselves and our families, we should consider expanding our ability, so that we can provide water to friends and neighbors. That way, we are seen as good guys, rather than just caring about ourselves.

It would be easy to work out an arrangement in a time of crisis, where we are trading water filtration for labor. Our neighbors could provide the labor, hauling water to our homes, and we could provide them with purified water.

4. You might need to bury your food

As with any other place in the country, few people had food supplies stockpiled to see them through. Stores started running out and many began rationing; only allowing shoppers to buy a certain amount of food on each trip.

But the bigger problem is that all of Puerto Rico’s farms were demolished in the storm. There will be no harvest this year and in some cases, they may not even have a harvest next year. So, all the food for at least the next year must be shipped in, raising prices to the consumer. For those who are on a limited budget, that will be a problem.

The other problem I see here is for those who had food stockpiles which were destroyed when their homes were destroyed. This is not something that most of us are prepared for. Our food supplies are in our homes, often in the basements. But if our homes would ever be destroyed, we would most likely lose our survival stockpile, too.

One solution to this problem is to create caches of food in other locations. However, that really wouldn’t have helped the people of Puerto Rico much. There really weren’t any safe places for them, as the whole island was hit. About the only thing they could have done to ensure that their food was stored safe from the storm was to bury it underground, in waterproof containers.

This really isn’t all that hard to do. Five gallon buckets, of the kind that many of us use to store our food stockpiles, are waterproof, insect proof and rodent proof. So, we could bury them as a way of storing food that will survive such a disaster.

5. Store some cash

We are gradually becoming a cashless society, with credit and debit cards taking the place of cash. While that is very convenient on a day-to-day basis, it assumes that there will be electricity to run the cash registers and ATM machines, as well as communication between all those points and our banks. When that electric supply and those communications are out, so is our money.

Goofy Gadget Can Recharge Your Laptop — And Jump-Start Your Car!

This is a very practical demonstration of why we need to keep cash on hand. I have heard some preppers say that they can’t see any reason to keep cash, but that’s because they are thinking of situations where cash won’t be usable anymore, such as in the wake of an EMP or a financial collapse. But those aren’t the only disasters that might strike us. We could very well find ourselves in a similar situation as in Puerto Rico, where we don’t have access to our electronic funds.

6. Stockpile medicine

As is often the case in the wake of a disaster, medical facilities in Puerto Rico have been stretched to the limit. The large number of injuries from the hurricane, as well as their normal workload, is making it difficult for people to receive the attention they need. On top of that, roads are damaged or blocked, and gas supplies are limited, making it hard for people to get to the hospital.

But this isn’t the biggest problem they face. All hospitals in the U.S. are required to have backup generators, and the hospitals in Puerto Rico are no exception. But the fuel for those generators is limited. So, there have been cases in which the power to the hospital cut out before fuel could be replenished. Without electricity, it is impossible for medical personnel to accomplish many of their tasks.

Two groups hard hit by the aftermath of the hurricane are diabetics and those on kidney dialysis. Insulin must be refrigerated, but without electricity that’s impossible to do. Kidney patients who require dialysis need treatments three times per week. Otherwise, the amount of minerals in their bloodstream can reach a point of becoming toxic. Some medical patients have been flown out of the country, where they can receive the care they need. But that has not been possible in all cases, especially for those who live far from airports.

Should any of us find ourselves in a similar situation, we must have the necessary medical supplies and training to take care of our own families. It is not unreasonable to keep a year’s supply of prescription medications on hand, if you have any family members with chronic conditions that require medication.

We also should be sure to stockpile enough emergency medical supplies to take care of major injuries, as there’s a strong possibility of family members and others that we know being injured. Medical supplies may be one of the slowest items to be resupplied, as any supplies that are shipped in will go to hospitals and clinics long before they become available to the public.

What lessons would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Preventing Prepper Burn Out | episode 165

Preventing Prepper Burn Out
Preventing Prepper Burn Out

 

https://www.survivalpunk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Preventing-Prepper-Burn-Out-165.mp3

Download

Preventing Prepper Burn Out

This week I talk about Preventing Prepper Burn Out. Many quit prepping for the reasons I talk about and more. 

 

Why People Quit Prepping

 

  • Event Prepping
  • Money
  • Burn Out
  • Peer Pressure 
  • Time
  • Overwhelmed
  • Passing The Buck

 

Ways To Get Around It

 

  • Take Breaks
  • Automation
  • Set Mini Achievable Goals
  • Just Do Something 
  • Limit Mentors and Information

 

 

 

Subscribe to the Survival Punk Survival Podcast. The most electrifying podcast on survival entertainment. 

Want to hear yourself on the podcast? Call in with your questions at (615) 657-9104 and leave us a voice mail. 

Like this post? Consider signing up for my email list here > Subscribe

Join Our Exciting Facebook Group and get involved Survival Punk Punk’s

Think this post was worth 20 cents? Consider joining

The Survivalpunk Army and get access to exclusive

content and discounts!join the Survival Punk Army

 

 

The post Preventing Prepper Burn Out | episode 165 appeared first on Survival Punk.

Preventing Prepper Burn Out | episode 165

Preventing Prepper Burn Out
Preventing Prepper Burn Out

 

https://www.survivalpunk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Preventing-Prepper-Burn-Out-165.mp3

Download

Preventing Prepper Burn Out

This week I talk about Preventing Prepper Burn Out. Many quit prepping for the reasons I talk about and more. 

 

Why People Quit Prepping

 

  • Event Prepping
  • Money
  • Burn Out
  • Peer Pressure 
  • Time
  • Overwhelmed
  • Passing The Buck

 

Ways To Get Around It

 

  • Take Breaks
  • Automation
  • Set Mini Achievable Goals
  • Just Do Something 
  • Limit Mentors and Information

 

 

 

Subscribe to the Survival Punk Survival Podcast. The most electrifying podcast on survival entertainment. 

Want to hear yourself on the podcast? Call in with your questions at (615) 657-9104 and leave us a voice mail. 

Like this post? Consider signing up for my email list here > Subscribe

Join Our Exciting Facebook Group and get involved Survival Punk Punk’s

Think this post was worth 20 cents? Consider joining

The Survivalpunk Army and get access to exclusive

content and discounts!join the Survival Punk Army

 

 

The post Preventing Prepper Burn Out | episode 165 appeared first on Survival Punk.

Preventing Prepper Burn Out | episode 165

Preventing Prepper Burn Out
Preventing Prepper Burn Out

 

https://www.survivalpunk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Preventing-Prepper-Burn-Out-165.mp3

Download

Preventing Prepper Burn Out

This week I talk about Preventing Prepper Burn Out. Many quit prepping for the reasons I talk about and more. 

 

Why People Quit Prepping

 

  • Event Prepping
  • Money
  • Burn Out
  • Peer Pressure 
  • Time
  • Overwhelmed
  • Passing The Buck

 

Ways To Get Around It

 

  • Take Breaks
  • Automation
  • Set Mini Achievable Goals
  • Just Do Something 
  • Limit Mentors and Information

 

 

 

Subscribe to the Survival Punk Survival Podcast. The most electrifying podcast on survival entertainment. 

Want to hear yourself on the podcast? Call in with your questions at (615) 657-9104 and leave us a voice mail. 

Like this post? Consider signing up for my email list here > Subscribe

Join Our Exciting Facebook Group and get involved Survival Punk Punk’s

Think this post was worth 20 cents? Consider joining

The Survivalpunk Army and get access to exclusive

content and discounts!join the Survival Punk Army

 

 

The post Preventing Prepper Burn Out | episode 165 appeared first on Survival Punk.

Food Storage Mistakes To Avoid

Click here to view the original post.

Food storage mistakes are more common than you may think, especially for newbie preppers. While it is one of the first things that most preppers initially set up and acquire regarding their family preparedness, there are mistakes to avoid. Food storage is easy to do, it has a big impact on general preparedness, and it doesn’t cost too much money to get started. There are a number of ways to go about acquiring food storage. However there are also a number of food storage mistakes and pitfalls to avoid.   Food Storage Mistakes Here are a few to consider:  

The post Food Storage Mistakes To Avoid appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Food Storage Mistakes To Avoid

Food storage mistakes are more common than you may think, especially for newbie preppers. While it is one of the first things that most preppers initially set up and acquire regarding their family preparedness, there are mistakes to avoid. Food storage is easy to do, it has a big impact on general preparedness, and it doesn’t cost too much money to get started. There are a number of ways to go about acquiring food storage. However there are also a number of food storage mistakes and pitfalls to avoid.   Food Storage Mistakes Here are a few to consider:  

The post Food Storage Mistakes To Avoid appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Why Preparedness?

Click here to view the original post.

Why Preparedness? Host: Lynna… “A Preppers Path” Audio player provided! Why? That is a question one asks themselves on a day to day basis about a vast array of things. In the 911 Dispatch world it (asking why) is ONE of SIX question applied to every situation. The questions are WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY … Continue reading Why Preparedness?

The post Why Preparedness? appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Conflicted: EMP, Pistol and Cash – What Would You Do?

Click here to view the original post.

Are you Conflicted?

 

Conflicted is a Survival Card Game.  Each card in the deck has a scenario that will stretch how you would respond in an SHTF situation.  What would you do?  Leave your thoughts in the comment section below!

SCENARIO – An Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) went off and you have about two weeks worth of food and water in your pantry and 200 dollars cash.  You also have a handgun and about 300 bullets and 4 more family members to look after.  What would you buy with the 200 before total chaos took over?  Why?

Don’t forget to leave your thoughts in the comments below.

If you are interested in purchasing your own Conflicted deck – CLICK HERE.

 

 

 

Peace,
Todd

Conflicted: EMP, Pistol and Cash – What Would You Do?

Are you Conflicted?

 

Conflicted is a Survival Card Game.  Each card in the deck has a scenario that will stretch how you would respond in an SHTF situation.  What would you do?  Leave your thoughts in the comment section below!

SCENARIO – An Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) went off and you have about two weeks worth of food and water in your pantry and 200 dollars cash.  You also have a handgun and about 300 bullets and 4 more family members to look after.  What would you buy with the 200 before total chaos took over?  Why?

Don’t forget to leave your thoughts in the comments below.

If you are interested in purchasing your own Conflicted deck – CLICK HERE.

 

 

 

Peace,
Todd

Conflicted: EMP, Pistol and Cash – What Would You Do?

Are you Conflicted?

 

Conflicted is a Survival Card Game.  Each card in the deck has a scenario that will stretch how you would respond in an SHTF situation.  What would you do?  Leave your thoughts in the comment section below!

SCENARIO – An Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) went off and you have about two weeks worth of food and water in your pantry and 200 dollars cash.  You also have a handgun and about 300 bullets and 4 more family members to look after.  What would you buy with the 200 before total chaos took over?  Why?

Don’t forget to leave your thoughts in the comments below.

If you are interested in purchasing your own Conflicted deck – CLICK HERE.

 

 

 

Peace,
Todd

Conflicted: EMP, Pistol and Cash – What Would You Do?

Are you Conflicted?

 

Conflicted is a Survival Card Game.  Each card in the deck has a scenario that will stretch how you would respond in an SHTF situation.  What would you do?  Leave your thoughts in the comment section below!

SCENARIO – An Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) went off and you have about two weeks worth of food and water in your pantry and 200 dollars cash.  You also have a handgun and about 300 bullets and 4 more family members to look after.  What would you buy with the 200 before total chaos took over?  Why?

Don’t forget to leave your thoughts in the comments below.

If you are interested in purchasing your own Conflicted deck – CLICK HERE.

 

 

 

Peace,
Todd

How To Make Rice Beer At Home

Click here to view the original post.

Rice beer is an alcoholic beverage found throughout Asia, and there is a rich history behind it. It is highly appreciated in the Asian culture because everyone can afford to make it at home and it also has a good taste. As you will see in this article, rice beer is a beverage that can … Read more…

The post How To Make Rice Beer At Home was written by Rhonda Owen and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Legacy Food Storage Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner Bucket Review

Click here to view the original post.
Legacy Food Storage Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner Bucket Review

I know that many preppers think it’s silly to fixate on taste when it comes to survival food. If you’re in an emergency situation, they’ll argue, you’re unlikely to care about the taste of the food as much as you’ll care that you have food in the first place. They’re obviously right, but somehow that […]

This is just the start of the post Legacy Food Storage Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner Bucket Review. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


Legacy Food Storage Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner Bucket Review, written by Elise Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

How to Use a Spotting Scope for Birding

Click here to view the original post.

Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: A guest contribution from Kevin Fleeman at LifeUnderSky.com to The Prepper Journal. A lot of gems in this to pick up and apply not only to the subject matter but to hunting and survival as well. As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly receive a $25 cash award as well as be entered into the Prepper Writing Contest with a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.

“Birding” is among the most popular recreational activities in America. In fact, statistics show that the total population of birders stands at around 47 million. At this rate, chances are if your next-door neighbor isn’t a birder, you are. And every skill and technique used by “birders” is directly applicable to survival in the wilderness.

Binoculars can help you spot a bird from a respectable distance away, but that is just about it. To get close and personal, the tool to use is a spotting scope. These will allow you to identify the type of bird by its unique markings with the least possible effort. Binoculars were the most important tool for birders however, with the quality of spotting scopes now available, this is really the right solution for any serious birder, or hunter, or survivalist.

  

When it comes to magnification, binoculars simply cannot compete with spotting scopes. While most binoculars offer a maximum magnification of around 15x, this is where spotting scopes begin. Some have eyepiece lenses that can magnify up to 60x and the whole unit is capable of producing up to 150x magnification.

Image clarity is also another important benefit of using the scopes. Binos will not provide quite as clear an image owing to the fact that they are two telescopes joined together by a middle section. Each however, adjusts independently making it difficult to achieve that clear-cut synchronization.

Using a spotting scope for birding brings you closer than you ever have been to your target. Even birds you already knew start to appear different. At this point, you can watch your progression start to develop as you become more in tune with your target.

Tripod

All that magnification comes at a cost. The spotting scopes are usually larger that the binoculars. For this reason, you will need a good tripod stand to use the scope more efficiently. It should be able to raise the scope high enough for a comfortable viewing experience.

  

Compared with the regular binoculars which can simply be hung around your neck and raised just a short distance to your eyes, spotting scopes need to be set up correctly and this may take valuable time. However, you can be sure that once it is time to look through the eyepiece, the experience will be worth it. As always, in a SHTF scenario the lower tripod provides less of a signature, BUT, on can use the surrounding foliage, rocks and land features to camouflage a larger set up.

Configurations

There are two main types of spotting scopes. Straight scopes and angled spotting scopes. With the straight type, the viewing position is parallel to the length of the equipment. With angled scopes, the eyepiece is at an angle of 45 degrees to the length of the scope.

            

Beginner bird watchers tend to prefer the straight spotting scopes. They find these easier to use. On the other hand, angled scopes have a more comfortable viewing position.

Whichever scope you use depends on your personal preference or viewing habits. If you like bird viewing from your car window then the straight variety is the best. However, for those who like to watch birds with the company of friends and family, the angled spotted scopes are preferable. This is due to the fact that individuals of varying heights will be able to view with fairly little adjustments.

 

Differences Between Spotting Scopes

As we have seen above there are two main types of spotting scopes. But that is not to say that two straight scopes from different manufacturers have the same features. The main differences come in the eyepiece magnification and the objective lens.

Some scopes have a fixed eyepiece that offers a standard magnification. Others have interchangeable eyepieces enabling the bird watcher to up the zoom. For veteran bird watchers, the interchangeable eyepiece seems to be a favourite. This is because it is easy for them to zoom out in order to cover a wide area. Once having spotted the bird, they can zoom in for a closer look.

   

The diameter of the objective is also a factor to consider. The larger it is the more light that can be gathered providing an even clearer image when the sun begins to set. It is tempting to go for the one with the largest objective lens. However, this means extra weight. Remember that a spotting scope is a piece of equipment that you will need to carry with you often into the field.

Finding the Best Spotting Scope for Birding

When you decide to buy a spotting scope, check out the extra features that are available to you. These features have to make your bird watching experience that more enhanced.

One of the most important things to look for is the ability to withstand harsh climatic condition. The best scopes have a rubber coating that protects the internal parts from getting damaged by water or fog.

The experience is far better if you can take images with you back home.  Some spotting scopes can be mounted onto cameras. This depends on the manufacturer and is referred to as digiscoping allowing you to take close up shots of your favourite birds.

Focus capabilities cannot be overlooked. Most modern spotting scopes have more than one feature for focusing on your birdie. Dual focusing is one of them where you can adjust for both coarse and fine viewing. This comes in handy where the target is quite a distance away and you need to zoom in. Adjusting for fine focus develops an even clearer image.

Apochromatic is a term that most spotting scope owners are aware of. It refers to a special lens that eliminates color schemes that are inaccurate also known as color aberrations. The image resolution is enhanced making it easy for you to identify the type of bird you are looking at.

 

Spotting scopes require a lot of investment both financially and logistics wise. Unlike the binoculars which you can hang around your neck and pull up to your eyes at will, a spotting scope requires extra equipment to be able to function properly. However, the advantages far outweigh any cons. For the birdwatcher with great passion, binoculars simply will not cut it. Spotting scopes bring a distant bird close enabling the viewer to get the best view.

 

Author

Eric John is the founder of LifeUnderSky.com which focuses on hunting/shooting/survival. As in his experienced, he will guide you through the Do’s and Don’ts of the hunting world and transform you into a better hunter. Whether you are an experienced hunting or an absolute beginner, you will find a gem!

The post How to Use a Spotting Scope for Birding appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

How to Use a Spotting Scope for Birding

Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: A guest contribution from Kevin Fleeman at LifeUnderSky.com to The Prepper Journal. A lot of gems in this to pick up and apply not only to the subject matter but to hunting and survival as well. As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly receive a $25 cash award as well as be entered into the Prepper Writing Contest with a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.

“Birding” is among the most popular recreational activities in America. In fact, statistics show that the total population of birders stands at around 47 million. At this rate, chances are if your next-door neighbor isn’t a birder, you are. And every skill and technique used by “birders” is directly applicable to survival in the wilderness.

Binoculars can help you spot a bird from a respectable distance away, but that is just about it. To get close and personal, the tool to use is a spotting scope. These will allow you to identify the type of bird by its unique markings with the least possible effort. Binoculars were the most important tool for birders however, with the quality of spotting scopes now available, this is really the right solution for any serious birder, or hunter, or survivalist.

  

When it comes to magnification, binoculars simply cannot compete with spotting scopes. While most binoculars offer a maximum magnification of around 15x, this is where spotting scopes begin. Some have eyepiece lenses that can magnify up to 60x and the whole unit is capable of producing up to 150x magnification.

Image clarity is also another important benefit of using the scopes. Binos will not provide quite as clear an image owing to the fact that they are two telescopes joined together by a middle section. Each however, adjusts independently making it difficult to achieve that clear-cut synchronization.

Using a spotting scope for birding brings you closer than you ever have been to your target. Even birds you already knew start to appear different. At this point, you can watch your progression start to develop as you become more in tune with your target.

Tripod

All that magnification comes at a cost. The spotting scopes are usually larger that the binoculars. For this reason, you will need a good tripod stand to use the scope more efficiently. It should be able to raise the scope high enough for a comfortable viewing experience.

  

Compared with the regular binoculars which can simply be hung around your neck and raised just a short distance to your eyes, spotting scopes need to be set up correctly and this may take valuable time. However, you can be sure that once it is time to look through the eyepiece, the experience will be worth it. As always, in a SHTF scenario the lower tripod provides less of a signature, BUT, on can use the surrounding foliage, rocks and land features to camouflage a larger set up.

Configurations

There are two main types of spotting scopes. Straight scopes and angled spotting scopes. With the straight type, the viewing position is parallel to the length of the equipment. With angled scopes, the eyepiece is at an angle of 45 degrees to the length of the scope.

            

Beginner bird watchers tend to prefer the straight spotting scopes. They find these easier to use. On the other hand, angled scopes have a more comfortable viewing position.

Whichever scope you use depends on your personal preference or viewing habits. If you like bird viewing from your car window then the straight variety is the best. However, for those who like to watch birds with the company of friends and family, the angled spotted scopes are preferable. This is due to the fact that individuals of varying heights will be able to view with fairly little adjustments.

 

Differences Between Spotting Scopes

As we have seen above there are two main types of spotting scopes. But that is not to say that two straight scopes from different manufacturers have the same features. The main differences come in the eyepiece magnification and the objective lens.

Some scopes have a fixed eyepiece that offers a standard magnification. Others have interchangeable eyepieces enabling the bird watcher to up the zoom. For veteran bird watchers, the interchangeable eyepiece seems to be a favourite. This is because it is easy for them to zoom out in order to cover a wide area. Once having spotted the bird, they can zoom in for a closer look.

   

The diameter of the objective is also a factor to consider. The larger it is the more light that can be gathered providing an even clearer image when the sun begins to set. It is tempting to go for the one with the largest objective lens. However, this means extra weight. Remember that a spotting scope is a piece of equipment that you will need to carry with you often into the field.

Finding the Best Spotting Scope for Birding

When you decide to buy a spotting scope, check out the extra features that are available to you. These features have to make your bird watching experience that more enhanced.

One of the most important things to look for is the ability to withstand harsh climatic condition. The best scopes have a rubber coating that protects the internal parts from getting damaged by water or fog.

The experience is far better if you can take images with you back home.  Some spotting scopes can be mounted onto cameras. This depends on the manufacturer and is referred to as digiscoping allowing you to take close up shots of your favourite birds.

Focus capabilities cannot be overlooked. Most modern spotting scopes have more than one feature for focusing on your birdie. Dual focusing is one of them where you can adjust for both coarse and fine viewing. This comes in handy where the target is quite a distance away and you need to zoom in. Adjusting for fine focus develops an even clearer image.

Apochromatic is a term that most spotting scope owners are aware of. It refers to a special lens that eliminates color schemes that are inaccurate also known as color aberrations. The image resolution is enhanced making it easy for you to identify the type of bird you are looking at.

 

Spotting scopes require a lot of investment both financially and logistics wise. Unlike the binoculars which you can hang around your neck and pull up to your eyes at will, a spotting scope requires extra equipment to be able to function properly. However, the advantages far outweigh any cons. For the birdwatcher with great passion, binoculars simply will not cut it. Spotting scopes bring a distant bird close enabling the viewer to get the best view.

 

Author

Eric John is the founder of LifeUnderSky.com which focuses on hunting/shooting/survival. As in his experienced, he will guide you through the Do’s and Don’ts of the hunting world and transform you into a better hunter. Whether you are an experienced hunting or an absolute beginner, you will find a gem!

The post How to Use a Spotting Scope for Birding appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Food Storage Moms-Printables All In One Place

Click here to view the original post.

I want to add all of my Food Storage Moms printables on this post so they are easy to find, hopefully. If you remember one I have forgotten, please let me know. This is 5 years worth of Food Storage Moms printables, not the printable recipes (except my bread recipes). The very first one I designed with the help of my sister, Carol. I would scribble them onto white sheets of paper and she would “purdy them up.” I am not very techie with making forms, I had to learn to copy and paste six years ago, yep, I own it.

I must confess, I still have my grandkids show me stuff on my iPhone, that’s how I roll. They make it look so easy, right? My very first printable was my emergency binder contents. Here’s the deal, I started out with selling the binders with everything in them. I soon learned it was too expensive for me to continue doing that. So I charged I about $2.99 for the download. Those that purchased my binder contents provided the funds to help me launch my blog. I didn’t realize it is quite expensive to get started with a blog, but I found out pretty fast. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for all the support.

Then, I made a decision about my blog, I would not ever sell any products, printables, e-books,  membership fees, or webinars on my website. I do have ads posted that help pays for the expenses of my website. I’m researching how to do a webinar, so I could teach and have questions and answers open to all my readers for FREE. Remember, I am not a techie at all. I’ll keep you posted on how the webinar plans progress. I’m adding my printables as I remember some or make more.

Printables by Food Storage Moms

Binder Contents by Food Storage Moms

Here’s what my binder looks like, on the outside, it has a zipper to keep all the contents safely secured inside of it.

Food Storage Moms

Here is a link for the inside contents, I have a list of items you may want to purchase at your local store to put in the binder:

FSM FREE Printable Emergency Binder Download  Please be patient for it to load and the PDF document should show up on your computer on the bottom left-side of your laptop or computer monitor. Once the document finishes loading it will be ready to click and print. I prefer printing it on cardstock, and it’s actually in color if you want to print with a color printer.

Here is a link on how to put together my Food Storage Moms Emergency Binder: Binder Compilation Instructions

Food Storage Moms No-Fail Bread Recipes

food storage moms

I know people sell bread making e-books, but here’s the deal, I want to teach people the pioneer skills of making bread. My recipes are no-fail, as long as you have fresh ingredients. Anyone can make bread. I would love to open a bakery and teach people how to make bread, there is nothing quite like the feel of bread dough in your hands and teaching others to make it.

Here’s a link to my tips to make no-fail bread: Back to Basics-Bread Making

Recipes:

Whole Wheat Bread by Linda

White Bread by Linda

Cinnamon Rolls by Linda

Dinner Rolls by Linda

French Bread by Linda

Pressure Cooker Printable by Food Storage Moms

food storage moms

I love using a pressure cooker, my favorite one is the Fagor Pressure Cooker, I guess because it seems sturdier than the Instant Pot. I have both of them, so I have used both. I took classes from Chef Brad using the Fagor product and I worked at a kitchen store teaching people how to make bread, cinnamon rolls, and so much more. It was a very fun job. They sold only the Fagor, so, after using both I bought all four daughters a Fagor for Christmas one year.

Here is the pressure cooker printable:

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Vegetables

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Meat

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Rice, grains, beans

Dutch Oven Printable by Food Storage Moms

food storage moms

PRINTABLE Lodge Dutch Oven time and temperature chart I put together after getting permission from the company:

Dutch Oven Chart

Where Do I Start by Food Storage Moms

FSM Meal Planning Schedule

What Do I Have by Food Storage Moms

FSM WhatDoIHave-basic

FSM WhatDoIHave-liquid

FSM WhatDoIHave-dairy

FSM WhatDoIHave-meat

FSM WhatDoIHave-veggie

FSM WhatDoIHave-fruit

FSM WhatDoIHave-grain

I will add some more printables as I think of them. I hope this makes it easier for you to find the ones you can use. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. We can do this together. May God bless this world.

The post Food Storage Moms-Printables All In One Place appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Food Storage Moms-Printables All In One Place

I want to add all of my Food Storage Moms printables on this post so they are easy to find, hopefully. If you remember one I have forgotten, please let me know. This is 5 years worth of Food Storage Moms printables, not the printable recipes (except my bread recipes). The very first one I designed with the help of my sister, Carol. I would scribble them onto white sheets of paper and she would “purdy them up.” I am not very techie with making forms, I had to learn to copy and paste six years ago, yep, I own it.

I must confess, I still have my grandkids show me stuff on my iPhone, that’s how I roll. They make it look so easy, right? My very first printable was my emergency binder contents. Here’s the deal, I started out with selling the binders with everything in them. I soon learned it was too expensive for me to continue doing that. So I charged I about $2.99 for the download. Those that purchased my binder contents provided the funds to help me launch my blog. I didn’t realize it is quite expensive to get started with a blog, but I found out pretty fast. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for all the support.

Then, I made a decision about my blog, I would not ever sell any products, printables, e-books,  membership fees, or webinars on my website. I do have ads posted that help pays for the expenses of my website. I’m researching how to do a webinar, so I could teach and have questions and answers open to all my readers for FREE. Remember, I am not a techie at all. I’ll keep you posted on how the webinar plans progress. I’m adding my printables as I remember some or make more.

Printables by Food Storage Moms

Binder Contents by Food Storage Moms

Here’s what my binder looks like, on the outside, it has a zipper to keep all the contents safely secured inside of it.

Food Storage Moms

Here is a link for the inside contents, I have a list of items you may want to purchase at your local store to put in the binder:

FSM FREE Printable Emergency Binder Download  Please be patient for it to load and the PDF document should show up on your computer on the bottom left-side of your laptop or computer monitor. Once the document finishes loading it will be ready to click and print. I prefer printing it on cardstock, and it’s actually in color if you want to print with a color printer.

Here is a link on how to put together my Food Storage Moms Emergency Binder: Binder Compilation Instructions

Food Storage Moms No-Fail Bread Recipes

food storage moms

I know people sell bread making e-books, but here’s the deal, I want to teach people the pioneer skills of making bread. My recipes are no-fail, as long as you have fresh ingredients. Anyone can make bread. I would love to open a bakery and teach people how to make bread, there is nothing quite like the feel of bread dough in your hands and teaching others to make it.

Here’s a link to my tips to make no-fail bread: Back to Basics-Bread Making

Recipes:

Whole Wheat Bread by Linda

White Bread by Linda

Cinnamon Rolls by Linda

Dinner Rolls by Linda

French Bread by Linda

Pressure Cooker Printable by Food Storage Moms

food storage moms

I love using a pressure cooker, my favorite one is the Fagor Pressure Cooker, I guess because it seems sturdier than the Instant Pot. I have both of them, so I have used both. I took classes from Chef Brad using the Fagor product and I worked at a kitchen store teaching people how to make bread, cinnamon rolls, and so much more. It was a very fun job. They sold only the Fagor, so, after using both I bought all four daughters a Fagor for Christmas one year.

Here is the pressure cooker printable:

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Vegetables

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Meat

Pressure Cooker Temperatures-Rice, grains, beans

Dutch Oven Printable by Food Storage Moms

food storage moms

PRINTABLE Lodge Dutch Oven time and temperature chart I put together after getting permission from the company:

Dutch Oven Chart

Where Do I Start by Food Storage Moms

FSM Meal Planning Schedule

What Do I Have by Food Storage Moms

FSM WhatDoIHave-basic

FSM WhatDoIHave-liquid

FSM WhatDoIHave-dairy

FSM WhatDoIHave-meat

FSM WhatDoIHave-veggie

FSM WhatDoIHave-fruit

FSM WhatDoIHave-grain

I will add some more printables as I think of them. I hope this makes it easier for you to find the ones you can use. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. We can do this together. May God bless this world.

The post Food Storage Moms-Printables All In One Place appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How to Hot Wire a Car When the SHTF

Click here to view the original post.

I want to be clear about something right up front: I am not condoning grand theft auto. Hot-wiring is a very useful skill, but not so you can steal cars. However, after the SHTF there could be situations where you desperately need a vehicle to escape danger, go on food and water runs, get an […]

The post How to Hot Wire a Car When the SHTF appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Lifesaving Rappelling Basics You Need To Know

Click here to view the original post.

In these times, riots, earthquakes, hurricanes, and many other problems make it likely you will be trapped in a building or need to get over a mountain.

While many people don’t think much about rappelling, it is a vital skill to have.

Basic rope working techniques associated with rappelling can help you get safely out of a multistory building to the ground, down the side of a mountain, or down from some other height when you need to save yourself.

Learning Rappelling

Essentially, when you rappel, you will be making your way down to the ground or a lower level using ropes and other accessories that enable you to control your downward motion and speed.

When compared to climbing up a mountain or to some other height, you will find that far more accidents happen on the way down.

Rappelling skills take time to learn and practice to maintain. Never rappel on your own until you master the process under the watchful eyes of an expert.

Better yet, sign up for classes in a certified climbing school.

Where to Practice

Like any other activity, it is best to start off in a place where you will be as safe as possible while you develop good habits and improve your skills.

When it comes to rappelling, the school you go to should have access to small cliffs or other safe locations.

Never try to learn the basics on a large cliff or off a building. This is where most beginners get into trouble and can get seriously injured or killed.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Don’t rush to meet your next goals just for the sake of completing them. Unfortunately, just because you think you are ready, that doesn’t mean you haven’t overlooked something critical.

Take your time and see what kind of mistakes emerge while you can fix them before they cost your life in a more dangerous setting.

Basic Hand Positions

Regardless of what you are doing or the hand positions you are using, NEVER let go of the rappelling ropes. When rappelling you must have both hands on the rappelling ropes.

  • If you are right handed, your right hand will be the braking hand. Keep your right hand below the rappelling device. Your left hand will be your guide hand, and must be kept above the rappelling device.
  • If you are left handed, then your left hand will be the braking hand, and right hand will be your guide hand.

Guide Hand Position

When rappelling down easy faces or slabs that are less than vertical, place your guide hand above the rappelling device. Use a light grip on the rope and let it slide through the hand.

Insert your guide hand’s index finger between the two ropes to keep them separated during the rappelling. This simple process keeps the ropes untangled and makes it easier to pull the ropes down.

Brake Hand Position

Your lower hand controls your speed of the descent down the rope. When rappelling using a single brake hand, keep the brake hand down by your hip to allow you to maintain a constant friction on the rope through the rappelling device.

 Warning! If you are using thin ropes and you let go with your braking hand, the thin ropes might to slip through the rappelling device and drop you to the ground below! This is just one of many reasons why you must always keep two hands on the ropes at all times while you are rappelling.

Two Braking Hands

Consider a situation where you are on a steep slope, or overhanging in a way that leaves you suspended in the air and not touching any surface with your feet. It is safer to use both hands as brake hands because it gives you more control than using a single brake hand.

On free rappels, always use an autoblock knot as a safety backup knot. This knot keeps you from zipping down the rope in an out of control fall.

Always put your lower brake hand on the autoblock knot so it slides easily and does not lock up unless you need to stop. Put your upper brake hand below the rappelling device and let the rope run through it.

Using Friction While Rappelling

How to Slow Down Using Friction

As you are rappelling downward, let the ropes slide through your brake hand. If you are going too fast apply more pressure to slow down.

You can also ratchet the ropes down in the rappelling device with your brake hand, which will increase the friction on the rope as it moves through the device.

Some rappellers wear a leather glove on their brake hand to help control their descent speed, as well as to protect their hands from cuts, friction burns, and debris from the ropes.

When to use extra friction on free rappelling

On very steep rappelling, you may need more friction than both your brake hands and the rappelling device can provide. For extra control and friction, wrap the ropes around your butt and hold onto them with a brake hand on the opposite side.

Another way to add more friction is to drop the rappelling ropes between your legs and pull them up against a thigh for more friction.

Basic Rappelling Steps

1. Choose the Rappelling Area Carefully

Before you prepare your ropes and gear, it is important to choose a safe area for the ropes to fall.

For example, if you are rappelling down a mountain, look carefully at the first ten feet or so for notches, grooves, sharp edges, and loose rocks. For safe rappelling try to avoid these features, as they can hang up the rope or damage it.

As you are rappelling downward, you will need to repeat the study process and look for other possible problems like tress, bushes or large rocks that could hang up the rope when you pull on it from below. Loose rocks and other debris can still fall and hit you or anyone with you when you pull on the ropes no matter how far along you may be.

Remember that rope safety is your first concern. If there is a chance of the rope getting stuck or having it rip out rocks or other hazards, try to relocate the rope to a safer spot.

2. Rappelling rope preparation

Take the two ropes and knot them together using a Double Overhead Knot or a Double figure 8 Fisherman’s knot, and then a stopper knot at the end of each rope tail.

Next stack the two ropes separately and throw them down separately so they don’t get tangled.

3. Safety check of the rappelling knot and rigging

Before you or anyone else begins rappelling, do a safety check of the knot between the two ropes to make sure the knots are tied correctly, both ropes have autoblock knots, and stopper knots on them.

Make sure that one of the ropes go through the metal descending ring. Check the slings or chains that secure the ring to the anchor bolts.

If your equipment is not in good working order, do not use it. If the sling isn’t working right, you can add an additional sling or a piece of webbing as a safety backup.

4. Recheck the ropes

Look at which side of the descending ring that the knot is on. This is the side to pull. Always look at the color of the rope and decide which color to to pull before rappelling. This helps to keep the wrong rope from being pulled and jamming the knot in to the ring.

Make sure the ropes haven’t crossed each other and are not twisted on the chains or slings. Be sure both strands of rope run cleanly down the wall from the rappel anchor without binding or twisting against each other.

It is possible for just one twist against the anchor or ring to hang up the rope and make it impossible to pull.

Sometimes as you are rappelling the ropes can twist against each other. Always be prepared for this problem and be able to solve it without putting yourself in danger.

5. To keep the rope strands separated use a guide finger

As the last individual goes down the ropes have them use a guide finger to separate the ropes so they drop without kinks or tangles to the next set of rappel anchors.

The best way to do this is to put a finger of your gloved guide hand above the rappelling device between the two ropes and descend.

If the ropes get twisted up at the anchor it will be nearly impossible to pull the ropes down. If this happens. Someone will have to reascend the stuck rope to untwist them.

6. Always test the rope pull from below

When the first climber rappels down to the next rappel station, have them test the pull of the ropes.

If the pull is easy, then the odds are you will be fine. If the rope is hard to pull, then the top climber will need to make adjustments from the top before rappelling down.

If you are rappelling alone, then you may need to go back up and adjust the ropes before moving on to the next point.

Some solutions to a rope that is hard to pull include:

  • Move the bulky knot that connects the two rappelling ropes downward.
  • If there is a ledge at the top, move the rope knot down below the ledge. Retest the rope pull from below. Do not forget to climb down over the ledge before adding your weight to the ropes.

7. Pulling the rappelling ropes

After you and your partner have both completed rappelling down to the next rappelling station or to ground level, it is time to pull the ropes. If everything has checked out, the ropes should pull easily.

Here are four safety tips for pulling ropes:

  1. When pulling ropes on multiple rappels, feed the free end of the rope through the new descending ring as you pull it. Failure to do this could result in losing the rope if you just let the rope fall to you before threading the ring.
  2. The flying free end of rope can lash out and cause injury after being pulled through a rappelling anchor. Wear gloves and a helmet to protect your face and hands.
  3.  While pulling the ropes, always be on the look out for falling rocks or other debris.
  4. It is very important to yell “Rope”! When pulling down a rope so that everyone you are with knows. This alerts everyone that ropes and possibly rocks will be falling.

Why Can Rappelling be so Dangerous?

Rappelling, in my opinion is the most dangerous technique used by climbers in the sport of mountain climbing. Here the safety of the climber depends on both their rappelling equipment and their anchors.

Once you lean back on the rappelling rope and you are committed for the descent, all that keeps you safe is your climbing skills and your equipment.

When rappelling your life depends on an anchor system. This system has to be well secured for your safety and well being. If you fall you could end up as a statistic for getting killed or being critically injured.

Most rappelling accidents are the end result of the rappeler’s errors in judgment and could have been avoided.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

When rappelling always use the buddy system to check out each others rappelling gear and rappelling set up.

Each individual needs to visually check the other person’s climbing hardware, the anchors, bolts and slings on the anchors, and finally verify that the knot connecting the two ropes are tied correctly.

What can go wrong?

Rappelling is always dangerous and sometimes a bit scary when you are trusting your life to anchors and a rope. When rappelling there are a few things that can go terribly wrong.

Here is a list of a few of them:

  1. Failure to tie a stopper knot in the ends of the ropes and you rappel off the end of the ropes.
  2. The rappel anchors fail and you fall down to the ground.
  3. The rope connector knot comes untied. This can also cause you to fall to the ground.
  4. Didn’t use an autoblock knot as a back up, which can cause you to run off the ends of the rappelling ropes.
  5. Letting go of the rope with your brake hand can cause an uncontrollable slide down the rappelling ropes.
  6. The pull rope gets stuck when you try to pull it. Don’t forget you can try pulling on the other rope to free it. If not, someone must ascend back up the ropes to untangle them.
  7. The rope gets cut on a sharp edge. Access, repair, or replace the cut rope before further use of it.
  8. You might lose control if the overhang is too large. If possible relocate the rappelling ropes to a better location where the overhanging is not as bad.
  9. The rappelling device was rigged wrong. The rappelling ropes will not operate correctly in the rappel device, which will prevent you from moving downward in controlled fashion.
  10. Clothing or your hair gets stuck in the rappelling device. This will jam the rappelling device and must be carefully removed to allow the device to work properly again.

Even though many people don’t think about rappelling much beyond an outdoor sport, it is also an important skill to learn for preppers.

You can use rappelling to get out of a building or down a mountain as long as you have the right training and gear.

As dangerous as rappelling can be, it can still save your life as long as you know how to avoid the most common problems and approach the event with care and consideration.

Practice this skill, as your life might depend on it one day! Would you survive?

This article has been written by Fred Tyrell for Survivopedia.

Lifesaving Rappelling Basics You Need To Know

In these times, riots, earthquakes, hurricanes, and many other problems make it likely you will be trapped in a building or need to get over a mountain.

While many people don’t think much about rappelling, it is a vital skill to have.

Basic rope working techniques associated with rappelling can help you get safely out of a multistory building to the ground, down the side of a mountain, or down from some other height when you need to save yourself.

Learning Rappelling

Essentially, when you rappel, you will be making your way down to the ground or a lower level using ropes and other accessories that enable you to control your downward motion and speed.

When compared to climbing up a mountain or to some other height, you will find that far more accidents happen on the way down.

Rappelling skills take time to learn and practice to maintain. Never rappel on your own until you master the process under the watchful eyes of an expert.

Better yet, sign up for classes in a certified climbing school.

Where to Practice

Like any other activity, it is best to start off in a place where you will be as safe as possible while you develop good habits and improve your skills.

When it comes to rappelling, the school you go to should have access to small cliffs or other safe locations.

Never try to learn the basics on a large cliff or off a building. This is where most beginners get into trouble and can get seriously injured or killed.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Don’t rush to meet your next goals just for the sake of completing them. Unfortunately, just because you think you are ready, that doesn’t mean you haven’t overlooked something critical.

Take your time and see what kind of mistakes emerge while you can fix them before they cost your life in a more dangerous setting.

Basic Hand Positions

Regardless of what you are doing or the hand positions you are using, NEVER let go of the rappelling ropes. When rappelling you must have both hands on the rappelling ropes.

  • If you are right handed, your right hand will be the braking hand. Keep your right hand below the rappelling device. Your left hand will be your guide hand, and must be kept above the rappelling device.
  • If you are left handed, then your left hand will be the braking hand, and right hand will be your guide hand.

Guide Hand Position

When rappelling down easy faces or slabs that are less than vertical, place your guide hand above the rappelling device. Use a light grip on the rope and let it slide through the hand.

Insert your guide hand’s index finger between the two ropes to keep them separated during the rappelling. This simple process keeps the ropes untangled and makes it easier to pull the ropes down.

Brake Hand Position

Your lower hand controls your speed of the descent down the rope. When rappelling using a single brake hand, keep the brake hand down by your hip to allow you to maintain a constant friction on the rope through the rappelling device.

 Warning! If you are using thin ropes and you let go with your braking hand, the thin ropes might to slip through the rappelling device and drop you to the ground below! This is just one of many reasons why you must always keep two hands on the ropes at all times while you are rappelling.

Two Braking Hands

Consider a situation where you are on a steep slope, or overhanging in a way that leaves you suspended in the air and not touching any surface with your feet. It is safer to use both hands as brake hands because it gives you more control than using a single brake hand.

On free rappels, always use an autoblock knot as a safety backup knot. This knot keeps you from zipping down the rope in an out of control fall.

Always put your lower brake hand on the autoblock knot so it slides easily and does not lock up unless you need to stop. Put your upper brake hand below the rappelling device and let the rope run through it.

Using Friction While Rappelling

How to Slow Down Using Friction

As you are rappelling downward, let the ropes slide through your brake hand. If you are going too fast apply more pressure to slow down.

You can also ratchet the ropes down in the rappelling device with your brake hand, which will increase the friction on the rope as it moves through the device.

Some rappellers wear a leather glove on their brake hand to help control their descent speed, as well as to protect their hands from cuts, friction burns, and debris from the ropes.

When to use extra friction on free rappelling

On very steep rappelling, you may need more friction than both your brake hands and the rappelling device can provide. For extra control and friction, wrap the ropes around your butt and hold onto them with a brake hand on the opposite side.

Another way to add more friction is to drop the rappelling ropes between your legs and pull them up against a thigh for more friction.

Basic Rappelling Steps

1. Choose the Rappelling Area Carefully

Before you prepare your ropes and gear, it is important to choose a safe area for the ropes to fall.

For example, if you are rappelling down a mountain, look carefully at the first ten feet or so for notches, grooves, sharp edges, and loose rocks. For safe rappelling try to avoid these features, as they can hang up the rope or damage it.

As you are rappelling downward, you will need to repeat the study process and look for other possible problems like tress, bushes or large rocks that could hang up the rope when you pull on it from below. Loose rocks and other debris can still fall and hit you or anyone with you when you pull on the ropes no matter how far along you may be.

Remember that rope safety is your first concern. If there is a chance of the rope getting stuck or having it rip out rocks or other hazards, try to relocate the rope to a safer spot.

2. Rappelling rope preparation

Take the two ropes and knot them together using a Double Overhead Knot or a Double figure 8 Fisherman’s knot, and then a stopper knot at the end of each rope tail.

Next stack the two ropes separately and throw them down separately so they don’t get tangled.

3. Safety check of the rappelling knot and rigging

Before you or anyone else begins rappelling, do a safety check of the knot between the two ropes to make sure the knots are tied correctly, both ropes have autoblock knots, and stopper knots on them.

Make sure that one of the ropes go through the metal descending ring. Check the slings or chains that secure the ring to the anchor bolts.

If your equipment is not in good working order, do not use it. If the sling isn’t working right, you can add an additional sling or a piece of webbing as a safety backup.

4. Recheck the ropes

Look at which side of the descending ring that the knot is on. This is the side to pull. Always look at the color of the rope and decide which color to to pull before rappelling. This helps to keep the wrong rope from being pulled and jamming the knot in to the ring.

Make sure the ropes haven’t crossed each other and are not twisted on the chains or slings. Be sure both strands of rope run cleanly down the wall from the rappel anchor without binding or twisting against each other.

It is possible for just one twist against the anchor or ring to hang up the rope and make it impossible to pull.

Sometimes as you are rappelling the ropes can twist against each other. Always be prepared for this problem and be able to solve it without putting yourself in danger.

5. To keep the rope strands separated use a guide finger

As the last individual goes down the ropes have them use a guide finger to separate the ropes so they drop without kinks or tangles to the next set of rappel anchors.

The best way to do this is to put a finger of your gloved guide hand above the rappelling device between the two ropes and descend.

If the ropes get twisted up at the anchor it will be nearly impossible to pull the ropes down. If this happens. Someone will have to reascend the stuck rope to untwist them.

6. Always test the rope pull from below

When the first climber rappels down to the next rappel station, have them test the pull of the ropes.

If the pull is easy, then the odds are you will be fine. If the rope is hard to pull, then the top climber will need to make adjustments from the top before rappelling down.

If you are rappelling alone, then you may need to go back up and adjust the ropes before moving on to the next point.

Some solutions to a rope that is hard to pull include:

  • Move the bulky knot that connects the two rappelling ropes downward.
  • If there is a ledge at the top, move the rope knot down below the ledge. Retest the rope pull from below. Do not forget to climb down over the ledge before adding your weight to the ropes.

7. Pulling the rappelling ropes

After you and your partner have both completed rappelling down to the next rappelling station or to ground level, it is time to pull the ropes. If everything has checked out, the ropes should pull easily.

Here are four safety tips for pulling ropes:

  1. When pulling ropes on multiple rappels, feed the free end of the rope through the new descending ring as you pull it. Failure to do this could result in losing the rope if you just let the rope fall to you before threading the ring.
  2. The flying free end of rope can lash out and cause injury after being pulled through a rappelling anchor. Wear gloves and a helmet to protect your face and hands.
  3.  While pulling the ropes, always be on the look out for falling rocks or other debris.
  4. It is very important to yell “Rope”! When pulling down a rope so that everyone you are with knows. This alerts everyone that ropes and possibly rocks will be falling.

Why Can Rappelling be so Dangerous?

Rappelling, in my opinion is the most dangerous technique used by climbers in the sport of mountain climbing. Here the safety of the climber depends on both their rappelling equipment and their anchors.

Once you lean back on the rappelling rope and you are committed for the descent, all that keeps you safe is your climbing skills and your equipment.

When rappelling your life depends on an anchor system. This system has to be well secured for your safety and well being. If you fall you could end up as a statistic for getting killed or being critically injured.

Most rappelling accidents are the end result of the rappeler’s errors in judgment and could have been avoided.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

When rappelling always use the buddy system to check out each others rappelling gear and rappelling set up.

Each individual needs to visually check the other person’s climbing hardware, the anchors, bolts and slings on the anchors, and finally verify that the knot connecting the two ropes are tied correctly.

What can go wrong?

Rappelling is always dangerous and sometimes a bit scary when you are trusting your life to anchors and a rope. When rappelling there are a few things that can go terribly wrong.

Here is a list of a few of them:

  1. Failure to tie a stopper knot in the ends of the ropes and you rappel off the end of the ropes.
  2. The rappel anchors fail and you fall down to the ground.
  3. The rope connector knot comes untied. This can also cause you to fall to the ground.
  4. Didn’t use an autoblock knot as a back up, which can cause you to run off the ends of the rappelling ropes.
  5. Letting go of the rope with your brake hand can cause an uncontrollable slide down the rappelling ropes.
  6. The pull rope gets stuck when you try to pull it. Don’t forget you can try pulling on the other rope to free it. If not, someone must ascend back up the ropes to untangle them.
  7. The rope gets cut on a sharp edge. Access, repair, or replace the cut rope before further use of it.
  8. You might lose control if the overhang is too large. If possible relocate the rappelling ropes to a better location where the overhanging is not as bad.
  9. The rappelling device was rigged wrong. The rappelling ropes will not operate correctly in the rappel device, which will prevent you from moving downward in controlled fashion.
  10. Clothing or your hair gets stuck in the rappelling device. This will jam the rappelling device and must be carefully removed to allow the device to work properly again.

Even though many people don’t think about rappelling much beyond an outdoor sport, it is also an important skill to learn for preppers.

You can use rappelling to get out of a building or down a mountain as long as you have the right training and gear.

As dangerous as rappelling can be, it can still save your life as long as you know how to avoid the most common problems and approach the event with care and consideration.

Practice this skill, as your life might depend on it one day! Would you survive?

This article has been written by Fred Tyrell for Survivopedia.

Lifesaving Rappelling Basics You Need To Know

In these times, riots, earthquakes, hurricanes, and many other problems make it likely you will be trapped in a building or need to get over a mountain.

While many people don’t think much about rappelling, it is a vital skill to have.

Basic rope working techniques associated with rappelling can help you get safely out of a multistory building to the ground, down the side of a mountain, or down from some other height when you need to save yourself.

Learning Rappelling

Essentially, when you rappel, you will be making your way down to the ground or a lower level using ropes and other accessories that enable you to control your downward motion and speed.

When compared to climbing up a mountain or to some other height, you will find that far more accidents happen on the way down.

Rappelling skills take time to learn and practice to maintain. Never rappel on your own until you master the process under the watchful eyes of an expert.

Better yet, sign up for classes in a certified climbing school.

Where to Practice

Like any other activity, it is best to start off in a place where you will be as safe as possible while you develop good habits and improve your skills.

When it comes to rappelling, the school you go to should have access to small cliffs or other safe locations.

Never try to learn the basics on a large cliff or off a building. This is where most beginners get into trouble and can get seriously injured or killed.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Don’t rush to meet your next goals just for the sake of completing them. Unfortunately, just because you think you are ready, that doesn’t mean you haven’t overlooked something critical.

Take your time and see what kind of mistakes emerge while you can fix them before they cost your life in a more dangerous setting.

Basic Hand Positions

Regardless of what you are doing or the hand positions you are using, NEVER let go of the rappelling ropes. When rappelling you must have both hands on the rappelling ropes.

  • If you are right handed, your right hand will be the braking hand. Keep your right hand below the rappelling device. Your left hand will be your guide hand, and must be kept above the rappelling device.
  • If you are left handed, then your left hand will be the braking hand, and right hand will be your guide hand.

Guide Hand Position

When rappelling down easy faces or slabs that are less than vertical, place your guide hand above the rappelling device. Use a light grip on the rope and let it slide through the hand.

Insert your guide hand’s index finger between the two ropes to keep them separated during the rappelling. This simple process keeps the ropes untangled and makes it easier to pull the ropes down.

Brake Hand Position

Your lower hand controls your speed of the descent down the rope. When rappelling using a single brake hand, keep the brake hand down by your hip to allow you to maintain a constant friction on the rope through the rappelling device.

 Warning! If you are using thin ropes and you let go with your braking hand, the thin ropes might to slip through the rappelling device and drop you to the ground below! This is just one of many reasons why you must always keep two hands on the ropes at all times while you are rappelling.

Two Braking Hands

Consider a situation where you are on a steep slope, or overhanging in a way that leaves you suspended in the air and not touching any surface with your feet. It is safer to use both hands as brake hands because it gives you more control than using a single brake hand.

On free rappels, always use an autoblock knot as a safety backup knot. This knot keeps you from zipping down the rope in an out of control fall.

Always put your lower brake hand on the autoblock knot so it slides easily and does not lock up unless you need to stop. Put your upper brake hand below the rappelling device and let the rope run through it.

Using Friction While Rappelling

How to Slow Down Using Friction

As you are rappelling downward, let the ropes slide through your brake hand. If you are going too fast apply more pressure to slow down.

You can also ratchet the ropes down in the rappelling device with your brake hand, which will increase the friction on the rope as it moves through the device.

Some rappellers wear a leather glove on their brake hand to help control their descent speed, as well as to protect their hands from cuts, friction burns, and debris from the ropes.

When to use extra friction on free rappelling

On very steep rappelling, you may need more friction than both your brake hands and the rappelling device can provide. For extra control and friction, wrap the ropes around your butt and hold onto them with a brake hand on the opposite side.

Another way to add more friction is to drop the rappelling ropes between your legs and pull them up against a thigh for more friction.

Basic Rappelling Steps

1. Choose the Rappelling Area Carefully

Before you prepare your ropes and gear, it is important to choose a safe area for the ropes to fall.

For example, if you are rappelling down a mountain, look carefully at the first ten feet or so for notches, grooves, sharp edges, and loose rocks. For safe rappelling try to avoid these features, as they can hang up the rope or damage it.

As you are rappelling downward, you will need to repeat the study process and look for other possible problems like tress, bushes or large rocks that could hang up the rope when you pull on it from below. Loose rocks and other debris can still fall and hit you or anyone with you when you pull on the ropes no matter how far along you may be.

Remember that rope safety is your first concern. If there is a chance of the rope getting stuck or having it rip out rocks or other hazards, try to relocate the rope to a safer spot.

2. Rappelling rope preparation

Take the two ropes and knot them together using a Double Overhead Knot or a Double figure 8 Fisherman’s knot, and then a stopper knot at the end of each rope tail.

Next stack the two ropes separately and throw them down separately so they don’t get tangled.

3. Safety check of the rappelling knot and rigging

Before you or anyone else begins rappelling, do a safety check of the knot between the two ropes to make sure the knots are tied correctly, both ropes have autoblock knots, and stopper knots on them.

Make sure that one of the ropes go through the metal descending ring. Check the slings or chains that secure the ring to the anchor bolts.

If your equipment is not in good working order, do not use it. If the sling isn’t working right, you can add an additional sling or a piece of webbing as a safety backup.

4. Recheck the ropes

Look at which side of the descending ring that the knot is on. This is the side to pull. Always look at the color of the rope and decide which color to to pull before rappelling. This helps to keep the wrong rope from being pulled and jamming the knot in to the ring.

Make sure the ropes haven’t crossed each other and are not twisted on the chains or slings. Be sure both strands of rope run cleanly down the wall from the rappel anchor without binding or twisting against each other.

It is possible for just one twist against the anchor or ring to hang up the rope and make it impossible to pull.

Sometimes as you are rappelling the ropes can twist against each other. Always be prepared for this problem and be able to solve it without putting yourself in danger.

5. To keep the rope strands separated use a guide finger

As the last individual goes down the ropes have them use a guide finger to separate the ropes so they drop without kinks or tangles to the next set of rappel anchors.

The best way to do this is to put a finger of your gloved guide hand above the rappelling device between the two ropes and descend.

If the ropes get twisted up at the anchor it will be nearly impossible to pull the ropes down. If this happens. Someone will have to reascend the stuck rope to untwist them.

6. Always test the rope pull from below

When the first climber rappels down to the next rappel station, have them test the pull of the ropes.

If the pull is easy, then the odds are you will be fine. If the rope is hard to pull, then the top climber will need to make adjustments from the top before rappelling down.

If you are rappelling alone, then you may need to go back up and adjust the ropes before moving on to the next point.

Some solutions to a rope that is hard to pull include:

  • Move the bulky knot that connects the two rappelling ropes downward.
  • If there is a ledge at the top, move the rope knot down below the ledge. Retest the rope pull from below. Do not forget to climb down over the ledge before adding your weight to the ropes.

7. Pulling the rappelling ropes

After you and your partner have both completed rappelling down to the next rappelling station or to ground level, it is time to pull the ropes. If everything has checked out, the ropes should pull easily.

Here are four safety tips for pulling ropes:

  1. When pulling ropes on multiple rappels, feed the free end of the rope through the new descending ring as you pull it. Failure to do this could result in losing the rope if you just let the rope fall to you before threading the ring.
  2. The flying free end of rope can lash out and cause injury after being pulled through a rappelling anchor. Wear gloves and a helmet to protect your face and hands.
  3.  While pulling the ropes, always be on the look out for falling rocks or other debris.
  4. It is very important to yell “Rope”! When pulling down a rope so that everyone you are with knows. This alerts everyone that ropes and possibly rocks will be falling.

Why Can Rappelling be so Dangerous?

Rappelling, in my opinion is the most dangerous technique used by climbers in the sport of mountain climbing. Here the safety of the climber depends on both their rappelling equipment and their anchors.

Once you lean back on the rappelling rope and you are committed for the descent, all that keeps you safe is your climbing skills and your equipment.

When rappelling your life depends on an anchor system. This system has to be well secured for your safety and well being. If you fall you could end up as a statistic for getting killed or being critically injured.

Most rappelling accidents are the end result of the rappeler’s errors in judgment and could have been avoided.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

When rappelling always use the buddy system to check out each others rappelling gear and rappelling set up.

Each individual needs to visually check the other person’s climbing hardware, the anchors, bolts and slings on the anchors, and finally verify that the knot connecting the two ropes are tied correctly.

What can go wrong?

Rappelling is always dangerous and sometimes a bit scary when you are trusting your life to anchors and a rope. When rappelling there are a few things that can go terribly wrong.

Here is a list of a few of them:

  1. Failure to tie a stopper knot in the ends of the ropes and you rappel off the end of the ropes.
  2. The rappel anchors fail and you fall down to the ground.
  3. The rope connector knot comes untied. This can also cause you to fall to the ground.
  4. Didn’t use an autoblock knot as a back up, which can cause you to run off the ends of the rappelling ropes.
  5. Letting go of the rope with your brake hand can cause an uncontrollable slide down the rappelling ropes.
  6. The pull rope gets stuck when you try to pull it. Don’t forget you can try pulling on the other rope to free it. If not, someone must ascend back up the ropes to untangle them.
  7. The rope gets cut on a sharp edge. Access, repair, or replace the cut rope before further use of it.
  8. You might lose control if the overhang is too large. If possible relocate the rappelling ropes to a better location where the overhanging is not as bad.
  9. The rappelling device was rigged wrong. The rappelling ropes will not operate correctly in the rappel device, which will prevent you from moving downward in controlled fashion.
  10. Clothing or your hair gets stuck in the rappelling device. This will jam the rappelling device and must be carefully removed to allow the device to work properly again.

Even though many people don’t think about rappelling much beyond an outdoor sport, it is also an important skill to learn for preppers.

You can use rappelling to get out of a building or down a mountain as long as you have the right training and gear.

As dangerous as rappelling can be, it can still save your life as long as you know how to avoid the most common problems and approach the event with care and consideration.

Practice this skill, as your life might depend on it one day! Would you survive?

This article has been written by Fred Tyrell for Survivopedia.

Lifesaving Rappelling Basics You Need To Know

In these times, riots, earthquakes, hurricanes, and many other problems make it likely you will be trapped in a building or need to get over a mountain.

While many people don’t think much about rappelling, it is a vital skill to have.

Basic rope working techniques associated with rappelling can help you get safely out of a multistory building to the ground, down the side of a mountain, or down from some other height when you need to save yourself.

Learning Rappelling

Essentially, when you rappel, you will be making your way down to the ground or a lower level using ropes and other accessories that enable you to control your downward motion and speed.

When compared to climbing up a mountain or to some other height, you will find that far more accidents happen on the way down.

Rappelling skills take time to learn and practice to maintain. Never rappel on your own until you master the process under the watchful eyes of an expert.

Better yet, sign up for classes in a certified climbing school.

Where to Practice

Like any other activity, it is best to start off in a place where you will be as safe as possible while you develop good habits and improve your skills.

When it comes to rappelling, the school you go to should have access to small cliffs or other safe locations.

Never try to learn the basics on a large cliff or off a building. This is where most beginners get into trouble and can get seriously injured or killed.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Don’t rush to meet your next goals just for the sake of completing them. Unfortunately, just because you think you are ready, that doesn’t mean you haven’t overlooked something critical.

Take your time and see what kind of mistakes emerge while you can fix them before they cost your life in a more dangerous setting.

Basic Hand Positions

Regardless of what you are doing or the hand positions you are using, NEVER let go of the rappelling ropes. When rappelling you must have both hands on the rappelling ropes.

  • If you are right handed, your right hand will be the braking hand. Keep your right hand below the rappelling device. Your left hand will be your guide hand, and must be kept above the rappelling device.
  • If you are left handed, then your left hand will be the braking hand, and right hand will be your guide hand.

Guide Hand Position

When rappelling down easy faces or slabs that are less than vertical, place your guide hand above the rappelling device. Use a light grip on the rope and let it slide through the hand.

Insert your guide hand’s index finger between the two ropes to keep them separated during the rappelling. This simple process keeps the ropes untangled and makes it easier to pull the ropes down.

Brake Hand Position

Your lower hand controls your speed of the descent down the rope. When rappelling using a single brake hand, keep the brake hand down by your hip to allow you to maintain a constant friction on the rope through the rappelling device.

 Warning! If you are using thin ropes and you let go with your braking hand, the thin ropes might to slip through the rappelling device and drop you to the ground below! This is just one of many reasons why you must always keep two hands on the ropes at all times while you are rappelling.

Two Braking Hands

Consider a situation where you are on a steep slope, or overhanging in a way that leaves you suspended in the air and not touching any surface with your feet. It is safer to use both hands as brake hands because it gives you more control than using a single brake hand.

On free rappels, always use an autoblock knot as a safety backup knot. This knot keeps you from zipping down the rope in an out of control fall.

Always put your lower brake hand on the autoblock knot so it slides easily and does not lock up unless you need to stop. Put your upper brake hand below the rappelling device and let the rope run through it.

Using Friction While Rappelling

How to Slow Down Using Friction

As you are rappelling downward, let the ropes slide through your brake hand. If you are going too fast apply more pressure to slow down.

You can also ratchet the ropes down in the rappelling device with your brake hand, which will increase the friction on the rope as it moves through the device.

Some rappellers wear a leather glove on their brake hand to help control their descent speed, as well as to protect their hands from cuts, friction burns, and debris from the ropes.

When to use extra friction on free rappelling

On very steep rappelling, you may need more friction than both your brake hands and the rappelling device can provide. For extra control and friction, wrap the ropes around your butt and hold onto them with a brake hand on the opposite side.

Another way to add more friction is to drop the rappelling ropes between your legs and pull them up against a thigh for more friction.

Basic Rappelling Steps

1. Choose the Rappelling Area Carefully

Before you prepare your ropes and gear, it is important to choose a safe area for the ropes to fall.

For example, if you are rappelling down a mountain, look carefully at the first ten feet or so for notches, grooves, sharp edges, and loose rocks. For safe rappelling try to avoid these features, as they can hang up the rope or damage it.

As you are rappelling downward, you will need to repeat the study process and look for other possible problems like tress, bushes or large rocks that could hang up the rope when you pull on it from below. Loose rocks and other debris can still fall and hit you or anyone with you when you pull on the ropes no matter how far along you may be.

Remember that rope safety is your first concern. If there is a chance of the rope getting stuck or having it rip out rocks or other hazards, try to relocate the rope to a safer spot.

2. Rappelling rope preparation

Take the two ropes and knot them together using a Double Overhead Knot or a Double figure 8 Fisherman’s knot, and then a stopper knot at the end of each rope tail.

Next stack the two ropes separately and throw them down separately so they don’t get tangled.

3. Safety check of the rappelling knot and rigging

Before you or anyone else begins rappelling, do a safety check of the knot between the two ropes to make sure the knots are tied correctly, both ropes have autoblock knots, and stopper knots on them.

Make sure that one of the ropes go through the metal descending ring. Check the slings or chains that secure the ring to the anchor bolts.

If your equipment is not in good working order, do not use it. If the sling isn’t working right, you can add an additional sling or a piece of webbing as a safety backup.

4. Recheck the ropes

Look at which side of the descending ring that the knot is on. This is the side to pull. Always look at the color of the rope and decide which color to to pull before rappelling. This helps to keep the wrong rope from being pulled and jamming the knot in to the ring.

Make sure the ropes haven’t crossed each other and are not twisted on the chains or slings. Be sure both strands of rope run cleanly down the wall from the rappel anchor without binding or twisting against each other.

It is possible for just one twist against the anchor or ring to hang up the rope and make it impossible to pull.

Sometimes as you are rappelling the ropes can twist against each other. Always be prepared for this problem and be able to solve it without putting yourself in danger.

5. To keep the rope strands separated use a guide finger

As the last individual goes down the ropes have them use a guide finger to separate the ropes so they drop without kinks or tangles to the next set of rappel anchors.

The best way to do this is to put a finger of your gloved guide hand above the rappelling device between the two ropes and descend.

If the ropes get twisted up at the anchor it will be nearly impossible to pull the ropes down. If this happens. Someone will have to reascend the stuck rope to untwist them.

6. Always test the rope pull from below

When the first climber rappels down to the next rappel station, have them test the pull of the ropes.

If the pull is easy, then the odds are you will be fine. If the rope is hard to pull, then the top climber will need to make adjustments from the top before rappelling down.

If you are rappelling alone, then you may need to go back up and adjust the ropes before moving on to the next point.

Some solutions to a rope that is hard to pull include:

  • Move the bulky knot that connects the two rappelling ropes downward.
  • If there is a ledge at the top, move the rope knot down below the ledge. Retest the rope pull from below. Do not forget to climb down over the ledge before adding your weight to the ropes.

7. Pulling the rappelling ropes

After you and your partner have both completed rappelling down to the next rappelling station or to ground level, it is time to pull the ropes. If everything has checked out, the ropes should pull easily.

Here are four safety tips for pulling ropes:

  1. When pulling ropes on multiple rappels, feed the free end of the rope through the new descending ring as you pull it. Failure to do this could result in losing the rope if you just let the rope fall to you before threading the ring.
  2. The flying free end of rope can lash out and cause injury after being pulled through a rappelling anchor. Wear gloves and a helmet to protect your face and hands.
  3.  While pulling the ropes, always be on the look out for falling rocks or other debris.
  4. It is very important to yell “Rope”! When pulling down a rope so that everyone you are with knows. This alerts everyone that ropes and possibly rocks will be falling.

Why Can Rappelling be so Dangerous?

Rappelling, in my opinion is the most dangerous technique used by climbers in the sport of mountain climbing. Here the safety of the climber depends on both their rappelling equipment and their anchors.

Once you lean back on the rappelling rope and you are committed for the descent, all that keeps you safe is your climbing skills and your equipment.

When rappelling your life depends on an anchor system. This system has to be well secured for your safety and well being. If you fall you could end up as a statistic for getting killed or being critically injured.

Most rappelling accidents are the end result of the rappeler’s errors in judgment and could have been avoided.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

When rappelling always use the buddy system to check out each others rappelling gear and rappelling set up.

Each individual needs to visually check the other person’s climbing hardware, the anchors, bolts and slings on the anchors, and finally verify that the knot connecting the two ropes are tied correctly.

What can go wrong?

Rappelling is always dangerous and sometimes a bit scary when you are trusting your life to anchors and a rope. When rappelling there are a few things that can go terribly wrong.

Here is a list of a few of them:

  1. Failure to tie a stopper knot in the ends of the ropes and you rappel off the end of the ropes.
  2. The rappel anchors fail and you fall down to the ground.
  3. The rope connector knot comes untied. This can also cause you to fall to the ground.
  4. Didn’t use an autoblock knot as a back up, which can cause you to run off the ends of the rappelling ropes.
  5. Letting go of the rope with your brake hand can cause an uncontrollable slide down the rappelling ropes.
  6. The pull rope gets stuck when you try to pull it. Don’t forget you can try pulling on the other rope to free it. If not, someone must ascend back up the ropes to untangle them.
  7. The rope gets cut on a sharp edge. Access, repair, or replace the cut rope before further use of it.
  8. You might lose control if the overhang is too large. If possible relocate the rappelling ropes to a better location where the overhanging is not as bad.
  9. The rappelling device was rigged wrong. The rappelling ropes will not operate correctly in the rappel device, which will prevent you from moving downward in controlled fashion.
  10. Clothing or your hair gets stuck in the rappelling device. This will jam the rappelling device and must be carefully removed to allow the device to work properly again.

Even though many people don’t think about rappelling much beyond an outdoor sport, it is also an important skill to learn for preppers.

You can use rappelling to get out of a building or down a mountain as long as you have the right training and gear.

As dangerous as rappelling can be, it can still save your life as long as you know how to avoid the most common problems and approach the event with care and consideration.

Practice this skill, as your life might depend on it one day! Would you survive?

This article has been written by Fred Tyrell for Survivopedia.

15+ Ways to Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

In my last post in the Apartment Homesteader series, we talked about setting goals for conserving water and electricity in your apartment homestead. Now, let’s talk about simple, apartment-friendly lifestyle changes that conserve fuel, lessen trash production, and reduce your carbon footprint.

Walking Away From Fossil Fuels

Our first step on the path to reducing our carbon footprint is to conserve fossil fuels. From driving a car to work or school every day to buying foods and other products that have to be shipped in from thousands of miles away, people in our society have a tendency to use fossil fuels left and right without giving it a second thought. As a result, carbon dioxide (CO2) has increased in the atmosphere, leading to some serious environmental challenges.

There’s still hope, though. With a few simple lifestyle changes, you can make big waves in your CO2 production.

Change Your Commute

Start with the no-brainer one. Transportation uses fuel. Every time you fill up your car, truck, or SUV with gas, you are contributing to carbon emissions. And, I get it, you have to get to work or school or the grocery store.

If you live less than two miles from your school or workplace—and assuming you have a five-day work weekwalking every day would lower your personal carbon dioxide production by an average of 40 gallons per day, which equals almost 10,400 fewer gallons of CO2 in the atmosphere per year.

If you live 10 miles from your workplace or school campus, biking every day would eliminate almost 52,000 gallons of CO2 pollution.

Remember that one added benefit of walking or biking to work or school is the built-in exercise. When you make a transportation change like this, you’ll not only make a real difference in your personal lifestyle sustainability, you’ll also feel better about yourself because of the exercise and the reduction in your carbon footprint.

If you live 30 miles from your workplace or school campus, carpooling every day could eliminate almost 160,000 gallons of CO2 pollution for each person in the carpool who would normally be driving themselves daily.

Carpooling can help promote a sense of community among green-minded individuals in your workplace or community.

And, if you live in a medium-to-large city and motorized transportation is necessary, explore the public transportation option and refuse to emit more carbon into the air from your own car.

Do some research to find out what public transportation companies in your city are doing to lower their greenhouse gas emissions, and express your desire for more fuel-efficient busses. You could even ask the companies to sponsor CO2-lowering projects, like a tree planting. You’d be surprised how many transportation company CEOs like the idea of good “green” press for sponsoring that kind of project in their city.

What to Do When a Car Is Essential

If you live 30 or more miles from your workplace and don’t have any public transportation or carpooling options, you can still help lower your CO2 emissions through regular automotive maintenance.

Take your car in for a monthly oil change and make sure they check that everything is working properly. Oil leaks and general vehicle malfunctions can wreak havoc on your CO2 emissions.

Get a vehicle emissions test done yearly. If your vehicle is not performing efficiently—meaning it produces too much CO2 simply by running—consider trading it in for a more energy-efficient vehicle. Car companies have been listening to their customers in recent years and many newer-model vehicles have an “energy boost” or a high fuel-mileage rating.

Running Errands

I work from home and I’m no longer a student, so the daily commute is limited for me—perhaps you’re like me in that regard.

But we run errands around town—hitting the grocery store, the coffee shop, the post office, the library, the bank, etc.—and we use our personal vehicles.

If you live in a medium-sized city, you probably live within one or two miles of a grocery store, a post office drop box, and a bank—maybe even a library. We’ll talk more about groceries in the next section, but think about how many gallons of fuel you’d save if you walked over to the post office instead of driving, if you switched to a bank within walking distance if yours isn’t already, and if you carried your groceries in a backpack or in bicycle saddle bags.

Many of us make between two and three trips to the grocery store per week, which means we could cut 20–40 gallons of CO2 emissions per trip, or another 2,1006,300 gallons per year just by utilizing an alternate mode of transportation.

A Quick Word About Making These Lifestyle Changes …

Perhaps you object because walking, biking, or ridesharing would mean making a larger time commitment to get from place to place.

But here’s how I see it: In general, I spend two or three hours of my time daily exploring social media, watching TV, listening to music, or reading books.

By simply walking or biking to the bank, the grocery store, the post office, and the library, I save money, burn a few extra calories, and limit my social media and TV timeneither of which do anything to promote a healthy, sustainable lifestyle anyway. Win-win! And in my walking or biking time, I can listen to audiobooks or music, making my commute time even more productive, fuel saving, and sustainable.

It isn’t easy, but it isn’t a difficult decision to make, either. Weigh the benefits against the inconveniences. I bet you’ll come to the same conclusions I have.

Eat Your Way to a Cleaner Environment

Next in the quest to conserve fuel and limit our carbon footprints, let’s chat about how our food choices can make a big difference in a sustainable lifestyle.

Meat Lovers

First, the thing no carnivore wants to hear: The beef industry is a huge producer of greenhouse gasses. Like, HUGE.

And I’m not just talking about how much these giant animals raised only to be fattened and slaughtered emit of their own gas … though that is a big part of the problem.

But to make room for cattle, trees must be cleared, which means fewer CO2-reducing plants doing the hard work of replacing oxygen.

Almost one-third of the earth’s available land is used to graze cattle and make animal products for the public to consume.

And then that meat has to be trucked from miles away to be butchered, packaged, and then distributed across grocery store chains. That meat transportation produces lots more CO2.

Now, I’m not going to make the mistake of asking my readers to go vegetarian or vegan.

I know that lifestyle isn’t for everyone. I’m a meat eater myself.

But there are some simple lifestyle changes you can make that will greatly reduce the amount you personally contribute to the carbon footprint of the cattle industry.

Try observing a “Meatless Monday” or meatless whatever other day of the week that works for you. You can drastically reduce your carbon footprint by simply going meat-free for one day a week.

Do some research and find out where the meat you normally buy in the grocery store comes from. If your usual meat of choice is trucked in from miles-on-miles away, find a local distributor to switch to Tuesdays through Sundays.

Veggie Lovers

Vegetarians and vegans are not entirely free from worry about their own carbon footprint.

The transportation issue extends to the vegetables and fruits we buy in the grocery story, as well. If people like me who live in the northern United States insist on eating strawberries in January, those strawberries have to be transported to our grocery stores from somewhere—probably from hundreds of miles away! That’s gallons of CO2 polluting the air simply because we want to drink ice cold smoothies in the dead of winter (note the irony).

What to do? Find out what produce is in season in your region and help reduce the toxicity you’re exposed to by seeking out local organic farmers. If you can’t get organic produce easily (or if you can’t afford it), look up the list of the “dirty dozen and clean fifteen.” Buy the dirty dozen organic. Buy the clean fifteen local (organic or not).

Also consider finding a natural fruit and veggie soak that can help remove harmful toxins from the skins of non-organic produce.

Consider the Packaging

Now what about the packaging our food comes wrapped in or the zipper-lock bags we store our food in?

That’s right. They’re plastic. And what is plastic? A substance made with oil, natural gas, or coal.

Substitute plastic with glass food containers and reusable grocery bags, food covers, and drink containers. And, if you already have plastic bottles on hand, keep in mind that there are so many clever reuses for them. Get on Pinterest and start reusing.

Fuel-Conserving Quick Switches

Bottom line, there are several things you can start doing right away to lessen your reliance on fossil fuels:

  • Walk, bike, or rideshare to work or school two to three days a week, with an eventual goal of five.
  • Walk or bike to run your errands. Switch to businesses that are closer to home, if necessary.
  • Start observing “Meatless Mondays.”
  • Find out where your food comes from. If it comes from farther than 20 miles away, switch it up and buy local instead.
  • Start researching seasonal eating for your region, and consume only seasonal fruits and vegetables.
  • Switch out your plastic bags for reusable containers.

Talking Trash

If you really want to up your green-living game, analyze your trash production.

Landfills are No. 3 on the list of largest sources of human-produced methane in the United States alone. That’s a lot of nasty trash producing a lot of nasty gas! But limiting our trash production can be as simple as making a few adjustments in our lifestyles.

We dispose of paper towels, paper napkins, newspapers, cardboard, and junk mail.

We dispose of plastic bags, plastic wrapping, plastic bottles, and plastic jugs.

We dispose of aluminum cans.

We dispose of food waste.

Here’s how to limit your trash production by making simple lifestyle “quick switches.”

Make the Switch From Paper to Cloth: Switch to washable kitchen towels, cloth napkins, and rags for cleaning.

Go Electronic

  • Get your news online; almost every newspaper is going electronic now.
  • Purchase e-books and electronic versions of the movies and TV shows you love.
  • Unsubscribe from junk mailing lists and opt to receive all of your bills and other mail electronically.

Store Your Necessities in Glass (and, Sometimes, Make Your Own!)

  • Purchase food in bulk and store it in glass containers rather than purchasing food that comes in cardboard containers.
  • Make your own personal care products and store them in glass containers. (Check out the upcoming Apartment Homesteader blog post on the natural, DIY home—coming soon!)

Reuse, Reuse, Reuse

  • Purchase reusable grocery bags (and make sure you have them every time you head to the store).
  • Store food in reusable glass containers, and use reusable coverings to heat leftover food.
  • Purchase a reusable water bottle and/or beverage container.
  • Shop at and donate to secondhand stores.
  • Reuse plastic bottles in creative ways.

Try to Repair It First

  • Learn the basics of sewing to mend damaged clothing and fabric gear. Mend it; don’t just throw it away.
  • Maintain your technology so you don’t have to throw away old cell phones. And, if you have to dispose of an electronic device, make sure you research how to do so properly or see if there are any options for sending it in for refurbishing.

Eat Out Wisely: If you go to restaurants, make sure not to use a plastic straw, and if the restaurant uses paper napkins, bring your own cloth one to use instead.

Consolidate Shipping: If you have to order anything online, make sure you’re also ordering other products you will need in the future to warrant the packaging the items will most likely come in. Then, if you get a cardboard box, find a way to reuse it for organizational purposes around your apartment. (You can even make a planter out of a cardboard box!) 

Use Refillable Containers for Milk and Beer

  • Find a grocery store that sells refillable, glass milk cartons and refill instead of throwing your milk jugs away.
  • Opt for purchasing a refillable beer growler and have it filled at your grocery store or local brewery.

Take the “7 Days to Trash-Free” Challenge
Think you have what it takes to go trash-free? Follow these steps to go trash-free in one week … then see if you can extend that to a month, a quarter, even a year. At the end of these seven days, you may even be able to repurpose your trash can … perhaps as a garden pot or a larger compost container!

  • Day 1: Purchase reusable grocery bags, food storage containers, bottles, and cloths (rags, towels, etc.). Use only reusable, sustainable materials when you’re buying and storing food and when you’re cleaning.
  • Day 2: Buy your dry goods in bulk from a grocery store, then store them at home in glass containers. Most grocery stores have bulk sections in the health-food area.
  • Day 3: Unsubscribe from junk mailing lists and opt in to electronic billing for all of your services.
  • Day 4: Find out where you can get refillable milk, beer, and any other beverage you regularly consume. Many regional grocery stores give you the option. If they don’t already, presenting the option to the management may make it possible. (You could even look into brewing your own beer if you’re feeling adventurous!)
  • Day 5: Establish your compost system. “Dispose” of all your food scraps in your compost bin instead of in your trash can.
  • Day 6: Learn to sew and mend a piece of clothing or gear that needs it.
  • Day 7: Donate to a secondhand store or shop at one to find something you’ve been pining for.

Keep Reading This Series 🙂
Check out an upcoming blog post in the Apartment Homesteader series on composting your organic waste material in an apartment!

 

Make these 15+ lifestyle changes, and you’ll be well on your way to drastically reducing your carbon footprint and living as a true homesteader in your apartment or condo.

Next in the Apartment Homesteader series, we’ll talk about going chemical-free in your apartment or condo. Stay tuned!

 


Resources

http://www.cartalk.com/content/global-warming-and-your-car-0

http://www.greeneatz.com/foods-carbon-footprint.html

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/08/if-everyone-ate-beans-instead-of-beef/535536/

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/health/the-dirty-dozen-and-clean-15-of-produce/616/

https://plastics.americanchemistry.com/How-Plastics-Are-Made/

http://www.budgetdumpster.com/blog/diy-plastic-bottles-recycling/

https://www.epa.gov/lmop/basic-information-about-landfill-gas

http://notrashweek.com/garbage-free-tips.php

 

The post 15+ Ways to Reduce Your Carbon Footprint appeared first on The Grow Network.

Fitness is Built: A Lesson in Being Better Than You Were Yesterday

Fitness is Built: A Lesson in Being Better Than You Were Yesterday If you think that fitness is about twitter pictures and feats of strength, you are wrong. Like anything else in life there are levels to fitness. Fitness is about taking full advantage of the body you were given. We only get one body …

Continue reading »

The post Fitness is Built: A Lesson in Being Better Than You Were Yesterday appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.