Fantasy cottage by the sea

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Do you remember the fairy tale Hansel and Gretel? Well, if they had a house today, this would be it! Located next to the ocean in Vancouver BC, this 600 square foot cottage is so unique on the outside, the first thing you notice is the roof, high pitched and covered by custom made cedar shakes. Next are the windows and doors, all locally sourced and made.

Once you pass through the gorgeous front door, you are immediately struck with the contemporary look of the finish. It was designed to be functional as well as beautiful. The loft bedroom is spacious enough for a queen size bed, and the tall ceiling makes it easy to walk around without having to crouch.

Living in a small castle myself, I can appreciate the fact that people will stop and look at your house if you live in an unusual house, ours is a bit more private than this is though since it’s right on the water, passing boats have a magnificent view of this cute tiny house.

Watch and enjoy!

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Conflicted: One Skill in the Apocalypse – What Would You Do?

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Conflicted is a Survival Card Game.  Each card in the deck has a scenario that will stretch how you would respond in an SHTF situation.  What would you do?  Leave your thoughts in the comment section below!

SCENARIO – What is the 1 skill you wish you had in case the world went into post-apocalyptic mode tomorrow?  Why?

Don’t forget to leave your thoughts in the comments below.

If you are interested in purchasing your own Conflicted deck – CLICK HERE.

Peace,
Todd

November 30 Day #GratefullyPrepared Challenge

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How does gratitude and being prepared come together you ask?  Well, it is like this… In life, the more you notice the simple blessings that are thrown your way and the more you focus on gratitude the better life becomes!  We all too well know that life throws us lots of lemons and it is […]

The post November 30 Day #GratefullyPrepared Challenge appeared first on Trayer Wilderness.

Survivalpunk Hoodies And T-Shirts Final Hours To Get One

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Survivalpunk Hoodies And T-Shirts Final Hours To Get One
Survivalpunk Hoodies And T-Shirts Final Hours To Get One

 

Survivalpunk Hoodies And T-Shirts Final Hours To Get One

There are only five days left to get a Survivalpunk Hoodie or T-shirt. Just head over to Teespring and grab one.

 

This is a limited edition run. In fact, it is the only time I have released hoodies. And the first of this design. 

On the front is the Survivalpunk logo in red on a black hoodie or shirt. On the back is the podcast slogan DIY to Survive. 

Survivalpunk Hoodies And T-Shirts Final Hours To Get One

 

Don’t kick yourself later wishing you had got one before they are gone. Get a hoodie and be the coolest punk out there. 

 

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Subscribe to the Survival Punk Survival Podcast. The most electrifying podcast on survival entertainment. 

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Quality, affordable gifts for girls ages 2 to 12. SmitCo LLC has several different locked diary sets for girls in Emoji, Diva and Mermaid themes, as well as scrapbook, nail and play dress up sets and party favors that can be used as stocking stuffers to provide hours of fun.

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Survival Gear Review: Fällkniven MB Modern Bowie

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Fallkniven_MB_Modern_Bowie_Knife_Cobalt_posing

Trigger Alert: This article is about a very big knife. If that scares you, then click here.  March 6, 1836 was aFallkniven_MB_Modern_Bowie_Knife_Cobalt_posing-survival bad day for Jim Bowie. In fact the two weeks prior weren’t much better since the small mission building in which Jim and a hundred others took a stand was under attack.  Remember the Alamo? But long before that fateful Sunday morning James Bowie was famous for his knife prowess whether true or not. In 1827 Bowie (pronounced BOO-ee) was involved in a skirmish known as the Sandbar Fight where Jim Bowie essentially won a gunfight with a knife. A very large knife. And, as they say, the rest is history.

By Doc Montana, a Contributing Author to SHTFBlog and SurvivalCache.com 

Modern Sporting Knife

The Bowie Knife is a pattern much like the AR15 is a pattern. The so-called Bowie Knife is general form withfallkniven knife review some characteristics, but there is no one type of Bowie, nor any particular feature that makes or breaks a Bowie Knife. In general a Bowie Knife is a large blade, something eight or more inches, an overall length more than a foot, a crossguard separating the blade from the handle, and a clip point blade tip. Finally, there is the appearance of a false edge running along the top of the blade from tip through a curve ending at the spine proper. The false edge may or may not be sharpened, and thus the Bowie might cut both ways. Today, however, most Bowie Knives are not sharpened on the upper portion of the blade due to weapons laws in many jurisdictions. But originally as a fighting knife, that was the point.

Related: CRKT Redemption Knife 

The origin of the Bowie Knife is a little tangled in lore and opinions. Even the facts depend upon which story Fallkniven_MB_Modern_Bowie_Knife_Cobalt_Granfors_Bruks_hand_hatchetyou subscribe to. But in the end, and even with all the unknowns, the Bowie Knife is one of the most recognizable and famous blades in the world. And just as the initial Bowie Knives were evolving and upgrading as each one was pounded into existence on the blacksmith’s anvil, the Bowie is evolving even today some 187 years after James Bowie brought a wooden model of his ideal knife to an Arkansas blacksmith named, of all things, James Black who then pounded Bowie Knife life into an old file. So a blacksmith named Black made a Bowie for Bowie. Even more, David Bowie, the famous rock star, took his stage name “Bowie” from the knife because, as David noted in an interview, the Bowie Knife “Cuts both ways.”

Rambowies

In addition to the famous Rambo blades of Hollywood fame, the silhouette of the Bowie Knife can be found inBest Rambo Survival Knife real life in the popular Buck 119 hunting knife, the famous leather-handled USMC KA-BAR fighting knife, and in a smaller form factor, the SOG Seal Elite, Seal Pup and their multitude of versions. However, the rich history of Bowie Knives and its variants are pretty much still using historical designs and antique blade technology. Until now, that is. At the moment, the most modern, the most durable, and the sharpest Bowie Knife in the world is the Fällkniven MB or Modern Bowie.

Although Jim Bowie did not travel much beyond the southern territories of a fledgling United States, the Bowie Knife is a worldwide phenomenon and therefore fair game for all knife makers. But with that fame comes a majority of so-called “Bowies” that are more art than substance, or those versions that substitute size for quality. For Fällkniven to produce such a monster knife rich in American history and then to openly name it a Modern Bowie takes guts. And confidence. So I’m very happy to announce that the Fällkniven Modern Bowie truly honors Jim Bowie and adds yet more cutting magic and lore to the never ending supply of tall tales that Bowie Knives generate. I certainly intend to add my own Bowie adventures to the story line.

Also Read: Review of the SOG Pillar Knife

A Muscle Blade That Would Make Jim Proud

The MB version is not completely new for Fällkniven, but in fact building on both their large Northern LightsFallkniven_MB_Modern_Bowie_Knife_Cobalt_A2_compare series of knives crossed with their professional survival knives. An NL1 crossed with an A1 Pro to be more specific. And the result is bigger, thicker, and certainly badder. The Modern Bowie, abbreviated MB by Fällkniven, is a true Muscle Blade (abbreviated MB by me) . Borrowing heavily from the Survival Pro series, the MB including cobalt steel, a convex edge, a protruding tang, and a Thermorun handle. Even the presentation box and included DC4 diamond sharpener are straight out the Pro playbook. However, three notable deviations with the Modern Bowie include a larger, thicker handle, a double sided guard, and a mild index finger groove just aft of the stainless steel crossguard.

Dynamite in the Hand

The balance of the Fällkniven Modern Bowie is exceptional. The grip provides both the comfort and control necessary to wield such a large blade with elegance and precision. This is especially important since a key feature of the Bowie concept is a sharp and deadly point effective for stabbing and piercing. In reality the point of the clip point blade is to move the blade point lower and more line with the grip when thrusting the knife like a sword. Unfortunately the clipped nature (almost like a bite (clipped) was taken out of the spine of the blade) causes some limitations in daily work. Fällkniven preserved the spirit of the Bowie clip point but tempered it with the wisdom learned from the A1 Pro blade.

The original Bowie was from a time before multi-shot handguns existed. Once a holster full of bangs replacedThe Answer Water Bottle Filtration Solution 300x250 a sheath full of large fighting knife, the Bowie spirit moved on to embrace the rest of its original list of tasks. Those other chores, by the way, include work as an axe, a machete, a sword, a razor, and even a canoe paddle. Some add being a mirror to the list since a variant of Bowie Knives had a huge girth of shiny steel. But also notice on many of those deep shiny walls of metal in that they often have spine covering of a softer metal like copper, bronze, or aluminium. The metal blanket covering the back of the blade is not for trapping an opponent’s blade during a fight, but rather preventing one’s own blade from breaking during a strike due to brittle or poorly forged iron. The mirror polish on those knives is, at best, lipstick on a pig.

Related: The Mora Camp Axe

The brute thickness of the Fällkniven MB is a staggering 7.4mm or a few hundredths shy of a third of an inch! Survival SHTF Fallkniven Knife Bowie The blade length is a full 10 inches and the overall length of the Modern Bowie exceeds 15 inches. Fällkniven’s laminated cobalt steel uses an incredible edge steel sandwiched between durable and stain resistant stainless steel faces. Laminated steel can be much stronger than solid steel. Fällkniven also uses its famous convex edge profile adding further strength and sharpness to its world class supersteel composition. Add a beefy stainless steel crossguard that is effective without being a tripping hazard, a swollen Thermorun grip, and a full tang that is bigger than some knives and you have a Muscle Blade worthy of proudly wearing the name Bowie.

Bring It On

The Fällkniven Modern Bowie cuts with dangerous impunity whether a small task or massive challenge. WhileBest Fallkniven Survival Knife the Modern Bowie sadly lacks as a canoe paddle, it does chop wood like a beast, and behaves very well when batoning. You can shave arm hair with care, and clear brush with reckless abandon. You can lunge and slope and long point without embarrassment, but when the MB is sheathed on your belt you will be conspicuous.

The Modern Bowie is a vastly different experience than carrying the Fällkniven A2 Wilderness Knife. In factFallkniven_MB_Modern_Bowie_Knife_Cobalt_A2_grip_compare the MB is almost as large as the A2 is when inside its overbuilt leather sheath. And the MB is certainly longer. The A2 seems a perfectly reasonable camp knife when compared to the Modern Bowie, yet in proximity of popular knives the A2 is eye-openingly large on its own.

Pack’n

The sheath the Fällkniven Modern Bowie sleeps in is a four-layer double stitched leather dangler that wouldFallkniven_MB_Modern_Bowie_Knife_Cobalt_in_hand double as a canoe paddle. Perhaps that’s what Mr. Bowie wanted given that swinging a two pound sharpened steel blade back and forth in the water might be a dumb idea. The blade slides into the sheath in either edge direction, and the single leather snap strap is reversible by rotating it vertically. The stern end of the sheath has two grommet holes that are necessary for using a leg strap which is not a bad idea for field work since the Modern Bowie dangles just north of my knee. On the A2 sheath, there are also two grommet holes on each end of the insertion slot of the sheath. On the MB sheath, east and west of the insertion slot are removable screw bolts opening similar holes but without grommets presumably for some more creative mounting options.

The Third Century

Knives claiming to be Bowies range in price from $10 to $10,000 with the extremes for show only. To get a Bowie that actually performs like the Bowie you will need to spend something much closer to four figures than two.  The Fällkniven MB Modern Bowie is a brand new knife with deep and rich history. If you have a weakness or need for a Bowie-class knife, then the MB should be your starting point. And for everyone else, the Bowie Knife will be waiting right here for you just as it has for the past two centuries.

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How To Find The Best Survival Knife For You

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Survival KnifeFirst off, I want to get one thing out of the way; there is no such thing as the “best survival knife.” It doesn’t exist.

However, there’s quite possibly a “best survival knife for you.”

That difference may seem slight, but it’s of utmost importance. Why? Because no two survivalists are alike.

We all have different goals and unique survival skills that make some survival knives better for you than others.

However, there are many great survival knifes and some poor ones as well.

So the goal of this survival knife guide is to provide you all the details and options to make an educated decision on which survival knife to purchase.

Here’s exactly what we’ll cover in this guide:

  • Survival Knife Comparision Chart
  • Top 6 Survival Knife Features
  • Detailed Survival Knife Reviews
  • Deep Dive Behind Survival Knife Designs
  • Survival Knife Wrap Up

So take a quick look at the comparison guide below and the analysis that follows will help you find the best survival knife for you.

Survival Knife Comparision Chart

Top Survival Knife Features


Before deep diving into all the available options for survival knives (such as blade design, blade edge, blade length, blade grinds, grips, etc.). Let’s highlight the top survival knife features to choose the perfect survival knife.

These are the key survival knife features you’ll want in any survival knife you choose.

1 – Size Matters

Too big and you’ll give up the ability to do detailed carving work like carving detailed snare sets or precision cutting.

Too small and you’ll be compromising important survival skills like chopping, splitting, and batoning.

You need a knife small enough for precision yet large enough to be rugged for tougher tasks.

So you’re looking roughly in the 9 to 11-inch overall knife length.

2 – Fixed Blade Only

A fix blade survival knife is exactly what it sounds like. The blade of the knife is in a fixed position. It does not switch, flip, or fold down.

The fewer moving parts mean a more durable knife for the long haul.

A tough, quality constructed fixed blade knife can handle some serious abuse. For example, one of the most abusing survival techniques for knives is batoning.

Batoning with a knife is a brutal test.

I tried batoning with a high-quality folding knife once, and it destroyed the springs and clips within 5 minutes.

Since you need your knife to last while being able to perform the most rugged survival skills, shop in the “fixed blade survival knife” category.

Don’t get me wrong, folder knives are awesome, and I carry a Kershaw Onion folder every day.

Kershaw Onion Blur Folding Knife

Kershaw Onion

But they are not advisable for serious survival.

A fixed blade knife is what you want for survival. It’s a blade you can stake your life on.

Folder blades have a weakness that fixed blades do not. They have pivot joint to make them foldable, and when you abuse a folding knife, the joint will eventually break.

3 – Full Tang Only

The tang of a blade is the metal section that is wrapped in the handle of the knife.

A full tang knife profile fills the entire handle, while partial tang knife is where the metal in the handle is smaller.

Full tang knives are designed to withstand a lot more abuse than a partial tang knife. If you beat on a partial tang knife, it will eventually come loose and develop play in the handle.

If the handle breaks off, it’s very difficult and dangerous to use a partial tang knife – while a full tang knife can be wrapped with some 550 paracord and still work nearly as well.

So full tang only for survival purposes – yes, they cost a little more, but it’s worth it.

4 – Sharp Spear Point Tips (or drop tip)

Many survival knife designers want to stand out from the crowd and design funky looking knife blades with insane shapes. They might look badass, or cool, but they won’t function as well for you in survival situations.

Spearpoint or drop points are best for penetration in self-defense, it also allows you to perform fine point work.

Unless you’re looking for a blade for your next Halloween custom – stick with the simple yet effective blade shapes of either a spear point or a drop point, and you won’t regret it.

5 – Single Edged Blade

Single-edged blades have only one side of the blade sharpened and used for cutting, slicing, etc. – while double-edged blades are sharp on both sides.

And in survival, the side that’s flat is as important as the side that’s sharp.

First, it helps with detailed control. You’re able to slide your thumb safely up onto the flat edge, while this control technique is not possible if the edge was sharp.

Second, when batoning to split wood, a double edge blade works against you. You end up beating down on a sharp blade and losing your striking power.

Third, it’s much easier to use a fire steel with a flat edge. A flat 90-degree grind is perfect for getting sparks from fire steel.

6 – Butt of Handle Flat

Look for a survival knife where you can use the butt of the handle as a makeshift light duty hammer. So you want the butt of the handle to be flat and not round.

This allows you to drive in tent stakes into the ground, or use your knife like a punch – where you drive the knife by hitting the bottom of it with a chunk of wood.

Detailed Survival Knife Reviews


Now that we have a general sense of what to look for in a good survival knife, let’s go through some detailed reviews of the top survival knifes.

These detailed review videos will help you further understand what makes a good survival knife and you’ll also get a sense of the best survival uses for each of these knives.

ESEE 4

Check Today’s ESEE 4 Price

ESEE 5

Check Today’s ESEE 5 Price

ESEE Desert Tan Izula II

Check Today’s ESEE Desert Tan Izula II Price

Morakniv Kansbol

Check Today’s Morakniv Kansbol Price

Morakniv Garberg

Check Today’s Morakniv Garberg Price

Schrade SCHF9 Extreme

Check Today’s Schrade SCHF9 Extreme Price

Schrade SCHF52M Frontier

Check Today’s Schrade SCHF52M Frontier Price

Ka-Bar Becker BK2

Check Today’s Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Price

Gerber LMF II Infantry

Check Today’s LMF II Infantry Price

Fallkniven A1

Check Today’s Fallkniven A1 Price

FallKniven FN78 F1

Check Today’s Fallkniven FN78 F1 Price

Ontario Black Bird SK-5

Check Today’s Ontario Black Bird SK-5 Price

Deep Dive Behind Survival Knife Designs


For some of you, the survival knife comparison chart above, the top features and the detail reviews are enough information to select your high-quality survival knife right now. But for others, you may want to learn even more.

So, this next section is for those who want to deep dive into all the specific details behind different survival knife designs, the steel differences, the coatings, grinds, tangs, etc. and the pros and cons of each.

Specifically, we will be covering the following topics in detail:

  • Blade Design
  • Fixed vs. Folding
  • Blade Length
  • Blade Steel
  • Blade Grind
  • Tang Construction
  • Blade Coatings
  • Grips

Blade Design: Choosing The Right Blade

Deciding on the blade design shape is one of the most important factors when choosing your survival knife.

For example, in a survival situation, you’ll likely use every bit of the blade from the belly to the tip for all sorts of tasks.

So you need to have a basic understanding of all the blade shape options.

There are four main options when it comes to blade design (spear, tonto, clip or drop point).

As we covered earlier, for survival we recommend you go with a spear or drop for most survival knives.

Because these blade designs put the tip of the blade close to the center line of the blade which provides great control. It also lowers the weight at the tip of the blade helping to move the balance point of the knife closer to the hilt. This helps give the user greater tip control as well.

However, it’s always good to understand the applications for the other blade designs as well. You might already have your “go to” survival knife, and you’re in the market for a specialty blade.

Here’s an excellent video overview of these main blade design options.

Fixed Blade Or Folding? Which Is Best For Survival?

Fixed blade knives are what you want for wildness survival situations.

However, fixed blade knives are more cumbersome to carry. You can’t carry a large fixed blade knife around unnoticed.

So for everyday carry needs, you should look into a folding knife. They are ideal for every day carry situation, when you’re not trying to build survival shelters, or start fires in the wild.

But for a true survival knife, you need something extremely durable that will not break under intense use and abuse.

Yes, a good folding knife should be in your pocket, but it also should never be your primary survival knife for extreme situations.

Blade Length: From Short To Long

The length of a knife’s blade determines how useful it is for certain tasks. Choppers are your larger machete-like blades while precision bushcraft work is best with smaller carver blades.

For survival you want a bit of both, so the best survival blades tend to be in the medium size range.

Survival Blade Steel: What’s It Make Of?

High carbon steel (i.e., 1095, 5160, 01 or A2) vs. stainless steels (i.e., 420HC, 440C, AUS-8 or AUS-10) – as you can tell there are a lot of blade steel options.

In laymen’s terms, high carbon tool steels tend to be tougher than stainless steels, meaning they are harder to break, but they are more susceptible to corrosion.

They also are easier to sharpen than stainless, but won’t keep an edge as well either.

If you want to understand the difference in blade steels you have to think like a knife maker. The following video deep dives into all the various steel options.

Worth watching if you want to get a great introduction into blade steel choices.

Blade Grinds: What’s The Difference?

There are several blade grind options for any knife design. Each grind has it’s pros and cons depending on how you want your knife to perform.

However, for survival knives, two specific blade grinds stand above the rest, the saber and flat grinds.

The saber grind has a short primary bevel from the cutting edge to the back of the blade. This creates a thicker edge that’s harder to sharpen to a very fine point but will hold it’s edge better when chopping and splitting.

The flat grind is a compromise between the saber grind and a hollow grind.

A hollow grind concaves inward from the blade edge to the cutting point, which makes the cutting edge extremely sharp but also prone to chipping and damage under intense use.

So a flat grind has a bevel that goes from the cutting edge all the way to the back of the blade. This allows for a much finer edge than the saber grind but is not as fragile as the hollow grind.

If this all sounds a bit confusing, watch the below videos for an excellent introduction into the basic knife grinds.

Tang Construction: Full Or Partial?

We only recommend you invest in a full tang survival knife. We talked about it previously so I won’t go over this again.

However, there may be some future knife enthusiasts who want an introduction into partial tangs (rat tail tang, narrow tangs, hidden tangs).

This following video gives a nice introduction into this interesting knife topic.

Blade Coating Options

The science of blade coatings is detailed and complex. However, it’s interesting chemistry.

This video provides you a detailed overview of 6 different blade coatings put through an extensive series of tests. Make sure to watch to the end to find out which blade coating holds up the best.

Handle Material: Understanding Grips

The grip of a survival knife is critical to its performance. You need a grip that’s tough and won’t break under intense forces. Yet it feels comfortable in your hands.

You also want a grip that won’t absorb moisture which can lead to handling rot.

A few of the most popular knife handle materials are Wood, Micarta, G-10, Zytel, Krayton or Hypalon.

The following video goes into a nice introduction of some of these handle materials.

Grip Techniques

Finally, I wanted to share a bit of information on grip techniques. I think it’s as important (maybe more) to invest time into learning how to use your new survival knife.

A survival knife is just a piece of survival gear, and it’s only useful in the right set of hands.

So watch the following video to get an introduction on how to use your survival knife once you decide on which one to buy.

Survival Knife Wrap Up


Survival knives come in all sorts of shapes, sizes, and designs.

You must decide for yourself which survival knife is best suited for your needs. The good news is you should invest in multiple survival knives. You should have a survival knife for your bug out bag, one for your survival pack, one for your medical first aid kit and one for your get home bag as well.

I don’t know anyone who’s serious about survival who ones just one knife. We own lots of survival knifes we’ve accumulated over the years. With each knife serving a specific purpose.

For example, there a video by a survival expert who shares with us his collection of survival knifes.

Survival Knife Comparision Chart

Remember: Prepare, Adapt, and Overcome,
“Just In Case” Jack

The post How To Find The Best Survival Knife For You appeared first on Skilled Survival.

Survival Cooking with the ‘GoSun Go’ Portable Solar Stove

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Survival Cooking with the ‘GoSun Go’ Portable Solar Stove Check out the ‘GoSun Go’ on Kickstarter before it’s too late! The campaign ends November 21st! Technology and prepping are going to play more of an active role together, as time goes on. While the idea that bushcraft will rule the day in the apocalypse I …

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4 Alternative & Dependable Power Sources For A Post-EMP Society

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4 Alternative & Dependable Power Sources For A Post-EMP Society

Image source: Pixabay.com

The deteriorating situation with North Korea has created a resurgence in interest in the chances of our country’s electrical grid being taken down by an EMP.

Sadly, the EMP Commission, the nation’s only true experts on the effect of such an attack, is being disbanded after 17 years. And this is occurring in the face of North Korea’s official news agency talking for the first time about using a high-altitude EMP against the United States.

Many people have said that if such a thing were to happen and we were to lose the electrical grid, it would put the nation back 150 years – and we’d be living as we did in the1800s. But there’s one major fallacy with that statement: We don’t know how to live like our ancestors lived 150 years ago.

A modern, industrialized society requires power. We get most of that from electricity, but we also depend heavily on internal combustion engines, both gasoline and diesel. While non-computerized internal combustion engines would survive an EMP without problem, the available fuel supply for them will be quickly exhausted and it will probably be years before refineries are running again.

This will leave us with a major problem. I seriously doubt that people will be satisfied with going back to living as if we were in the 1800s or even earlier. We, as a society, are accustomed to our comforts and we will want them back. But to get any of them, we will need some sort of power.

While some of this power will be used to provide for our comforts, the biggest portion of it will be needed to power industry, which will be relegated back to the cottage industry or at least local industry level. Even simple things, like grinding grain and plowing fields, require energy, more than what we can reasonably expect to have with human power. So much of our ability to survive and thrive will depend on our ability to find alternate sources of power.

1. Renewable electric

While the electrical grid will be destroyed by an EMP, that doesn’t mean that all means of electric power production will come to a complete standstill. I imagine that there are some power plants which are shielded from EMP, if for no other reason than they are in metal buildings.

Get Free Backup Electricity — That Works Even During Blackouts!

But that power won’t do us much good, as the distribution network that we need to get that power from the power plants to our homes will be destroyed. Until that can be rebuilt, which will probably take years, it won’t matter if those power plants are working or not.

About the only dependable source of electric power that will survive the EMP will be that which we have in our homes — the solar panels and wind turbines that preppers like you and I have.

2. Animal power

Before internal combustion engines and electrical power took over, animal power was the main motive power used in the world. Horses and oxen were harnessed to wagons and carriages. But they were also harnessed to the windlass in order to provide mechanical power for industry. Grain mills, saw mills and even machine shops were powered by draft animals in this way. It was slower than an electric motor or internal combustion engine, but it worked.

4 Alternative & Dependable Power Sources For A Post-EMP Society

Image source: Pixabay.com

Sadly, the number of draft animals in the United States is extremely low right now, as they are no longer used. The horse population, which was at a high of 25 million a century ago, is currently roughly 9 million, relegated to a few private owners, most of whom use them simply for recreation. That’s actually up about 6 million in the last 30 years.

If you have the land to do so, you might want to consider buying some horses to add to your prepping equipment. Of course, that means more than just having land; you’ll need a barn, feed for the horse, saddles, bridles, harnesses and a host of other horse-related gear, too.

3. Water power

The other major source of power used in the 1700s and 1800s was water power. Waterwheels, which are a quaint historic novelty today, were a major source of industrial power for centuries, right up into the early days of the industrial revolution. Like animal power, water power was used for running a host of different equipment.

The great advantage of water power is that it is free and renewable, assuming you have someplace where you have access to flowing water. That means having property on the edge of a river or stream somewhere — something that most of us don’t have. But if you do, you might want to look into how you could harness that power for your use.

Water wheels don’t work by the speed of the water flowing through them, but rather by the weight of the water in the buckets. This is amplified by leverage, with the wheel itself acting as a giant lever. The larger the wheel and the greater distance the water falls, the more the leverage.

4. Steam power

Other than the waterwheel, one of the earliest means of producing mechanical power was the steam engine. This may very well be one of the best means of power available to us in a post-EMP world. The big advantage that the steam engine has over other forms of power is that any fuel can be used to heat the water and generate the steam.

The U.S. Navy uses nuclear power for this, heating water in a nuclear reactor, which is then used to drive aircraft carriers and submarines through the water. While you and I won’t be able to use nuclear power, we can accomplish the same thing by burning wood. It may not produce as much power as a nuclear reactor can, but it has the distinct advantage of being a power source that doesn’t require a lot of fancy equipment to harvest. Besides, it’s renewable energy, as well.

The trick, of course, will be in building the steam engine in a post-EMP world, with minimal power and equipment to work with. We will probably have to adapt existing equipment to do so. Nevertheless, the steam engine will be one of the best sources of mechanical power available to use in rebuilding industry.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:  

Vehicular Terror: The Easiest Blueprint To Create Mayhem

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Vehicular Terror: The Easiest Blueprint For Terror

vehicular terror

vehicular terror

In these days of smartphone distractions, you’re seeing more and more people oblivious of their surroundings. In the past, this might get you a bump on the head by walking into a lamp post. In today’s world, however, it could cost you your life.

The NYC vehicular attack that killed 8 and injured a number of others is just the latest in a number of incidents by the deranged, disgruntled, and politically motivated.  These events occur with little warning. Yet, being situationally aware could prevent you from becoming a victim of a future vehicular terror event.

Situational awareness involves understanding factors in your immediate vicinity that might represent a threat. I’m not talking about second-hand smoke; I’m talking about serious dangers that you can avoid with rapid action.

Vehicular terrorism is not new, with Israel the scene of multiple attacks in past years. It’s becoming more and more common in the West, however, with attacks in NYC, London, Nice, France, Berlin, and elsewhere. A Somali student used his car to run over several people at Ohio State University and then perpetrated a knife attack on those who, ironically, ran over to see if he was injured. Many similar events have occurred, but rarely make the news.

Why vehicular terror? Terror attacks are often associated with bombs, but making a bomb requires some expertise to assemble safely. Guns, the other preferred weapon, are difficult to come by in most countries other than the U.S. Owning or renting a vehicle, however, is easy. Trucks and cars can cause mass casualties if wielded as a weapon; obtaining one isn’t an act that evokes suspicion.

Early this year, an article titled “Just Terror Tactics” was published by the English-language ISIS magazine “Rumiyah”.  It described which vehicles will cause the most damage and called for attacks on Western crowds. “It is a simple idea and there is not much involved in its preparation,” the article said. “All what is needed is the willingness to give one’s life for Allah.”

The article goes on: “Pick your location and timing carefully. Go for the most crowded locations. Narrower spots are also better because it gives less chance for the people to run away. Avoid locations where other vehicles may intercept you…”

“To achieve maximum carnage, you need to pick up as much speed as you can while still retaining good control of your vehicle in order to maximize your inertia and be able to strike as many people as possible in your first run.”

The writer also suggested attackers weld steel blades onto the front of an SUV: “They do not need to be extra sharp because with the speed of the truck at the time of impact, even a blunter edge would slice through bone very easily. You may raise the level of the blades as high as the headlights. That would make the blades strike your targets at the torso level or higher.”

These tactics represent the new blueprint among terrorists for causing mayhem. Few people pay much attention to traffic unless they’re driving a vehicle themselves or crossing the street. The speed at which a vehicle can accelerate and turn into a crowd leaves little reaction time. Therefore, the “success” rate of this type of terror event may surpass even a gunman’s ability to cause deaths and injuries.

I advocate for a constant state of “Yellow Alert” when in public spaces. By that, I mean a calm but vigilant observation of what’s happening around you. Look for anomalies in behavior that might warn you of nefarious intentions. For example, hopping up and down and screaming may be normal at a rock concert, but it’s an anomaly at Starbucks.

This attitude is useful, but it’s difficult to respond quickly enough to avoid an oncoming car or truck.  When a vehicle moves erratically or leaves the normal pattern of traffic, it’s an anomaly that requires quick action. Mentally noting routes of escape whenever you’re in public will give you the best chance of escaping. Just as knowing the location of exits in a mall or theatre is good policy, a heightened awareness is now important at any public area near roadways.

For vehicular terrorists, the target will be crowds of people near the street. Their objective is mass casualties, and those pedestrians nearest the curb will bear the brunt of the attack. Consider walking on the fringe of a crowd away from the road to give yourself the most options. In the center, the masses, not your own good judgment, will dictate your movement.

Bollards may help protect again vehicular terror

Bollards may help protect again vehicular terror

Municipalities can protect their citizens from vehicular terrorism by constructing barriers known as “bollards” which stop vehicles from entering pedestrian areas. These can be seen outside many government buildings and airport terminals. Expanding their use to areas that attract crowds would be an important consideration for the future.

I’m not the only one thinking of how to deal with vehicular terror. The FBI and the Department of Homeland Security issued a release warning of vehicular terrorism and how to identify an imminent attack. The release acknowledges the time issues in reacting to such events, but includes the following things to look for:

  • Unusual modifications to vehicles, such as frontal reinforcement.
  • The purchase or rental of large or heavy-duty vehicles, especially if there is nervousness during the transaction, payment in cash, or lack of familiarity with the vehicle’s operations.
  • Commercial motor vehicles or heavy equipment being operated in unusual locations, such as particularly heavy pedestrian areas.
  • Attempts to approach areas closed to traffic, such as street festivals or farmers’ markets.
  • A vehicle operator’s apparent unfamiliarity with operating a commercial vehicle, such as trouble with gear shifting.

I’ll admit that the likelihood you’ll be in the path of a terrorist using a vehicle, or any other weapon, is very small. Panic isn’t the answer, but these are troubled times; the more situationally aware you are, the safer you’ll be.

Joe Alton MD

Dr. Alton

Dr. Alton

Read more about terror preparedness and 150 other medical topics in the 2017 Book Excellence Award winner in Medicine “The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way”, now in its 700 page Third Edition.

How To Make All-Natural Dye With Black Walnuts

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How To Make All-Natural Dye With Black Walnuts

Image source: Pixabay.com

When we think of foraging, we generally think of food. But once your belly is full, there’s a lot more to life than just eating. When you’re learning to forage, it’s important to keep in mind that clothing, tools and art are a vital part of the human experience.

Black walnuts are a great source of foraged food, containing healthy fats and high levels of protein. And the husks of black walnuts are useful in making dyes for clothing, leather, yarn, hair and naturally made ink for writing.

From a purely practical perspective, a dark-brown, earth-toned dye can be useful for creating camouflage clothing. Even light-colored hair against a dark-brown muted background can give away your position if you’re trying to hide. Using black walnut husks to dye both clothing and hair can help keep you concealed.

Let’s Get Started

To make dye from black walnut husks, start by collecting about a dozen black walnuts – that’s enough for a gallon of dye. Husk them immediately. The husks will begin to rot quickly, which makes them a lot less fun to work with.

Learn Unordinary Uses For Ordinary Stuff In “The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets”!

Husk the nuts by placing them on a rock or stump and whacking with a hammer or another stone.  It can take quite an impact to get the fibrous husk off the nut. The outer husk (not the actual nut shell) is what you’ll be using to make the dye. Once you get the husk off, you still have whole walnuts in shells that can be dried and stored for later eating.

Keep in mind that the dye is very strong. If you’re working without gloves, your hands will be dyed brown/black and it may take weeks for them to get back to normal.

Crush the green hulls into small bits, about the size of a pea to maximize surface area. As you work, the hulls will quickly oxidize and turn to a dark brown color that will eventually be your dye color. Place the hulls from a dozen nuts into a large non-reactive enameled or stainless steel pot. Add 1 gallon of water and bring the mixture to a boil. Simmer for about an hour.

While your dye is cooking, you need to scour the material you plan to dye. This gets it really clean and removes any oils that will interfere with the dye process. Fill a pot with water and add in 1 tablespoon of washing soda and 1/2 teaspoon of household detergent. Place your cloth or natural fiber in the pot and simmer for an hour while your dye simmers in another pot.

Rinse your cloth to remove all the soap, and then place it in the pot with the black walnut hulls. Simmer with the walnut hulls, occasionally checking on the color. When your cloth is about a shade darker than your desired final color, take it out of the dye bath and rinse it until the water runs clear.

Allow the cloth to dry, and watch as the color changes slightly as the dye oxidizes further while the cloth dries. If it’s not dark enough once it’s dry, repeat the dye step of the process.

How to Avoid Stains

Be sure to wash clothing once or twice before wearing it or before washing it with other clothing to ensure that all the surplus dye is out; otherwise, it can stain skin or clothing.

To make ink, simmer the hulls for several hours before filtering through a muslin cloth or cheesecloth. For a darker color, concentrate the ink by simmering longer. Add a small amount of alcohol, like cheap vodka, to the final bottle to preserve your ink.

For hair dye, it’s a bit trickier. You’ll need to soak your hair in the dye for 10-15 minutes once the simmered dye has cooled. Apply a neutral oil around your neck and along your hairline, such as coconut oil. This will help prevent the dye from staining your skin (but it’s not foolproof…).

Place a bowl of the dye outdoors in a grassy area, and tilt your head back into the cooled dye. When you come out, be prepared to wrap your hair up in an old towel to keep it off your neck, and allow the dye to soak in for a while longer.

Rinse the dye thoroughly and allow to dry to check your color. If you want it a bit darker, repeat.

Have you ever used black walnuts for dye? What tips would you add? Share your advice in the section below:

Very Unusual Earthquake Activity — High Alert for “The Big One”

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Note – Added some screen shots from today, still 50 EQ over the earth per day, that is quite high, its usually 20 to 30 above 2.5.    And 4 areas of the earth far away from traditional EQ fault lines.   Never seen anything like that over thousands of observations.

I did some pretty good EQ prediction in the past, but it take time and effort.    I don’t have the time now.   But after observing a bunch of over 6.0 across the world, and a 3.6 in Arkansas, I decided to take a quick look.

Plates are moving for sure, we are in a weird “zone” that I haven’t really seen before.   Like a good boy scout, be prepared.      So have at it, and comment if you have any questions or insights.

 

Kids and Animals: Natural Explorers

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What Is Magical to a Child?

Kids and animals are a magical combination.

Nature holds a fascination for all people, but kids are especially entranced by the natural world. As adults, we are sometimes too busy to “stop and smell the roses,” but kids are always more than willing to explore and discover new things.

Animals, domestic and wild, are also natural explorers. Pairing a child up with a dog, cat, or other furry friend creates a lifelong bond between child and animal.

From plants to bugs to animals, the natural world provides a classroom perfect for learning.

Kids and Animals 1

Perfect Partners

Kids and animals are perfect partners. There are many studies that show the positive effects that pets have on kids, including the following:

  • Increased self-esteem
  • Heightened sense of responsibility
  • More physical activity
  • Better social and emotional health

As with people, building trust is key to developing a healthy relationship with all animals. Kids are naturally geared toward succeeding at this. Their small size and soft voices calm and soothe, paving the way to a lasting relationship.

But that is only the beginning. Animals are also key to a healthy ecosystem and provide countless learning opportunities. How can we teach kids that animals are even more than our fluffy friends?

Can We Get a Puppy?

Whether it is a puppy, fish, or kitten, every kid has at some point asked for a pet. They swear they will take care of it, feed it, water it, and play with it … but they quickly lose interest once the novelty has worn off.

One way to ensure that they follow through and stay interested is by showing them how beneficial animals are to the home.

Dogs are normally the first type of pet a child will want.

With their furry faces and playful nature, it’s no wonder that they are a child’s dream pet. But dogs can be so much more than just a cuddly companion.

Dogs can help by guarding chickens and other livestock; by herding cattle and, in some cases, kids to safety; and by protecting their territory against predators and threats.

Most dogs have a natural instinct to protect.

Through proper training and good treatment, that instinct can be honed, making the dog more than just a pet.

Teaching kids that there are some tasks a dog could help with around the homestead and making children a part of the training process, if not responsible for it, will ensure that their interest and enthusiasm stays focused.

The Wow of Meow

Kids love cats. They are playful, soft, and oh-so-cute as kittens. They are also natural hunters and lethal tools for the homestead.

Having a few outdoor cats not only reduces any mice, mole, or vole problems you may have, but also teaches kids how every type of animal and pet has a different purpose.

Kids and Animals: Life Lessons

It is easy to get attached to an animal that you see and spend time with every day. However, it is important for kids to understand not only the purpose of animals, but also the role they play in the food chain.

It is our job to care for and treat well any animal in our care, but we must also remember that any animal we intend to eat is not our pet.

Chickens are a wonderful animal to have on the homestead. They keep weeds down and pests at bay, and they help spread seeds and fertilize the garden.

But, most importantly, they provide us with food.

We have kept chickens on our homestead for four years now, and our boys have been a part of every life stage from freshly hatched chicks to full-grown hens.

Kids and Animals 2

Just like kids should be helpers in the garden from seed to harvest, they need to be a part of the raising and butchering of any livestock that will eventually end up on the table. They need to know and understand that the chicken they see in the grocery store was once a living, breathing bird that someone raised for egg or meat production.

When we butchered our first flock, our boys were a part of the process.

We talked to them about what the chickens had provided for us in life, and what they would be giving with their death.

Get the kids involved, but make sure to tell them why and how the butchering will happen. This will prepare them for the process and make it less scary to witness.

  • Talk about the purpose of the animal on the homestead.
  • Thank the animal for providing labor and food.
  • Tell the kids what will happen when the animal is butchered.

Animals are the messengers of the tree, and trees the gardens of animals. Life depends upon life. All forces, all elements, all life forms are the biomass of the tree. —Bill Mollison

Call of the Wild

Nature provides so much fodder for both the imagination and the mind. Even if you don’t live on a farm or in a remote area, you can likely find an animal to study.

Frogs and fish are a great way to introduce and study life cycles. The boys caught a frog in our swales one day and started asking questions:

  • Where do frogs come from?
  • How do they grow?
  • Why aren’t they bumpy?

Kids and Animals 3

So many great questions, and all stemming from simply capturing a little frog!

These moments of curiosity and wonder can quickly turn into a brief lesson on life cycles and biology that will make a lasting impression on an interested and engaged child.

Dangerous Animals

Talking to kids about animals can also help prepare them for potentially dangerous situations.

Predators are a part of life, and teaching kids how to react when faced with certain predators can prepare them for these situations.

Coyotes and foxes are common animals in our area, and with chickens it becomes even more likely that we will encounter them at some point. We don’t want our kids to fear nature, but we do want them to have a healthy respect for animals and events that are outside of our control.

  • Talk about what certain predators hunt.
  • Discuss ways to be safe around them.
  • Explain what to do when threatened.

Teaching kids about animals and the role they play in a vibrant and robust ecosystem will help ensure that children treat them with care and respect. Kids need to understand that their job is to help by working with these partners nature provides.

Understanding the role animals play in a healthy ecosystem will help kids see the world for what it is—a garden of endless possibility.

The health of soil, plant, animal, and man is one and indivisible. —Sir William Howard

 

References

http://www.parents.com/parenting/pets/kids/pets-good-for-kids/

https://permaculturenews.org/category/animals/working-animals/

https://www.animalsandsociety.org/human-animal-studies/society-and-animals-journal/articles-on-children/animals-in-childrens-lives/

https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/371765

The post Kids and Animals: Natural Explorers appeared first on The Grow Network.

The Definitive Bushcraft Skills List

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by Nick O’Law

Bushcraft is the art of living in a natural environment, within and in harmony with nature. It is distinct from (though it shares a lot with) survival, where the mindset is only about getting out at the other end as safely as possible. Bushcraft will teach you skills not just to survive, but to thrive in comfort, and rely not on your gear, but yourself. This is a list of the skills you will need.

Finding and Purifying Water

Water is almost certainly the very first thing to worry about when learning bushcraft. The rule of three gives you a maximum of three days without water, which goes down to one in very hot, arid conditions. Remember that even once you have found water, in most cases it will then need at least to be filtered and possibly distilled or boiled before it is safe to drink.

Finding water is often just a matter of understanding your surroundings well, such as knowing that water flows downhill, so valleys and gullies are always a good start. Humans are only animals, and all other animals need water too, so following animal trails or watching for birds flying quickly (they fly slower after drinking, because they are heavier) are also good strategies.

There are many, many different ways to purify water, and there is not space here to do justice to all of them, but suffice it to say that filtering will remove only the larger particles, distilling will get rid of smaller stuff, and boiling will kill bacteria. Sometimes all three may be needed.

Finding Food

There are three ways to find food in the wild: foraging, hunting and trapping. Foraging is by far the easiest to learn, and is likely to produce the most reward. Learn what plants you can eat, and how best to cook them, but be very careful of lookalikes and mistakes. It is best to take a knowledgeable guide out with you at least for your first few trips, and to begin with ingredients and recipes which are simple and well known, like nettle tea and blackberries. Richard Mabey’s Food for Free is an acknowledged Bible for foragers.

Remember that bushcraft is not an ‘all or nothing’ venture’, it can be whatever suits you, so starting off by trying recipes out at home, and then only cooking what you are confident with in the bush is a good way to go. With all foods, but especially in the case of mushrooms, be very careful to only ever eat what you are absolutely certain is safe. Try to get off the beaten path, because the passage of many often obscures or kills plants, and fungi especially are very delicate.

After foraging, trapping is the next most reliable source of food. Learn first to make a few good traps. The Bushcraft Field Guide to Trapping, Gathering, and Cooking in the Wild is a great introduction to many types of snares and traps, with some basic bushcraft tips as well.

wilderness trap

photo: Apache foot trap

Remember that one of the most important things when trapping is to know your quarry, so go out and learn, not just about whatever you want to eat tonight, but also about its environment, where it’s likely to be, what might get to the trap first and so on, and try to factor this into your considerations when building traps.

Finally, there is hunting. Hunting is certainly the ‘coolest’ but also the least efficient way of getting food, and is best suited to large, wild game which it is unrealistic to trap safely and must be killed from a distance. Even in this case, the best course of action may still be to construct a trap to keep the animal immobile, and then approach and kill it from afar with a ranged weapon such as a bow or spear. On the other hand, this approach requires that the hunter checks all their traps very regularly, to avoid inhumane treatment of animals, or losing their quarry to another predator.

If you do decide to hunt directly, obviously ranged weapons are the far preferred choice. What you choose depends on your style of bushcraft, but most people will be going for some kind of bow. Once you have made this decision, the most important thing is the welfare of the animal as it dies. Bowhunting is great, and you may be perfectly happy with the ethics in principle, but surely a quick, clean death is preferable to a slow, dirty one? Make sure you are using the appropriate arrows and a strong enough bow to kill the animal as quickly as possible, and of course make certain that you will only hit an animal, not any people who might be in the vicinity.

Train hard first, practice in your back garden, then on static, and (if possible) moving targets in the woods, before attempting to hunt live game. If you get advice and help from a more experienced hunter then always heed it! Other than that, have fun, happy hunting!

In the case of both hunting and trapping, it is wise and educational to follow the Native Americans and try to use as much of the animal as possible. The primary reason for hunting is meat, but animal skins are a classic of bush tailoring and can be stitched with sinew of the same carcass. Antlers and bones make good tools (including needles), fish hooks and knapping strikers.

Making and Using Fire

Fire Starting methods can be categorized as: strikers, friction, and ‘modern’ methods. Strikers (such as flint and ferrocerium) will last forever (or near enough) but can be tricky to get used to using, and require very good, dry tinder.

With the exception of the fire plough, (which can be useful, but is very labor intensive) all friction methods are drills, which are the most ‘primitive’ of the fire methods. Most use some kind of wound cord, but you can also use your fingers. Drills are difficult to master and can be very tiring, and only really work in the right (dry) conditions with good tinder.

Once you can build (and build up) a fire, learn and practice building different sizes and shapes of fire, for different uses. For example long, thin fires (which can be made to be much hotter at one end) are the best for cooking. The Native Americans of old had a saying which went something like “Red man builds small fire and stays warm, white man builds large fire and stays warm collecting firewood”. There’s nothing wrong with being white, just don’t be white and stupid, build the correct fire for the job, and always clear up and leave no trace.

For longer term living and the beginnings of homesteads, you can also build perfectly good wood-fired ovens and kilns for making baked food and fired pottery. Practicing pit roasting (where you bury a fire with what you are cooking and dig it up the next day) is also an easy way to learn to cook big, hearty meals, without much advanced field dressing of meat.

Tracking

Tracking is an incredibly important bushcraft skill, with applications across the field. Good tracking will of course aid your hunting, but also realize that the flight pattern of a bird or a cloud of midges can lead you to water. The best way to learn tracking is in the field, by long practice. If possible start with a guide, who can teach you what to look for and ‘how to see’ in the right way, then develop further on your own.

Tracking should eventually become not a skill that you actively decide to use, but a part of how you see the world around you, an awareness of your environment and its mechanics.

Tying Knots

Although this is not ‘directly’ a useful bushcraft skill, you will find it comes in handy in a lot of situations. Building shelters is the most obvious, but tying up fire drills and hanging cooking pots also come to mind. Try to learn a range of different ones, across different applications. This is a good list to start with.

Situating and Building Shelters

The title includes the word ‘situating’ because the very first thing to know about shelter is what to build in a given environment, and exactly where to build it. Learn a variety of different environment-specific types (snow hole, debris hut etc.), and practice, practice, practice! Practicing and learning the little tricks which can only come with experience will make your shelters much better when you need them. Shelters should also be appropriate to conditions. If the weather looks good and you are only staying for one night, a few sticks and some debris as a heat reflector are enough, but a two week camp in late Fall is obviously a different matter.

Once you have the smaller, faster types of shelter down, invest time and build a more solid structure like a log cabin, or a shelter built into the side of a hill. This is good experience for long term bushcraft, or if you ever decide to set up a small homestead.

Remember not to discount man made shelters. Try out a few different tarps and learn to use them well. Learn the difference between heavyduty and ultralight and find what you like. If you prefer the heavier side of things, this advice applies more to tents. Remember also that many countries also have systems of free ‘mountain huts’, such as the bothies in Scotland, which provide free accommodation, and sometimes a fire and basic rations.

Finding your Way (Home or Away)

The most basic navigational consideration is to know how to get back to where you started. After that, you also need to know how to get where you are going, and ideally some place of safety in between.

The most important thing is to have a good working knowledge of your environment and its geography, so that even without specialist skills you can have a fighting chance. Look at some maps before you leave, and know where important resources like rivers and public shelters are.

Next is a compass, and knowing how to use it, as well as knowing at all times roughly what direction important places (your home, the nearest place of safety, your shelter etc.) are in relation to you. From this standpoint, you can work on ‘wild compass’, skills like learning to read the stars, sun and moon, and pick up signals from your environment, like feeling rocks, and using which side is warmer to work out where north is.

Taking Care of Yourself

Often overlooked is the art of what do when things go wrong in the bush, which is surprising given the number of sharp tools and fearsome animals available to cause havoc. Foraging again comes in useful here, as some plants (most notably the dock leaf) have medicinal qualities, and any non-harmful, large leaved plant can be used to improvise a bandage, at least briefly.

This is probably the only area of bushcraft where unless you have vast experience, and really know what you are doing, you must take ‘non-primitive’ equipment out with you, making sure to cover every eventuality. Pay particular attention to treatments for injuries from wild animals if they are in the area, serious cuts and bruises (so go heavy on dressings and plasters) and food-related illnesses (food poisoning, indigestion etc.).  Do not be afraid to take a big kit with you, it will be worth it one day.

Many first aid organizations such as the red cross offer training courses, and mountaineering and survival schools often do the same for specialist, bushcraft related first aid. Guidebooks can also be useful, and both The Bushcraft First Aid: A Field Guide to Wilderness Emergency Care Expedition Medicine come well recommended.

Hand Skills

These do not really come under a particular heading, but are important to mention nonetheless. Learning to use an axe, saw and knife properly, as well more specialist tools like a froe or a crook knife for whatever you are particularly interested in will save you a lot of time and effort.

A good place to start is with learning to make tools and equipment for all of the above skills. Make yourself a netting needle, fid or bradawl for complex ropework, or learn to make a knife from flint and pine pitch. Knowing a few ways of building a compass is also very handy. Hunting equipment is very satisfying to make, fishing hooks, lures and flies have endless variations to learn and play around with and bow making is a great thing to add to your arsenal of skills. Good guides can be found all around the internet, but in the case of blacksmithing, forging and more complex bow making skills like tillering, a course or at least some advice from a professional is must.

For a lot of the more ‘primitive’ inclined bushcrafters, the end game here is to flintknapping. With a good knowledge of flintknapping one can make all the tools for bushcraft, including those necessary for making further tools (bow making supplies for example). In the modern day, flintknapping techniques can also be applied to the thick glass which often washes up on river shores, for making arrowheads and blades.

A similarly fundamental skill is making rope, thin cords and threads (and then presumably needles, for which bone is often best). This skill more than any other is a part of ‘absolute bushcraft’ or primitive skills, where everything is made by you, from what you find around you.

In Conclusion

The best way to truly learn ‘bushcraft as a whole, is to combine these elements together, for example, you might take a weekend to learn more about bushcraft cooking, and eat only wild food, prepared only on a campfire, with only vessels you yourself have made. The point is to not treat these skills in isolation, but as parts of a single ability to live independently in the wilderness.

Alabama: 5 Years In Prison For Voting The Wrong Way

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Alabama: 5 Years In Prison For Voting The Wrong Way

Image source: Pixabay.com

Voting the wrong way might lead to a five-year prison term in Alabama.

Secretary of State John Merrill, a Republican, wants the 674 people who crossed parties to vote in a recent runoff election prosecuted.

“If these people knowingly and willfully voted because they didn’t like the law, they thought the law was wrong, they thought the law was stupid, they didn’t think the law should be enforced, our intentions are to identify those people, fully investigate them, if it’s warranted to have them indicted, to have them prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law,” said Merrill, according to Think Progress. “I want every one of them that meets that criteria to be sentenced to five years in the penitentiary and to pay a $15,000 fine for restitution. That’s what I want.”

Put God Back Into History And Teach Your Kids What They Won’t Learn Anywhere Else!

A new law prohibits crossover voting – that is, voting in a Republican primary when someone is registered as a Democrat, and vice versa. Upwards of 674 voted in both the August Democratic primary and then a September GOP runoff. Although that previously was legal, the legislature passed a vote in the previous session banning it. Crossover voting still is allowed in a handful of other states.

Roy Moore defeated U.S. Sen. Luther Strange in the September GOP runoff.

Randall Marshall of the ACLU of Alabama said he was “stunned” by Merrill’s threat.

“This is a brand new law,” he told Think Progress. “People have been allowed in Alabama to crossover vote prior to this special election.”

Further, Marshall said, anyone who tried to vote in both primaries – accident or no accidentally — should have been stopped from doing so by poll officials.

“Crossover voting should not have been permitted to even occur,” Marshall told the website. “Instead of putting it on the backs of voters and effectively chilling the right to vote going forward for fear of doing something that gets you put in prison for five years, this is a strong message from the state that we don’t care about your right to vote.”

The state asserted that there were signs notifying people of the new law.

Said Marshall, “When I got to the polls, I don’t read the stuff that’s on the wall. The notion that, there is signage here and that takes care of the state’s obligation I think is pretty small-minded.”

What do you think? Should voters who violated the law be prosecuted? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Cucumber Beetle Battle: How To Rid Your Garden Of These Pests

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The post Cucumber Beetle Battle: How To Rid Your Garden Of These Pests is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

The last thing you want to see in your yard is a cucumber beetle. No, really, I’m not kidding. If you are starting to see these little beetles scattered around your garden, that is a major problem. The larvae have a tendency to gnaw on the roots of your plants, and the adults chew on … Read more

The post Cucumber Beetle Battle: How To Rid Your Garden Of These Pests is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Keeping Your Eye on the Big Picture

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preparedness

Different people prep for different reasons. Many people have zeroed in on a particular disaster or event that has them concerned: EMP, reversal of the poles, nuclear war, government takeover, pandemic, you name it.

Maybe one of those things will happen, and maybe they won’t. It’s anyone’s guess.

The one thing that all preppers can agree on is the fact that the way of life we enjoy right now is exceptionally fragile, and something is going to bring it to a screeching halt, probably sooner, rather than later.

When it happens, those who have planned ahead will be in a position to thrive and rebuild, and those who haven’t probably won’t survive the first month.

Unfortunately, spending too much time focused on prepping for one very specific kind of disaster can leave you ill-prepared should TSHTF in some way you had not anticipated.

Drawing from the examples mentioned above, let’s say your big fear is that a global pandemic will hit.

In that case, your preps will likely be heavily centered on medical supplies, surgical masks, bleach, and other things related to triaging, quarantining, and treating people who succumb to whatever disease you’re worried about.

Not to say that other preppers don’t stockpile medical supplies, but if a pandemic is your big worry, you’ll probably spend an inordinate amount of time and resources preparing for that specific incident.

If you’ve guessed wrong, and the end of the world as we know it takes the form of say, an EMP, then you’re likely going to be meds-heavy and electronics-lite. Not a happy situation.

Your best bet, by far, is to be more of a generalist when it comes to your preparations, because then, no matter what happens, you’ll be well-positioned to survive it.

Even if you are more of a generalist, it’s still possible to get off track, because let’s face it, there’s a lot to keep track of, and while it’s virtually impossible to cover all your bases. Most preppers are pretty good at covering the basics: Food, water, and basic tools.

Unfortunately, there’s a lot more to surviving than just these. At the end of the day, you want to do much more than just survive day-to-day, you want to make sure you’re in a position to thrive in the aftermath and be an integral part of the rebuilding effort.

So how does one stay focused on the big picture, exactly?

Opinions vary, but a good place to start is to review your stockpile and setup on a regular basis and with your current preps in mind, answer the following questions:

  • How long will my food stockpile last, and knowing that it is finite, what’s my specific plan for creating a renewable food supply before it runs out?
  • How long will my water supply last, and knowing that it is finite, what’s my specific plan for creating a renewable water supply before it runs out?
  • How do we move from merely existing, to thriving in the post-disaster world? What tools are required, and do I have them? If not, what’s missing?
  • How do we get the lights back on, post-disaster? What will it take to build a robust, independent power supply for my family pre-disaster, and what will it take to expand it, post-disaster?
  • How (specifically) do we defend ourselves from those who would want to take it away from us in the wake of a civilization-ending disaster (note that this involves a lot more than simply counting guns and rounds of ammo, but developing a detailed defense plan to deal with all manner of threats you might face)
  • How long do we wait, post-disaster, to begin searching for and reaching out to other communities? When we do, who handles the initial meeting with those groups? Where? (a detailed protocol needs to be developed—subject to revision, of course—well in advance)
  • What communications equipment do I have? How are those devices powered? Do I have backups?
  • What skills do I currently lack that would be of tremendous value in the post-disaster world? Is it practical for me to acquire them?

All of these are vitally important questions that deserve well-considered answers.

Final Thoughts

The bottom line here is that preparation isn’t just about stockpiling provisions.

That’s key, because if you don’t have the basics well-covered, you won’t live long enough for the rest to matter, but “the rest” isn’t going away.

If you don’t have detailed answers to those questions, at a minimum, then you’re going to find it very difficult to move away from merely existing, and on into thriving and rebuilding.

The ability to make that transition is critical. Don’t leave it to chance, and don’t just assume you’ll be able to “figure it out” on the fly.

When TSHTF, you’re going to be very, very busy, and you won’t have a lot of spare time to sit around and brainstorm solutions to the highly complex problems you’ll be facing. The more of that you can do now, and the more infrastructure you can put in place on the front end, the better off you’ll be.

—————————–

Bio (if needed):

J. C. Simmons is a life enthusiast, father of two, and a compulsive reader. He loves enjoying a natural outdoors life with his family and delving into the world of self-sufficiency. J. C. is a writer by hobby and passion, currently a contributor to Consumer Files and other online publications.

Guest Author’s Website

The post Keeping Your Eye on the Big Picture appeared first on American Preppers Network.

5 Super Warm Winter Jackets

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Winter is coming (or already here for some of you) and dressing warmly sure makes it much easier to be productive out in the cold. Most of us have a favorite winter jacket. Mine is a light fleece that doesn’t see the light of day often because in Houston we don’t see real cold very often. My house doesn’t even have a coat closet! But if you live in an area where winter includes weeks or months of really cold weather, you might want to take a look at these 5 super warm winter jackets.

Outdoor Research Ascendant

Outdoor Research Ascendant This is a very light weight, comfortable jacket. Features included internal thumb loops, zip chest pocket, dual hand warming pockets, internal front stormflap, and a key clip.

Building on the glowing reception of our Uberlayer Jacket, we ratcheted up the breathability while cutting the weight a little more to build the Ascendant Collection—Pertex Microlight movement-mirroring stretch fabric and Polartec Alpha insulation create the perfect combination for skinning uphill, belaying, or layering under a ski jacket on cold days at the resort. Meet your new favorite layer for fall, winter and spring.

The Ascendant is water repellent and stops the wind well. It is available in six different colors.

Outdoor Research Product Page | Buy from Amazon


The North Face Ventrix

The North Face Ventrix The Ventrix is a light weight hoodie that is soft to the touch. Specifically designed for climbing, so the overall design is form fitting and comfortable. It has large pockets to keep your hands warm. Additionally there is an internal chest pocket to keep valuables in.

Our new, dynamic ventilation responds to your body movements during aerobic activities for balanced warmth and breathability. Perforated micro vents open with motion to prevent overheating and close with decreased activity to keep you warm and ready for your next move. – The North Face

The Ventrix is water repellent and stops the wind well. It uses a synthetic insulation for warmth. The Ventrix is available in five different colors.

The North Face Product Page | Buy from Amazon


Columbia Heatzone 1000

Columbia Heatzone 1000 This is a light weight but really warm jacket. It is the only jacket in the five that uses goose down as one of the insulators. Bulkier that the Ventrix. But handles colder temperature better.

Part of the Titanium line, the Heatzone 1000 gets its insane warmth from 900-fill, water-resistant goose down, 100g’s of Omni-Heat insulation, a thermal reflective lining, and finally our revolutionary wave baffle construction that eliminates the cold spots found in traditional down jackets. The Heatzone 1000 also features a helmet-compatible hood, a ski pass pocket and the ability to keep you warm, even when wet. – Columbia

The Heatzone 1000 is water repellent and stops the wind well. It is available in three different colors.

Columbia Product Page | Buy from Amazon


Milwaukee M12 Heated Gear

Milwaukee Heated Jacket Honestly I had no idea that the tool manufacturers were making heated jackets. The Milwaukee M12 is a rugged work jacket. The 12V battery charges quickly and lasts between six and eight hours depending on what heat level you use.

Milwaukee® has developed a range of proprietary material solutions that drastically outperform traditional work wear. By analyzing common usage environments and applications, we’ve evolved our materials to be stronger, lighter, and more flexible than what exists today. It’s time to re-think the gold standard. Your go-to work clothing shouldn’t need months to break in, and it shouldn’t rip or tear right after it finally feel comfortable.

The M12 is water repellent and stops the wind well. It is available in five different colors.

Milwaukee Product Page | Buy from Amazon


Dewalt 20V/12V MAX Lithium Ion Camo Heated Jacket

Dewalt Heated Jacket Like the Milwaukee M12, this Dewalt heated jacket is built tough so it can handle outside work and hunting well. This jacket uses both the 20V and the 12V batteries that Dewalt makes. Batteries will last between six and eleven hours depending on what battery and heat level you use.

Powered by DEWALT 20V MAX or 12V MAX lithium ion batteries each heated jacket offers: an LED controller with three temperature settings plus pre-heat mode, and three or four heating zones (depending on model). The outer shells are built with durable fabrics that are wind and water resistant (depending on model). These heated jackets provide warmth and comfort on or off the jobsite. Included with every heated jacket is a USB power source that not only transfers the heating power from the battery to the jacket but can also charge up to two USB-compatible electronic devices at the same time.

The Dewalt Heated Jacket is water repellent and stops the wind well.

Dewalt Product Page | Buy from Amazon

If you found this article helpful/interesting, please Share it by clicking on the social media links. Thank you for helping us grow!

The post 5 Super Warm Winter Jackets appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

5 Super Warm Winter Jackets

Winter is coming (or already here for some of you) and dressing warmly sure makes it much easier to be productive out in the cold. Most of us have a favorite winter jacket. Mine is a light fleece that doesn’t see the light of day often because in Houston we don’t see real cold very often. My house doesn’t even have a coat closet! But if you live in an area where winter includes weeks or months of really cold weather, you might want to take a look at these 5 super warm winter jackets.

Outdoor Research Ascendant

Outdoor Research Ascendant This is a very light weight, comfortable jacket. Features included internal thumb loops, zip chest pocket, dual hand warming pockets, internal front stormflap, and a key clip.

Building on the glowing reception of our Uberlayer Jacket, we ratcheted up the breathability while cutting the weight a little more to build the Ascendant Collection—Pertex Microlight movement-mirroring stretch fabric and Polartec Alpha insulation create the perfect combination for skinning uphill, belaying, or layering under a ski jacket on cold days at the resort. Meet your new favorite layer for fall, winter and spring.

The Ascendant is water repellent and stops the wind well. It is available in six different colors.

Outdoor Research Product Page | Buy from Amazon


The North Face Ventrix

The North Face Ventrix The Ventrix is a light weight hoodie that is soft to the touch. Specifically designed for climbing, so the overall design is form fitting and comfortable. It has large pockets to keep your hands warm. Additionally there is an internal chest pocket to keep valuables in.

Our new, dynamic ventilation responds to your body movements during aerobic activities for balanced warmth and breathability. Perforated micro vents open with motion to prevent overheating and close with decreased activity to keep you warm and ready for your next move. – The North Face

The Ventrix is water repellent and stops the wind well. It uses a synthetic insulation for warmth. The Ventrix is available in five different colors.

The North Face Product Page | Buy from Amazon


Columbia Heatzone 1000

Columbia Heatzone 1000 This is a light weight but really warm jacket. It is the only jacket in the five that uses goose down as one of the insulators. Bulkier that the Ventrix. But handles colder temperature better.

Part of the Titanium line, the Heatzone 1000 gets its insane warmth from 900-fill, water-resistant goose down, 100g’s of Omni-Heat insulation, a thermal reflective lining, and finally our revolutionary wave baffle construction that eliminates the cold spots found in traditional down jackets. The Heatzone 1000 also features a helmet-compatible hood, a ski pass pocket and the ability to keep you warm, even when wet. – Columbia

The Heatzone 1000 is water repellent and stops the wind well. It is available in three different colors.

Columbia Product Page | Buy from Amazon


Milwaukee M12 Heated Gear

Milwaukee Heated Jacket Honestly I had no idea that the tool manufacturers were making heated jackets. The Milwaukee M12 is a rugged work jacket. The 12V battery charges quickly and lasts between six and eight hours depending on what heat level you use.

Milwaukee® has developed a range of proprietary material solutions that drastically outperform traditional work wear. By analyzing common usage environments and applications, we’ve evolved our materials to be stronger, lighter, and more flexible than what exists today. It’s time to re-think the gold standard. Your go-to work clothing shouldn’t need months to break in, and it shouldn’t rip or tear right after it finally feel comfortable.

The M12 is water repellent and stops the wind well. It is available in five different colors.

Milwaukee Product Page | Buy from Amazon


Dewalt 20V/12V MAX Lithium Ion Camo Heated Jacket

Dewalt Heated Jacket Like the Milwaukee M12, this Dewalt heated jacket is built tough so it can handle outside work and hunting well. This jacket uses both the 20V and the 12V batteries that Dewalt makes. Batteries will last between six and eleven hours depending on what battery and heat level you use.

Powered by DEWALT 20V MAX or 12V MAX lithium ion batteries each heated jacket offers: an LED controller with three temperature settings plus pre-heat mode, and three or four heating zones (depending on model). The outer shells are built with durable fabrics that are wind and water resistant (depending on model). These heated jackets provide warmth and comfort on or off the jobsite. Included with every heated jacket is a USB power source that not only transfers the heating power from the battery to the jacket but can also charge up to two USB-compatible electronic devices at the same time.

The Dewalt Heated Jacket is water repellent and stops the wind well.

Dewalt Product Page | Buy from Amazon

If you found this article helpful/interesting, please Share it by clicking on the social media links. Thank you for helping us grow!

The post 5 Super Warm Winter Jackets appeared first on Surviving Prepper.

Cold Weather Primer: A Refresher If You Will

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To survive in cold weather like anything else it takes a certain skill set, proper materials i.e. clothing, shelter and it takes practice/training. You need to know before you have to know that what you are doing and wearing will keep you alive. First, as a reminder, the human body puts out heat, a considerable […]

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Low maintenance Chickens

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chicken eating pumpkin seeds

Finger-licking good

It’s great to rear chickens – eggs, scratchy kind of companionship, and eventually a roast bird.

But should every off-grid home have a few? They need work and they can get ill. If they would just stay healthy chickens, they could be a great source of both food and income. If you decide to own some chickens, here are some tips and tricks to keep them healthy and happy.

FACT OF THE DAY: Raw pumpkin seeds are natural de-wormer for chickens!

And at this time of the year there are a lot of free pumpkins to be had.

It seems a lot of people put their faith in this tasty treatment. According to Sunny Simple Life , pumpkin seeds are coated in a naturally occurring chemical that paralyzes the worms so the chicken can expel them.

But where do you get your pumpkin seeds?

What To Not Give Your Flock.

Just like any other animal, giving treats to your chicken is a classic way to earn their trust and get them to bond with you! Most of your left-over food will be safe for your flock but try to avoid salty. You should also keep them away from moldy food for it is toxic. Citrus is another food that should not be given to chickens due to the acidity. You don’t want to make your chickens upset!

If you’re having trouble finding pumpkin seeds for your flock, here’s another article that shows you an alternative for chicken feeding – Karl Hammer, the king of compost, explains how he feeds his extremely large flock with tall mounds of fertilizer. Compost can do the job just as equally as raw pumpkin seeds. Yes that’s right, compost.

Never buy grain for your chickens again!

Happy Feeding!

The post Low maintenance Chickens appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Low maintenance Chickens

chicken eating pumpkin seeds

Finger-licking good

It’s great to rear chickens – eggs, scratchy kind of companionship, and eventually a roast bird.

But should every off-grid home have a few? They need work and they can get ill. If they would just stay healthy chickens, they could be a great source of both food and income. If you decide to own some chickens, here are some tips and tricks to keep them healthy and happy.

FACT OF THE DAY: Raw pumpkin seeds are natural de-wormer for chickens!

And at this time of the year there are a lot of free pumpkins to be had.

It seems a lot of people put their faith in this tasty treatment. According to Sunny Simple Life , pumpkin seeds are coated in a naturally occurring chemical that paralyzes the worms so the chicken can expel them.

But where do you get your pumpkin seeds?

What To Not Give Your Flock.

Just like any other animal, giving treats to your chicken is a classic way to earn their trust and get them to bond with you! Most of your left-over food will be safe for your flock but try to avoid salty. You should also keep them away from moldy food for it is toxic. Citrus is another food that should not be given to chickens due to the acidity. You don’t want to make your chickens upset!

If you’re having trouble finding pumpkin seeds for your flock, here’s another article that shows you an alternative for chicken feeding – Karl Hammer, the king of compost, explains how he feeds his extremely large flock with tall mounds of fertilizer. Compost can do the job just as equally as raw pumpkin seeds. Yes that’s right, compost.

Never buy grain for your chickens again!

Happy Feeding!

The post Low maintenance Chickens appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Low maintenance Chickens

chicken eating pumpkin seeds

Finger-licking good

It’s great to rear chickens – eggs, scratchy kind of companionship, and eventually a roast bird.

But should every off-grid home have a few? They need work and they can get ill. If they would just stay healthy chickens, they could be a great source of both food and income. If you decide to own some chickens, here are some tips and tricks to keep them healthy and happy.

FACT OF THE DAY: Raw pumpkin seeds are natural de-wormer for chickens!

And at this time of the year there are a lot of free pumpkins to be had.

It seems a lot of people put their faith in this tasty treatment. According to Sunny Simple Life , pumpkin seeds are coated in a naturally occurring chemical that paralyzes the worms so the chicken can expel them.

But where do you get your pumpkin seeds?

What To Not Give Your Flock.

Just like any other animal, giving treats to your chicken is a classic way to earn their trust and get them to bond with you! Most of your left-over food will be safe for your flock but try to avoid salty. You should also keep them away from moldy food for it is toxic. Citrus is another food that should not be given to chickens due to the acidity. You don’t want to make your chickens upset!

If you’re having trouble finding pumpkin seeds for your flock, here’s another article that shows you an alternative for chicken feeding – Karl Hammer, the king of compost, explains how he feeds his extremely large flock with tall mounds of fertilizer. Compost can do the job just as equally as raw pumpkin seeds. Yes that’s right, compost.

Never buy grain for your chickens again!

Happy Feeding!

The post Low maintenance Chickens appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

And the winner is…………

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Well folks, it’s time to pick a winner for the Saver Emergency Breath System 2-Pack!
We have 24 comments to choose from.  The blog shows 25, but one was removed by the commenter, so here we go.

Using Random.org, we set up to pick a number between 1 and 24,  The number generated will correpond to the comment made in the order they appear.

And the number we got was……..6.

Congratulations to Bigmoe99!

Mother Nature Can Be Fierce!

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Mother Nature is an exceedingly powerful force! So often she is calm, mild, even pleasant. However there are times when this force can become extremely destructive, and it can happen fast… Having just gone through a major windstorm up here in northern New Hampshire, the New England region experienced a powerful Nor’easter (without the snow) that brought down trees and power lines all over the place. Up here we had wind gusts and straight line winds powerful enough that flattened swaths of trees, especially those with a southern exposure along slopes and ridges. Jet-stream upper level winds were brought down

The post Mother Nature Can Be Fierce! appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Must-Have Medical Supplies For Seniors’ Survival

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Though we may still be plenty capable of taking care of ourselves no matter how old we get, it’s a sad fact that as we age, our bodies just can’t take the abuse that they could when we were 20.

Everybody should have a medical supply kit,  and there are few extra items that seniors may want to throw in along with the bare-bones necessities.

Keep reading to find out the list you should follow to set up your medical supply if you’re a senior.

Trading medical skills and services may be a great way for you to contribute to your group or trade for things that you need, so if you’re stocked up, you’ve just made yourself more valuable.

Medical supplies tend to be pricey, but if you keep an eye on local sales, you can pick much of it for almost nothing (literally) if you combine sales with coupons. Sales tend to run in 6-week cycles. In other words, if peroxide is on sale this week, it will be on sale again in 6 weeks or so. Catch them when they’re on sale and stock your medicine cabinets for next to nothing.

This is the Best Natural Painkiller, and Grows in your Backyard!

Incidentally, and completely off topic, all hygiene products do that too. If you pay attention to sales and are willing to clip a few coupons, you’ll never run out of shampoo, soap, razors, toothpaste, or any of the other typically-expensive products. Since both medical and hygiene items may end up making great barter items, and you may not be able to perform such tasks as carrying wood, barter items are a great thing to have a plentiful supply of!

Building Your Basic First Aid Kit

Though these are available for purchase as entire kits, we prefer to build our own first aid and med-surge kits. That way, we can ensure that we have plenty of everything that we’ll need without having an entire box full of stuff that we’ll likely never use.

Just like with your stockpile, rotate the items in your medical kit so that bandages don’t dry rot and super-glue doesn’t harden. Yes, we said superglue. Have it in your kit because it makes a great substitute for stitches if you have to other alternative.Start with this list of items to carry in your box. Have plenty of backup stored in your stockpile, especially of items that you already use:

  • 1 package fishing line, 8lb test
  • 1” surgical tape
  • 2” bandage – 1 roll – in a pinch, you can always roll 4” bandages in half
  • 30-day supply of any life-sustaining prescription medication, more if obtainable
  • 4” gauze bandage – 1 roll
  • 550 parachute cord – 20 feet minimum. We like to actually have these made into bracelets and pet collars so that it’s decorative, handy, and doesn’t take up space in our kits
  • 97% isopropyl alcohol – 1 bottle
  • Ace wrap
  • Acetaminophen 500mg
  • Adhesive bandages – 1 box multi-size
  • Alcohol pads – 10 packs minimum
  • Antibacterial Ointment
  • Anti-diarrheal
  • Aspirin
  • Aspirin 350mg
  • Bandage scissors
  • Benadryl – 1 box
  • Burn cream – 1 tube
  • Butterfly-type wound closure strips – 1 box
  • Cayenne Pepper – can stop a heart attack and helps stop topical bleeding
  • Denture adhesive
  • Diabetic sugar tabs or individual packets of sugar
  • Dial Liquid Gold Soap
  • Epi-Pen – 1 if obtainable
  • Extra bandages, especially stretchy ones. These are great for using as circulation wraps on your arms and legs should the need arise.
  • Fiber to assist with bowel movements. This may not sound serious now, but impacted bowels can be a serious issue for older people who are experiencing stress and a drastically-altered diet.
  • Gauze pads, 2×2
  • Gauze pads, 4×4
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Heat packs
  • Hemorrhoid cream
  • Hemostats – 2 pair
  • Hydrocortisone cream – 1 tube
  • Hydrogen peroxide – 1 bottle
  • Ibuprofen 500mg
  • Ice packs
  • Iodine
  • Iodine – 1 bottle
  • Kitchen-sized garbage bags – 1 roll – great for everything from carrying supplies to building a tent
  • latex gloves – 5 pair minimum
  • Magnifying Glass
  • Matches
  • Minimum 30-day supply of all medications
  • Needles – 1 pack various sizes
  • OB tampons – 10 – you can use them for their intended purpose or to pack wounds
  • Pencil and small notebook
  • Plain sugar – 2 packs standard or more if you’re diabetic
  • Quik-Clot, 2 packs
  • Razor blades – Single-edge, 1 box
  • Safety pins – several large and small
  • Saline solution – 1 bottle
  • Scissors
  • Super Glue
  • Suture Needle
  • Tooth wax – 1 pack
  • Topical analgesic cream, 1 tube
  • Treatments such as hot packs and rubs for sore muscles
  • Triangular bandage to use as sling
  • Tweezers – 1 pair
  • White 100% cotton thread – 1 spool
  • Zipper top plastic bags – 1 box – quart or gallon size

Have Extra Equipment

If you need special equipment on a day to day basis to help you see, eat, get around or otherwise make it through your day, it’s a good idea to have extras on hand in case your device gets lost or damaged in an emergency situation. Here are a few examples.

  • Eyeglasses
  • Canes or walkers
  • False teeth
  • Shower chairs
  • Hearing aids (and batteries)
  • Diabetic socks
  • Diabetic testing supplies
  • Safety rails
  • Wheelchairs

Learn How to Replace Meds with Natural Alternatives

As seniors, having enough meds is of bigger concern because often the medications that you take are quite literally life-preserving. The good news is that there are some natural alternatives to some medications.

There are also a few handy tricks that can actually do just as good a job as the medication but for the most part, these are suggestions to naturally reduce or eliminate the condition that requires the medication.

Get more exercise, lose weight if you need to, eat healthier foods, reduce consumption of high-cholesterol, high-saturated fat foods and just take better care of yourself in general. It’s much better to not need medications to begin with than to try to find substitutions for them if SHTF and you don’t have access to a pharmacy.

Pain Killers and Anti-Inflammatories

Pain and swelling can make you miserable, but many meds cause further harm to your body (liver damage, increased risk of heart attack, cataracts, and macular degeneration). Here are a few substitutions to consider in case you don’t have access to your meds.

  • Gingko Balboa has been used forever as a clotting agent and to improve circulation.
  • Turmeric and Ginger both have anti-inflammatory and pain relieving properties.
  • Vitamins B-6, D, and E all work as natural blood thinners. Natural vitamin E (100 IUs) works as well as aspirin as a blood thinner, and natural sources of E include spinach, tomatoes, mangoes, peanut butter, almonds, kiwi and sunflower seeds.
  • Organic strawberries, pineapples, raisins, prunes, cranberries, blueberries grapes, oranges broccoli, avocados, cherries, Brussels sprouts, almonds, apple cider vinegar, and honey all work as blood thinners when incorporated as part of your diet. Dried fruits are actually best as blood thinners. High amounts of vitamin E are generally key.
  • Fish oil works nearly as well as Coumadin to thin the blood, according to some research.
  • Devil’s claw has been used in teas and tinctures for centuries as an anti-inflammatory and pain. reliever. It’s frequently used to treat arthritis, tendonitis, and muscle pain and stiffness.
  • Herbs and spices that reduce inflammation include black pepper, cayenne pepper, basil, cardamom, chamomile, chives, cilantro, cinnamon, cloves, garlic, ginger, parsley, nutmeg, rosemary, and turmeric. Therapeutic dosages vary per herb and per person so if you need a natural anti-inflammatory, do your research.
  • Water is one of the best blood thinners that you consume. It may sound cliché, but it’s true!

High Blood Pressure Meds

High blood pressure is one disease that is largely avoidable by practicing a healthy lifestyle. It’s one of the few diseases you can actually get rid of, too. In some cases, though, it’s genetic and you’re just going to have to deal with it. There are several natural approaches to controlling your blood pressure:

  • Water plays a huge part in regulating your blood pressure. Make sure that you drink plenty of it!
  • Potassium, Magnesium and Calcium play roles in sodium absorption, which is crucial to maintaining a healthy blood pressure. Consider stockpiling supplements but if you do, be careful. Too much potassium or magnesium can be lethal and too much calcium can cause kidney stones. No fun. Good natural sources of potassium include bananas, strawberries, cantaloupes and potatoes.
  • Sodium is essential in your blood but unless you suffer from a handful of relatively rare conditions such as hyponatremia (low blood sodium), you need to watch your sodium intake as you get older because there’s a direct link between sodium intake and blood pressure. You can significantly reduce your blood pressure by reducing your sodium intake.
  • Coenzyme Q10 naturally reduced blood pressure
  • Garlic is just good all the way around. Eat it. Supplement with it if you don’t like to eat it.
  • Hawthorn, Basil, Cinnamon, Cardamom, Celery Seed, French Lavender, and Cat’s Claw are all herbs that are linked to reducing blood pressure.

Antacids

Heartburn and indigestion are frequent companions of those of us who no longer get carded for buying our wine and it’s an issue that’s plagued mankind since the first buffalo pterodactyl wings were served.

It’s often controllable by avoiding foods that cause it but not always. And it could be that you’re just not willing to give up those delicious sauces or fresh veggies that cause your chest to feel like it’s on fire. If so, no worries, even if SHTF, there are some natural cures.

  • Almonds naturally reduce stomach acid. Much on a handful of them and you’ll feel better in 15-30 minutes. Plus they’re awesome for you.
  • Aloe Vera Juice may not taste fabulous but it’s been used for ages to sooth stomach agues. This is great for survival purposes because aloe is easy to grow and is also great for treating burns and abrasions.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar is almost as versatile as garlic and is one of those must-have stockpile items. To get rid of heartburn, drop a couple of tablespoons into a glass of water and drink it. A slice of fresh apple helps, too.
  • Baking Soda, though not entirely pleasant to consume, will get rid of heart burn if you mix a teaspoon of it in a glass of water. Don’t use this often if you have high blood pressure because it can increase your sodium levels.
  • Bananas are extremely soothing to your stomach. Plus they’re a good source of fiber. Handy tip – almost all of the vitamin K in a banana is found in the hard, dark tip that most of us throw away.
  • Basil leaves, Chamomile, Cinnamon, Fennel, Garlic (yes again), Ginger, and Peppermint are all herbs or spices that will help get rid of heartburn or upset stomach.
  • Buttermilk is an old wives’ cure but it works. Just sip a glass and you’ll feel better in no time.

Statins, aka High Cholesterol Meds

High cholesterol is another condition that you can often eliminate if you’re just willing to make some lifestyle changes. Get up, put down the cupcake, and exercise. If you’re one of the unfortunate people who do that but still deal with high cholesterol, here are some natural alternatives to chemical medications such as Lipitor and Zocor.

  • Coconut oil and other medium-chain triglycerides are your best bet for fat because, unlike saturated fat, it raises good cholesterol right along with “bad” so that it balances out.
  • Dark Chocolate, Soy Beans, Garlic, Olive Oil and Omega-3s all help to reduce cholesterol.
  • Red wine is rich in resveratrol and other antioxidants that can help reduce cholesterol.
  • Fiber-rich foods such as veggies and fruits help reduce cholesterol.
  • Rosemary, ginger, turmeric, yarrow and holy basil are herbs that may help to reduce cholesterol.

Antibiotics

In a post-SHTF scenario, infections and diseases caused by bacteria are going to be huge issues. Particularly for people who may not have the strongest immune systems, the absence of antibiotics may turn out to be lethal. Having a sustainable source of natural antibiotics is simply logical.

Several different natural antibiotics are easy to grow. Some treat a wide range of conditions while others are suited to specific infections. Either way, learn how to use these before you just eat them or make tea because “natural” does not imply “safe”.

Remember, arsenic is a naturally-occurring mineral! Many times, herbs can cure you in a small dose or kill you in a large one so study up and have a herbal guide in your medicine kit for reference purposes.

  • Honey is a natural topical antibiotic, antiviral, antimicrobial and antifungal. Rub it right onto the wound to protect it from infection and to kill bugs that are already trying to cause trouble.
  • Goldenseal (Hydrastis) is an herb native to the northwest US. It’s used to treat sore throats and digestive infections that cause diarrhea. It’s also useful for soothing and treating respiratory, digestive tract, and genitourinary infections.
  • Oregon Grape is also native to the Northwest US and contains berberine which keeps harmful bacteria from sticking to the walls of your intestinal or urinary tract. Drink it like a tea to sooth and treat UTIs or take a liquid tincture or dried capsule to fight bacteria that cause digestive conditions such as infectious diarrhea.
  • Andrographispaniculata is an Asian herb that’s been shown in modern studies to disrupt the quorum-sensing system of bacteria. This is basically the homing beacon that pulls bacteria to each other so that they can set up camp and really do some damage. It’s commonly used to treat upper respiratory infections and sinus problems.
  • Horseradish is used to successfully treat urinary tract infections, respiratory infections and sinusitis.
  • Turmeric has a ton of research that supports its effectiveness as an antibacterial. It’s effective against Bacillus cereus, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
  • Ginger has been used historically, and has medical studies backing it, for treating respiratory infections and infections in the mouth caused by pathogens.

Some people prefer to store their first aid supplies in a 5-gallon bucket. We personally prefer to use a more traditional case that opens in such a manner as to display the contents. We like the cases better because in an emergency, you can just open it up, look for what you need, and grab it.

If all of your supplies are in a bucket, you’ll need to dump the bucket out in order to find what you need, then put it all back in. At the very least, you’re wasting time and at the worst, you’re contaminating the contents of your kit.

How’s your medical supply? Are you ready to face a disaster with what you have at the moment? Or are you going to rely entirely on your skills and on what nature can provide you for survival?

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia.

Play and Prepping Healthy Fun!

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Play and Prepping Healthy Fun! Host: Lynna… “A Preppers Path” Audio player provided! How about it will you come out and play with me? What? No is that what I heard, Why? What what was that, you say your and adult and adults don’t play! Pish Posh if you aren’t playing your playing with fire, … Continue reading Play and Prepping Healthy Fun!

The post Play and Prepping Healthy Fun! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Melt-In-Your-Mouth Beef Tips Recipe – Instant Pot and Crockpot Instructions Included

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Are you ready for a melt-in-your-mouth Beef Tips Recipe? Look no further!!! One of our classic, cold weather, go-to recipes is Beef Tips. They are so versatile as you can serve them over noodles, mashed potatoes or rice. In fact,

The post Melt-In-Your-Mouth Beef Tips Recipe – Instant Pot and Crockpot Instructions Included appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Don’t Leave Home Without It: The Vehicle 72-Hour Kit

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vehicle emergency kitSoccer moms, football moms, cheerleading moms, whatever they call us, “chauffeur” better describes what we, Survival Moms, do every day. In my world, it’s not unusual to have a kid’s dentist appointment, a field trip, and a swim meet all on the same day, transported by our trusty Tahoe. Now, if that Tahoe ever broke down or for some reason we couldn’t get home as planned, what would we do?

My answer is the Vehicle 72 Hour Kit, or Emergency Kit. If you were well and truly stuck somewhere, this Kit could see you and your family through at least 72 hours. That’s three days. It wouldn’t be luxurious living, that’s for sure, but it would be survival, and that’s what we’re talking about here.

I consider the Vehicle 72 Hour Kit to be an essential part of being prepared for emergencies, and fortunately, it’s pretty easy to put together. In fact, you might have all the necessary, basic supplies in your home and garage right now.

Putting the vehicle 72 hour kit together

To get started on your own Vehicle 72 Hour Kit, you’ll need some type of container that will fit in the back of your  minivan, SUV, or in the trunk of your car. I chose a Rubbermaid clear plastic bin, the type that is designed to fit under beds. It’s the perfect width for our vehicle, and I like the fact that I can see what’s inside. It also holds a lot.

The typical 72 Hour Kit, also sometimes called a Bug-Out Bag, is stored at home and ready to grab as you run out the door in case of an evacuation. Since we’re building a Kit for the vehicle, we want it filled with items we’ll need if stranded somewhere. If you have more than one vehicle in the family, make a kit for the one you use most often and then add kits to the other vehicles as you have the time, supplies, and money.

You can find numerous lists online of what should be in a 72 Hour Kit, but since I’m a mom, and I pretty much always have the kids with me, my own list is a little different.  A lot of these items are available online, and I’ve included links. Anything to make shopping easier, right?

Here’s what I’ve packed.

Sanitation

(With kids, you just have to start here.)

  • A 4-pack of toilet paper, flattened  (Take the center cardboard tube out to make it as flat as possible. You can put these flattened rolls in a Food Saver bag and vacuum seal for even flatter toilet paper.)
  • Baby wipes
  • Small box of tissues
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Bar of soap
  • Clorox wipes (Germs never take a vacation.)
  • A few plastic grocery bags stuffed into another grocery bag.
  • Toothbrushes and toothpaste
  • Dental floss
  • Tampons/feminine protection. A menstrual cup is a great option. You can read more here to decide if this is something you might want to try.
  • Paper towels
  • Emesis bags for unpleasant car sickness incidents. These are so much easier to use than a random trash bag or, worse, your purse.

Sustenance

(Kids will quickly panic if they think you’re out of food, but whatever you pack, make sure it’s something your kids will eat.)

  • Beef jerky or something similar
  • Trail mix
  • Shelled sunflower seeds
  • Small cans of food, such as fruit, ravioli, tuna
  • Protein bars and granola bars
  • High calorie energy bars. This article compares several different brands.  (Handle these with care. High energy may be the last thing your kids need!)
  • Hard candies (Offer a prize for whoever can make their Lifesaver last the longest!)
  • Packets for flavoring water
  • Can opener, unless all your cans have a pop-top
  • Plastic forks, spoons and knives, one set per person. I like this set of sporks from Amazon.

Entertainment

(After everyone has eaten and gone to the bathroom, then what??)

  • A read-aloud book  (Should be something entertaining for the whole family with plenty of chapters. I packed Journey to the Center of the Earth and Charlotte’s Web.)
  • Small Bible  (This is more for my own sanity than that of the kids!)
  • Paper and pens/pencils
  • Deck of cards  (Think “War”, “Go Fish” and math flashcards. If you’re stranded for very long, your kids will invent their own games!)
  • Single-use digital camera  (Not only good for entertainment, but it might come in handy to document your emergency situation.)
  • Small binoculars
  • Sharpie  (Drawing fake mustaches on each other should keep the kids busy for a couple of minutes (make sure it’s a WASHABLE Sharpie!), and you’ll be grateful for this if you have to leave a note on your vehicle.)
  • Glo-sticks  (Great value:  entertainment and emergency light in one!)
  • Ibuprofen  (For me.)
  • Ear plugs  (Again, for me.)

Hard-Core Survival

  • Emergency blankets. These have multiple uses.
  • Fleece blankets  (Cheapest way to get these?  Buy two yards of any fleece print at a fabric store.  Instant blanket. Bulky, but can be stowed beneath a seat.)
  • Light sources  (Headlamps are worth their weight in gold, but also have a traditional flashlight or two.  These can be stored in a glove compartment or other niche in your vehicle.)
  • The Luci light. My current favorite solar lantern because not only does it charge quickly using sunlight, but it collapses to a thin disk, which is very easy to pack.
  • Rain ponchos
  • Duct tape
  • Hand and foot warmers  (Small, stashable)
  • Rope  (Check out paracord for top quality and versatility.)
  • Knife  (A cheapie pocket knife is better than nothing, but you’ll be grateful if you pack something sturdier.)
  • Battery/solar-powered emergency radio in case your car battery dies
  • Ground cover (I packed two large heavy-duty plastic tablecloths purchased at a dollar store.)
  • Work gloves
  • Extra batteries for anything battery powered in your Kit
  • Umbrella
  • Waterproof matches
  • Whistle
  • Water purification tablets
  • Small portable water filter
  • Mirror for signaling — this one comes with a whistle
  • Small, sturdy shovel  (Check out a collapsible shovel if space is tight.)
  • Two heavy duty black trash bags

Medical Emergencies

(With kids, need I say more?)

  • Basic First Aid Kit from Wal-Mart, price $9
  • Children’s pain relief medication and dispenser
  • Adult pain relief medication. Read more about pain relief choices in this article.
  • QuickClot (This product quickly stops bleeding in the case of a serious wound.)
  • Benadryl
  • Aspirin
  • Small bottle of bleach to use for water purification and sanitize medical supplies
  • Thermometer
  • Sunblock
  • Medical gloves and face masks
  • Tweezers
  • First Aid reference book. I own this one by Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy and this book by the Survival Doctor.
  • Super glue
  • Additional medical supplies according to the needs of your family, e.g. inhaler, a few doses of prescription meds

Miscellaneous

  • Ziploc-style bags  (Just store some of your items in different sized bags so you’ll have them already packed.)
  • Rubber bands
  • A bungee cord or two
  • A cell phone charger, unless you know that you know there’s one elsewhere in the car.
  • A charged battery pack for your small electronics
  • Comb/hairbrush
  • Small scissors
  • Sewing kit
  • Cloth sheet
  • A couple of compact nylon bags and a nylon backpack  (If we have to leave our vehicle, we’ll need something for carrying our supplies.)
  • Money in small bills, along with plenty of change  (If nothing else, this will help greatly with bribing your children to be nice to each other!)

In addition to storing things in the plastic bin, I took a long, hard look at the Tahoe to find other nooks and crannies where I could put additional supplies. A large city map book, along with maps of neighboring states, is in a back seat pocket, and there are two Gymboree baby blankets and a couple of beach towels rolled up and stored beneath the back seat.

I also have several 2-liter bottles filled with water stashed beneath the back seat. I’m not so sure the water/plastic bottle/heat is a good combination, so when we leave the house, I always make sure we have a handful of fresh water bottles with us. However, if the stored water was all we had, we’d drink it until we could get fresh water. Even if we don’t drink the stored water, it can be used for washing grubby hands and faces.

It’s recommended to have a gallon of water on hand per person, per day. It would be pretty difficult to keep that much water stored in your vehicle.   One option, in addition to the 2-liter bottles, is a 5-gallon collapsible water bottle or two. My family has used the inexpensive Coghlan brand for years and recommend it.

What about a change of clothing for each person? It depends on how much space you have in your Kit and in your vehicle, but a clean shirt, pants, underwear and socks shouldn’t take up too much space. If you have Space Bags, a Food Saver, or something similar, clothing and items like the fleece blankets will take up even less room and can be stored beneath the back seat.

For warmth in extreme cold condition, check out this homemade heater demonstrated by Erich over at Tactical Intelligence.  If you use this, be sure to roll down a window for ventilation. This article contains many more ideas for surviving cold weatherif you are ever stranded in your vehicle.

Finally, not to be a fear-monger, but there’s always the chance you’ll be stranded far from any bathroom facilities. A 5 or 6 gallon bucket, equipped with a portable potty lid is a big improvement over squatting by the side of the road.  Be sure to include toilet bags and there are even chemicals to have on hand that keep the odors down.

You’ll be surprised by how quickly your own Kit comes together once you get started.  I was able to finish mine in just a day or two.  I actually had most everything on hand already.  You may never need this Vehicle 72 Hour Kit, but I’ll bet it will bring you and your family peace of mind just knowing it’s there.

Get the printable list!

Click here to get a printable list for your own Vehicle 72 Hour Kit!

vehicle 72 hour kit

 

Save

Don’t Leave Home Without It: The Vehicle 72-Hour Kit

vehicle emergency kitSoccer moms, football moms, cheerleading moms, whatever they call us, “chauffeur” better describes what we, Survival Moms, do every day. In my world, it’s not unusual to have a kid’s dentist appointment, a field trip, and a swim meet all on the same day, transported by our trusty Tahoe. Now, if that Tahoe ever broke down or for some reason we couldn’t get home as planned, what would we do?

My answer is the Vehicle 72 Hour Kit, or Emergency Kit. If you were well and truly stuck somewhere, this Kit could see you and your family through at least 72 hours. That’s three days. It wouldn’t be luxurious living, that’s for sure, but it would be survival, and that’s what we’re talking about here.

I consider the Vehicle 72 Hour Kit to be an essential part of being prepared for emergencies, and fortunately, it’s pretty easy to put together. In fact, you might have all the necessary, basic supplies in your home and garage right now.

Putting the vehicle 72 hour kit together

To get started on your own Vehicle 72 Hour Kit, you’ll need some type of container that will fit in the back of your  minivan, SUV, or in the trunk of your car. I chose a Rubbermaid clear plastic bin, the type that is designed to fit under beds. It’s the perfect width for our vehicle, and I like the fact that I can see what’s inside. It also holds a lot.

The typical 72 Hour Kit, also sometimes called a Bug-Out Bag, is stored at home and ready to grab as you run out the door in case of an evacuation. Since we’re building a Kit for the vehicle, we want it filled with items we’ll need if stranded somewhere. If you have more than one vehicle in the family, make a kit for the one you use most often and then add kits to the other vehicles as you have the time, supplies, and money.

You can find numerous lists online of what should be in a 72 Hour Kit, but since I’m a mom, and I pretty much always have the kids with me, my own list is a little different.  A lot of these items are available online, and I’ve included links. Anything to make shopping easier, right?

Here’s what I’ve packed.

Sanitation

(With kids, you just have to start here.)

  • A 4-pack of toilet paper, flattened  (Take the center cardboard tube out to make it as flat as possible. You can put these flattened rolls in a Food Saver bag and vacuum seal for even flatter toilet paper.)
  • Baby wipes
  • Small box of tissues
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Bar of soap
  • Clorox wipes (Germs never take a vacation.)
  • A few plastic grocery bags stuffed into another grocery bag.
  • Toothbrushes and toothpaste
  • Dental floss
  • Tampons/feminine protection. A menstrual cup is a great option. You can read more here to decide if this is something you might want to try.
  • Paper towels
  • Emesis bags for unpleasant car sickness incidents. These are so much easier to use than a random trash bag or, worse, your purse.

Sustenance

(Kids will quickly panic if they think you’re out of food, but whatever you pack, make sure it’s something your kids will eat.)

  • Beef jerky or something similar
  • Trail mix
  • Shelled sunflower seeds
  • Small cans of food, such as fruit, ravioli, tuna
  • Protein bars and granola bars
  • High calorie energy bars. This article compares several different brands.  (Handle these with care. High energy may be the last thing your kids need!)
  • Hard candies (Offer a prize for whoever can make their Lifesaver last the longest!)
  • Packets for flavoring water
  • Can opener, unless all your cans have a pop-top
  • Plastic forks, spoons and knives, one set per person. I like this set of sporks from Amazon.

Entertainment

(After everyone has eaten and gone to the bathroom, then what??)

  • A read-aloud book  (Should be something entertaining for the whole family with plenty of chapters. I packed Journey to the Center of the Earth and Charlotte’s Web.)
  • Small Bible  (This is more for my own sanity than that of the kids!)
  • Paper and pens/pencils
  • Deck of cards  (Think “War”, “Go Fish” and math flashcards. If you’re stranded for very long, your kids will invent their own games!)
  • Single-use digital camera  (Not only good for entertainment, but it might come in handy to document your emergency situation.)
  • Small binoculars
  • Sharpie  (Drawing fake mustaches on each other should keep the kids busy for a couple of minutes (make sure it’s a WASHABLE Sharpie!), and you’ll be grateful for this if you have to leave a note on your vehicle.)
  • Glo-sticks  (Great value:  entertainment and emergency light in one!)
  • Ibuprofen  (For me.)
  • Ear plugs  (Again, for me.)

Hard-Core Survival

  • Emergency blankets. These have multiple uses.
  • Fleece blankets  (Cheapest way to get these?  Buy two yards of any fleece print at a fabric store.  Instant blanket. Bulky, but can be stowed beneath a seat.)
  • Light sources  (Headlamps are worth their weight in gold, but also have a traditional flashlight or two.  These can be stored in a glove compartment or other niche in your vehicle.)
  • The Luci light. My current favorite solar lantern because not only does it charge quickly using sunlight, but it collapses to a thin disk, which is very easy to pack.
  • Rain ponchos
  • Duct tape
  • Hand and foot warmers  (Small, stashable)
  • Rope  (Check out paracord for top quality and versatility.)
  • Knife  (A cheapie pocket knife is better than nothing, but you’ll be grateful if you pack something sturdier.)
  • Battery/solar-powered emergency radio in case your car battery dies
  • Ground cover (I packed two large heavy-duty plastic tablecloths purchased at a dollar store.)
  • Work gloves
  • Extra batteries for anything battery powered in your Kit
  • Umbrella
  • Waterproof matches
  • Whistle
  • Water purification tablets
  • Small portable water filter
  • Mirror for signaling — this one comes with a whistle
  • Small, sturdy shovel  (Check out a collapsible shovel if space is tight.)
  • Two heavy duty black trash bags

Medical Emergencies

(With kids, need I say more?)

  • Basic First Aid Kit from Wal-Mart, price $9
  • Children’s pain relief medication and dispenser
  • Adult pain relief medication. Read more about pain relief choices in this article.
  • QuickClot (This product quickly stops bleeding in the case of a serious wound.)
  • Benadryl
  • Aspirin
  • Small bottle of bleach to use for water purification and sanitize medical supplies
  • Thermometer
  • Sunblock
  • Medical gloves and face masks
  • Tweezers
  • First Aid reference book. I own this one by Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy and this book by the Survival Doctor.
  • Super glue
  • Additional medical supplies according to the needs of your family, e.g. inhaler, a few doses of prescription meds

Miscellaneous

  • Ziploc-style bags  (Just store some of your items in different sized bags so you’ll have them already packed.)
  • Rubber bands
  • A bungee cord or two
  • A cell phone charger, unless you know that you know there’s one elsewhere in the car.
  • A charged battery pack for your small electronics
  • Comb/hairbrush
  • Small scissors
  • Sewing kit
  • Cloth sheet
  • A couple of compact nylon bags and a nylon backpack  (If we have to leave our vehicle, we’ll need something for carrying our supplies.)
  • Money in small bills, along with plenty of change  (If nothing else, this will help greatly with bribing your children to be nice to each other!)

In addition to storing things in the plastic bin, I took a long, hard look at the Tahoe to find other nooks and crannies where I could put additional supplies. A large city map book, along with maps of neighboring states, is in a back seat pocket, and there are two Gymboree baby blankets and a couple of beach towels rolled up and stored beneath the back seat.

I also have several 2-liter bottles filled with water stashed beneath the back seat. I’m not so sure the water/plastic bottle/heat is a good combination, so when we leave the house, I always make sure we have a handful of fresh water bottles with us. However, if the stored water was all we had, we’d drink it until we could get fresh water. Even if we don’t drink the stored water, it can be used for washing grubby hands and faces.

It’s recommended to have a gallon of water on hand per person, per day. It would be pretty difficult to keep that much water stored in your vehicle.   One option, in addition to the 2-liter bottles, is a 5-gallon collapsible water bottle or two. My family has used the inexpensive Coghlan brand for years and recommend it.

What about a change of clothing for each person? It depends on how much space you have in your Kit and in your vehicle, but a clean shirt, pants, underwear and socks shouldn’t take up too much space. If you have Space Bags, a Food Saver, or something similar, clothing and items like the fleece blankets will take up even less room and can be stored beneath the back seat.

For warmth in extreme cold condition, check out this homemade heater demonstrated by Erich over at Tactical Intelligence.  If you use this, be sure to roll down a window for ventilation. This article contains many more ideas for surviving cold weatherif you are ever stranded in your vehicle.

Finally, not to be a fear-monger, but there’s always the chance you’ll be stranded far from any bathroom facilities. A 5 or 6 gallon bucket, equipped with a portable potty lid is a big improvement over squatting by the side of the road.  Be sure to include toilet bags and there are even chemicals to have on hand that keep the odors down.

You’ll be surprised by how quickly your own Kit comes together once you get started.  I was able to finish mine in just a day or two.  I actually had most everything on hand already.  You may never need this Vehicle 72 Hour Kit, but I’ll bet it will bring you and your family peace of mind just knowing it’s there.

Get the printable list!

Click here to get a printable list for your own Vehicle 72 Hour Kit!

vehicle 72 hour kit

 

Save

And the Round Eleven Winners Are….

Click here to view the original post.

Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

The Polls have closed! The results have been tabulated and no Russian interference has been charged!

The five (5) articles in contention for the three (3) prizes of Amazon gift cards were (in no particular order):

Build Your Own Firearm – (Part 6 – Assembling and Testing the AR-15)

Practical Prepping

The Truth About Bartering – Part 1

Superfoods in Seven (7) Days

Lessons Learned: When “Prepping” Shows Up on Your Doorstep

Congratulations (in order) to:

  1. John D.
  2. Ra Denney
  3. R. D. Watson

The Results:

The post And the Round Eleven Winners Are…. appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

And the Round Eleven Winners Are….

Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

The Polls have closed! The results have been tabulated and no Russian interference has been charged!

The five (5) articles in contention for the three (3) prizes of Amazon gift cards were (in no particular order):

Build Your Own Firearm – (Part 6 – Assembling and Testing the AR-15)

Practical Prepping

The Truth About Bartering – Part 1

Superfoods in Seven (7) Days

Lessons Learned: When “Prepping” Shows Up on Your Doorstep

Congratulations (in order) to:

  1. John D.
  2. Ra Denney
  3. R. D. Watson

The Results:

The post And the Round Eleven Winners Are…. appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

And the Round Eleven Winners Are….

Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

The Polls have closed! The results have been tabulated and no Russian interference has been charged!

The five (5) articles in contention for the three (3) prizes of Amazon gift cards were (in no particular order):

Build Your Own Firearm – (Part 6 – Assembling and Testing the AR-15)

Practical Prepping

The Truth About Bartering – Part 1

Superfoods in Seven (7) Days

Lessons Learned: When “Prepping” Shows Up on Your Doorstep

Congratulations (in order) to:

  1. John D.
  2. Ra Denney
  3. R. D. Watson

The Results:

The post And the Round Eleven Winners Are…. appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

An Invitation To Our Military Veterans

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     Although Veteran’s Day is still more than a week away, it is never too early to be focusing on honoring our nation’s Military veterans.  Also, I have a very unique opportunity this coming weekend to serve as Assistant Spiritual Director for a Christian retreat for retired female military veterans.  I will be serving as a part of a team under the auspices of an organization called Christian Warriors Retreat. And I want to call attention to the need for our military to accept an invitation from Jesus to lay their burdens down.
     CWR is the brainchild of Nick “Doc” Lowry, the son of a career Navy man and a Vietnam era Marine grandfather. Not surprisingly, Doc grew up with a passion for the military and became a Marine corpsman. He was deployed to Iraz in 2003, and to Fallujah in 2004 during Operation Phantom Fury.  Like many military veterans, Doc came home with a lack of trust and the inability to relate to civilian life, which resulted in bouts of alcoholism.  It cost him two marriages; he couldn’t keep a job, and his diagnosis of PTSD and TB (Traumatic Brain Disorder) left him feeling he had no hope.
     Long story short, Doc reunited with his best friend in high school, Nikki, who introduced him to Jesus, they married, and in 2008, he gave his life to Christ.  He has rededicated his life to helping other vets heal through a personal relationship with Jesus. That’s where the Christian Warriors Retreat comes in.
     Through the 4-day retreat experience and discipleship, CWR initiates and sustains three levels of success for veterans:  They will understand their value in Christ; they will heal and improve vital relationships; and most importantly, they will find God’s mission for which they were created.
     What an important mission for our veterans!  As the proud daughter of a WWII Navy veteran, my dad never discussed his experiences as a tailgunner over the Pacific.  But after having the honor of being on the Board of Directors of the Chris Kyle Memorial Foundation, and serving wounded warriors and their families at the Fisher Houses at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, I have seen the devastation to the flesh and spirits of our military veterans.

Doc Lowry

     Doc Lowry also knows firsthand the sacrifice made by his Veteran community.  And he is doing something about starting the healing process by working with Jesus.  But, the average civilian is unaware of some of the startling statistics that surround the veterans.  Let me share just a few of them with you:  Every 65 minutes, a military veteran commits suicide; 22 military veterans commit suicide every day; 31 of these suicides were veterans aged 49 and younger; Every month nearly 1,000 veterans attempt to take their own lives; That’s more than one attempt every half hour; About 7-8% of the population with have PTSD at some point in their lives; The unemployment rate for Iraq and Afghanistan veterans is 10% — this is higher than the national rate of 7.3%; More than 2 million American children have coped with a parent going to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; As many as one half million of those children may have become clinically depressed; The National Institute of Drug Abuse reports that 25% of returning Iraq and Afghanistan veterans showed signs of substance abuse disorder; The divorce rate among military couples has increased 42 percent throughout the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

      Heard enough facts? Can you see the devil’s tactics of “steal, kill, and destroy”? War should not be the natural state of man, if we are made in God’s image.  So you can see where all this damage to our veterans is coming from, right?  They may have come home from some battlefield on earth, but there is a spiritual battle going on for their souls.  (I have written several articles on the spiritual war our veterans face, but this one seems particularly fitting considering my subject today).
     With Veteran’s Day in another week and a half, I just wanted to put a spotlight on this organization who is trying to help our veterans by focusing on the healing powers of Jesus in their lives.  What a breath of fresh air from government-sponsored programs that do nothing about healing the inner wounds of our servicemen and women.  Only Jesus can do that! And I am anxious to see the new movie, Thank You For Your Service, in which the director, Jason Hall, likens it to a “spiritual sequel to American Sniper”, saying, “[It’s about] the return home of the warrior — it’s about home coming. It’s about the return to self. And the warriors blessed with all the masculine gifts of heroism. And then the warrior has to turn inside. It’s finding a way back into the light and that’s what this movie is about”.  Of course, we and Doc Lowry know how imperative it is that our warriors find their way into the Light of Jesus.  Through His Light they will be restored to a new life in Him. 
     And I am excited about being a part of the very first Female Veterans Retreat.  I think that oftentimes they are overlooked and no one is seeing to their healing.  But I am blessed to be a part of an amazing group of women leaders who will be ministering to these female veterans as they are restored and renewed through our support, and the unconditional love of Jesus.  So, I ask for your prayers beginning tomorrow and through Sunday, when we will see the results of this retreat.  Our goal is to let them meet Jesus and receive His forgiveness, His love, and the cleansing power of His Blood.  They may be arriving as spiritually wounded female veterans, but they will be leaving as healed and renewed Daughters of the King! 
     Give me a couple of days after returning home on Sunday to process all that Jesus will have done in the lives of these remarkable women, and then I will write about the experience. Also, if you make any comments, I won’t be responding to them until Sunday night, but I will post them and give you my follow-up comments. I just want to leave you with this … The very thought of how Jesus will revive the spirits of these women, heal their broken hearts, and redeem their souls fills me with such joy and anticipation!  Praise Him, all who love Him!

This Veteran’s Day, let us renew our commitment to our veterans and pledge our efforts to begin a spiritual revival within their ranks.  Please check out www.christianwarriorsretreat and support this important effort to bring spiritual healing to the veterans of our nation. Consider sponsoring a veteran to attend the next retreat. Thank you!  
    
John 8:12    Again Jesus spoke to them, saying, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”       

The Basics Of Reloading Ammunition

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Reloading ammunition is a beneficial and economic skill for a large number of shooters. It helps them save money, and it provides the reassurance of having available ammunition when shortages are in effect. In a SHTF scenario, reloading ammunition may be the only way to get bullets for your firearms in case you don’t have … Read more…

The post The Basics Of Reloading Ammunition was written by David Andrew Brown and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

How To Have Clean Clothes Anywhere In The World

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I’m here to tell you how to have clean clothes anywhere in the world, yes even after a disaster or on a vacation. Oh, you are hiking, then this is a dream come true! Or maybe you are in your RV traveling all over the USA (this is my dream). I will be doing a road trip in a car, but you get the idea. One of my favorite sponsors Earth Easy asked me to do a review on one of their new products. If you missed the one I did on The Scrubba Bag here it is. It’s from Earth Easy as well. They sent the Scrubba Stealth Pack to me and these comments are my thoughts about this product. Keep in mind, I will only do reviews on products I would buy and recommend to my readers. So let’s get started, this backpack is awesome!

I love the idea of a backpack that I can wear or pack in my suitcase to do laundry in a hotel or use up in the mountains to wash a few clothes. You know when you have little ones we can all use a mini-washing machine. This is a backpack with a scrubbing side that gently scrubs your clothes when you add water and a small amount of laundry detergent. Then you can rinse your clothes in the same bag and hang them up in the hotel bathroom, on some trees to let them dry. How easy is that? I love it!

The Scrubba Stealth Pack has really nice heavy duty straps and a clip to hold the backpack in place. It has gear loops, adjustable sternum straps, grip backing, weatherproof seal, and waterproof fabric. Here’s the deal, you can travel with fewer clothes because you can wash your clothes in this nifty bag. Hang them to dry overnight. Hang them on a tree or bedpost or over a chair. Easy peasy.

clean clothes

You can see the circle that it is the Scrubba (scrubbing washboard) section. I put 12 hand towels and filled it with water.

clean clothes

I then had Mark roll the top down 4-5 times to so we could lock it in place.

clean clothes

You can see Mark is locking the click together. It has a see-through clear section on one side where you can see the clothes you are going to wash and then rinse. This is a great feature because you can then see if you need to rinse the clean clothes one more time. If you have too many bubbles, rinse them again. You can also view how much water you need to add.

I think of all the times I have been with toddlers and we would run out of underwear or other clean clothes. This is a mother’s dream for clean clothes on a road trip. I know my grandkids would love this when they go camping for 7 days. I like the fact that it rolls up pretty small to fit inside my small carry on suitcase.

My grandson, Jake would fill this with his hiking stuff and love the fact that he can travel and have some clean clothes by using this Scrubba Stealth Pack.

clean clothes

I’m not sure you can see it next to Mark’s right-hand index finger, but there is an XL air release valve to let the air out and let you scrub your clothes.

Clean Clothes

Instructions on the bag:

clean clothes

Here are some additional ideas where I’m quoting from their website:

Features & Benefits:

  • Wash clothes wherever and whenever you want.
  • Wear this versatile daypack as either a backpack or messenger-style sling bag, with or without a waist strap.
  • Keep gear dry – it is a weatherproof day pack.
  • Clean your clothes twice as effective as hand washing*
  • Pack fewer clothes and travel with a lighter backpack, bag or suitcase.
  • Grip circles on the outside prevent sliding on surfaces when washing.
  • Achieve a machine quality wash in 6 easy steps.
  • Alleviate the need to ineffectively wash clothes in dirty hotel sinks.
  • Avoid excess airline baggage fees by packing fewer clothes.
  • Save money and water when doing laundry while traveling.
  • Great for day trips, sightseeing, carry on, family outings, beach trips, cycling, commuting.
  • User instructions printed on the outside of the bag.
  • Transparent window to monitor washing and water levels.
  • Grip backing on the outside to prevent sliding on surfaces while washing.
  • Easy release air valve.
  • Adjustable shoulder and waist straps.
  • Made from high-quality polyether urethane coated nylon.

I highly recommend them for camping, traveling by air or on a road trip. You can have clean clothes and never use the hotel sink again. If you have access to water, this is a dream come true for all of us. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected. May God bless this world.

Prepare Your Family For Survival by Linda

The post How To Have Clean Clothes Anywhere In The World appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

If You Don’t Know the Answers to These Questions, You Need to Work on Your Prepper Mindset

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This article’s purpose is to provide you with a framework of ideas for self-assessment.  The piece is Part I of two parts.  It is one of the U.S. Army’s Principles of Leadership to know yourself and seek self-improvement.  This is rooted in a principle that goes back to the time of the Bible, that he who knows himself and controls his passions is stronger than the conqueror of a city.  As conquerors of cities run, few were as adept as Sun Tzu, ancient Chinese warlord, and strategist.  Sun Tzu said to know yourself and to know your enemy, with emphasis on the first part.  It is this part that we concentrate our focus.

Do you know yourself?  It is a fair question.  Survivalist and prepper, yes, but do you really know yourself?  One of the problems that we face in life is that we find our identity, the “who we are” within our interests…of what we do.  If a guy works with electrical outlets and wiring buildings, then he is an electrician and calls himself as such.  Akin to the zombies in George Romero’s movie, “Night of the Living Dead,” we plod through life and live and die within our professions, perhaps changing from one profession to another, but always self-identifying with what we do: a utilitarian identity.

            But who are we?  Do we know ourselves?

Perhaps this is confusing; however, rather than leave you with the question to sort out, let’s place some feedback and framework into it.  Let’s answer a question by asking ourselves more questions.  YOU SHOULD WRITE THESE DOWN ON PAPER, to review.   Let’s do it!

  1. How do you see yourself outright, in what roles in their totality? A husband and father who is a college graduate and works as a master mechanic. That is an example of a potential “first impression” of yourself.
  2. Now…how have you challenged yourself, physically, in your life? Were you an athlete?  Are you still?  What did you accomplish with sports?  What were your awards?  What was your greatest athletic accomplishment, the one you were the proudest of…and why were you proud of it?
  3. Who are your friends? [An old saying: Show me who your friends are, and I’ll show you who you are].  Are you tightly-knit, akin to a family?  Are they “winners” in life, meaning successful at taking care of themselves and their families?  Or are they huddled around a 55-gallon drum with a fire in it, passing around the Popov?
  4. How have you challenged yourself academically and mentally? What are your greatest accomplishments from a scholastic (and perhaps competitive) perspective?  Were you a chess champion?  An “Avalon Hill” game tournament winner?  An excellent speech and debate practitioner?  Do you write?
  5. Service: How have you served something greater than yourself? The Red Cross?  Your church?  In the military, or the Peace Corps?  What were your greatest accomplishments there?  Have you ever saved someone’s life…in peacetime, or in war?  Have you ever been recognized by your peers for your accomplishments?
  6. What are your greatest strengths?
  7. What are your weaknesses, physical, mental, and emotional? Are you prone to a violent temper?  Are you docile to the point of being afraid of confrontation, either verbal or physical?
  8. What skills do you possess? List them all…yes, all of them.  What do you know how to do?  What have you done?  There is a difference between those two parts.  Knowing how to do it is being “technically proficient.”  Actually being able to get it done is being “tactically proficient.”
  9. What are your three greatest skills and strengths?
  10. What is your number one strength…the one that you could match up with anyone in the world that you know of? What is that area where you are a master technician and tactician, performing it so well that you move in the fluid manner of an artist…that when you perform what you do best, it is more akin to an art form?

These are your starting points.  A good self-assessment.  If you are honest with yourself, you will really have some great material to look back on and to use as a tool to find out your goals and how you’re going to achieve them.

Then, #11.  For number 11?  Take one person whom you trust and know will be honest with you…and have them read all of it.  Then ask for their opinion of all of it…especially asking them to be honest with their assessment of your strengths and weaknesses.

How is that for a challenge?  Not only do you have to be honest with yourself, but you should trust someone who you believe in…and face honesty from them.  In this manner, you will be able to form a truly beneficial assessment, and put together two of the component parts:

  1. Who we see ourselves as being, and
  2. Who others see us as being.

When are these determined?  We can then better answer number 3.  Do you know this one?  It returns to the first question I asked you, and the hardest thing to learn:

  1. Who we are.

What a challenge: to find out who you are…take criticism (self and others) to heart, to improve yourself.  You’ll need the courage to do it.  In the end, we can defeat many battles in the fight to prepare and survive.

But the greatest battle you’ll ever face and the toughest opponent will be yourself.  Stay in that good fight, assess yourself, know yourself, and seek self-improvement.  Part 2 we will detail how to know your enemy.  Good luck and God bless!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

If You Don’t Know the Answers to These Questions, You Need to Work on Your Prepper Mindset

This article’s purpose is to provide you with a framework of ideas for self-assessment.  The piece is Part I of two parts.  It is one of the U.S. Army’s Principles of Leadership to know yourself and seek self-improvement.  This is rooted in a principle that goes back to the time of the Bible, that he who knows himself and controls his passions is stronger than the conqueror of a city.  As conquerors of cities run, few were as adept as Sun Tzu, ancient Chinese warlord, and strategist.  Sun Tzu said to know yourself and to know your enemy, with emphasis on the first part.  It is this part that we concentrate our focus.

Do you know yourself?  It is a fair question.  Survivalist and prepper, yes, but do you really know yourself?  One of the problems that we face in life is that we find our identity, the “who we are” within our interests…of what we do.  If a guy works with electrical outlets and wiring buildings, then he is an electrician and calls himself as such.  Akin to the zombies in George Romero’s movie, “Night of the Living Dead,” we plod through life and live and die within our professions, perhaps changing from one profession to another, but always self-identifying with what we do: a utilitarian identity.

            But who are we?  Do we know ourselves?

Perhaps this is confusing; however, rather than leave you with the question to sort out, let’s place some feedback and framework into it.  Let’s answer a question by asking ourselves more questions.  YOU SHOULD WRITE THESE DOWN ON PAPER, to review.   Let’s do it!

  1. How do you see yourself outright, in what roles in their totality? A husband and father who is a college graduate and works as a master mechanic. That is an example of a potential “first impression” of yourself.
  2. Now…how have you challenged yourself, physically, in your life? Were you an athlete?  Are you still?  What did you accomplish with sports?  What were your awards?  What was your greatest athletic accomplishment, the one you were the proudest of…and why were you proud of it?
  3. Who are your friends? [An old saying: Show me who your friends are, and I’ll show you who you are].  Are you tightly-knit, akin to a family?  Are they “winners” in life, meaning successful at taking care of themselves and their families?  Or are they huddled around a 55-gallon drum with a fire in it, passing around the Popov?
  4. How have you challenged yourself academically and mentally? What are your greatest accomplishments from a scholastic (and perhaps competitive) perspective?  Were you a chess champion?  An “Avalon Hill” game tournament winner?  An excellent speech and debate practitioner?  Do you write?
  5. Service: How have you served something greater than yourself? The Red Cross?  Your church?  In the military, or the Peace Corps?  What were your greatest accomplishments there?  Have you ever saved someone’s life…in peacetime, or in war?  Have you ever been recognized by your peers for your accomplishments?
  6. What are your greatest strengths?
  7. What are your weaknesses, physical, mental, and emotional? Are you prone to a violent temper?  Are you docile to the point of being afraid of confrontation, either verbal or physical?
  8. What skills do you possess? List them all…yes, all of them.  What do you know how to do?  What have you done?  There is a difference between those two parts.  Knowing how to do it is being “technically proficient.”  Actually being able to get it done is being “tactically proficient.”
  9. What are your three greatest skills and strengths?
  10. What is your number one strength…the one that you could match up with anyone in the world that you know of? What is that area where you are a master technician and tactician, performing it so well that you move in the fluid manner of an artist…that when you perform what you do best, it is more akin to an art form?

These are your starting points.  A good self-assessment.  If you are honest with yourself, you will really have some great material to look back on and to use as a tool to find out your goals and how you’re going to achieve them.

Then, #11.  For number 11?  Take one person whom you trust and know will be honest with you…and have them read all of it.  Then ask for their opinion of all of it…especially asking them to be honest with their assessment of your strengths and weaknesses.

How is that for a challenge?  Not only do you have to be honest with yourself, but you should trust someone who you believe in…and face honesty from them.  In this manner, you will be able to form a truly beneficial assessment, and put together two of the component parts:

  1. Who we see ourselves as being, and
  2. Who others see us as being.

When are these determined?  We can then better answer number 3.  Do you know this one?  It returns to the first question I asked you, and the hardest thing to learn:

  1. Who we are.

What a challenge: to find out who you are…take criticism (self and others) to heart, to improve yourself.  You’ll need the courage to do it.  In the end, we can defeat many battles in the fight to prepare and survive.

But the greatest battle you’ll ever face and the toughest opponent will be yourself.  Stay in that good fight, assess yourself, know yourself, and seek self-improvement.  Part 2 we will detail how to know your enemy.  Good luck and God bless!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Get Your HAM Radio License in 7 Days

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HAM radio is one of the best ways to communicate after a disaster, especially over huge distances. The thing is, they’re a bit complicated. As with most electronics, it’s easier to learn as you go. The problem is that you need to get a license before you can even use one. Tin Hat Ranch wrote […]

The post Get Your HAM Radio License in 7 Days appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

What This Prepper Buys: The $36 Dollar Tree Spree

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What This Prepper Buys: The $36 Dollar Tree Spree Prepping can happen anywhere. There are no issues when it comes to where your preps come from. I think as preppers, there are ideas that you must buy all the best tactical gear and get your food from these prepper suppliers. I am all for supporting …

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