Walmart & Amazon Ask: Can We Enter Your Home When You’re Gone?

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Walmart & Amazon Ask: Can We Enter Your Home When You’re Gone?Amazon and Walmart want the key to your house, and one of them even wants access to your refrigerator.

Both are testing services that will allow employees to bring packages and food into your home when you are away.

“The idea is you can chose to receive orders from Walmart.com — not just on your door and left on your porch but securely inside your home,” a Walmart video states. “If you’re not home rather than leaving the package on the front porch, the driver enters a one-time use code.”

The video shows a Walmart employee entering a house and restocking the fridge while the owner is away. Walmart claims the service is secure because there’s a one-time use code and users can watch the driver’s activities via video. Access to the home is achieved by typing a code into a keypad.

The service is provided by Walmart in conjunction with two companies: delivery service Deliv and smart lock maker August Home. Deliv CEO Daphne Carmeli claimed the service will be safe because drivers will undergo “regular audits, ratings and checks,” CNN reported.

“We are going to have to build trust with consumers,” August Home CEO Jason Johnson said. “At first you might be a little nervous. But after you do it once or twice, you absolutely will do it again. Everyone who has tried it so far is really satisfied.”

Walmart is testing the service in the San Jose area. Amazon has its own version ready for rollout on Nov. 8, CNN reported.

“Not at home? Not a problem,” an advertisement for a service called Amazon Key states.

Amazon Key uses a cloud cam to observe the driver and a keypad for entry. An Amazon Key smart lock replaces the traditional lock.

“As a Prime member, get your Amazon packages securely delivered just inside your front door. Plus, grant access to the people you trust, like your family, friends, dog walker, or house cleaner – no more leaving a key under the mat.”

Would you take advantage of such a service? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Purse Carry: A Good Idea Or An Accident Waiting To Happen?

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Purse Carry: A Good Idea Or An Accident Waiting To Happen?

Image source: Cutting Edge Products

Women in recent years have bought and begun carrying concealed handguns in unprecedented numbers.

I believe that’s a good thing for personal and public safety. If you look closely at big-city newspaper reports, usually buried far beneath the front page you’ll find stories detailing how a gun in the hands of a good citizen prevented or ended a violent crime. An untold number of other crimes never happen, and are never reported, thanks to the presence of a gun in a would-be victim’s hand.

Unfortunately, not all people, women included, understand what it is to carry in a safe manner that still allows access to the firearm.

The Danger of Purse Carry

Purse carry is the most common method I hear women discuss — even by those who’ve been licensed and packing for years. This is disappointing in a few ways. First, drawing from a purse is slower than drawing from most on-body locations. Five seconds is the average length of a deadly force encounter. Can drawing from a purse happen faster? With the right equipment and practice, yes. But that’s a tall order that most women simply aren’t going to take time for.

You Don’t Need A Firearms License For This Weapon!

Second, most women haven’t practiced drawing from a purse, and may not understand that dropping it to the ground, for a handheld style, or firing one-handed if using a shoulder strap purse, are often necessary for the purse not to interfere, dangerously, with point of impact.

As too many news reports have described, a purse can’t be under the owner’s control 100 percent of the time. Children as young as two have gotten handguns out of purses, with tragic results.

Finally, carrying in a purse requires diligent observance of the safety rule “finger off trigger until the sights are on target.” For many purses, breaking another safety rule, “never allow the muzzle to cover anything you’re not willing to destroy,” is nearly impossible not to break during the draw or while re-holstering.

Nevertheless, purse carry has a couple of advantages. The greatest is the ability to pack a bigger gun that’s easy to shoot and holds more ammunition. Another is the capability to establish a firing grip on the gun while it’s in concealment, which can buy valuable seconds as well as send a strong non-verbal message to the observant thug.

Some instructors tout the fact that a revolver can be fired repeatedly from inside a purse as an advantage. Anyone who’s given it any thought will realize that the likelihood of those shots impacting the intended target is small. As wise instructors say, “there’s a potential lawsuit attached to every bullet.” Except for distances close enough to smell the assailant’s breath, shooting from inside a purse is an irresponsible plan that’s not likely to stop the attack, and could kill or injure bystanders.

A couple incidents have been cited in the news wherein women dropped a loaded gun into a purse along with all the usual stuff—pens, keys, eyebrow pencils, etc. Any one of these items can, and has, caused a negligent discharge while the gun was in the purse and the owner was going about her business. Responsible purse carry means, in part, choosing one of the hundred-plus designs of bags specifically made for concealed carry, which has a dedicated gun section, an inner holster of some kind, and a reinforced bottom.

Consider Purses With Gun Compartments

Safe purse carry means the gun is contained in a compartment that holds it and only it, and perhaps a spare magazine, assuming your purse has:

  • An inner sheath or holster of some sort that keeps the firearm anchored in one predictable position inside the dedicated space.
  • A closure for the gun’s compartment that is quick and easy to open. You should be able to grasp the opening device (a flap or zipper pull) in your fist and open it without having to use fingertips. This keeps access to your gun in the gross motor action department.
  • The ability to cleanly draw without crossing the muzzle over any of your own body parts (most often the support-side hand is at risk here).
  • Construction that allows you to carry the purse in exactly the same position every time you use it, one in which your firing hand can easily get to the gun.

If the purse is not a holster-purse or is retrofitted or pinch-hitting as such, the gun compartment must not be penetrable by any object, within or outside of the purse, during normal use. What you must avoid is any object like a pen, keys or a child’s fingers being able to get inside the trigger guard from outside the compartment.

The purse is under your control at all times. That means on your body any time you’re not in the car or at home. There can be no leaving it where it can be stolen or rifled through by a child.

Now does purse carry still sound like the easiest way to carry your gun? It’s not convenient to do well, but it is workable, and is the preferred method of many women. When the guidelines above are followed, purse carry can work, though it is not recommended.

What is your opinion about purse carry? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Everything You’ve Heard About Winter Gardening Is Wrong

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It’s a gardening mantra we’ve heard our entire lives: Spring and summer are for gardening, fall is for harvesting, and winter is for dreaming about gardening. Right? Well, maybe not.

Author and horticultural expert Caleb Warnock gardens year-round – and he does it outdoors in the ice-cold state of Utah. In fact, he even grows beans, cantaloupes and tomatoes outdoors, and he doesn’t use a greenhouse.

Caleb – the author of “Backyard Winter Gardening” – is this week’s guest on Off The Grid Radio.

He shares with us tips on growing vegetables even in locations that get a foot of snow. Caleb also tells us:

  • The quickest and easiest way to get started in backyard winter gardening.
  • How to make a cold frame that will withstand the fiercest frigid temps.
  • What an all-natural hot bed is – and how it can revolutionize your winter garden.
  • How our ancestors grew vegetables during the winter.

If you’ve got a green thumb and want to try something new this year, then this show is for you!

 

Butterfly Crafts You Can Do at Home

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Autumn is here and it’s time to start conquering some new crafts! Whether you have a preschooler, kindergartner, or a 1st grader, butterfly crafts offer a great way to spend an afternoon, to decorate your house, to spend time together, and to learn about nature. In this post you’ll find four of my favorite butterfly crafts put together by top-notch bloggers who walk you through the process of creating butterfly crafts step-by-step.

Picking things like butterfly crafts will open up discussions with your child about science and nature. Ask questions like “Where do butterflies live?” or “Why are butterflies important?” Talk with your child about the differences between moths and butterflies. You can also use this as a chance to try out new craft items. Each craft below requires different things – some use paint, some use markers, and some use scissors. Choose a butterfly craft that meets your child’s needs and that is age-appropriate for your little ones.

Two-Daloo has a fantastic post on creating an easy butterfly suncatcher. This post also includes links to other bloggers who have similar springtime Easter crafts available.

Crystal & Co shows you how you can teach your child the letter “B” with this cute butterfly craft.

Spotted Canary has an easy butterfly craft that is perfect to do with a group of kids or for a party.

Modern Handmade Child shows you how to make a cute little butterfly at home with your preschool child.

Now you’re all set to work on the letter “B” with your child! Remember to relax and have fun as you work together on your new project.

The Pros & Cons Of Residential Wind Power

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Wind power works best in areas with steady directional winds. You see the most use of wind turbines in flatter landscapes with few obstructions such as large open rangeland, coastlines, etc. These spaces are large enough to put multiple turbines and increase the chance of profitability. A smaller space doesn’t mean some wind energy cannot. . . Read More

Autumn Leaves: ‘Miracle Mulch’ For Your Spring Garden

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How Autumn Leaves Can Become 'Miracle Mulch' For Your Spring Garden

Image source: Pixabay.com

As we enjoy the changing seasons and the vibrant colors that come with autumn, we prepare ourselves for cooler temperatures and the raking and gathering of fallen leaves. For gardeners, this doesn’t mean an added chore, but actually a beneficial moment for improving and preparing our gardens for winter. There are many uses for those discarded leaves, and below are a few common ones.

  • Compost: Mow the leaves and place in the compost pile. It is easy to shred the leaves with a mower.
  • Leaf mold: This is a pile of leaves and soil that sits for about a year, and then is added to the compost. It helps with nutrients and soil-building.
  • Storing: This is a method of keeping all the leaves in a pile and using them to add to the compost when brown material is needed.
  • Mulch: Mulch retains moisture, controls temperature of soil and limits weed growth. Leaves also add nutrients and brown material as time goes on.

Let’s take a look at using autumn leaves. Mulching is one of the easiest and most beneficial methods of using autumn leaves. It is also the most inexpensive way to deal with fallen leaves and takes as much, or even less, time than the usual raking and bagging. Mulch can be used in vegetable gardens, flowerbeds, shrubs and under trees. It looks attractive in any garden and is completely natural.

Tree leaves absorb about 50 percent of the nutrients that the tree gathers during the growing season. By using as mulch, they return these nutrients to the soil. They also encourage worms and micro-organisms to work the dirt. The end result will be a lighter soil which is easier to work and grow plants in.

Your Best Source For Non-GMO Seeds Is Right Here!

Mulch can also be used to insulate plants and protect them from the cold winter winds and temperatures. It helps prevent soil compaction.

Things to Remember

How Autumn Leaves Can Become 'Miracle Mulch' For Your Spring Garden

Image source: Pixabay.com

Almost any leaves will make good mulch, but not Black Walnut. Black Walnut leaves should never be used because there are plants that are sensitive to this particular leaves’ compounds. Use only healthy leaves, not any covered with mildew, rust or tar. If you collect from trees such as laurel, walnut and eucalyptus, compost them before turning into mulch as they contain growth-inhibitors.

Shred the leaves before using in the garden. Whole leaves can prevent water from reaching the ground and plants. When you shred leaves for mulch, you are ensuring micro-organisms have more room to do their work.

Mulch expands, so cover all the ground with an even distribution, but don’t put it right up on a plant’s stem or trunk. Otherwise, it will encourage rot.

This New All-Natural Fertilizer Doubles Garden Production!

Here are some essential tips:

  • To start mulching, use the lawnmower and run over the leaves a few times. This mowing will shred the leaves into acceptable sizes. Once mowed sufficiently, rake into piles, and place in bags, buckets or wheelbarrow to move to where you need to mulch.
  • Weed the area first, and then add mulch
  • Apply a two- or three-inch layer of leaf mulch around the vegetable garden and flower beds.
  • If you cover vegetables like kale, leeks, carrots and beets, you may be able to harvest them most of the winter.
  • For plants like leeks and other closely planted greens, use your hands and take fistfuls of mulch to place several inches between the vegetables.
  • Plants that love shade can be covered by leaf mulch. It’s natural for them to be covered at this time of year. Place less than two inches, or five centimeters, of mulch over them so they can push through with little issue in the spring.
  • If you are using mulch as insulation, use about six inches, or 15 centimeters, to protect the more tender plants.

So when you see the leaves begin to fall this year, do not worry. Use them to enhance and create healthy plants and soil for the next season. With a little work, you can have a top-notch, natural mulch all your neighbors will envy! Nature provided us with the best mulch material, so don’t waste it. Mow those leaves and create an awesome autumn leaf mulch.

Got any fall mulching tips? Share them in the section below:

Every Year Gardeners Make This Avoidable Mistake — But You Don’t Have To. Read More Here.

10 Survival Movies List

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Have you watched any survival movies lately? While films from Hollywood are often filled with garbage, I thought that I would list 10 survival movies for your interest. I’m not saying that these are not hyped up or unrealistic in any way, however there may be some lessons learned for SHTF survival, possibly including what NOT to do! I have watched all of these survival movies at one time or another (and lots more). The following list came to mind, all of them unique in their own way. If you’re looking for some movie entertainment, you might watch any of

The post 10 Survival Movies List appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

November 4th The Beginning of the End

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November 4th The Beginning of the End James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio player below! Something is stirring in this nation. It’s in the back of all our minds. While some call it revolution others call it insurrection. NO matter how you slice it its an ugly thing that many claim is unavoidable. On November … Continue reading November 4th The Beginning of the End

The post November 4th The Beginning of the End appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

PSA: Massive Kidde Fire Extinguisher Recall

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I just heard about this recall on the radio this morning and looked it up here. It seems that Kidde is recalling quite few of their plastic-handle model fire extinguishers (134 models, in fact) manufactured roughly between 1973 and 2015 because it can become clogged and not discharge. Yeah, that’s not good! FYI, if you … Continue reading “PSA: Massive Kidde Fire Extinguisher Recall”

Resources – Compiliation of Radiation Monitoring Stations — You Won’t Get A First Alert From the Government

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stock here — Here is a comprehensive list of radiation monitoring stations.   There were

compiled by a Colleague in Australia, who also does FREE Gamma Spectroscopy
testing, you can send a food or soil or lichen sample (check laws though, thats on you) and they will give a detailed report on what exact radio-isotopes (Cesium, Strontium, Plutonium, Iodine, etc) are in the sample and how much.  

My “Teaser” from the article title, I believe is true.   You will not get a First Alert from the US Government, or probably from almost any government.    They have fully and shamefully conspired to cover up Fukushima and radiation pollution in general, but Fukushima was the tipping point.   Radiation in Hawaii mushrooms and lichens was as high as in Fukushima in the same time frame.   

Strontium, the worst radioisotope besides Plutonium, was found in milk that kids were drinking.    Radiation has been detected in fish all along the west coast of North America, and on the mainland.    

Massive die offs have occurred from 2012 onward, and Main Stream Media is mostly silent, except for downplaying while admitting it’s there—they reference Woods Hole Institute which is a government and military funded “science outfit” who are determined to protect the nuclear cartel.




———————————————————————————————————

Monitoring Station List Index:
(C) Company run
(G) Government Agency Run
(P) Private Independent Monitoring Station
(U) University

This short animation shows Northern, and Southern Hemisphere air circulation.

Under the “Helpful Tools and Services” items at the top of this page, you will find a link to the Nullschool 3D Earth wind map service. This service allows you to see location wind direction at different heights. You can rotate the 3D map by holding down your mouse on the map, and dragging. If you use your mouse scroll wheel you can zoom the map in and out. If you click on the “Earth” item at the lower left corner of the Nullschool wind map page, a menu will pop up, that allows you to select the wind height.

ARGENTINA

Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Argentinian station. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

AUSTRALIA
Australian Live Monitoring  Sunshine Coast Computer Club Inc. (P)
Monitoring site Sunshine Coast Queensland Australia,  10 years of local recorded data. (P)
Black Cat systems  Drag world map to see European stations (P)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor  Drag and zoom World map to see Australia stations (P)
Nuclear Emergency Tracking Centre Drag World map to see Australian stations  (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Australian stations (P)
24 Hour Chart,Long Term Trend Chart Automatic Weather Station, Sydney Australia Live Monitoring Station (P)
Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization  (G)
Australian Map of Nuclear and Uranium Sites
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

AUSTRIA

Austrian radiation early warning system are shown on the map as squares whose color depends on the measured value. Stations for which no values are available, are displayed in gray. The measured data are transferred automatically and unchecked on this website. The displayed values are hourly averages.(G)
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Austrian stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

BELARUS
The Republican Center for Radiation Control and Environmental Monitoring. (G)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

BELGIUM
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor  Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

BRAZIL
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see Brazilian stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see station (P)

BULGARIA
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see station. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

BURMA
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

CANADA
Black Cat systems  Drag world map to see Canadian stations  (P)

Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see Canadian stations (P)
Health Canada  air monitoring (G)
Nuclear Emergency Tracking Centre Drag world map to see Japanese stations  (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Radiation Network  USA, Canada, Hawaii, also has one station in Europe, and Australia. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

CHILE
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

CHINA
Honk Kong Observatory(G)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

CZECH REPUBLIC

EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Czech Republic monitoring stations  There are lots of monitoring stations here. Click the “External Irradiation” button, to select the type of monitoring station to show on the map. You can also click the “What we breath, drink and eat” button, to see food item testing results! (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor  Drag and zoom World map to see stations  (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

DENMARK
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor  Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)

DOMINICA
Nuclear Emergency Tracking Centre Drag World map to see Australian stations  (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

ECUADOR
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Ecuador stations (P)

ENGLAND
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Black Cat systems  Drag world map to see English stations (P)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor  Drag and zoom World map to see English stations (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see English stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

ESTONIA
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see station (P)

EUROPE
Black Cat systems  Drag world map to see European stations (P)
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor  Drag and zoom World map to see European stations (P)
Nuclear Emergency Tracking Centre Drag world map to see European stations (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see European stations (P)
Radiation Network   (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

FINLAND
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor  Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)
STUK Finland Environmental Radiation Monitoring Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (G)

FRANCE
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
IRSN (G)
Real-time Geiger counter in Paris (P)

Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

GERMANY
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see German stations (P)
ODL-Info  Click on the monitoring station location number, to zoom into individual stations. (G)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see German stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)
Sea GmbH, current dose rate in Dülmen from hours to year, uses a highly sensitive NaI scintillation detector. (C)

HOLLAND
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Dutch stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

HUNGARY
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Hungarian Monitoring Stations official, click site name to see chart. (G)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

ICELAND
The Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (G)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

INDIA (Check the chart date on Indian stations as they are often months old, and very unreliable!)

Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

INDONESIA
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

INTERNATIONAL
Black Cat systems  (P)
Carbon Brief Mapped: The worlds nuclear power plants. (P)
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Nuclear Emergency Tracking Centre, Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see monitoring stations (P)
Radiation Network   (P)
Research Reactor Map Some locations have live monitoring stations (G)(P)

RSOE EDIS – Emergency and Disaster Information Service, includes nuclear events. (G) (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)
World map of Radioactive@Home radiation sensors (P)
World map of nuclear power plants

IRAQ
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

IRELAND
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see Irish stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

ISRAEL
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Israel stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

ITALY
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see station (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Italian stations (P)
Monitoring Radioactivity  (G)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

JAPAN

ATMC   Information updated every 10 minutes, plus this site has language translation. (P)
Black Cat systems  Drag world map to see Japanese stations  (P)
Japanese Radiation Map (G)

Nuclear Emergency Tracking Centre Drag world map to see Japanese stations  (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Japanese stations (P)
Safe Cast Maps and lots more (P)
Safe Cast Tile Map (P)
Weather Online (P)


LATVIA
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Safe Cast Tile Map (P)

LITHUANIA
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see Lithuanian station (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Safe Cast Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

MALAWI
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

MALAYSIA
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)

MALTA
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see station. (P)

MOLDOVA
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see station. (P)

NAMIBIA
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

NEW ZEALAND
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see New Zealand stations (P)
North Island New Zealand Kapiti gaigakaunta (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see station (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

NORWAY
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor  Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority Radnett monitoring system, Click geographical location buttons (G)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

POLAND
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Polish stations (P)
University Maria Curie – Sklodowska  (U)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)
World map of Radioactive@Home radiation sensors  (P)

PORTUGAL
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)
World map of Radioactive@Home radiation sensors  (P)

PHIIPPINES
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

ROMANIA
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Bucharest-Măgurele (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see Romanian stations (P)

RUSSIA
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Russian Atom (G)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Russian stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

SINGAPORE
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

SLOVAKIA
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see station (P)

SLOVENIA
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor  Drag and zoom World map to see station (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Radiation Monitoring Si  radioaktivnost (G)

SOUTH AFRICA

Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

SOUTH KOREA

Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
South Korean official monitoring stations, click language translation buttons at top right of screen. (G)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)
World map of Radioactive@Home radiation sensors (P)

SPAIN
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Consejo de Seguridud Nuclear (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see Spanish stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

SUDAN
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

SWEDEN
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see stations (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

SWITZERLAND
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, click on the green circles to see detailed charts.(P)
Switzerland Bundesamt für Bevölkerungsschutz (G)
Switzerland High Volume Sampler (G)
Aussen-Radioaktivität in 6283 Baldegg
Der erste öffentliche Geigerzähler in der Schweiz (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see  stations (P)

TAIWAN
Radiation monitoring Center, in English,  in Chinese (G)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

THAILAND
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see stations. (P)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

TURKEY
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (G)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see station (P)

UKRAINE
EURDEP European Radiological Data Exchange Platform, is now monitoring the Ukraine. (G)
Nuclear Power Plants  Place mouse cursor over NPP location to see its background level, and mouse click on to the NPP location see more monitoring stations. (G)
Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

Safecast Tile Map, Click on the green circles to see detailed charts. Drag the World map to see other countries. (P)

USA
Black Cat systems  Drag world map to also see Hawaii, and Japanese stations (P)
Berkely Radwatch, Dose Net Bay Area San Francisco, click on the map marker to zoom in, or school name on right. (U)
EPA USA Radnet (G)
EnviroReporter.com  Lots of stations links, plus live monitoring for California. (G) (P)
Geiger Counter World Map, Drag and zoom World map to see stations. (P)
Global Radiation Monitoring Network Uradmonitor Drag and zoom World map to see USA stations (P)
Kelp Watch 2014 scientific campaign, designed to determine the extent of possible radionuclide contamination (primarily Cesium-137 & -134) of our kelp. (P)
Longmont Colorado (P)
Los Alamos National Laboratory (G)
Nuclear Emergency Tracking Centre Drag world map to also see Hawaii, and Japanese stations (G)(P)
Our Radioactive Ocean Interactive map of west coast USA sea water sampling locations, and testing results. (P)
Potrblog  Saint Louis Outdoor & Indoor Live Radiation Monitors (P)
Radcast (P)
Radiation Monitor Click geographical location buttons, or drag world map to see USA stations (P)
Radiation Network USA, Canada, Hawaii, also has one station in Europe, and Australia. (P)
Radtest4U Company offering free car and home air-filter radiation testing. (P)
Radviews, has interactive map, plus station graphs. (P)
RadWatch Berkley Realtime Air Monitoring (U)
Radwatch, Provides elevated stations graphs from Radiation Network (P)
Safecast Tile Map, click on the green circles to see detailed charts. (P)
SW Oregon Radiation Monitoring, for the Coos Bay & North Bend area. (P)
The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP),  Monitoring Nevada and Utah, is a network of 29 monitoring stations located in communities surrounding and downwind of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), that monitor the airborne environment for man made radioactivity.

Xively Radiation Levels in Chadds Ford PA (P)

DIY Preparedness: Projects for Any Pocketbook

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Here are some of our favorite DIY preparedness projects to get you started. Pick one to complete each week or choose a larger project for each month. Each step toward self-reliance is one less reason to be concerned about the future | PreparednessMama

Here are some of our favorite DIY preparedness projects to get you started. Pick one to complete each week or choose a larger project for each month. Each step toward self-reliance is one less reason to be concerned about the future. The thing that I find encouraging about preparedness is the fact that you can […]

The post DIY Preparedness: Projects for Any Pocketbook appeared first on PreparednessMama.

7 Surprising Prepping Statistics: Beyond the Numbers

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7 Surprising Prepping Statistics: Beyond the Numbers Statistics can tell us a lot about some things, and nothing is more mind boggling than prepping statistics. They can show just how little the average person prepares for any calamity in their life or if they can illustrate just how dangerous certain situations can be. I find …

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The post 7 Surprising Prepping Statistics: Beyond the Numbers appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Learning Survival Archery – Is It Necessary for Preppers?

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Using the bow and arrow has been at the heart of human existence. From simple designs used for hunting to more advanced bows, empires have even been constructed around them. In the modern world, it’s easy to think that there is no place for such primitive tools, but regardless of the day and age, humans […]

The post Learning Survival Archery – Is It Necessary for Preppers? appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

Key Steps on Turning Your Garage into A Storage Space for Survival

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Key Steps on Turning Your Garage into A Storage Space for Survival Although the conspiracy theory of the Dooms Day back in 2012 is long over, people are still thinking of how they can make use of areas in their homes for emergency storage space for survival. Because in reality, there are multiple severe threats …

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The post Key Steps on Turning Your Garage into A Storage Space for Survival appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

The Ultimate Stealth Bug Out Vehicle

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

When the time comes that I need to leave my suburban fortress, I think I’m leaving the SUV behind.  I have a mountain bike, and that’s all I think I’ll need for a short-term disaster situation.  How about you?

Bikes offer numerous advantages over automobile transportation, especially in a crisis situation.

  

Consider this:

They’re smaller, and not as confined to roadways or passable terrain as an automotive vehicle, and they can be more easily hidden if you need to shelter in a wooded area.

They have fewer parts, which means that they’re easier to repair, and that there’s simply less that could go wrong.

The fuel that powers your bike does double duty as fuel for your body; with a car, you need to maintain a separate fuel storage system.

They are SILENT.

In a traffic jam, my bike will weave in and out of traffic while your car sits in the middle of the chaos for mile upon mile.  Is it any wonder that in the crowded streets of New York City or Chicago that parcels move faster by bike messenger than by car?

 

Sure, there are disadvantages to consider.  Obviously, a bike cannot carry as much raw “stuff” as a car, truck or SUV could. Preparedness, however, is not about carrying the most stuff, it’s about maximizing what you do carry.  The unprepared can’t possibly live without their piles of clothing and food, but as preppers, our bug-out bags are designed to keep everything we need for a 72-hour period in a small, confined, easy-to-carry space.  If we’ve done a good job preparing the Bug-Out Bag, then there shouldn’t be too much more that is essential.  With a child carrier attachment, or with a flat storage crack/pack above the back wheel, or even a handlebar mounted basket, there are plenty of ways to add a little extra to your load if you can manage.

Second, any kind of covered automobile will provide shelter, but you did pack some kind of tent or tarp, didn’t you?  My tent and bike can take shelter in a tree-heavy forest where I can be off-road and out of sight, but a car or SUV may not always offer that option depending on terrain and the vehicles capabilities.

Of course there are situations where a bike is less than ideal, such as a need for traveling a long distance (though die-hard cyclists will argue that point), or in a rural environment where you are exposed to passing vehicles and the possible desperation of the occupants. In some cases safety may be easier to reach by car without the added worry of a crush of traffic or people, but for those who are forced to live closer to others than they may prefer, a well-outfitted bike should at least be considered a viable option.  I’m certain that in inclement weather, you’d rather be safe and warm inside your car or truck’s cabin than pedaling through a storm, but in those cases, you could shelter underneath an overpass or in your shelter until the danger passes.

 

In general, I think that it will depend on your situation.  Cars for long distance travel or rural environments, remembering to factor in the fuel you have available and your ability to obtain more; bikes for evacuation from a city center or crowded suburb.  Bikes also have an advantage when the exit routes from a city or town are limited, either due to  the disaster itself, the competing traffic or towns that just have a few roads passing through them. While cars offer better protection from the elements a bike will give you flexibility to escape in almost any direction and get away from roads, a big plus.  In a best-case scenario, you can start in a car with your bike strapped to the roof or on a trunk-mounted carrier, run the car to it’s end (gas or end of the road) and then keep on going by bike.

  

Outfitting Your Bike

First things first, it is essential that you get some kind of all-terrain mountain bike instead of one of those cruiser or racing models that are only good on pavement, or else you’ll lose many of the key advantages of using a bike in the first place.  A heavy-duty frame, large, wide tires, and multiple gear speeds and combinations are the key to ensuring you can tackle almost any terrain. Don’t believe it – check this video out, after the ads skip the first 120 seconds and then see what one can do in terrain with the right bike, and a bit of skill and balance.

Second, let’s consider some basic safety features.  A helmet, is, even for practiced, advanced riders, an absolute essential that I’m never without when I’m riding.  When my daughter was small enough to ride in her kid carrier, I made her ride with a helmet as well, even though she was in a very controlled environment with little threat of harm.  Second, carry a few basic tools that will help you repair your bike.  An extra bike tire tube or two is a must for emergency repair, and they are small enough that you should be able to carry them in a pouch underneath your seat if you pack carefully.  A patch kit is nice too, but may not be usable in all circumstances.  There are dozens of low-cost, low-footprint tool kits for bikers that you can purchase that contain Allen wrenches, nut drivers, and multi-tools, but make sure you match the tools to your actual bike, as there are vast differences in how mountain bike gear assemblies are constructed, and kits are never one-size-fits-all (metric vs imperial).  Finally, a portable hand-pump, a lock, and a water bottle cage can round out your all-purpose, on-frame equipment without adding much weight, but with adding a great deal of flexibility.

Adding other storage options as mentioned above does add flexibility in what you can pack, store and bring, and it’s always good to bring as much as you can, but this adds weight and impacts your mobility.  The least egregious is a flat stand that sits over your back wheel, sometimes with built-in bungee cords, but the parcels you carry have to be pretty specifically sized to latch on easily.  A basket attached to your handlebars may give you the “cool” factor of a grandma meeting the ladies for euchre, but it is a more flexible storage option that will allow you to bring a small dog easily, or pack some extra food or clothing.  A child carrier is best (especially if you don’t need the room for a child), but these have issues, namely that they can be burdensomely heavy when packed with even a small amount of gear, and that they are probably not built to be quite as off-road as your bike itself.  More parts mean more opportunities for breakage.

  

Finally, outfitting your bike also means outfitting the rider.  Those tight biking hot pants are certainly optional, but if your pedals require specific shoes to lock in, then you’d better make sure those shoes are near at hand, or better yet, just replace those pedals with general purpose metal ones (the larger, the better in my opinion).  Toe clips can be useful and can help make the adjustment from exercise bike to actual bike a little easier.  I am of the belief that no matter the weather, long pants will provide more benefits in terms of injury reduction than you’ll get worrying about wind drag or heat, although that may be personal preference.  The more in-shape you are, the farther you’ll get and the faster you’ll get there.

An Action Plan

First, you need to find a bike.  Solid and dependable mountain bikes can be found in the fall season for less than $300 if you’re on a budget, and these bikes will have enough features for almost everyone.  Since most mountain bikes are owned by people who don’t actually use them for off-roading, the mountain bikes you find at garage sales are probably still in good enough condition that a simple tune-up or gear replacement will make them like new.  Even if you do decide to shop online, I’d recommend visiting a bike shop so they can make recommendations on what size of bike you need for your body size, and see about getting on a few models to see if you like how they ride.

 

  

Second, accessorize.  Replace any plastic pedals or handlebars with strong, dependable metal varieties, get your air pump and water bottle cage, and a strong cable lock.  If you decide on a child carrier, flat back-wheel storage, or a handlebar basket or bag, it’s probably cheaper to purchase these through an online retailer than at a bike shop.  Get a helmet that fits well.  If you’re investing in pads, then wrist pads are more important than knee pads, although they can be uncomfortable to wear while biking.  Most cars will allow you to attach some sort of bike carrier that is easy to remove if so required.

Third, bring your bike home and get to know how it works.  Read the manual, try to actually perform some of the simple maintenance tasks even before you take it on a ride.  Attach your own accessories.  Doing the work yourself when it comes time to maintain your bike means that you’ll know how to do it when the bike shop isn’t around anymore.  If your bike had a less than stellar manual, invest in a book on bike maintenance and repair.  Once you know what kinds of tools you need to do basic tasks with your bike – install or replace a tire, fixing the gear assembly, adjusting the seat and handlebars – you’ll know what kinds of tools to pack in one of the storage compartments.

Finally, start riding. Get in the habit of packing up the family and using this versatile get-away vehicle.  My family rides every other Saturday morning in search of local garage sales, and I try to visit one bike path per week on my own after work.  If you’re like the majority of people, you take major streets to work and to the store, but on bike, you are a little more free to explore unusual routes that you don’t normally take, and it’s a good way to meet some neighbors and keep up with local activity.  While most preppers tend to be solitary people, these are your local allies in case of an SHTF situation, and they can appraise you of local trouble or activity, which is always a benefit.

Fitness is an important part of preparedness, and bikes will certainly help you in that regard as well.  If possible, you can bike to work to save a little money and get a little more exercise.  Biking is not limited to the Spring and Summer months, although I certainly tone it down when it gets too cold.  Winter is a great time to do some basic maintenance on your bikes, improve their mechanisms and make some improvements.  The more you work with your bike, the better you’ll get with it.

Over time, you could consider entering in a long bike race or cross-country or city-to-city ride.  There are many Chicago-to-Milwaukee rides that take place every year, in which hundreds of people leave from Chicago on bike and travel the 100 miles from city center to city center.  This is one of those life-defining events that requires a lot of commitment, time and physical fitness, and is a fun experience to take part in, in addition to providing you a great number of physical benefits.

In the introduction to this article, I may have been a little facetious at the beginning as I don’t think I would actually leave my SUV or car behind completely, although I’m certain that I’m bringing my bike along in tow, and I’ll use it as circumstances dictate.  A bike is an important part of my long-term survival plan regardless, especially in an SHTF situation, and, I believe, something that is not considered as often as it should be. And, if you have unlimited funds well…  a mere $10,000 will get you one of these. Up to 50 mph for 2 hours but getting that second charge, hmmmm….

The post The Ultimate Stealth Bug Out Vehicle appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Caught In The Crowd: What Makes The Difference Between Life And Death?

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A car is approaching in high speed and one second after you hear the wheels rolling over bodies that collapse right next to you. You hear shotgun fires and you see people running in despair around you. You don’t know where the danger comes from and you can’t see your way out of this. You’re caught in the middle of a human turmoil that sweeps you and flows against your will.

How are you going to make it out? How are you going to survive?

The answer is simple but tricky: it’s not only the immediate actions that save you, but what you should have done before.

Safety Becomes Obsolete

When things turn sideways, like they did a couple of days ago in Manhattan or sooner in Las Vegas, you need to understand and accept that there is no safe place, and nobody – and especially the government – is not going to save you. Holding out an unrealistic hope that there is a safe place or that others will take care of you will cause you to perish.

It is up to you to find a way to survive, facing a danger that you could hardly anticipate in a matter of seconds.

Power in Numbers?

Crowded areas and military outposts, if these even exist, will be fraught with danger. Actually, in any type of disaster or chaotic situation, crowds and crowded areas can pose a very big threat to your safety and even your survival.

Look at what happened in New Orleans, Louisiana during and immediately after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. There was mass looting, assaults, sexual assaults, murders, and even police officers who shot and killed some of the people in a group of survivors who were crossing Danziger Bridge trying to find help.

Experts have found that in almost any life threatening or survival situation 3 out of 4 people become so bewildered or overwhelmed that they are mentally paralyzed, and they cannot act in their own best interest when it comes to staying alive and surviving.

Another 10% will be extremely dangerous because they will lose it and freak out, putting everyone in their vicinity at high risk of danger.

Only around 15% of individuals will stay calm and analyze the situation rationally. Would you be one of them?

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Why are crowds so dangerous despite of the large number of people they include?

  • A large number of people together could make the entire area or group much more noticeable or attractive to people looking for an easy score. This will attract other groups who may want to harm you or take what you need to survive.
  • Rioting could break out and leave you open to attack.
  • In a disaster or other chaotic event which is life threatening large groups could attract the attention of military or law enforcement, and you could end up in a deadly situation that you can’t get out of if these groups see you and others with you as a threat.
  • Large numbers of people that you do not know greatly increases the danger because any one of them could become unhinged or dangerous at any time. You could quickly become targeted for theft, assault, or even something worse.
  • A crowd can quickly go from calm to a full stampede in very little time. If you get caught up in a large throng of people all pushing you could end up trapped, or even crushed to death from the force of the crowd.
  • When your life depends on keeping a low profile and avoiding any unnecessary attention the last place you want to be is in a crowd of people. Stay isolated and avoid crowds and crowded areas whenever possible if you want to stay safe!

The Sense We Call Situational Awareness

The simplest definition of situational awareness is to be completely aware of everyone and everything around you, paying close attention to even smaller details that many people would miss. When you are aware of all the important elements of a situation then you are far less likely to be caught by surprise or end up in danger.

Identify all the critical elements of the situation, process this information in a calm manner, and then comprehend how this could impact you.

If you see some men fighting down the block or a large mob gathered you can avoid the situation and protect yourself from any danger. If you are walking along in your own little world you could end up entering a very dangerous situation. You need to know where you are, what is going on around you, and how to escape the situation in the fastest way possible if this becomes necessary.

Practicing your situational awareness can seem like a game while training you for almost any survival or disaster situation. Make a habit of really paying attention to your surroundings and other people, taking note of even small details like the color of a building or what a person ahead of you in line is wearing.

After paying attention to your situation close your eyes and try to remember what you have seen and experienced. What color was that woman’s dress?. Where are the two exits closest to you in the building? As you practice you will be able to answer these types of questions faster because you will pay more attention to detail from the beginning.

Look around you and try to find things that seem out of the ordinary or abnormal in some way. If it is 100 degrees outside yet a man is wearing a trench coat or large jacket this can be a red flag. If a woman is standing still on a street corner and is holding a cigarette with a long ash but she does not take a puff for some time this is unusual. Someone who is profusely sweating while staying still when it is cold out would be suspicious.

When you first enter any building always make a mental note of the exits, especially those that are closest to you.

Look at the people around you and try to determine what they do, where they are headed, and what they are thinking. This will help you pay closer attention to every detail about that purpose and over time you will become more observant in a shorter time.

Visualize an emergency situation, such as a mass shooter or a bomb explosion, and practice what you would do in your head. This is similar to visualization and it can be very beneficial for this type of situational awareness training.

Predator vs. Prey or Alpha vs. Beta

All animals fall into one of two categories: predator or prey, namely those who kill to survive, and those who are killed for food. What the predator versus prey mentality means in a survival situation? Being prey means being a victim and the possibility of not surviving. Animals can’t choose the category they belong to, but you can turn from pray to predator if you train your skills and mindset well enough to make the swipe from one category to another.

Today the word predator is associated with negative things, but in a survival situation a predator survives while prey usually does not.

Another way to look at it is using alpha and beta model instead of predator and prey. The predator is an alpha, a top dog, someone who is dominant that others look up to and want to be like. Prey is a beta a follower instead of a leader and who is submissive to others. Alphas always tend to come out on top in any situation while betas rarely do. If you want to survive then you need to become an alpha, a predator.

If people around you see you as weak, then they’ll try to take advantage of this weakness, and this threatens your survival when things become more primitive and it is everyone for themselves.

How to awake and train you alpha senses

  • Project confidence. This is different from being cocky or aggressive. When you are confident in your skills and abilities then this shows, and others pick up on it. Kill off negative thoughts that erode your confidence before these thoughts can take root and grow. Replace negative thoughts with positive affirmations.
  • You need to be psychologically dominant in order to stay alive, because this can prevent danger in the first place. This means refusing to submit and letting others know that you will do what is necessary if push comes to shove.
  • Use body language to your advantage. Foes may be able to tell just from your stance, your facial expressions, and other obvious body language whether you will put up any resistance. If you seem like an easy target you are more likely to be engaged by an enemy. Assume an
  • aggressive or fighting stance with your feet placed apart for stability. Stand up straight and look the opponent directly in the eyes.
  • Learn to adapt to any environment or situation. Be realistic about what your strengths and weaknesses are, and then minimize the weaknesses that you have while maximizing your strengths.
  • Practice persistence, even if you initially fail. Predators never give up and neither should you. Set a difficult goal, such as walking 2 miles with a 40-pound pack, and then be persistent in trying to meet it. Eventually you will reach this goal, and you will learn the value of
  • patience while your confidence goes up.
  • Practice situational awareness and mindfulness. Prey goes through life blindly, hoping that they will not come across a predator. An alpha will pay attention to even the smallest details and everything in their environment so that they fully understand the situation and can respond appropriately to any threat.

When your life is on the line, safety is just an illusion while everything is out of control, and feeling safe will make let your guard down. This makes you vulnerable and could leave you open to attack.

Don’t become a victim or put your survival at risk with a false sense of security. Train your senses and your skills to overcome the danger and survive!

This article has been written by John Gilmore for Survivopedia.

My Fourth Book Will Be Available This Month

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Lawrence DeWolfe Kelsey, taken just before the Finn Ronne Antarctic Expedition

                   Later this month, my fourth book will be available for sale.  It is entitled:

Lawrence DeWolfe Kelsey:
                                  The Life of the Explorer

            This is the true life story of a tenacious human being who started life as a Californian, and later as teen in the Merchant Marine, during WWII. He was aboard ship in Okinawa when bombs dropped on both Hiroshima and on Nagasaki. Then, he departed as a radio officer and technician on the Finn Ronne Antarctic Expedition in the late nineteen-forties. Afterward he took assignments which took him to the Canadian Arctic, and then to Afghanistan with the Fairservis Archaeological Expedition.  He spent five years in Afghanistan before going to university in England. All of this was simply the beginning.
          All the years of his life were spent doing something difficult and challenging in many ways.  This is the story of my own father, who was quite unconventional for his era, and from whom a great deal of my knowledge concerning preparedness and survival is derived.
        I will keep you informed. 

10 Gray Man Tips To Help You Blend In During A Crisis

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When disaster strikes your city and you are away from home, one of the best things you can do to survive is to become what is called the gray man. No, being a gray man doesn’t mean wearing gray clothing. It primarily means three things: blend in with the crowd, steer clear of confrontation, and […]

The post 10 Gray Man Tips To Help You Blend In During A Crisis appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Preparing For the Future By Learning From the Past

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As preppers we are always trying to figure out the perfect combination of living simply, while taking advantage of today’s technology. There is quite a bit we can learn from how people lived a century ago. If an EMP, CME or something else took down the power grid, we could easily find ourselves in that […]

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Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar, the Easy Way—With 29 Uses

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Making apple cider vinegar is a topic that is well-documented on various sites across the Internet. When I searched searched for recipes online, I found a wealth of information—covering how to make cider from fresh organic apples, how to transform that cider into hard cider (with many warnings to keep it out of reach of any alcoholics in the household) and, finally, how to allow the cider to go from alcohol to vinegar.

Making cider from fresh fall apples, as is recommended, can take up to six months from start to finish.

At the time that I wanted to do this, fall apples were not in season, and I was really looking for the quickest, easiest technique I could find. I opted to make my homemade apple cider vinegar using the “path of least resistance,” and here is how I did it:

How to Make Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar, the Easy Way

clean-jar-and-apple-ciderAny large vessel should work for this fermentation project. Stick to glass or pottery; avoid plastic and metal.

Some time ago, a friend of mine was getting rid of unneeded items from her kitchen. She had two large Lipton Sun Tea jars that she thought I could put to use. I have a policy of accepting things that other people want to give me, so I took the jars home with me and started thinking about how I could use them.

When I started researching the method to make my own apple cider vinegar, I realized that these big jars would make the perfect vessel—so I dusted one of them off and headed to the store for some cider.

  1. jar-of-apple-cider-covered-with-cheese-clothI bought the cheapest, no-frills bottle of apple cider that I could find.
  2. After sterilizing my big glass jar, I poured the cider in and covered the mouth of the jar with cheesecloth, secured in place with a strong rubber band.
  3. I placed the jar in the cabinet above my stove to allow it to ferment in a warm, but not too warm, dark place.
  4. fermenting-apple-cider-vinegarVinegar can take between two to four weeks on average to complete the fermentation process. You can begin taste testing your fermenting apple cider after a few days and throughout the process until you are satisfied with the quality of your vinegar.
  5. At that point, you will want to put the vinegar into bottles or jars that you have designated for the storage of your finished product. In a sealed container, you can store your vinegar in the refrigerator indefinitely.

If you are anything like I am, you probably have a motley assortment of jars and bottles that you have saved and you will have plenty of ways to store your batch of vinegar. My grandmother’s oft-quoted motto of, “Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without” is my guideline, so there are always jars, bottles, and containers aplenty in my home.

step 6 ready jars for bottlingI found that homemade apple cider vinegar is easy to make. The hardest part of making the vinegar was waiting for it to finish fermentation.

The next time I make vinegar, I will opt for creating my own organic cider from fresh fall apples and turning that cider into apple cider vinegar.

29 Uses for Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar

Health and Wellness

  • Take a tablespoonful daily in eight ounces of water as a preventative against colds and flu. It works, people. Just give it a try.
  • When battling gastroenteritis, also known as stomach flu, take a tablespoonful in eight ounces of water several times a day.
  • When battling diarrhea, take a tablespoonful in eight ounces of water several times a day. Don’t argue about it like my husband and kids do—just take it. You will be glad you did!
  • Treat sunburn by soaking a washcloth in undiluted vinegar and applying directly to the burned area of skin. Let the dampened cloth lie on the skin for 5-10 minutes. You will smell like a salad, but your sunburn won’t hurt!
  • Taking vinegar in the same dosage as for flu can help reduce joint pain and is safer than taking anti-inflammatory medicines.

Household

  • Clean and deodorize after pet accidents by spraying the carpet with a solution of 50 percent vinegar to 50 percent water. First, blot up any liquid, then soak carpet with vinegar water. After five minutes, blot the area thoroughly and allow to dry. Once dry, there should be no odor.
  • Clean and deodorize after the toddler’s potty training accidents, following the same process as is used to clean up pet accidents. Pets and toddlers do have some interesting similarities!
  • Use vinegar and water to clean glass and mirrors in a ratio of one part vinegar to eight parts water.
  • Adding 1/2 cup of vinegar to the last rinse cycle of your wash load will help to soften clothes and control static cling.
  • Adding vinegar to the last rinse cycle also helps to reduce lint buildup on clothes and keeps pet hair from sticking to clothes. We all love our pets, but no one wants to wear the evidence of having pets on their clothing.
  • Vinegar can aid in removing stubborn stains such as coffee and tea. Soak the stain in a solution of 1/3 cup vinegar to 2/3 cup of water. After soaking, hang items out in sun until dry.
  • Full strength vinegar can remove stubborn mildew stains from clothing.
  • Use a mixture of 50 percent vinegar to 50 percent water as a stain treatment before washing any items that are stained. Keep this near the washer in a spray bottle. This solution costs way less than name-brand stain removers and contains no petrochemicals.

Beauty Treatments

  • Apple cider vinegar is a great hair conditioner. Mix with water in a one-to-one ratio in an old shampoo or conditioner bottle. Apply to hair and allow to sit for a couple minutes, then rinse.
  • Rinse it through hair to detangle and reduce frizziness.
  • Rinsed through hair, it helps control dry, itchy scalps due to the antifungal and antibacterial properties of the vinegar.
  • Use apple cider vinegar as a face wash. Mix one tablespoonful of vinegar to a cup of water and apply to facial skin using a cotton ball. Apple cider vinegar-water is naturally antibacterial and deep cleans pores. Follow with a moisturizer suited to your skin type.

Dog Treatments

  • Apple cider vinegar can help restore proper pH to your dog’s system. If your dog is itchy, scratches constantly, is losing fur, or is stinky, adding a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar twice a day to his or her food can help relieve the misery. You can increase the dose up to a tablespoonful a day if you are not seeing results at a lower dosage.
  • Apple cider vinegar is also useful for preventing ear infections in dogs. Apply a few drops inside your dog’s ears following a bath.
  • Spraying your dog after a bath with a 50/50 vinegar-water mixture and allowing him or her to air dry can help kill fleas, ticks, and ringworm.
  • Adding one teaspoon of apple cider vinegar to your dog’s drinking water can help reduce or eliminate the tear stains that light-colored pets often get by their eyes.
  • Apple cider vinegar added to a dog’s water can help to eliminate urinary problems.

Cat Treatments

  • Apple cider vinegar used in a 50/50 vinegar-water mixture can be applied to cats with pink eye to clear the infection.
  • Apple cider vinegar in a 50/50 vinegar-water water mixture can be wiped on a cat’s paws and applied to its neck to combat the urinary tract infections that cats seem to be prone to having. Adding vinegar to a cat’s water can treat the UTI, but cats can be finicky about the way their food and water taste and may avoid drinking the water. Applying the mixture to the paws makes them ingest it as they clean their paws. Do this twice a day for best results.

Horse Treatments

• Apple cider vinegar can be used to treat horses who have urinary tract stones by adding 1/2 to one cup of vinegar to six gallons of water.
• Treat hoof rot by soaking your horse’s hooves in apple cider vinegar two to three times a day.
• Treat your horse’s dry skin and dandruff by adding up to 1/2 cup of apple cider vinegar to your horse’s feed daily.
• Adding apple cider vinegar to your horse’s feed and water can help combat fly problems.
• It is effective in relieving painful joints in horses. Add up to 1/2 cup to your horse’s feed daily.

As with any information you read, it is your responsibility to do your research and evaluate the use of apple cider vinegar for yourself, your household, and your pets. I do not claim to be a medical professional or a veterinarian, nor do I play one on television, but I can tell you that I have used apple cider vinegar at home for myself, my family, and my pets with great success for the past twenty years at least.

Because my family and I survive and actually thrive on a tight budget, I have made it my mission to find ways to run my home as inexpensively as I can, while maintaining or improving our quality of life.

I also have a philosophy of thinking for the long term as my husband and I grow older, to find ways of keeping our spending low as our income decreases.

Using natural products such as apple cider vinegar has been a boon to our health and our budget, and I hope you will find similar results for yourself!

TGN Bi-Weekly Newsletter

(This is an updated version of a post that was originally published on September 6, 2015.)

The post Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar, the Easy Way—With 29 Uses appeared first on The Grow Network.

Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar, the Easy Way—With 29 Uses

Making apple cider vinegar is a topic that is well-documented on various sites across the Internet. When I searched searched for recipes online, I found a wealth of information—covering how to make cider from fresh organic apples, how to transform that cider into hard cider (with many warnings to keep it out of reach of any alcoholics in the household) and, finally, how to allow the cider to go from alcohol to vinegar.

Making cider from fresh fall apples, as is recommended, can take up to six months from start to finish.

At the time that I wanted to do this, fall apples were not in season, and I was really looking for the quickest, easiest technique I could find. I opted to make my homemade apple cider vinegar using the “path of least resistance,” and here is how I did it:

How to Make Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar, the Easy Way

clean-jar-and-apple-ciderAny large vessel should work for this fermentation project. Stick to glass or pottery; avoid plastic and metal.

Some time ago, a friend of mine was getting rid of unneeded items from her kitchen. She had two large Lipton Sun Tea jars that she thought I could put to use. I have a policy of accepting things that other people want to give me, so I took the jars home with me and started thinking about how I could use them.

When I started researching the method to make my own apple cider vinegar, I realized that these big jars would make the perfect vessel—so I dusted one of them off and headed to the store for some cider.

  1. jar-of-apple-cider-covered-with-cheese-clothI bought the cheapest, no-frills bottle of apple cider that I could find.
  2. After sterilizing my big glass jar, I poured the cider in and covered the mouth of the jar with cheesecloth, secured in place with a strong rubber band.
  3. I placed the jar in the cabinet above my stove to allow it to ferment in a warm, but not too warm, dark place.
  4. fermenting-apple-cider-vinegarVinegar can take between two to four weeks on average to complete the fermentation process. You can begin taste testing your fermenting apple cider after a few days and throughout the process until you are satisfied with the quality of your vinegar.
  5. At that point, you will want to put the vinegar into bottles or jars that you have designated for the storage of your finished product. In a sealed container, you can store your vinegar in the refrigerator indefinitely.

If you are anything like I am, you probably have a motley assortment of jars and bottles that you have saved and you will have plenty of ways to store your batch of vinegar. My grandmother’s oft-quoted motto of, “Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without” is my guideline, so there are always jars, bottles, and containers aplenty in my home.

step 6 ready jars for bottlingI found that homemade apple cider vinegar is easy to make. The hardest part of making the vinegar was waiting for it to finish fermentation.

The next time I make vinegar, I will opt for creating my own organic cider from fresh fall apples and turning that cider into apple cider vinegar.

29 Uses for Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar

Health and Wellness

  • Take a tablespoonful daily in eight ounces of water as a preventative against colds and flu. It works, people. Just give it a try.
  • When battling gastroenteritis, also known as stomach flu, take a tablespoonful in eight ounces of water several times a day.
  • When battling diarrhea, take a tablespoonful in eight ounces of water several times a day. Don’t argue about it like my husband and kids do—just take it. You will be glad you did!
  • Treat sunburn by soaking a washcloth in undiluted vinegar and applying directly to the burned area of skin. Let the dampened cloth lie on the skin for 5-10 minutes. You will smell like a salad, but your sunburn won’t hurt!
  • Taking vinegar in the same dosage as for flu can help reduce joint pain and is safer than taking anti-inflammatory medicines.

Household

  • Clean and deodorize after pet accidents by spraying the carpet with a solution of 50 percent vinegar to 50 percent water. First, blot up any liquid, then soak carpet with vinegar water. After five minutes, blot the area thoroughly and allow to dry. Once dry, there should be no odor.
  • Clean and deodorize after the toddler’s potty training accidents, following the same process as is used to clean up pet accidents. Pets and toddlers do have some interesting similarities!
  • Use vinegar and water to clean glass and mirrors in a ratio of one part vinegar to eight parts water.
  • Adding 1/2 cup of vinegar to the last rinse cycle of your wash load will help to soften clothes and control static cling.
  • Adding vinegar to the last rinse cycle also helps to reduce lint buildup on clothes and keeps pet hair from sticking to clothes. We all love our pets, but no one wants to wear the evidence of having pets on their clothing.
  • Vinegar can aid in removing stubborn stains such as coffee and tea. Soak the stain in a solution of 1/3 cup vinegar to 2/3 cup of water. After soaking, hang items out in sun until dry.
  • Full strength vinegar can remove stubborn mildew stains from clothing.
  • Use a mixture of 50 percent vinegar to 50 percent water as a stain treatment before washing any items that are stained. Keep this near the washer in a spray bottle. This solution costs way less than name-brand stain removers and contains no petrochemicals.

Beauty Treatments

  • Apple cider vinegar is a great hair conditioner. Mix with water in a one-to-one ratio in an old shampoo or conditioner bottle. Apply to hair and allow to sit for a couple minutes, then rinse.
  • Rinse it through hair to detangle and reduce frizziness.
  • Rinsed through hair, it helps control dry, itchy scalps due to the antifungal and antibacterial properties of the vinegar.
  • Use apple cider vinegar as a face wash. Mix one tablespoonful of vinegar to a cup of water and apply to facial skin using a cotton ball. Apple cider vinegar-water is naturally antibacterial and deep cleans pores. Follow with a moisturizer suited to your skin type.

Dog Treatments

  • Apple cider vinegar can help restore proper pH to your dog’s system. If your dog is itchy, scratches constantly, is losing fur, or is stinky, adding a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar twice a day to his or her food can help relieve the misery. You can increase the dose up to a tablespoonful a day if you are not seeing results at a lower dosage.
  • Apple cider vinegar is also useful for preventing ear infections in dogs. Apply a few drops inside your dog’s ears following a bath.
  • Spraying your dog after a bath with a 50/50 vinegar-water mixture and allowing him or her to air dry can help kill fleas, ticks, and ringworm.
  • Adding one teaspoon of apple cider vinegar to your dog’s drinking water can help reduce or eliminate the tear stains that light-colored pets often get by their eyes.
  • Apple cider vinegar added to a dog’s water can help to eliminate urinary problems.

Cat Treatments

  • Apple cider vinegar used in a 50/50 vinegar-water mixture can be applied to cats with pink eye to clear the infection.
  • Apple cider vinegar in a 50/50 vinegar-water water mixture can be wiped on a cat’s paws and applied to its neck to combat the urinary tract infections that cats seem to be prone to having. Adding vinegar to a cat’s water can treat the UTI, but cats can be finicky about the way their food and water taste and may avoid drinking the water. Applying the mixture to the paws makes them ingest it as they clean their paws. Do this twice a day for best results.

Horse Treatments

• Apple cider vinegar can be used to treat horses who have urinary tract stones by adding 1/2 to one cup of vinegar to six gallons of water.
• Treat hoof rot by soaking your horse’s hooves in apple cider vinegar two to three times a day.
• Treat your horse’s dry skin and dandruff by adding up to 1/2 cup of apple cider vinegar to your horse’s feed daily.
• Adding apple cider vinegar to your horse’s feed and water can help combat fly problems.
• It is effective in relieving painful joints in horses. Add up to 1/2 cup to your horse’s feed daily.

As with any information you read, it is your responsibility to do your research and evaluate the use of apple cider vinegar for yourself, your household, and your pets. I do not claim to be a medical professional or a veterinarian, nor do I play one on television, but I can tell you that I have used apple cider vinegar at home for myself, my family, and my pets with great success for the past twenty years at least.

Because my family and I survive and actually thrive on a tight budget, I have made it my mission to find ways to run my home as inexpensively as I can, while maintaining or improving our quality of life.

I also have a philosophy of thinking for the long term as my husband and I grow older, to find ways of keeping our spending low as our income decreases.

Using natural products such as apple cider vinegar has been a boon to our health and our budget, and I hope you will find similar results for yourself!

TGN Bi-Weekly Newsletter

(This is an updated version of a post that was originally published on September 6, 2015.)

The post Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar, the Easy Way—With 29 Uses appeared first on The Grow Network.