Ferment Your Feed for Healthier and Happier Chickens

Click here to view the original post.

Sprouting fodder for your chickens to eat is a great way to diversify their diet, and it is also a great way to increase the overall health and immune strength of your flock.  Leslie Parsons provided a long list of seeds that are good for sprouting in various conditions in her article “Growing Your Own Chicken Feed the Easy Way.” I’d like to draw some attention to another method for improving your flock’s diet: fermenting.

Fermented food has picked up a lot of traction in popular media these days, with the success of Sandor Ellix Katz’s books The Art of Fermentation and Wild Fermentation. People have become more and more aware of the benefits of ingesting healthy living cultures of microflora. “Probiotics” has become a household word, and you can pick up a bottle of fresh kombucha at the corner convenience store.

Active cultures are helping people maintain good digestive health, enhance their immune systems, and even lose weight. But did you know that fermented food is good for your chickens too?

Raising Meat Chickens_336x280

Fermented Chicken Feed Can Improve the Health of Your Flock

Fermented chicken feed has been shown to increase weight gain in growing chicks. Chickens whose diets include fermented foods develop healthier intestinal tracts than those that eat a strictly dry diet. Moist fermented feed helps defend against dehydration, and it even promotes a healthy genetic profile for mother hens.

Fermenting chicken feed can significantly improve the nutrients that are available to your flock.

In an Aarhus University study about Fermented feed for laying hens, fermenting layer rations reduced the concentration of dietary sugar by more than three-quarters, from 32.1 to 7.3 grams per kilogram. Fermented food also has high concentrations of lactic acid bacteria, and small amounts of beneficial yeasts and fungi; so you’re basically creating some homemade probiotics for your flock. If you’ve got a chicken with IBS, maybe some fermented food could help her get regular.

Moist fermented food is easily digestible and its nutrients are more easily absorbed by the chicken than dry feed. Chickens will get more B vitamins, more vitamin K2, and more of several beneficial enzymes from fermented food.

Fermented foods help with immune function in chickens. Chickens with a fermented diet develop a highly acidic barrier in their upper digestive tract that blocks several acid-sensitive bacteria like E. coli and Salmonella. One study, published by the African Journal of Biotechnology, considered using fermented foods as a replacement for antibiotic growth promoters in commercial poultry production.

There are also benefits for egg production and egg quality in laying hens.

Incorporating fermented food can help improve the number and size of eggs you’ll get. Yolk size frequently increases when a hen is fed a diet that includes fermented food. A diet that incorporates fermentation can help with problem egg shells too, improving shell quality, weight, and stiffness.

Why You Should Start Feeding Fermented Food

In addition to the health considerations outlined above, there are some benefits for you, the human, as well.

The biggest thing is that fermenting allows you to buy less feed. Chickens eat a little less dry feed when the feed has been fermented. The chickens are able to get more nourishment out of the same volume of feed. So, this is one way to make those expensive bags of organic layer rations last a little longer.

The chickens will also waste less of their food. As soon as a bowl is filled with dry feed, the first thing many chickens do is jump right in and start scratching. They throw the larger grains all over, leaving only the inedible fine dust at the bottom of the bowl. They don’t do that with a moist fermented food. They might still get in the bowl, but they won’t be able to disperse the food like they normally do with dry feed.

Finally, fermentation is an easy way for anyone to diversify their flock’s diet.

Chickens have an adventurous pallet at the table. They like to eat all kinds of things. Many of us don’t have the room to keep our chickens at pasture where they can get a good mixed diet of bugs and greenery.

Growing fresh chicken fodder is a great way to diversify your flock’s diet, but some people don’t have enough confidence in their green thumbs to begin starting seed for their birds. Fermentation is one way that any chicken keeper can mix things up for their chickens to begin improving health and immunity.

How Can I Start Fermenting My Chicken Feed?

fermenting-chicken-feed-in-a-bucketThe type of fermentation you’re going to do is called lactic acid fermentation. I’m not wearing a lab coat, but I think this means that good bacteria digest the available sugars and leave lactic acid as a by-product. You might recognize the sweet/sour smell of the lactic acid from yogurt, sauerkraut, and kimchi.

  1. Use any non-metallic container to create the ferment. I have been using a food grade plastic five-gallon bucket from the big box store and it works well enough.
  2. Start with a small amount of dry feed, about two days worth.
  3. Cover the feed with non-chlorinated water. Lactic acid fermentation is an anaerobic process, and it is important that you keep the food completely covered with water, so that it is not exposed to the open air. When the feed soaks up so much water that the feed is exposed to air, cover it back up with more water.
  4. Stir the mixture regularly, several times a day, and add more water as needed. Well water, distilled water, or rain water are fine, but fresh city water contains chemicals that are specifically designed to kill bacteria—so don’t use fresh city water. If all you have is city water, treat it to remove the chlorine or chloramines. [A Guide for Using Tap Water in Your Garden]
  5. IMG_5885Keep the fermenting container in a warm place; keeping it above 65 degrees F will get the best results. Warm temperatures speed up the process and increase the odds that the right bacteria will flourish when fermentation begins.
  6. You can add a starter culture if you want to, to make sure you get the right bugs. Allow at least 24 hours to begin producing a culture of lactic acid bacteria, but allow several days to significantly drop the pH.
  7. The end product should have a sour smell like sauerkraut. If your feed smells rancid or rotten, don’t use it. You might not have kept the mash covered with enough water, allowing air in to the mix. If this happens, throw it out to resolve in the compost, and start again.
  8. Dip a scoop or ladle down to the bottom of the container to get the moist feed. Try to include a little of the water in each scoop, but always make sure that the feed in the bucket remains covered in water. You can add more dry feed to replace the fermented feed you take out, if you want to keep the process going for a while. If you prefer to use up the first batch before starting the second, just rinse and repeat when the fermented feed is used up.
  9. IMG_5898If all of this sounds like too much work for you, consider trading with a friend for something they are fermenting. A neighbor of mine makes beer at home. We worked out a barter agreement where he receives fresh eggs and in exchange I get his fermented grains. My chickens love these grains and fight over them every time I put them out. Just make sure that the grains aren’t being fermented in a toxic metal container that could harm your chickens or you.

Common Problems with Fermented Chicken Feed

The biggest problem with fermented chicken feed is that chickens don’t really love to eat it.

In the Aarhus study I referenced above, the authors attribute irritability in the flock to a distaste for the fermented food. My chickens don’t seem to mind it that much, but I think they do prefer their normal dry rations. I know that they definitely prefer fresh bugs and green plant growth when those are available.

In nature, chickens will eat just about anything that’s small enough to eat. That includes a lot of bugs, a lot of plants, some invertebrates, and lots of odds and ends.

A very diverse diet is the best diet you could possibly feed your chickens.

If you’re someone who feeds only layer rations and nothing else, adding in some of that same feed after fermenting is an easy way to begin mixing up your flock’s diet and working your way toward the diverse diet they crave.

There is also a chance that you could accidentally grow the wrong bacteria, or grow yeast instead of bacteria. Always smell the food before you give it to the chickens. If it smells off, just throw it out.

Raising Meat Chickens_1000x525_2

(This post is an updated version of an article originally published on February 17, 2015.)

The post Ferment Your Feed for Healthier and Happier Chickens appeared first on The Grow Network.

The Siding is finished!

Click here to view the original post.

OMG the siding looks great!  The guy that installed the siding, trim and soffits worked everyday including weekends from 9 AM till dark to finish the job.  Everyday he cleaned up the cut up siding materials so the pets did not walk over cut metal or vinyl siding.

We all hear stories of bad contractors but I have had great contractors, so far and those craftsman that do a great job need more good recommendations as they are a treasure.

Once I clean up the yard and paint the exterior doors to match the new paint scheme. I’ll post pics of the finished job.  My Contractor was a bit dubious about the red corner post I demanded but after seeing it today he loves the look of it.  My siding guy said the house looked like a throw back to the “Americana” look.  Rather than using a glaring Red, White and Blue, I chose muted tones of barn red, cape cod grey and a subdued blue.  No pale pastels but colors that are strong but weathered and with a history.

I recommend you always get at least 3 contractors to bid a job and check out their references.  Once you find a good contractor then you ask who they would recommend for other jobs like electrical.  I found several great companies that do work homes but I also did the work of getting several bids before any work was done.  Most of the bids I accepted were in the mid-range price wise.  Remember if it sounds to good to true it probably is not true.  Learn some DIY skills and be familiar with the cost of basic materials for home maintenance.  I’m still learning how to do stuff around the house but I know the basic costs of materials needed to do a job.  These things take some effort on your part but it will save you a lot of money long term.

On to my stitches in my upper left hip area or my butt. While a bit extreme it does show how a simple fall can screw everything up as a prepper.  I’m probably going to pay around a grand on this medical issue.  At this time that is cheap as I’m using a “Doc in a Box” and did not go into an Emergency room.  I went to Walgreen’s and bought the biggest most flexible bandages on sale.  Athletic tape is not the best tape to use when you have a gash with stitches though I think it would be great for splints.  I’m probably replacing the bandage twice a day after washing with soap and water.  That may be more than what is needed but it is my ass I’m protecting and me not getting sick from infection.  So I’ll spend a bit extra on not getting an infection.  The tetanus shot did not set a flare up of my CIDP.  Though I do seem a bit sleepy and less energetic.   Well it is to be expected after taken a big physical hit.

Tried out the Walgreen’s 4×4 absorbent/drainage bandage.  Wow, this is a great bandage as it has a double thickness of gauze area over the wound. Also very easy to apply. Hey if I do dumb stuff at least I learn how to treat it.  You all can learn without doing my dumb stuff.

The deadly diseases being released as ice thaws. Surviving The Next Pandemic!

Click here to view the original post.
The deadly diseases being released as ice thaws. Surviving the next pandemic.

Scientists have raised the issue of new old diseases being released by the global warming melting the ice. They say it is quite possible that these diseases have been lying dormant since before the coming of man. This means that we will have no immunity to these diseases, & we will have no medicines to combat these diseases. Once released & started they could sweep the globe annihilating humanity completely except perhaps in isolated cases.

In this day & age an infected person could get on a plane & be in another country before they even know they are carrying a disease!
So there is a hell of a biggy to add to our lists!

Master Deterrents and Keep Yourself Safe and Aware

Click here to view the original post.

Master Deterrents and Keep Yourself Safe and Aware You may be carrying concealed. I would say it is a must in the world we live in. Just because you carry concealed does not mean you carry without consequence. It’s a very stark reality for those not paying attention. You can be punished for saving your …

Continue reading »

The post Master Deterrents and Keep Yourself Safe and Aware appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Housing For Off-Grid Survival

Click here to view the original post.

Housing For Off-Grid Survival Living comfortably off-grid without the need of utility companies and government services can be quite challenging. Most people start by buying a piece of land far from utility services because it’s cheaper compared to traditional lot housing. They see the potential in it when others don’t. If you have such piece …

Continue reading »

The post Housing For Off-Grid Survival appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Preparing Kids for Life

Click here to view the original post.

Today we are THRILLED to be sending our newsletter subscribers something we have been working on for months. We couldn’t have pulled this off without all your help, so THANK YOU!  If you’re not subscribed you can subscribe here.

Since we started this blog almost 10 years ago we have added 5 kids to our families and now have 4 kids each. And those kids are getting bigger! Preparing our kids to face the real world is something we spend a lot of time thinking about. A few months ago we asked YOU what are some things you wished you would have known before becoming adults? You came through with some fantastic ideas and answers. ​​​​​​​

We compiled all the feedback into a workbook you can print for each kid, grand-kid, niece, nephew, or any young loved one. To be honest you could probably print it out for yourself and start learning a few things too! 

Fell free to add to this workbook and make it your own. Items to learn include things your kids may learn at school, scouts, church, and most importantly, the home! The workbook contains the following sections:

  • Money/budgeting
  • Cooking
  • Gardening/preservation
  • Cleaning
  • Tools
  • Sewing/clothes
  • Mechanics/car safety
  • Plumbing
  • Communication
  • Frugality
  • Eprep/camping
  • First aid
  • Hunting/fishing
  • Physical health
  • Computer/electronics
  • Physical health
  • Spirituality

AGAIN, this is available to subscribers. If you aren’t one already join now:

The post Preparing Kids for Life appeared first on Food Storage Made Easy.

So How Do We Protect Our Houses of Worship?

 

ChurchAgain. A church was attacked. 26 people, some children were murdered. As usual, the liberal cry of “gun control” rings out, ignoring that the murderer was stopped by two honest citizens with guns before he could continue the carnage.

Christian churches and Jewish Synagogues have come increasingly under attack in recent years.  Many preppers worship at one or the other.  But oddly enough, people who will prep to the max and arm to the teeth will often not even consider proper security measure where they worship. It is a combination of the psychological trust that God will protect them, as well as the idea that a House of Worship is meant to be an open and welcoming atmosphere available to all, and that proper security measures would hinder this. There was a time in this country when even a hard-bitten criminal might hesitate to commit a crime in a religious place. Those days are long gone.

And there is a reason I know this. In my real life, I am in the security industry. I have a degree in Industrial Retail Security. I am a member of the American Society for Industrial Security International (ASIS) one of the largest security organizations in the world. I hold their Physical Security Professional Certification, which is one of the most difficult to acquire security certifications in the world.

But more importantly, in the context of this article, I am the Chair of the Phoenix Chapter ASIS House of Worship Committee. And we provide FREE security surveys and advice to any House of Worship that requests it. Notice the emphasis on the word FREE.  And I am about as busy in this role as a Maytag Repairman.

Most large churches in this country have quietly adopted a security posture. Some have gone as far as to actually incorporate in-house security guards. Some hire outside security for services. But it is the medium and smaller churches and synagogues that are sadly lacking in proper security. And need it the most. Many of my comments below may ruffle some feathers, but ruffled feathers beat the hell out of a bullet to the head.

There is no such thing as perfect security. But there is a lot that medium and small-sized religious house can do to mitigate the threat.

First, accept the fact that it CAN happen to you!

Yes, you Pastor and your flock. And why not? It has been happening in churches all across the country for some time now. What makes you and your church more special than anyone else? I am not trying to offend anyone here, but it is time for the religious community to WAKE UP and accept the fact that they are targets, and perceived as soft targets, for criminals, the mentally disturbed, and terrorists.

Second, Get Organized

Take stock of your assets. Does your congregation have active or retired Law Enforcement Officers? Military? Combat veterans? Form a Security and Safety Committee. This would be made up of the Senior Pastor and whatever security expertise you may have in the congregation. Take stock of your current situation. Where is your church located? Out in the country? High crime district? If you want some good crime statistics of your local neighborhood, ask your local police. Or you can purchase an in-depth report from  CAP INDEX at https://capindex.com/ . It may cost you a little, but it is in-depth and compares your community to surrounding areas. Do a complete and proper physical security survey of your church or facility. If you have members of your congregation who has experience doing these, so much the better. If not, see if you have a local ASIS chapter nearby that will do one for free. Or ask your local police department if they will do one. If nothing else, hire a professional security consultant to do one. Trust me, it will be worth it. A professional physical security survey will show you your vulnerabilities and will show you how to avoid all kinds of pitfalls ranging from local ordinance violation to avoiding theft of your offerings up to mitigating an active shooter situation.

Third, Start Planning

By now your Security and Safety Committee should have a pretty good idea of your assets and vulnerabilities. If you have active Law Enforcement in your congregation, see if they will rotate being armed and in uniform posted in the lobby or out front during services. Get to know your local police department. See if they will use your parking lot during services to do their paperwork or when taking breaks. An armed uniformed presence is a serious discouragement to active shooters. They are called predators for a reason, and are looking for soft targets that will get them the most body count.

Fourth, Train

All church staff should have an understanding of situational awareness.   Ushers and greeters should be especially alert. At least one member of the Security and Safety Committee should be tasked with keeping abreast of current trends in regards to church security. A few people should be trained in advanced first aid, and supplies kept on hand. If you have older parishioners, a defibrillator would be a good idea. There is a tremendous amount of free information from security organizations on the web. You need to develop plans for various contingencies and train for them. How do you evacuate in case of fire? If an active shooter situation occurs, who calls 911?, How is the children’s center secured? What is the evacuation plan? Etc. And rehearse those plans. Here is a link to an ASIS pdf document that has a number of recommendations for church security.

https://www.asisonline.org/About-ASIS/Documents/SecuringHOWs.pdf

The Subject of Firearms in the Church

This is a delicate subject but one that needs careful consideration. Do you want an armed presence during services? I believe that the best defense against a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun who is trained to use it. Much of this will depend on your location, and the various laws that apply to your jurisdiction. It will also depend on the culture of your organization. This is a subject that the Security and Safety Committee needs to take a hard look at. Exactly who do you want to be armed during services? And under what set of rules.

Summary

This is a very short article on a very complex subject, and my intent is to make members of religious organizations think. This barely touches the surface of the issues involved. Christians and Jews especially are under increasing attack in this country from the mentally deranged and political and religious fanatics. Our Sanctuaries are no longer safe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Filed under: Azweaponcraftprepper Tagged: Active shooter, Church security

Lube and Spare Guns

Click here to view the original post.
My recent post got a couple comments worth addressing.

-Different forms of firearm lubrication. I should give the disclaimer that some guns have specific needs for specific reasons. You should always do what the manufacturer recommends. That said…..

It is my somewhat experienced opinion that any/ all commonly available lubricants perform Very similarly if not the same. Typically I will just use motor oil. The people making claims about this special lubricant or that one almost invariably have a vested financial interest in selling said product.

– Using spare parts to build more guns. Don’t get me wrong if you have all the parts to make a gun make a gun. That said you still want spare parts, now for your two guns. Look at it like this. Most of us own a car. That car has a spare tire. If it goes through a certain fuse/ bulb you probably keep a couple around. You don’t need he added expense of a whole other car just to get the tire and bulb!

On the bright side most of the parts that typically would need to be repaired are pretty cheap. Pins, springs, etc. Buying a whole second $800 rifle to get $200 in spare parts doesn’t make sense. Plus when you take the first $5 part now that while gun is deadlined! Buy a second (or 5tg!) rifle if you need/ want one but don’t ignore spare parts. 

13 Best Herbs to Grow Indoors

Click here to view the original post.

13 Best Herbs to Grow Indoors Herbs are known to enhance flavors in food and offer natural remedies for ailments. Therefore, trying your hand at growing them indoors is well worth the effort. We’ve listed 13 of the best herbs you can grow indoors with ease. Basil Use the smaller variety of basil to ensure …

Continue reading »

The post 13 Best Herbs to Grow Indoors appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Right After Church Shooter Opened Fire, This Texan Did The UNTHINKABLE To Wipe Him Off Earth

Click here to view the original post.

Right After Church Shooter Opened Fire, This Texan Did The UNTHINKABLE To Wipe Him Off Earth Images From: ABCNews  What is happening to our fellow Americans? The question on all of our minds this morning after the terrible church shooting in Texas. How are we heading down these dark roads? What is happening in a …

Continue reading »

The post Right After Church Shooter Opened Fire, This Texan Did The UNTHINKABLE To Wipe Him Off Earth appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Eating Corn from my own “Field of Dreams”

Click here to view the original post.

An excerpt from Christopher’s “Squatter in Los Angeles” book, available from Kindle, or from the Store at www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com.
[circa 1978]
I think I was just a natural dreamer and I believed that I could magically earn a very sufficient income by freelance writing and teaching, so this period of squatting gave me the luxuries to choose my life’s activities.
I continued to write newspaper columns, though I never earned much from them. I  began to work more actively on my first book about the uses of local wild plants. I continued to engage in metaphysical studies, and gardening, and conducting occasional wild food outings.
My garden never seemed highly productive but  I had a few of the tall red amaranth plants, some squash, a corn patch, some greens, and wild foods. It was probably my first successful corn patch. I didn’t plant the rows of corn that you see so often in gardens and on farms. Rather, in my approximately 10 by 20 foot corn patch, I had corn more of less evenly spaced.  I had wanted to try the so-called Three Sisters of the native Southwest, of corn, beans, and squash.
In the arid soil of the Southwest, the corn was planted first, and once it  arose, beans were planted at the base of the each corn. The beans’ roots fix nitrogen and this acts as a fertilizer to the corn. Squash was then planted as a sprawling ground cover to retain the valuable scant moisture of the desert.
I planted my corn in my wood chip patch, three seeds per hole about two feet apart.  Corn came up, and then I planted bean seeds.  Beans are usually an easy crop to grow, but not that many came up. Who knows, maybe the ducks ate them. I planted squash too. Not a desert squash but ordinary zucchini which did a good job as a ground cover and food producer. I loved the little garden, and at night when I sat at my plywood desk with my typewriter, I’d look out my window through the several feet tall corn patch to see the lights of the city below.  During the day, little birds would flock to the corn patch and eat bugs. I enjoyed the fact that this little garden that I created with my simple efforts was now teeming with wildlife.  It felt good just to look at it. It provided food for my body, food for wildlife, and food for my soul.
Not long after I started this patch – it was near Thanksgiving – David Ashley came by for a visit.  David had already moved into the neighborhood from wherever else he’d been living. He came up to the top of the hill where I was an illegal squatter. My housing status didn’t cause David to lower his regard for me.
I took David out into my garden, and we stood there talking about life. I pulled off a ripe ear of corn and handed it to him and picked one for myself.
“What’s this?” asked David.
“To eat,” I responded as I began to peel off the leaves and hairs on my average size ear of corn.  He took a bite of the sweet kernels.
“I didn’t know you could eat corn raw,” said David in a surprised voice.
“Yep, you can,” I told him as I chewed on my sweet cob.  David began to peel his and take some bites.
“Wow, that’s really good!” said David, chewing on more kernels. We stood there for a few moments, eating our corn, looking at the outside world through the stalks of corn that were taller than us. It was a quiet, special moment.
Eventually, David left, and over the ensuing months, I would occasionally hear David telling someone about his surreal experience eating raw corn in Christopher’s little corn patch, our own little “field of dreams.”

Movie Monday – Wartime Farm – Episode 6

Click here to view the original post.

Wartime Farm


Back by popular demand is the entire series of BBCs Wartime Farm.  BBC’s “Wartime Farm” features the efforts of historian Ruth Goodman and archaeologists Alex Langlands and Peter Ginn, who run Manor Farm as it may have been run during World War II. The program focuses on all aspects of domestic and farming life of the period, with the team managing livestock, attempting to cultivate unused land, tackling new tools and technologies, and learning the basics of civil defense — all while facing shortages. They face one of the biggest challenges in the history of the British countryside, what Winston Churchill called “the frontline of freedom.”














 These films are presented as an exception to the copyright act as fair dealing for the purpose of research, private study, education, parody or satire. See bill c-42 article 29.

Disaster Supplies

Click here to view the original post.

 

DISASTER SUPPLIES

Disaster Supplies

Disaster Supplies

A natural disaster can disrupt the lives of average citizens, and having the right supplies when it hits can mean the difference between life and death. Assembling these supplies in advance is the key to success.

 

If you’ve ever lived in a community that was in the path of a hurricane, you’ve seen the empty shelves and crowds at local supermarkets.  Panic buying is a poor alternative to an organized plan of action, with many supplies unavailable by the time you get to the store.

 

But where to start? Lists of recommended items are long and sometimes so detailed that you mind just explodes at the thought of gathering it all. You can’t finish if you don’t start, however; begin to accumulate a few items each month and you’ll be much more likely to weather the storm.

 

I split my personal supplies into three types: short-, medium-, and long-term. A typical short-term event would be, say, a blizzard or other event that takes you off the grid for just a few days or not at all. A medium-term event could be the aftermath of a major hurricane, where weeks may go by without electricity. A classic long-term event would be an electromagnetic pulse (EMP), where years may go by without power.

 

Preparing for any emergency involves knowing who you will be responsible for. If you have family with special needs, consider extra supplies tailored for them. Infants and children require even more thought when gathering supplies, like formula and diapers. Older members of your family may need items to keep them safe and healthy, like extra medications, adult diapers, or walkers.

 

The categories of items you’ll need (called “preps”) don’t really change with the length of time off the grid, but the quantities and variety do. The amount you stockpile depend upon what event your community is most at risk to experience.

 

Just the mere fact of not having enough drinkable or “potable” water puts you and your family in danger. Knowing how to turn unsafe water into drinkable water may save your life. Knowledge is the greatest power, but having supplies will make that knowledge work much better.

A way to disinfect water is imperative

A way to disinfect water is imperative

If you need to leave your house, consider making “go bags” for each member of the family, including pets. Keep them lightweight and easily carried. Look for compact items, like energy bars and small water filters (Lifestraw and Mini Sawyers are examples).

 

 

Here’s a list of useful items grouped by category:

 

  1. Water: Just the mere fact of not having enough drinkable or “potable” water puts you and your family in danger. Knowing how to turn unsafe water into drinkable water may save your life

 

To avoid dehydration, have at least 1 gallon of drinkable water per person, per day. Have a way to store water and methods to make water safe to drink through filtration, and purification. You can use plain, non-scented, household bleach, at 12-16 drops per gallon, to help purify water (filter first if needed). Be sure to wait 30 min for the bleach to take effect, then shake to aerate which makes it taste better.

 

  1. Food: Most municipalities recommend you have at least 3 days of food. This is somewhat arbitrary; I suggest at least 7-10 days, as loss of power can easily last longer. Get non-perishable food and have a manual can-opener. Some freeze-dried foods come in packets that last for 15-30 years and only require boiling water to prepare.

 

  1. Warmth and Shelter: Have ways to start fires (outside only) to stay warm, cook food, and boil water. Get tents, tarps, rope and paracord. Learn how to make shelters and seal off roof or window leaks. Have extra plywood for doors and windows in case of a hurricane; taping windows is no longer recommended.
three compact first aid kits great for hiking and camping made by Amy Alton of store.doomandbloom.net

medical kits

  1. First Aid: Have at least a basic first aid kit and OTC medicines to deal with common injuries and illnesses seen in the aftermath of disasters, such as cuts, bleeding, sprains and strains, diarrhea, pains and aches, colds and flus, etc. Don’t forget prescription medications for those with chronic medical issues.

 

  1. Hygiene: In order to stay healthy, you must keep your family clean. Get extra toilet paper, paper towels, buckets for washing, moist towelettes, feminine supplies, and supplies for waste disposal (like garbage bags and ties).

 

  1. Lighting: Have ways to light up the night. Get flashlights, of course extra batteries (rechargeable are better), solar lights, crank powered lights (power discussed later). The medic should consider a head lamp to keep both hands free.

 

  1. Whistle or Loud Sound Producing item: Have a method to make a loud noise to alert emergency response personnel to your whereabouts.
useful multitool

useful multitool

  1. Tools: Get multiuse tools, like the Swiss army knife and Leatherman. Have a wrench to turn off utilities, some duct tape, an axe, and a saw. If you are in a flood zone, place the axe and saw in your roof space to aid you in escaping to the roof.

 

An escape ladder may be necessary if you are getting out of a roof or higher than a 1-story building. Make sure you know where the fire extinguishers are and that they are not expired.

 

  1. Communication: Text messages will be delivered easier than voice in some circumstances. A CB radio, Ham radio (you need a license), and two-way radios are good to have. To keep updated on the news and emergency bulletins, have a battery and hand-crank radio with NOAA Weather tone alerts. Don’t forget the extra batteries.

 

  1. Power: If the electricity is out, you will need a way to recharge batteries and other items. Solar panels along with a solar storage “battery” can help. There are several on the market. Small solar charged battery storage products are lightweight and can recharge a cellphone or power a radio. These may be best for your “go bag”.

 

Generators that use gasoline must be outside and far away from open doors and windows, to avoid being overcome by fumes.

 

  1. ID and Important Document Storage: Back-up all computers on external hard drives (more than one). Put important scanned documents on an icloud account (which you can then access anywhere later), and on memory USB sticks (several).

 

Place them in different locations like a water/fire-proof safe, in a bank safety deposit box and mail to a trusted relative). Store documents in small waterproof containers for your “go bag”. Include insurance policies, driver licenses, passports, birth certificates, and photos of every room of your house (for insurance purposes).

 

You can also email these scanned documents to yourself for later printing. Don’t forget ID and passwords for accounts, I write mine in a way only I can interpret (for safety).

 

  1. Money: When we talk about a power outage, there may be another loss of power: purchasing power. If the electricity is out stores will not be able to process credit cards or make change. Have cash on hand in small denominations. Keep small bills and coins in a waterproof case/bag, and consider a little silver as well.

 

  1. Evacuation: Your GPS may not function, so have maps and a compass to help guide your escape. You may end up in an area you are not familiar with.

 

Plan routes of escape for fires and flooding and make sure each family member practices drills and has a specific meeting point. As mentioned earlier, each person should also have their own personal “go” bag with appropriate items, including the kids and pets.

 

  1. Writing Tools: You may want to document events or communicate with others, so having pens, pencils (and a sharpener) and notebooks should be considered.

 

  1. Distractions and Fun: Stress is not good for people long-term. Get some playing cards and a book with rules for lots of different ways to play games. Put an extra toy or favorite stuffed animal in your child’s “go bag”. Get some board games, puzzles and hobby craft supplies. (Don’t focus on the disaster and all the horrible details with your children; keep it light if you can.)
Consider the needs of kids and pets

Consider the needs of kids and pets

  1. Pets: Have extra pet supplies including food and medications. Have a way to get them out of the house safely if needed. Few people know that hotels cannot refuse to rent you a room during officially-declared states of emergency just because you have a (small) pet, but don’t expect them to let your family goat or chicken in the room. Have a plan for larger pets if possible.

 

Knowledge is power, but having supplies will make that knowledge work much better! Have a survival library in print books (not digital) with the knowledge you don’t have right now; A flashlight or fire is all you will need to read them in the dark.

Amy Alton, ARNP

Amy Alton ARNP

Amy Alton ARNP

Find lists of medical items you should have, and a lot  more information, in the 2017 Winner of the Book Excellence Award in Medicine “The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way”.

Survival Medicine Handbook, Third Edition

Survival Medicine Handbook, Third Edition

 

Survival Knife With Fire Starter

Click here to view the original post.

A survival knife with a fire starter is a recommended combination by Modern Survival Blog for general applicable carry. Having both a knife and a fire starter will serve as excellent bushcrafting tools. Bonus: It will also help assure your survival. I personally like the knife sheath that includes a holder for a fire starter such as a firesteel / ferro (ferrocerium) rod. It’s just a perfect combination. There’s nothing wrong with separately carrying a fire starter but this keeps it all in one place (the knife spine as a striker and the fire starter rod tucked in the sheath).

The post Survival Knife With Fire Starter appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Digging Fork Decisions: Which One And What’s Best For Your Wallet

Click here to view the original post.

The post Digging Fork Decisions: Which One And What’s Best For Your Wallet is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

If you’ve ever discovered that your soil is simply too tough to penetrate with a shovel, you’ll need a digging fork. These tools are a great way to loosen the soil in preparation to digging. They’re also great for working organic material, fertilizer, or compost into your garden beds. They’re amazing for getting root vegetables … Read more

The post Digging Fork Decisions: Which One And What’s Best For Your Wallet is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Keeping Preparedness Simple: Tips from the Health Ranger

Click here to view the original post.

Keeping Preparedness Simple: Tips from the Health Ranger This is a great article from a prepper. I have said this in the past but to get a first person representation of the struggles that new preppers face is so important. You always feel like a new prepper. That’s the secret, right? There is always something …

Continue reading »

The post Keeping Preparedness Simple: Tips from the Health Ranger appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Keeping Preparedness Simple: Tips from the Health Ranger

Keeping Preparedness Simple: Tips from the Health Ranger This is a great article from a prepper. I have said this in the past but to get a first person representation of the struggles that new preppers face is so important. You always feel like a new prepper. That’s the secret, right? There is always something …

Continue reading »

The post Keeping Preparedness Simple: Tips from the Health Ranger appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Keeping Preparedness Simple: Tips from the Health Ranger

Keeping Preparedness Simple: Tips from the Health Ranger This is a great article from a prepper. I have said this in the past but to get a first person representation of the struggles that new preppers face is so important. You always feel like a new prepper. That’s the secret, right? There is always something …

Continue reading »

The post Keeping Preparedness Simple: Tips from the Health Ranger appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Survival for the Common Man – Your Water Storage Solution

Click here to view the original post.

Don’t Fear the Unknown! Get Prepared!

Water is one of the most important preps. As you plan for survival, you need to be purposeful about having enough water for you and your loved ones. The good news is that you can acquire a water supply for survival with little or no money. With the simple steps below, you can feel confident that you will have a water supply to keep your family safe in an emergency.

Why Is Water So Important

The body needs water. According to the Mayo Clinic, water regulates body temperature, moistens body tissue, like in the mouth, eyes and nose, lubricates joints, protects body organs, prevents constipation, flushes the kidneys and liver by pushing out waste, helps to make minerals and nutrients available to the body and carries nutrients and oxygen to cells. Water is tied to health. Without clean drinking water, you and your family will be unhealthy.

How Much Water Should I Store

The number that you will always hear floated in preparedness circles is 1 gallon. But you need to understand that is a minimum amount for drinking and cooking only. You will need clean water for hygiene purposes; washing your body and hair, brushing your teeth, washing clothes and simply washing your hands. Start with the minimum amount for every family member for 2 weeks and then build from there.

1 gallon of water x 14 days x ___ family members = Your starting amount of water storage!

You also need to know that water is heavy and it is going to take up space. You will have to be purposeful about where you will keep all of this water. Depending on the storage container, you can’t just put your water storage in the garage or other areas that will experience extreme temperatures throughout the year. If you have spare closets and bedrooms, this is the best solution for you. If you have limited space, you will need to be creative!

I have prepared a free resource for you to download to help walk you through how many gallons and liters you will need to store for your family. To download the worksheet – CLICK HERE.

Storing Water – On the Cheap

As you begin your water storage, the easiest and simplest solution is to fill 2-liter plastic bottles that once contained soda (or POP). 2-liter bottles hold carbonated drinks under pressure for a long time. Many feel this makes 2-liter bottles a perfect FREE container to hold water.

Acquiring 2-liter bottles is fairly easy if you let people know you are doing a “project.” You can also load up during parties if you keep an eye out for them.

The procedure for washing and filling water bottles varies depending on which articles you read. I will provide you with a few ideas. You’ll have to decide on how far you want to go with your water storage.

To use these bottles, you need to make sure you wash them thoroughly with hot water and bleach. You don’t want to leave any of the soda or sugar behind. This can cause bacteria to grow in your water bottles.

Common advice among preppers is to mix 1 teaspoon of unscented bleach per 1 quart of water and use the water to clean out the soda bottles. Some people will tell you to let them dry and then do it again to be safe. You need to decide on that for yourself. Most don’t do the second washing.

After you feel comfortable with how clean your 2 liter bottles are, you can then fill them up using regular tap water. Here again, you will find various schools of thought. Some will tell you to fill the bottles up with tap water and then seal them up for storage and others will tell you to put two drops of unscented bleach into each 2-liter bottle for safety purposes. You have to make and live with the final decision.

Lastly, the water in the 2-liter bottles will need to be rotated. AGAIN, ideas vary. Some will tell you this needs to be done every six months. Others will say this needs to be done every year. And then some will say that if you did a good job of cleaning them in the first place, you don’t ever have to worry about rotating out the water. You have to feel comfortable with your decision, so do what you feel is right here!

NOTE – If you do rotate your water out, use the water to water your plants or yard.

Other Water Storage Solutions

One term that is very common to know in survival is redundancy. You’ll often hear the phrase, “two is one, one is none.” This phrase refers to the fact that sometimes things don’t go as planned and you need a back-up. When you are talking about something as precious as water, you need redundancy.

I suggest that every household have at least one, if not two WaterBobs. A WaterBob is a one time use, 100-gallon plastic bladder that sits in your bathtub and is filled with water from your tap. In the onset of an emergency, you would deploy the WaterBob and fill it up. The WaterBob comes with a pump that allows you to pump water out of the bag and into your container. A WaterBob costs about $70 and is well worth the peace of mind that you can quickly deploy this device and store up 100 gallons of water for your family.

You might be asking, can I just fill up my tub with water and not purchase a WaterBob? Yes and no! Yes, you can fill up your tub with water. But you can’t use that water to drink or for hygiene purposes. The reason is that you can never get your bathtub clean enough. No amount of scrubbing and cleaners will ever get all the nasty crud out of your tub! You can use the water in your bathtub to flush your toilet though. So if you have multiple bathtubs, you might want to consider using one to fill for flushing purposes.

 

Another option that you might want to consider is a Lifestraw water filter. This is the easiest type of water filter on the market. You basically put one end in dirty water and the other in your mouth and then suck the water up like a straw. If you have little ones, this might be an important solution for you. There are no moving parts or ways you can mess this up. It is easy for a young child to understand how to use. 

My first experience with the Lifestraw was at an expo. The guy behind the counter was using the water in a nasty gallon jug of dirty water. He would suck up a whole mouth full and then spit it out in a clear cup. The water was clean. It was pretty amazing to watch. After that moment, I was sold.  I always suggest Lifestraws to anyone wanting a water filtration system for their family. Are there others? Yes. But this is by far the easiest. Again, it is easy enough for a young child to use.

Conclusion

Water is life. You need water! This is the reason that I have chosen to write about this topic as my first topic, after planning, for this series. Take a moment to download the FREE PDF resource to help you calculate how many 2-liter bottles you will need to store up enough water for your family. Then put this information into practice!

 

Action Steps:

 

_____________________________________________
Survival for the Common Man is a series of articles for those who are new to prepping or those who never really felt they had a good foundation to start.

Why Survival for the Common Man? I love to gain experiences in wilderness survival, bushcraft, homesteading and “tactical” preparedness. But the truth is, most preppers are regular, everyday people (the common man). We live in the suburbs, go to our day jobs, and attend school and family events. But we also see the world around us and see the need to be prepared, to make sure our family is safe and able to thrive in times of uncertainty. There are more of us than you might realize! This series is for you!

Other Articles in the Survival for the Common Man Series:

Peace,
Todd

Survival for the Common Man – Your Water Storage Solution

Don’t Fear the Unknown! Get Prepared!

Water is one of the most important preps. As you plan for survival, you need to be purposeful about having enough water for you and your loved ones. The good news is that you can acquire a water supply for survival with little or no money. With the simple steps below, you can feel confident that you will have a water supply to keep your family safe in an emergency.

Why Is Water So Important

The body needs water. According to the Mayo Clinic, water regulates body temperature, moistens body tissue, like in the mouth, eyes and nose, lubricates joints, protects body organs, prevents constipation, flushes the kidneys and liver by pushing out waste, helps to make minerals and nutrients available to the body and carries nutrients and oxygen to cells. Water is tied to health. Without clean drinking water, you and your family will be unhealthy.

How Much Water Should I Store

The number that you will always hear floated in preparedness circles is 1 gallon. But you need to understand that is a minimum amount for drinking and cooking only. You will need clean water for hygiene purposes; washing your body and hair, brushing your teeth, washing clothes and simply washing your hands. Start with the minimum amount for every family member for 2 weeks and then build from there.

1 gallon of water x 14 days x ___ family members = Your starting amount of water storage!

You also need to know that water is heavy and it is going to take up space. You will have to be purposeful about where you will keep all of this water. Depending on the storage container, you can’t just put your water storage in the garage or other areas that will experience extreme temperatures throughout the year. If you have spare closets and bedrooms, this is the best solution for you. If you have limited space, you will need to be creative!

I have prepared a free resource for you to download to help walk you through how many gallons and liters you will need to store for your family. To download the worksheet – CLICK HERE.

Storing Water – On the Cheap

As you begin your water storage, the easiest and simplest solution is to fill 2-liter plastic bottles that once contained soda (or POP). 2-liter bottles hold carbonated drinks under pressure for a long time. Many feel this makes 2-liter bottles a perfect FREE container to hold water.

Acquiring 2-liter bottles is fairly easy if you let people know you are doing a “project.” You can also load up during parties if you keep an eye out for them.

The procedure for washing and filling water bottles varies depending on which articles you read. I will provide you with a few ideas. You’ll have to decide on how far you want to go with your water storage.

To use these bottles, you need to make sure you wash them thoroughly with hot water and bleach. You don’t want to leave any of the soda or sugar behind. This can cause bacteria to grow in your water bottles.

Common advice among preppers is to mix 1 teaspoon of unscented bleach per 1 quart of water and use the water to clean out the soda bottles. Some people will tell you to let them dry and then do it again to be safe. You need to decide on that for yourself. Most don’t do the second washing.

After you feel comfortable with how clean your 2 liter bottles are, you can then fill them up using regular tap water. Here again, you will find various schools of thought. Some will tell you to fill the bottles up with tap water and then seal them up for storage and others will tell you to put two drops of unscented bleach into each 2-liter bottle for safety purposes. You have to make and live with the final decision.

Lastly, the water in the 2-liter bottles will need to be rotated. AGAIN, ideas vary. Some will tell you this needs to be done every six months. Others will say this needs to be done every year. And then some will say that if you did a good job of cleaning them in the first place, you don’t ever have to worry about rotating out the water. You have to feel comfortable with your decision, so do what you feel is right here!

NOTE – If you do rotate your water out, use the water to water your plants or yard.

Other Water Storage Solutions

One term that is very common to know in survival is redundancy. You’ll often hear the phrase, “two is one, one is none.” This phrase refers to the fact that sometimes things don’t go as planned and you need a back-up. When you are talking about something as precious as water, you need redundancy.

I suggest that every household have at least one, if not two WaterBobs. A WaterBob is a one time use, 100-gallon plastic bladder that sits in your bathtub and is filled with water from your tap. In the onset of an emergency, you would deploy the WaterBob and fill it up. The WaterBob comes with a pump that allows you to pump water out of the bag and into your container. A WaterBob costs about $70 and is well worth the peace of mind that you can quickly deploy this device and store up 100 gallons of water for your family.

You might be asking, can I just fill up my tub with water and not purchase a WaterBob? Yes and no! Yes, you can fill up your tub with water. But you can’t use that water to drink or for hygiene purposes. The reason is that you can never get your bathtub clean enough. No amount of scrubbing and cleaners will ever get all the nasty crud out of your tub! You can use the water in your bathtub to flush your toilet though. So if you have multiple bathtubs, you might want to consider using one to fill for flushing purposes.

 

Another option that you might want to consider is a Lifestraw water filter. This is the easiest type of water filter on the market. You basically put one end in dirty water and the other in your mouth and then suck the water up like a straw. If you have little ones, this might be an important solution for you. There are no moving parts or ways you can mess this up. It is easy for a young child to understand how to use. 

My first experience with the Lifestraw was at an expo. The guy behind the counter was using the water in a nasty gallon jug of dirty water. He would suck up a whole mouth full and then spit it out in a clear cup. The water was clean. It was pretty amazing to watch. After that moment, I was sold.  I always suggest Lifestraws to anyone wanting a water filtration system for their family. Are there others? Yes. But this is by far the easiest. Again, it is easy enough for a young child to use.

Conclusion

Water is life. You need water! This is the reason that I have chosen to write about this topic as my first topic, after planning, for this series. Take a moment to download the FREE PDF resource to help you calculate how many 2-liter bottles you will need to store up enough water for your family. Then put this information into practice!

 

Action Steps:

 

_____________________________________________
Survival for the Common Man is a series of articles for those who are new to prepping or those who never really felt they had a good foundation to start.

Why Survival for the Common Man? I love to gain experiences in wilderness survival, bushcraft, homesteading and “tactical” preparedness. But the truth is, most preppers are regular, everyday people (the common man). We live in the suburbs, go to our day jobs, and attend school and family events. But we also see the world around us and see the need to be prepared, to make sure our family is safe and able to thrive in times of uncertainty. There are more of us than you might realize! This series is for you!

Other Articles in the Survival for the Common Man Series:

Peace,
Todd

Here’s the Story about the Texas Church Shooting Gun Control Advocates Don’t Want You to Hear

Click here to view the original post.

By now, everyone has heard about the horrific shooting yesterday in Sutherland Springs, Texas, in which a man dressed in tactical gear entered the First Baptist Church and opened fire. … Read the rest

The post Here’s the Story about the Texas Church Shooting Gun Control Advocates Don’t Want You to Hear appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

Survival Home Defense: How To Make A Flour Bomb

Click here to view the original post.

While making artisanal bombs at home may end up in a visit from your local FBI office, with agents Scully and Mulder asking you weird questions about your internet surfing habits, mastering the dark arts of home-made explosives might come pretty handy at some strange moment in one’s life; I mean, who knows what the future brings?

Life is stranger than fiction and maybe someday you’ll be required to blow stuff up for the resistance, or to plant some mines on your survival corn field, waiting for those pesky scavengers to trip on your traps and get lit up like on the 4th of July.

Joke aside, it’s pretty easy to make artisanal flour bombs for your home defense, provided you know your chemistry. Let’s see the magic of it!

If you’ve seen that awesome movie about anarchy as an ideology, you’re probably aware of the fact that if you know how to make soap at home, you’re a certified chemist. And to make soap, you must first render fat. The thing is, with enough soap, you can basically blow up just about anything.

Click here to get your guide to a layered survival defense!

If you have the recipe for  home-made soap, take a load of this: once the tallow hardens, you can skim off a layer of glycerin. If you add to that some nitric acid, you got, well, basically nitroglycerin, check out that bad boy. If you add some sodium nitrate and a pinch of sawdust, you’ll be as smart as Alfred Nobel. You know, the dude who invented dynamite.

But enough of this already.

How Dust Explosions Work

Today we’ll concentrate on more benign stuff, something called dust explosions.

If you are wondering what I am talking about, a dust explosion (the rapid combustion of particles which are suspended in the air) occurs when a dispersed powdered combustible material (flour, powdered sugar, , coal dust or whatever) is present in high enough concentration in an oxygen (or other oxidizing gaseous medium) rich environment.

Dust explosions happen due to the fact that compared to their mass, dusts have a huge surface area and burning only occurs at the surface of a liquid/solid, where the reaction with oxygen takes place, thus dust is way more flammable than bulk stuff.

Dust explosions are very dangerous, especially in industrial environments, as they spontaneously appear in grain elevators and coal mines (due to coal dust).

Pyrotechnicians, filmmakers and special-effect artists are relying on dust explosions on a regular basis, due to their spectacular appearance  and also the fact that dust explosions can be safely contained in a tightly controlled environment.

What you must know about dust explosions is that if they take place in a confined environment, they can cause massive damage and flying shrapnel due to the enormous overpressures that build up following the shockwave which occurs after the initial detonation. The shockwave will be produced anyway, both in open air or in a confined space.

How to Make a Flour Bomb

To create a dust explosion, you’ll require 4 things: a combustible dust, in our case flour and/or powdered sugar, a high enough concentration of the respective dust to be suspended in the air, an oxidant (in our case, the oxygen in the atmosphere) and finally, an ignition source.

The thing about flour is that it’s made up of starch mostly. Starch is a carbohydrate, which is a sort of sugar-molecule chained in a weird way (compared to regular sugar), and anyone who ever lit a marshmallow on fire is aware that sugar burns fairly easy. And obviously, the same principle applies to flour.

To begin with, here’s a flour and powdered sugar experiment, which results in cool outdoor explosions. These guys got their idea about experimenting with home-made explosives after hearing a story about a sugar factory which blew its roof off after a guy lit his cigarette inside.

There were so much sugar particles floating around in the air, that a flame occurred (via the cigarette), which caused a concussion that lifted the roof up and blew the windows out. So, keep in mind, these things (dust explosions) are very dangerous in confined spaces, i.e. always experiment with dust explosions outdoors.

For our first DIY dust-explosion project, you’ll require all purpose flour, powdered sugar, a flare and tannerite. Oh, and a 12 gauge shotgun (38 inch barrel), or at least that’s what these guys use. The end result is spectacular, but I won’t spoil it for you, just check out the video.

Video first seen on Iraqveteran8888.

 

The second experiment is more dangerous as it’s performed inside a home-made (improvised) chemistry lab (or so it appears).

This is basically a flour bomb demonstration, involving a paint can as a closed receptacle (it has the lid on, which makes for a confined space dust explosion), flour (the inflammable stuff for the dust explosion to occur), and a lit candle. Oh, and a pair of safety goggles.

The DIY job is as simple as it gets: the tin can must come with a relatively tight lid, and a hole must be drilled at the lowest point in the can’s side wall, large enough to fit a straw. In the next step, put a handful of flour inside the can and then place the lit candle inside.

Now it’s time to put your safety goggles on. Insert the straw in the can, close the lid and blow through the straw at the base of the can, so the flour stirs up inside, hopefully without extinguishing the candle.

Video first seen on kentchemistry.com.

This experiment is very neat for chemistry demonstrations regarding surface area reaction rates, but if you’re not paying attention and you’re a total amateur, you may end up with your ceiling requiring some repairs. Oh, and a very cool bang.

Unlike the guy in our experiment, don’t forget to put the goggles on, for safety reasons. Truth be told, these types of experiments should never be performed inside your house, as I already told you. Always play with fire outdoors, away from anything flammable.

Playing with chemicals is pretty dangerous stuff, but also massive fun if done nice and proper. Take care not to blow yourself up while preparing your home defense with these bombs!

I hope the article was as fun for you to read as it was for me to write. Feel free to comment if you have other ideas in the dedicated section below!

This article has been written by Chris Black for Survivopedia.

References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitroglycerin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tannerite

Feel Safer in Your Apartment and Save Money with These 5 Smart Gadgets

Click here to view the original post.

Written by Krystal Rogers-Nelson You don’t have to rely on someone else to have a secure and energy efficient apartment. Thanks to technology, it’s easier than ever to secure your home and reduce your energy usage without relying on outside services. These five apartment-friendly smart gadgets will not only help you feel safe, you will save money as well. 1. Wi-Fi Smoke Alarm Battery Most renters don’t want or aren’t allowed to make many upgrades to their apartment. Instead of […]

The post Feel Safer in Your Apartment and Save Money with These 5 Smart Gadgets appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

How to Survive a Bed Bug Infestation

Click here to view the original post.

Are you suffering from a bed bug infestation? If so then you are in the right place. Bed bugs don’t live on their hosts the way that ticks and fleas do but tend to feed on them only. They prefer feeding on humans as compared to any other animals. Your pets can also be hosts … Read more…

The post How to Survive a Bed Bug Infestation was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

11 Home Security Tips for Life After SHTF

Click here to view the original post.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: one of the biggest threats during any type of disaster is people who are unprepared. At first, they’ll stay in their homes and wait for the government to send help. But after several days, when they start running out of food and realize no one is […]

The post 11 Home Security Tips for Life After SHTF appeared first on Urban Survival Site.