These Crimes Against Harvey Victims Will Make You Angry — and teach you how to avoid becoming a victim

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crimes against harvey victimsHurricane Harvey put a huge dent in my hometown, with close to 200 businesses and 20% of the homes here flooded, some up past their rooflines. It’s been a tough couple of months. Our home was spared but if the flood waters had continued to rise for just a few more hours, we wouldn’t have been so lucky.

Piles and piles of “house guts” as I called them quickly lined the streets, and in some cases are still there, waiting to be picked up. Needless to say, the mounds of wet carpet, sheetrock, furniture, clothing, and every type of belonging you could imagine drew flies, rodents, bred mosquitoes, and, unfortunately, attracted a certain group of human predators who focused on bedraggled families as their next victims.

You can see from this photo how many, many people have lived in the weeks, and now months, post-Harvey.

Now, don’t get me wrong. The community here was and continues to be outstanding in their level of support. Our church was one of the leaders in organizing work crews who went into homes and helped shellshocked owners do what had to be done — dismantle the remnants of their secure lives, leaving them with nothing but concrete floors and wall studs. It was backbreaking work, but “Texas Strong” was a reality, every single day.

The worst in human nature came in the form of those who had no shame in taking advantage of my community in every possible way. Looters, of course, arrived to go through homes that had been temporarily abandoned, taking off with what very little the homeowner had salvaged. I now completely understand the sentiment, “Looters will be shot.”

Homeowners, in their rush to gut their homes and start the drying process, piled things in the front yard to sort through later, but soon discovered that ANYTHING left outside was considered fair game. At different hours of the day and into the night, cars prowled these neighborhoods, with human vultures looking for anything with potential value.

Along with piles of house guts, people had no choice but to put out piles of soggy paperwork, mail, and files of family and financial records. Incredibly, the dregs of society soon found those and began putting them to use, creating fake identities, complete with drivers licenses, checks, and credit cards. In some cases it was the work crews who found the documents and sold them to other criminals. Here’s an example of one identity thief who was caught. I’ve heard of many instances of mail being stolen out of mailboxes once mail delivery resumed. With so many homeowners unable to stay in their homes and check their mail in a timely manner, it was there for the taking.

Speaking of work crews, as you can probably imagine, our town soon attracted construction workers and contractors of all kinds who took advantage of flood victims in every possible way, from demanding large deposits and then never doing the job to doing shoddy work that had to be re-done by actual professionals. Anti-mold companies sold products and services that weren’t necessary, and one experienced construction professional sent this plea on a Facebook page,

As you look for your homes and properties to be repaired, PLEASE don’t tell contractors, bidders, and handyman you’ve just received your insurance check unless you absolutely need to. And please don’t tell them how much it was. I’ve seen several areas become devastated and people will be looking to get the most money from you. Telling them you received your check and how much it was, tells them just how much to bid the job for! Whether or not the work is worth that amount. People unfortunately, are not as honest these days. Do not be afraid to ask to see a portfolio of pictures of their work, request references, and by all means… ask questions! Keep all quotes to yourself, unless using it to negotiate a lower price. This will ensure your quotes and estimates are truthful and honest. Don’t be afraid to get multiple quotes either. This will make the money hungry bids stand out. And last but not least… cheapest isn’t always the best. Some people will cut corners to cut costs.

On Facebook pages and in community forums, I’ve seen multiple examples of scammers, hired by desperate people but, in the end, leaving them even more desperate, betrayed, and a lot poorer.

My wife very actively kept track of people in need and worked to connect them with donations, but in a few cases, she saw that some individuals whose homes had NOT been flooded, were joining in with requests for everything from furniture to appliances, clothing, you name it. One woman posted a variety of sob stories on different Facebook pages, until the community began to catch on. Many of us began requesting more information from those posting needs, like asking for an address so we could make sure there was an actual need, their home had actually flooded, and they weren’t just someone looking for a handout, leaving less for the true flood victims.

And then there were those who used the telephone and a computer to try and defraud:

I just received a call from someone saying they were with FEMA and that I was being offered $9k. They wanted my banking info. They could not tell my name or address. They hung up when I asked if they knew my name. It was from a 202 (DC) number. Don’t give banking info over the phone. FEMA should already have it if you applied for relief.

Here’s another example of the lengths criminals go to in order to defraud victims:

There are individuals out there that are using addresses of homes that have been vacant due to flooding for purposes of obtaining governmental services (i.e. Unemployment Benefits and/or Government Assistance). How can you tell? When you receive mail addressed to strangers with your address and a lot # after the street address. Watch out for this as it has happened to me from about 4 strangers. I contacted the TWC (Texas Workforce Commission) and reported them. I then returned the mail to the Post Office marked RETURN TO SENDER – DOES NOT LIVE HERE. This could stem from strangers driving the neighborhood to Contractors working in the neighborhood.

We asked our community about other crimes they had experienced during this horrific flood, and here’s just a sampling:

  • (People are) selling flooded cars or other items with out disclosing the damage.
  • My friend got her purse stolen at Lowe’s. The police told her a lot of people have come into town to steal. Because everyone is so distracted, we become easy targets.
  • Someone in the streets where I’m volunteering asked me for donations. I talked with other volunteers, asking about help to find donations for him and they said he was selling the donations.
  • There are people selling items they collect from donation points. I see it all over Facebook. Huge stockpiles of diapers, cleaning supplies, clothes, purses, etc.
  • I have had friends have AC companies quote for new AC unit ($10k a pop) and then sent my repair man out to say the units are fine and may need a new coil at $1400 max. Also had a general inspector confirm units were fine.
  • (My husband’s) warehouse was broken into during the hurricane. They took almost everything valuable from his office including his signed print of The Alamo.
  • People trying to return our donated items to the store for cash- we were told to cross through the bar code with a thick black marker so this couldn’t happen.
  • Price gouging! I got quotes for drywall replacement from $20K to $41K!
  • A picture of my collapsed townhome was posted on FB as if it was someone else’s home. They used it so they could garner sympathy and collect donations for a boy who wasn’t living in any of the Townhomes and his home wasn’t flooded. The post was eventually taken down but not until they bragged about getting all kinds of money….for example $5k from someone and $250 from State Farm.
  • The Red Cross hasn’t even been here yet and all I hear is them asking for donations.

I’m sure this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the level of crimes and scams that happened across the Houston area following Hurricane Harvey. I have to admit, I’ve seen a lot in my lifetime and, in fact, lived for more than 20 years in a part of the world where typhoons were a regular occurrence, but seeing up close the impact a record-breaking flood has on families and businesses and then hearing about the lowlifes who saw opportunities to commit crime — well, it’s been discouraging. Life for these families will forever be divided into, “before the flood” and “after the flood,” and they didn’t deserve to be victimized twice, first by Mother Nature and second by their fellow human beings.

Not everything post-Harvey has been terrible. In fact, on our partner blog, The Survival Mom, you can read inspiring examples of how the communities, including my own, pulled together in extraordinary ways. “27 Creative Ways to Help Disaster Victims” and “50+ Ways to Help the Victims of Harvey (and other disasters yet to come)” are encouraging because just about everyone in our community found a way to help out.

There’s no doubt that the crimes listed here are happening again and again across the country, wherever vulnerable people can be found. With these examples from my own experience, I hope you’ll be able to protect yourself and your loved ones from the human scum who see you as their prey.

 

 

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Is This Organic Chicken Feed Good or Evil?

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A Funny Thing Happened at the Fair

A couple of years ago, I was invited to speak at the Mother Earth News Fair in Topeka, Kansas. I gave my talk about “How to Grow Half of Your Own Food in an Hour a Day.” The talk was really great and several people in the audience came up to me afterward to tell me how excited they were about starting to grow some of their own food and medicine.

I just love that energy when someone gets excited about working toward real food independence!

After my talk was over, I was walking around the aisles at the fair and chatting with all of the people there. There were some pretty cool products on display—heritage crafts and folk art, these awesome modular livestock fodder systems, local organic seed companies . . . you name it.

If it’s about sustainable living or traditional organic foods, it was there.

So I was walking around, taking in the sites and soaking up as much info as I could retain, when I had a chance encounter that I want to tell you about . . .

Read more: Grow Your Own Chicken Feed the Easy Way

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Strangers in the Crowd

This encounter didn’t exactly start out on a positive note.

To tell you the truth, we were in each others’ way. I was trying to round the corner on a crowded aisle, and I had identified a tiny little narrow pathway where I could just squeeze through.

But about halfway through, I realized that there was someone else coming from the other direction who was also trying to squeeze through the same narrow opening in the crowd.

We met in the middle and started trying to shimmy around each other, but the space was too tight. We were stuck there together, caught in the crowd face to face, and neither of us could get to where we were trying to go.

We were both a little embarrassed, and we both gave each other a slightly sheepish smile when our eyes finally met.

“It’s pretty crowded today,” I said, in an attempt to break the ice and relieve the awkward vibe that was going on.

“Yeah,” she said, “I can’t believe how many people came out.”

The crowd started to thin around us, but we had already struck up a conversation, so I decided to stick with it. “I’m Marjory Wildcraft. I just did a presentation over there at the stage in the back corner. Did you see it?”

“No, I’ve been in the booth all morning long,” she said. As she spoke, she pointed to a big booth across the aisle.

I had to do a double take, because the booth she pointed to had a huge logo on the banner that I recognized instantly. It was the infamous red-and-white checkerboard of Purina.

Read more: Ferment Your Feed for Happier and Healthier Chickens

A Fox in the Hen House?

I was a little bit shocked . . . .

There I was, surrounded by all of the latest and greatest products in the organic, sustainable, traditional living marketplace.

Purina was one name I definitely had not expected to see in this crowd.

I looked around a little bit to see if maybe she had pointed at the wrong booth.

And that’s when I noticed her name tag.

There it was, right in front of me the whole time—that same red-and-white checkerboard right above her name, “Jodi.” I tried not to be rude, but I simply had to ask…

“What are you doing here?”

“Excuse me?”

“I’m sorry,” I said, trying to take a step backward in the conversation. “I, uh, I’m surprised to see that Purina is here at the Mother Earth News Fair.”

“Oh. Ha, ha, yeah, a lot of people have said that to me today.” She smiled, and I knew that she wasn’t too offended by my surprise.

Read more: Are You Prepared for Peak Chicken?

Making a New Friendship

When Jodi laughed, we both relaxed. I could tell that she was used to getting responses like mine, and she could tell that I was happy I hadn’t offended her.

But I still had to know. I gave Jodi a gentle smile and took a second try at asking the same question . . . .

“So, really, what are you doing here?”

Jodi explained that Purina sees a lot of value in small-scale family farms. They recognize that homesteading is a growing movement; they think it’s important; and they want to make sure that they’re listening to those customers about what they need and want from the products they buy to feed their animals.

“Huh,” I said, still a little surprised. I was trying to tread lightly so I wouldn’t offend her again. “Have you gotten a pretty good response from the people here?”

Jodi lit up, “We have! We’re just here to listen to people, and I think that people really appreciate that.”

“I see,” I said.

My first instinct had been that the people at this fair would be somewhat hostile toward a company like Purina. But for a company like Purina to show up at a Mother Earth News Fair, just to listen to the people . . . well . . . you can’t really get too upset about that.

I looked over at her booth again, and sure enough, it didn’t look like they were trying to sell any products that day. I noticed that there was a small group of homesteader-type families standing around and talking to the Purina representatives, who were listening intently to what the people had to say.

All of a sudden it started to make sense to me.

“What are people saying to you?” I asked.

Jodi thought it over for a second and then replied, “Organic.”

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Is Organic Enough?

We talked for a while longer. Jodi explained that she had talked to lots of people with lots of opinions. Some of the people at the fair already purchased Purina feed regularly from their local farm supply stores. Others, like me, were just surprised to see Purina there at all.

But, one common thread that she heard a lot that day was that people want to give their chickens organic feed. It was a big deal.

And Jodi explained that Purina was already working hard to get a line of organic chicken feeds out on the market. It wasn’t a small task for them—they had to source all new suppliers, create a new production process, and find new distributors who were willing to stock the product.

I could see that Jodi knew all of the ins and outs of the project, and it sounded to me like Purina was serious about creating this new line of organic chicken feeds.

But still, even as Jodi was speaking, my mind kept wondering off. I was thinking about the Purina company that I already knew. The Purina company that supplies food to all of those big industrial chicken farms . . . . The Purina that formulated chemical changes in animal food to make eggs come out bigger and make hogs grow faster . . . . The Purina that has been passed around over the years—owned and operated by huge global conglomerates like BP, Koch Industries, and Nestle . . . . The Purina that has been blamed for poisoning thousands of cats and dogs with low-quality pet foods…

I was pretty confused.

Read more: Would You Eat Chicken-less Eggs?

The Benefit of the Doubt

After we had talked for a few minutes, I decided to give Jodi the benefit of the doubt.

“Well, I’m impressed that you’re here listening to people. And I’ll tell you what . . . If you ever get that organic chicken feed on the market, I’m going to buy a bag of it.”

Jodi laughed, “Oh, I hope you will!”

We parted ways, and I kept walking to take in the rest of the fair.

To tell you the truth, I didn’t even think about it again for the next few years. That is, until I bumped into Jodi again at the Mother Earth News Fair in Texas this past spring. This time, I was lucky enough to have Anthony—the Grow Network’s videographer—there with me:

I’m A Woman of My Word

Well, I’ve never been one to break a promise. After we shot this video, I asked Jodi where I could find Purina’s new organic chicken feed, so that I could buy a bag and let my chickens try it.

She said that my local farm supply should have it—if it wasn’t there, I should just wait a month or two and try again. Sure enough, I found it in stock at my local store.

I have been raising a big flock of meat birds for a project we’re working on for The Grow Network this summer. I gave this food to those chickens for a couple of weeks, as a test. Come to think of it, it wasn’t much of a test. I think these chickens would have eaten anything. But they did seem to like the organic Purina feed. They ate the whole bag and I didn’t notice any changes in their health or behavior while they were eating it.

But I’m dying to know. . . .

Would you buy organic chicken feed from Purina?

Some of the people I’ve talked to swear that they’d never touch anything made by Purina. Other people don’t have a problem with it, and they say their decision would just be made based on the price.

So, what do you think? Is Purina’s organic chicken feed good or evil? Drop a comment down below to let me know what you think…

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(This post is an updated version of an article originally published on August 9, 2016.)

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Raising Chickens: The Scoop on the Coop

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If you are reading this article hoping to figure out the absolute best coop option available for raising happy chickens, you’re going to be disappointed.

That’s because the coop, as we know it today, is more about what humans want than about what makes chickens happy.

There is no single perfect coop.

Most of your decision-making depends on your location, regulations, and preferences. As long as you keep a few basic chicken needs in mind, the rest is up to you.

Meeting Chickens’ Needs

From a chicken’s perspective, its needs are basic:

  • Fresh air
  • Clean water
  • A patch of dirt to use as a dust bath
  • Lots of forage (particularly insects)
  • Options to let it escape from predators
  • Enough freedom of movement that it doesn’t have to spend all day standing in its own poop

Sometimes it needs a little private time, away from the rest of the flock. If it’s a broody hen, then it also wants a safe place to nest, undisturbed, for about twenty-one days.

The Last-Century Chicken

If it had been a backyard chicken a hundred years or so ago, it may have roosted in the barn with other animals, roosted in a tree, or found shelter around the porch of the family that threw it scraps.

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Maybe it spent its nights in a designated outbuilding reserved just for chickens, but it probably wasn’t anything like the luxury chicken manors found on sites like Pinterest today.

It probably didn’t have a nest box.

Eggs were often collected by children in a manner resembling an Easter egg hunt, since the hen’s goal was to hide its eggs for safekeeping until it had enough to make it worth risking life and limb to set a nest.

As long as it laid eighty or so eggs a year and managed to hatch a brood of chicken replacements once in a while, the family that let it forage in the yard was content to keep the bird around.

As far as predator protection went, the bird and its flock mates kept watch and used elaborate vocal communications to warn each other when trouble was near. If there was a rooster among them and the flock was attacked, he might defend the hens in his care to the death, if necessary.

Mamas would also protect their chicks by sheltering them in her wings.

But, among mature hens, with the moral imperative to survive and reproduce hardwired into their chicken nature, the expression “you don’t have to be faster than a bear, just faster than the guy behind you” usually applied.

Weak or sick hens were often pecked to death by stronger hens for the health and safety of the flock.

And though the birds may have really appreciated it when the lady who lived in the house threw them kitchen scraps or a handful of grain, they’d watched her wring enough chicken necks to realize they should scatter if she got too close.

How Things Have Changed

Things have changed a bit in the last hundred years.

As more areas are developed and populations increase, so does predator pressure on livestock. And it’s not just your random roaming mountain lion (which is now a rarity in the suburbs) or a wily coyote.

Now, chickens have to be careful about domesticated dogs and cats, escaped pet snakes and ferrets, car traffic, and even overzealous or malicious neighbor children. Top that off with all the local legal ordinances, HOA requirements, and other lethal hazards in our environments, and we’ve got to rethink the way we raise chickens.

Toward that end, let’s take a look at chicken space needs.

The Truth About Chicken Spaces

A hundred years ago, eggs were eaten when available and chicken meat was reserved for special occasions. Now, the average American eats 90 pounds of chicken meat15 and about 250 eggs16 per year.

In fact, chicken-based products rank No. 3, just below bread and dessert, among our sources of calories in the American diet.17

Living Space for Factory-Farmed Chickens

The amount of space and quality of life considered suitable for raising chickens seems to have declined in direct proportion to the amount of chicken meat and eggs we want to eat. Today, your grocery store egg layer gets about a sheet-of-paper-sized allotment of space and shares a battery cage the size of a filing drawer with five to nine other hens.18

Your typical grain-fed broiler gets only eight-tenths of a square foot per bird.19

“Free-range” birds need only two square feet of space outdoors to qualify and “pasture-raised” requires 108 square feet per bird.20

All of us who are concerned about the state of our factory-farmed food system would love to give our chickens as much room to roam as their hearts desire. But sometimes you’ve only got a limited area to work with.

And when you factor in the costs of predator protection, less space starts to make a whole lot more sense.

The Ideal Amount of Space for Chickens

So, how much space do chickens really need to be healthy and happy?

We’re not talking about how much they can survive in, but more like what amount of space would be enough to keep you from having to trim their beaks to keep them from pecking each other to death.

The answer is, “less than you might think, but more than factory farms allot.”

Right-Sizing Your Coop

As Marjory tells us in her Grow Your Own Groceries [LINKTO:] video series, you will need about four square feet of space per chicken in the coop if they will be allowed to forage outdoors most of the day.

If your chickens will be confined full-time, then you need to add an additional 10 square feet to that number. If you have an 8-foot-by-8-foot coop, or 64 square feet of chicken space, you can protect 16 chickens for overnight lodging and only 4 chickens for full-time living quarters.

But as Marjory also points out in her video, a suburban backyard may be best suited for about two or three hens if you intend to allow your chickens unfettered access to your landscape.

Cost Considerations

Building or buying coops can be expensive—even if you free-source your materials by using discarded pallets, scrap wood, or non-traditional building materials.

The larger your coop, the more labor intensive it will be to build and the more space you have to maintain. It may also mean more regulations to navigate and more hoops to jump through. Additionally, if you live in cold-climate areas, smaller coops that keep chickens in close contact are warmer without supplemental heat.

So, bigger is not always better when building a coop. However, for overall chicken health and happiness, the more outdoor foraging space you can provide the better.

These space suggestions are just a starting point for determining your coop size and style of raising chickens.

Coop Concerns

All chicken owners need to think about two major things: predator protection and poop.

Chicken books and blogs often break these ideas down into more categories. But for simplicity and easy memorization, we settled on these two concepts as the big ideas chicken keepers should address to provide safe, healthy habitats for chickens.

Predator Protection

Many chicken owners will tell you that the hardest part about keeping chickens is keeping them safe. When you confine chickens to a limited space, you also limit their ability to protect themselves from predation.

Also, when you invest your time and resources into caring for your flock, you don’t want to face the 40 percent loss rate that would occur if your chickens were not housed in a predator-proof coop.21

Suburban development has placed pressure on wildlife to seek new habitats and find alternate ways of feeding themselves. As a result, suburban areas are sometimes the most predator-prone places of all.

Add to that the number of backyard pets eager to express their genetic history (i.e., dogs descended from wolves, house cats from jungle cats), and you’ve got lots of incentive to place priority on building a rock-solid coop.

Ways Predators Can Breach a Coop

Here’s a few predator facts to be aware of when planning predator protection.

  • An owl can fly through an open window and carry away a small chicken.
  • A fox or digging dog can tunnel under a foot of dirt to get to your chickens.
  • A determined raccoon can claw through chicken wire, reach a paw through openings over an inch wide, and open many doors.
  • A bear can tear a door from its hinges.

Planning All-Around Predator Protection

Given these examples, as you are planning your coop, you will want to consider predator protection overhead, underground, and all around (e.g., windows and eaves).

This includes measures like the following:

  • Burying wire mesh (better than chicken wire) underground around the perimeter of your coop or placing it underneath moveable coops, over windows, around eaves, and over any openings otherwise not protected
  • Building a floor in a fixed coop or elevating a coop off the ground to deter diggers
  • The use of electric fencing, motion-sensing lights, or even a well-trained livestock guardian dog (LGD)
  • The use of overhead netting if flying predators (e.g., hawks, owls, magpies) are a big concern—or keeping chickens confined until they are full sized

You may also want to keep separate storage and feeding areas and make egg collection a frequent activity.

Many predators, such as bears, snakes, and opossums, are more interested in your chicken feed or eggs than in eating your chickens. By removing red-carpet invites like a feed trough housed in your coop and by emptying nest boxes daily, you can discourage some predators.

If there are other chicken keepers in your area, talk to them to find out what kind of predator pressure they have experienced to determine where to focus your efforts and what to expect.

Poop (Ventilation and Cleaning)

Yep, we just said poop, not manure. When the thick, putrid stink of fresh chicken droppings first hits your nasal passages, you’ll understand why.

This stuff doesn’t come out as lovely, garden-friendly manure.

It’s as rank and nasty as our stuff is until the freshness dissipates, which—depending on degree of soppiness and external humidity—can be minutes to hours.

How poop is treated in the collection process also determines whether it is useful manure or nuisance “feces” (as it is often referred to in city ordinances on chicken keeping).

Managing the Smell

Chickens may have just as many olfactory senses as human beings,22 so managing poop odors is as important for your chickens as it is for you (and your neighbors).

For indoor areas, good ventilation is key.

  • You can use wire-mesh covered windows or vents for this purpose and open coop doors during the day. Placing windows on opposite sides of the coop with access to the prevailing winds can be helpful.
  • However, keep in mind, ventilation is good, but drafts in extremely cold weather are bad.
  • For cold-weather areas, avoid placing ventilation openings directly across from nest boxes or roost bars.
  • For warmer climates, feel free to take advantage of cross breezes over roost bars. Or better yet, opt for an open coop, with plenty of fresh air for your chickens’ olfactory pleasure.

Other ways to minimize poop odors include adding a layer of fresh litter to poop-catching surfaces (e.g., straw, wood shavings, or cardboard chips on floors) or using a square head spade to scrape up manure and ladle it into a lidded bucket on a daily basis.

Alternatively, if you use a chicken tractor [LINKTO:] instead of a coop, you may need to move your chickens once or twice daily to keep them from spending the day standing in their own poop or creating problems in your soil from excessive nitrogen and phosphorous.

Except with a chicken tractor–style coop, you will need to the clean up the poop in the coop—and the more often the better if you want to cut down on pests, attract fewer predators, minimize the potential for health issues in your flock, maximize compost for your garden, and remain friendly with your neighbors.

(NOTE: Some people also use the built-up litter method to control odors, generate a little heat during the winter, and produce some nice compost for their spring garden.) [LINKTO:]

Coop Design With Cleanup in Mind

So, an important consideration related to poop and coop design is easy cleanup.

If considering an elevated coop, it’s a good idea to bring it up to waist height and make sure you can reach all parts of the coop by bending at the waist rather than hunching. This way you can use a hand shovel, dust pan, and brush for easy cleaning. In larger elevated coops, this may require more doors for comfortable cleaning access.

A coop that is tall enough to stand up in with easy-to-sweep floors or pitchfork-accessible areas also works. And the fewer unnecessary horizontal poop-catching surfaces, the better.

Bottom line, the easier your coop is to clean, the more likely you will be to clean it.

A clean coop contributes enormously to chicken well-being. It also cuts down on the likelihood that neighbors will take offense over your keeping chickens. Plus, fresh poop has a lot more benefits for your compost pile than old, dried droppings, so collect it early and often.

If chicken poop accumulates in outdoor run areas or heavily trafficked chicken hangouts, occasionally adding some kind of mulch material or hosing down the area to dilute and distribute can help.

However, your best method for minimizing poop plots is to use moveable pens or paddocks to direct chicken activity.

The post Raising Chickens: The Scoop on the Coop appeared first on The Grow Network.

Conflicted: Psychological Barriers – What Would You Do?

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The game BEFORE the SHTF!

Conflicted is a Survival Card Game.  Each card in the deck has a scenario that will stretch how you would respond in an SHTF situation.  What would you do?  Leave your thoughts in the comment section below!

SCENARIO – Your bug out location is far off the beaten path, but you feel you need to put something as a barrier to discourage people from heading your way.  There aren’t enough materials to build a physical barrier, it has to be a psychological one that would cause people to turn away just from seeing it.  What kind of psychological barrier would you build and how would it be effective?

Don’t forget to leave your thoughts in the comments below.

If you are interested in purchasing your own Conflicted deck – CLICK HERE.

Peace,
Todd

Your Chances of Surviving a Post-Collapse Urban Environment are Slim

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Your Chances of Surviving a Post-Collapse Urban Environment are Slim We all are in this thing to survive. There is no getting around it. We are collecting items and skills to handle the very worst case scenario. Now, all that preparation comes down to decision making. There are some decision that you cannot come back …

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Uses and Benefits of Frankincense

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Uses and Benefits of Frankincense Are you using essential oils? There is a catch 22 when it comes to essential oils. This has kept me out of it for a very long time. You see, if you depend on them they are very hard to emulate. I was also unaware of how many of the …

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RE: Using vs Collecting

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http://booksbikesboomsticks.blogspot.com/2017/11/using-vs-collecting.html?m=1

Admittedly while there is some overlap between her huge blog and my tiny one (I’m not sure if she knows I exist) we have different angles. Hers is a little more guns and such and mine is more preparedness.

In general I find her reasoning sound. From what I have seen in the survivalist world I have two concerns though.

First people who try to press collectible guns into a working gun role. The guy whose go guns are a P1 Walter and an M1 Garand. He is making a very stupid decision. Without going deep into this gun vs that guns collectibles should be enjoyed and modern designs from post WWII should be used for work.

Second is similar putting money that should go to a working gun towards a collectible one. Don’t get me wrong, collect whatever you want. The thing is if you need a defensive handgun buy a Glock 19 or similar gun. Use your non preparedness fun cash to buy that S&W pre model 10 you really want. 

These are the Diseases that Could be Unleashed in a Bio-Weapon from North Korea

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There have been several articles circulating over the past several weeks pertaining to the Biological Weapons capability of North Korea, as well as delivery systems for those weapons.  I’m going to provide the title and the source for one of these articles for your perusal, and then we’re going to cover the “meat and potatoes” of this article: meds needed against such attacks.

North Korea is ‘mass producing biological weapons’ and could unleash smallpox, cholera, plague, and anthrax on US troops,” by Patrick Knox of The Sun, 10/22/17 

Diseases that Could Be Used As BioWeapons

Let’s give brief overviews of the diseases, now.

  1. Smallpox: (bacterium Variola minor) A very horrible disease indeed.  The last naturally-occurring case was in 1977.  It was one of the most severe diseases to afflict mankind, and was “eradicated.”  Not in the labs, though.  Militaries all over the world (to include the U.S. and North Korea) possess it.  The disease is easy enough to reproduce, as cowpox (a similar disease occurring in cattle) can be mutated to form smallpox.  The treatment is the smallpox vaccine, which should be administered within 3 days to be able to arrest the disease and heal the patient.  The problem is the only smallpox vaccine supplies are controlled by the U.S. government…in their secret warehouses, in unknown numbers…at taxpayer expense.

2. Plague: (the bacterium Yersinia pestis) We just covered treatment medications for the bubonic plague in previous articles, as the pneumonic plague is spreading in Africa (11 nations at the time of this writing), a severe form of bubonic plague that affects the lungs.  We mentioned that Ciprofloxacin (or Cipro) is a drug with a long shelf-life that can be acquired for your pet fish from pet veterinary medication suppliers.  ‘Nuff said there.

3. Anthrax: (bacterium Bacillus anthracis) The spores of the bacteria are the method this disease is spread.  Two forms of antibiotics can be used to treat the infection…Doxycycline, and [Drum-Roll!] Ciprofloxacin, once again.

As I had mentioned in other articles, Cipro has a long shelf life, and as you see here, it can be used against both Anthrax and Plague

4. Cholera: (bacterium Vibrio cholerae) This disease attacks the digestive system and causes diarrhea and loss of electrolytes.  Vomiting and intensely-painful muscular cramps accompany it.  As vomiting and diarrhea are occurring, the body loses both acids and bases respectively, and dehydration (if left unchecked with good oral and/or IV replacement) can lead to death.  Doxycycline, once again, is effective, and guess what else?  [Drum-Roll!]  Ciprofloxacin, yet a third time!

Antibiotics Will Be a Lifesaver!

One of the reasons I’ve focused on Cipro?  Check it out yourself.  Try and get ahold of Doxycycline, and you’ll find it next to impossible.  This is because the government (that’s the U.S. government, starting under Obama) bought up most of it as it was listed as a “critical National Defense material” and stockpiled in those government warehouses, for distribution by the government…at taxpayer expense.

For the rest of us outside of the bunkers and not dining on steak and lobster at taxpayer expense, Ciprofloxacin is the way to go.

We’ve mentioned these four diseases and what is needed to treat them.  We have had great comments [Special “kudos” for Craig Escaped Detroit who gave a plethora of good info] and interaction that have been helpful to other readers and to Miss Tess and I as well.  Keep the interaction coming…it’s what gives all of us the edge.  I also encourage you to read past articles we’ve written about biological warfare that are in the archives.  We’ll do another piece to cover some more equipment and preps in the days ahead.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

Biological Warfare 101: Knowledge and Preparation are your Keys to Survive

Biological Warfare 101: What Weapons and Tactics Governments Use Against You

Biological Warfare: Protecting Yourself Against Mankind’s Deadliest Weaponized Diseases

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Guide to Picking the Best Mattress & Sleeping Pad for Survival

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This is a guest article by Will Bermudez 

“Hope for the best, but prepare for the worst!” This already famous truism is the perfect advice for all humanity: the smartest thing to do to ensure our survival is to have a strategy for the times when such planning will be required. One may hope those times will never come, but being ready for any circumstances is a moral duty. One essential detail you need to think about when developing a survival strategy – whether if it is for living in the wild or for surviving a natural disaster – is sleeping arrangements. Depending on your needs, you’ll be inclined to choose between a mattress and a sleeping pad. I tried both options, and I can’t decisively swing over one or another. They both have numerous pros. But in the end, the choice is based on individual preferences. That’s why I put together a short guide to help you consider vital factors when making your purchase of either a mattress or a pad – or both.

Think comfort

Whether you want a thin sleeping pad or a thick air mattress, seek the most comfortable option according to your needs. If you have health issues, allergies or back pains or you just have to sleep in a specific position, choose the product that addresses your problem. Read the descriptions of the products carefully; ask the retailer for more details and, most importantly, read the buyers’ reviews. Test the pad or the mattress, if you have the possibility, for at least 15 minutes, in your favorite sleeping position.

Think storage and transportation

sleeping padModern pads and mattresses are designed to pack small, especially the outdoors models. Some pads pack to the size of a soda can. Deflated mattresses take little space in backpacks as well. But remember that you should focus on quality: the ultra-light ones may not offer the same sleep experience as the full body length ones. Sometimes too thin can mean a hard bed; too large, and the pad or mattress is difficult to carry. Considering you’ll probably sleep on the ground or the floor of a shelter, you should go for a thicker product, but still easy to transport.

Think materials and durability

The sleeping pad & mattress industry has evolved a lot over the past decades in all aspects – materials, weight, versatility, features. Pads are usually made of dense foam filled with tiny closed air cells. Most airbeds are made of PVC and other leading-edge materials meant to increase their durability. A thicker PVC layer (0.6 mm, for instance) offers better insulation, but can also bring extra weight. Good news is that lately, manufacturers went for fumes-free materials for airbeds, which reduces the safety concerns regarding the chemicals in these products.

Think power source

Consider the fact that you may not have an electric power source or that the one you have might get cut off. Thus, if you want to choose an air mattress, look for a self-sufficient product that can be inflated manually, or that can work on batteries as well.

Think quality and price

Try to find the best brands on the market, the ones that have been around for a long while and have developed a wide range of models, making them better and more affordable. Research thoroughly what others have to say about a particular product or brand; TryMattress recommends checking the website of the manufacturer and even the social media accounts since many people choose to give reviews on these networks. Last but not least, consider the fact that a good and reliable product will not be cheap, but it will be a long-term investment in your safety and comfort.

mattress

Publisher’s note: Amazon carries a good selection of sleeping pads and air mattresses.

Filed under: Azweaponcraftprepper, Beginning Prepper Series, Survival and Camping, Survival and Prepping Tagged: Beggining preppers, Bug Out Bag, Survival and Prepping, Survival Sleeping gear

Mexican Bean Beetle: How To Eliminate Epilachna Varivestis

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The post Mexican Bean Beetle: How To Eliminate Epilachna Varivestis is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

The Mexican bean beetle looks an awful lot like a ladybug of a different color, and we all love ladybugs, or as some call them, ladybirds. But under that cute orangish exterior lies a voracious agricultural pest. Unlike its sweet red relatives, it doesn’t prey on other pest insects, but on the plants themselves. How … Read more

The post Mexican Bean Beetle: How To Eliminate Epilachna Varivestis is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Mexican Bean Beetle: How To Eliminate Epilachna Varivestis

The post Mexican Bean Beetle: How To Eliminate Epilachna Varivestis is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

The Mexican bean beetle looks an awful lot like a ladybug of a different color, and we all love ladybugs, or as some call them, ladybirds. But under that cute orangish exterior lies a voracious agricultural pest. Unlike its sweet red relatives, it doesn’t prey on other pest insects, but on the plants themselves. How … Read more

The post Mexican Bean Beetle: How To Eliminate Epilachna Varivestis is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Survival Gear Review: Clickspring Fire Piston

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clickspring_fire_piston_starter_review

In today’s prepping survival marketplace there are many choices of fire starting tools.  Fires can be ignited byreview_clickspring_fire_piston_survival using a variety of these available tools by using many different techniques.  The bottom line though is to have a reliable fire starting implement that you can count on to get you a blaze started under all kinds of conditions.  This tool can do that.

By Dr. John J. Woods, a contributing author to SHTFBlog & Survival Cache

Brand new to the market to the point that sales packaging is not yet even complete, the Clickspring Fire Piston actually uses old school technology that has been around for some time.  In this new tool fire starting is delivered by a precision machined tool constructed of aluminum and brass.

The Origin of Clickspring

If you want a lot of background information on this new product, your search may leave you with more clickspring_fire_piston_shtfquestions than answers, but that does not impact the quality or function of the Clickspring Fire Piston.

The company or founding name Clickspring oddly comes from a home shop project development machine shop whose primary focus is on clock making.  The proprietor “Chris” creates the home shop project videos that you can watch on YouTube.

Firing up the Clickspring

You’ll need access to a computer or device that can dial up the YouTube video that shows you how to start a fire using the Clickspring Fire Piston.  The package I received for this product review contained no written instructions, no owner’s manual or a parts list.  All that is described in the video.  I can only assume once the final packaged product hits the market it will contain the necessary written information to learn to use it.

Also Read: DIY Firestarter

Though I could not ever get the sound working on the video thank goodness it came with subtitles, otherwise IEpic Smart Shield ad - kids water glasses with frame 300x250 would have been lost.  It is not an intuitive use tool, primarily because it is a specialty precision engineered device.  I had to watch the video several times to get the full orientation on it.

The fire piston uses a forceful thrust of air that is heated by a fast pump on the piston inside the chamber tube or body of the tool.  There are seals forward and aft on the end of the piston rod that allows the pressure to rise as the rod is thrust forward down the tube.  Apparently this rise in pressure creates the heat that ignites the tiny piece of pre-burned char cloth inserted into the forward end of the piston rod.

Once the piston rod is quickly thrust down the tube this ignites the char cloth which then glows red as an ember.  The end of the rod with the ember is then held to the remaining piece of the char cloth to ignite it.  Then this glowing char cloth is inserted into a wad of quick fire starting fodder such as a wad of dry grass, leaves or other materials that will start to burn.  From there the fire is tended and built up as usual.

Tool Shop Specs

The Clickspring Fire Piston is milled or precision turned from brass and aluminum.  Both end caps are brass.  The tube is aluminum.  The threaded brass end holds a small liquid filled compass which is a handy item.  This cap is drilled though to hold a piece of lanyard material that is 700mm in length and a sliding brass keeper to tighten around the wrist or other holding spot.  This threaded cap end screws down onto the threated end of the tool body or tube.

Related: Review of the Best Firestarters

The opposite end of the tube is where the brass piston rod with recessed dimple in the end of the rod holds theclickspring_fire_piston_review_survival_tool char cloth fits.  This is inserted into the tube and held in place by the pressure created by the seals when the screw on end is in place.  Caution here.  If the opposite end screw cap is screwed down tightly, then the piston rod will not insert because of the pressure created by the seals on the rod.  Once you handle it a few times you will quickly get the hang of how it all goes together and works.  Again, watch the play-by-play video.

The overall length of the Clickspring Fire Piston is just 5.35 inches long.  The outside diameter of the assembled tube unit is 0.75 inches.  It weighs a mere 5.6 ounces.  The entire unit is quite compact and easy to store in a Bug Out bag, vehicle glove compartment, backpack or cargo pants pocket.  The Clickspring Fire Piston retails for $89 and can be ordered on Amazon.

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8 Wild Nuts You Can Forage For Each Fall

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8 Wild Nuts You Can Forage For Each Fall

Hazelnuts. Image source: Pixabay.com

If you enjoy foraging, nuts are one of the easiest ways to harvest a lot of protein in a very short time. Many other foraged foods contain mostly sugars and complex carbohydrates, which provide good fuel, but are not enough to sustain us in the long run.

Unlike meat, foraged nuts will keep at room temperature for months without deteriorating. In a survival situation, knowing which nuts are available in your area could help keep you nourished through the winter months.

1. Black walnuts

Notoriously difficult to crack, black walnuts hide a valuable prize. You can literally harvest them by the bucket full in the fall. (But wear gloves!) Start by de-hulling the nuts either by hand, or by driving over the nuts to pulp the hull off the outside. Nuts tend to hull easier when they’re a few days old, so if you can’t get them off, take a break for a few days.

Once the hull is removed, wash the nuts with a hose and pressure nozzle and allow them to dry in the sun for a few days. Black walnuts, like most nuts, store best in their shell to prevent oxidation. Keep them in a cool, dark place or if you have the space, they can be stored in bags in the freezer.

Properly prepared, black walnuts can be just as tasty as commercial walnuts. Try them fresh out of hand, or get creative and bake them into a black walnut pie.

2. Beechnuts

Though they produce every year, once every 3 to 5 years is known as a mast year for beech nuts and they’ll produce extraordinary harvests. Individual nut masts are inside a husk that cracks itself open when they’re ripe and fall from the tree.

It’s difficult to husk beechnuts when they’re fresh, but they easily come from the shell once they’ve been roasted. Roast them in a low oven or over a fire until they’re toasted and then rub them between two towels until the husk comes free.

3. Acorns

If you know a thing or two about history, you know that acorns were a staple food source for Native Americans for centuries. They’ve fallen out of favor as European nuts and grains came to America, but acorns are still plentiful if you know where to look. They’re especially high in omega fats, and they’re commonly touted as a survival grain for making tasty cookies in the absence of modern grains.

Learn Unordinary Uses For Ordinary Stuff In “The Big Book Of Off The Grid Secrets”!

8 Wild Nuts You Can Forage For Each FallAs any squirrel will tell you, acorns keep well all on their own. Just keep undamaged acorns in a cool dry place until you’re ready to process them.

But before you eat acorns, you must remove the tannic acid. The fundamental process involves either a boiling water bath or cold-water bath (perhaps multiple times). This process can take a couple of days up to a week or more, depending on the amount of tannins in the acorns.

4. Hop hornbeam

Often overlooked as a food source, hop hornbeam tree produce hop-like catkins that contain edible nutlets that are about the size of a sunflower seed. Though each individual seed is small, they’re produced in papery husks containing many seeds in a group. In heavy production years, trees produce large amounts, meaning that they can be a meaningful food source.

Hornbeam tends to grow in the understory, and in areas with wet soil that are not suitable for oak trees. If you don’t have acorns in your area, you may have hornbeam. When foraging hop hornbeam, look for the green hop-like seed clusters anytime during the summer. They’ll be ready for harvest around October.

Store the dried catkins in a cool dark place until you’re ready to husk them and eat.

5. Butternuts

Buttery and mild, they’re the perfect substitute for pine nuts in a pesto or eaten straight out of hand. The butternut canker is causing the trees to decline, but tolerant trees and resistant hybrids still linger on in the wild throughout the northern latitudes.

They’re easier to crack than black walnuts, and well worth the effort to find. They keep best in the shell in a cool dark place all winter long.

6. Hickory nuts

The nuts of shagbark hickory and smooth bark hickory (pignuts) are tasty and sweet. The trees are common throughout the northeast, and bear heavily, especially when they’re along roadsides in full sun.

As foraged nuts go, hickories are relatively easy to crack. Leave them out in the sun for a few days to allow them to dry a bit so that the nut meat pulls away from the shell easier, and then they should come apart with a nutcracker, or lacking that, a moderate blow from a rock.

7. Hazelnuts

Growing in dense thickets in many parts of the country, hazelnuts provide a readily accessible food source. They’re easy to pick, and they naturally store longer than any other nut. Hazelnuts can be good for 9-12 months after harvest if stored in a cool place. Pick them by the bucketload, and remember that your biggest risk is an invasion of your stock by rodents, so protect your harvest accordingly.

8. Sweet chestnut

If you’ve ever tried to pick up a chestnut husk, you’ll remember your mistake. They’re exceptionally spiky inside the husk, but those spikes are guarding a delicious high calorie prize.  Immature nuts fall early, but the fully ripe fruit won’t be ready until sometime in mid to late fall.

Score the shells to open them, then blanch or roast them before you peel them.

What would you add to our list? Share your tips in the section below:

Raw Honey For Nutrition and Medicine

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I would recommend buying a significant supply of raw unfiltered pure honey for long term storage preparedness. Why? Because this honey will never spoil. This type of honey can be used for food (sweetener, nourishment) and medicinal purposes (treat wounds, burns, and even ulcers). Note that honey never spoils because it inhibits the growth of bacteria (and fungi and viruses). It will essentially store forever under the right conditions. Honey Nutrition It contains roughly 80% natural sugars (glucose & fructose), about 18% water, and 2% vitamins, minerals, pollen, and proteins. Vitamins in honey: Riboflavin, B6, thiamin, niacin, pantothenic acid, and

The post Raw Honey For Nutrition and Medicine appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Raw Honey For Nutrition and Medicine

I would recommend buying a significant supply of raw unfiltered pure honey for long term storage preparedness. Why? Because this honey will never spoil. This type of honey can be used for food (sweetener, nourishment) and medicinal purposes (treat wounds, burns, and even ulcers). Note that honey never spoils because it inhibits the growth of bacteria (and fungi and viruses). It will essentially store forever under the right conditions. Honey Nutrition It contains roughly 80% natural sugars (glucose & fructose), about 18% water, and 2% vitamins, minerals, pollen, and proteins. Vitamins in honey: Riboflavin, B6, thiamin, niacin, pantothenic acid, and

The post Raw Honey For Nutrition and Medicine appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

How to Survive World War 3: Useful Tips & Tricks

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There are many possible scenarios where a third world war might arise: ideological or religious reasons, as well as a lack of resources. So what are you going to do in an SHTF situation, especially one when nuclear or microbiological weapons are used? You need to be prepared for everything that might happen, so you’ve […]

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A Rose by any other name?

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A Rose by any other name?
Host: Lynna… “A Preppers Path” Audio player provided!

In our busy world we often overlook what is right in front of us. In our quest to make things easier and better than, we forget that man still has yet to improve on Mother Nature. The rose for many has been relegated to the florist shop and perhaps something to be enjoyed in a garden or used as a symbolic gesture of love or friendship or maybe even I am sorry.

Continue reading A Rose by any other name? at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Trump Requests $4 Billion More For Missile Defense Against North Korea

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Trump Requests $4 Billion More For Missile Defense Against North KoreaThe White House is asking Congress for an additional $4 billion to fund a missile defense against North Korea.

The request was made in a Monday letter from President Trump to Congress, The Hill reported.

The money would pay for 16 Standard Missle-3 Block11A interceptor rockets, 50 Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor missiles, and upgrades to radar and missile detection capabilities, the letter revealed. It also would add an additional Ground Based Interceptor Field at Fort Greely, Alaska, and 20 new interceptors. The request is apparently in addition in $9.9 billion Trump had already requested for missile defense.

“We’re going to be increasing our budget by many billions of dollars because of North Korea and other reasons having to do with the anti-missile [aspect],” Trump told reporters in August.

Are Your Prepared For A Downed Grid? Get Backup Electricity Today!

Despite the spending, no one knows if an anti-missile defense system will work. The missile system based at Fort Greely, missed targets in nine out of 18 tests since 1999, the All Things Nuclear blog noted.

The missile-defense money was part of a larger request for a variety of defense and other spending. The same request included $1.6 billion for the Mexico border wall and $1.2 billion for additional troop deployments in Afghanistan and elsewhere.

“Providing for the safety and security of the American people is my top priority,” Trump wrote in the letter.

What is your reaction? Share it in the section below:

How to Make Hard Cider 5 Easy Steps

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How to Make Hard Cider 5 Easy Steps Is there a better tell that the Fall as arrived than a delicious glass of apple cider. Those fresh apples are incredible. I guess the only thing better than apple cider is hard cider! Do you know that you can make hard cider yourself, from scratch. Are …

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The post How to Make Hard Cider 5 Easy Steps appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Medieval Leather Needle Case

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Medieval Leather Needle Case This is a very interesting little design here. It is called a medieval leather needle case. There is much more to this article than just this design. Not to mention the design is an incredible little storage case to begin with. Of course, you don’t have to hold needles in this …

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After Disaster Hygiene And Sanitation

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After Disaster Hygiene And Sanitation The unspoken threat of the disaster world. Looters make the news. We see them setting fires or running into homes. They look like us and we can easily understand the threat. There is the threat from nature as well. That is another threat we understand. It’s older than us. This …

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Survival Bug Out Myths | episode 170

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Survival Bug Out Myths | episode 170
Survival Bug Out Myths | episode 170

Survival Bug Out Myths | episode 170

https://www.survivalpunk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Survival-Bug-Out-Myths-170.mp3

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This week I have an episode about Survival Bug out myths. 

In the past, I have tackled a few of the big survival myths. Such as moss only grows on the north side of a tree. 

This week I have a few survival myths that are all centered around a bug out or post-collapse.

 

Topics

  • I have a gun I’ll just take what I need
  • I will just eat deer
  • The Gov Will save you
  • Don’t need community
  • Just go to So and So’s House
  • Bug out to WM 
  • Lose weight when the SHTF
  • Hike 4mph and do 30 miles in a day
  • Learn After the collapse
  • Cars still run on old gas
 

Links

Bugging out To Walmart

Survival Myths

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The Truth about Bartering Series – Part 3

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Written by Mike Harris on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: Another contribution from Mike Harris in his series on bartering for The Prepper JournalThe content is that of the authors. 
Commodities and the Facts about Barter – Preppers you may have it WRONG!

This series is truly centered on the idea of commodities. What they are and how are they actually used. This particular article I believe undoubtedly will be the most controversial piece I have ever written. I have reviewed countless articles on Barter and the ideas portrayed therein are, in my most humble opinion, somewhat ignorant and in some cases negligent. This idea that the mere possession of alcohol, water filters, canned food, candles, firearm related items and first aid products (insert random household/camping item here) will somehow equate to a gold standard currency (i.e. quintessential standard) that will allow the average person the ability to effectively engage in commerce to a standard of livability is ludicrous.  This is a myth that has been passed on from one prepper to another, without even taking a second to look at the facts or the peer research that is out there on this topic.

My goal is not to change anyone’s mind. I’m not even going to make suggestions on what commodities you should be prepping. I simply want to present the facts and evidence that are relevenant to the ideal that we all hold dear and that is “Preparedness”. I want to give you a systematic and fact based lens by which you can judge and discern commodities, or other barter items. Even more importantly I want to show you how you can establish a systematic approach on how to judge a “medium of exchange” in a post-WROL economy. If you haven’t read the first two articles I encourage you to do so as they really lay the foundation on this barter series. The articles can be found here:

The idea that a backpack, cellar, bunker or sunken ship has monetary worth based upon the items it possesses is the fundamental idea of “commodity”. A commodity is anything that holds intrinsic value in of its self and based upon that merit is widely accepted as a “medium of exchange”. Things like gold, silver, jewelry, precious metals/stones, even seashells have historically been considered “commodity money”. Even items like chocolate, cigarettes, and alcohol have been seen as ”commodity money” in many instances. It is important to realize that most of the items I noted in the beginning are not mentioned above. This is based upon a very striking paradigm – just because something is useful doesn’t make it valuable and vise versa. A great example of this is a roll of toilet paper and a 1-ounce silver coin. One is used everyday by millions upon millions of people while the other is not. Yet in a situation where a fiat currency is no longer in play one can be used, as “commodity money” while the other cannot.

Now it’s important to realize what makes currency effective in commerce. What does a reliable currency look like in a Post-WROL world? As mentioned in the last two articles there are three excellent indicators of a strong currency (“medium of exchange”). 1) A strong currency is one that is “widely accepted”. Unlike U.S. currency aka “Fiat Currency” paradigms (Federal Reserve Notes) commodities don’t require government force for them to be “widely accepted”. 2) You want your currency to have “stored value”. At a minimum you want it to have the ability to be left alone for long periods of time and still have the same value years later. With a good strong currency it would actually not be surprising to see it increase in value the longer it sits. 3) A strong currency has a “Unit of Measure”. Meaning there is an accurate and dependable standard by which you can account for its worth (1 oz. gold= $1,282.30 or 77oz. silver or €1086.70). The ability to have a criterion for which you can engage other commodities or currencies whether they are local or international goes to prove its merit not only as commodity but also as a currency.

Now that you have a blue print for what makes a strong reliable currency lets put some common barter items to the test. Lets start off with Medicine; While drugs, antibiotics and other pharmaceutical applications can be super valuable especially to the right person still in of its self doesn’t make it a great barter item.  Medicine is not widely accepted especially here in the US where it is highly subsidized and usually has a very specific clientele base (meaning bilateral trades will be very difficult). It does not have stored value due to its half-life and the fact that it has a set expiration date. Lastly it does not have a strong “Unit of Measure” by which an accurate calculation that can be made of its worth compared to that which would be bartered for it (How many eggs would an 800mg of Motrin be worth?). Next lets look at toilet paper, everyone uses toilet paper. It could be stored for long periods of time and remain relatively the same in quality. However it has absolutely no “Unit of Measure” nor is it widely accepted in the sense of commodity. It’s a luxury item with a relatively low priority in regards to human needs.

This leads us directly into the last thing I want to discuss which is Gresham’s Law. Gresham’s Law is a monetary principle that’s states that “bad money drives out good money”. For example, if there are two forms of commodity money in circulation, which are accepted by law or by perceived value as having a similar face value, the more valuable commodity will disappear from circulation. Gresham’s Law is the economic standard in currency valuation. We have seen this played out historically through the use of debasement. Especially if we look at the coinage act of 1965. Getting the most “bang for your buck” so to speak has been the objective of mankind since the beginning of time (Uses and Abuses of Gresham’s Law in the History of Money by Dr. Robert A. Mundell, 1999 Nobel Laureate). The same is true of bartering, people engaging in commerce will look to trade their lesser valuable commodities and items (alcohol, cigarettes, first aid supplies, jewelry, ammunition, water filters etc.) for the items they need or want.

When we look Bartering, and the concepts of commodities and more importantly economics from a post-WROL lens the most important thing we should do is to be realistic. Realistic about your economic abilities, realistic about the energy you are willing to put into engaging in commerce. Most importantly be realistic about the strength (“Widely Accepted”, “stored value”, “Unit of Measure”) of the commodity or barter items you plan to use when SHTF.

 

 

The post The Truth about Bartering Series – Part 3 appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

The Truth about Bartering Series – Part 3

Written by Mike Harris on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: Another contribution from Mike Harris in his series on bartering for The Prepper JournalThe content is that of the authors. 
Commodities and the Facts about Barter – Preppers you may have it WRONG!

This series is truly centered on the idea of commodities. What they are and how are they actually used. This particular article I believe undoubtedly will be the most controversial piece I have ever written. I have reviewed countless articles on Barter and the ideas portrayed therein are, in my most humble opinion, somewhat ignorant and in some cases negligent. This idea that the mere possession of alcohol, water filters, canned food, candles, firearm related items and first aid products (insert random household/camping item here) will somehow equate to a gold standard currency (i.e. quintessential standard) that will allow the average person the ability to effectively engage in commerce to a standard of livability is ludicrous.  This is a myth that has been passed on from one prepper to another, without even taking a second to look at the facts or the peer research that is out there on this topic.

My goal is not to change anyone’s mind. I’m not even going to make suggestions on what commodities you should be prepping. I simply want to present the facts and evidence that are relevenant to the ideal that we all hold dear and that is “Preparedness”. I want to give you a systematic and fact based lens by which you can judge and discern commodities, or other barter items. Even more importantly I want to show you how you can establish a systematic approach on how to judge a “medium of exchange” in a post-WROL economy. If you haven’t read the first two articles I encourage you to do so as they really lay the foundation on this barter series. The articles can be found here:

The idea that a backpack, cellar, bunker or sunken ship has monetary worth based upon the items it possesses is the fundamental idea of “commodity”. A commodity is anything that holds intrinsic value in of its self and based upon that merit is widely accepted as a “medium of exchange”. Things like gold, silver, jewelry, precious metals/stones, even seashells have historically been considered “commodity money”. Even items like chocolate, cigarettes, and alcohol have been seen as ”commodity money” in many instances. It is important to realize that most of the items I noted in the beginning are not mentioned above. This is based upon a very striking paradigm – just because something is useful doesn’t make it valuable and vise versa. A great example of this is a roll of toilet paper and a 1-ounce silver coin. One is used everyday by millions upon millions of people while the other is not. Yet in a situation where a fiat currency is no longer in play one can be used, as “commodity money” while the other cannot.

Now it’s important to realize what makes currency effective in commerce. What does a reliable currency look like in a Post-WROL world? As mentioned in the last two articles there are three excellent indicators of a strong currency (“medium of exchange”). 1) A strong currency is one that is “widely accepted”. Unlike U.S. currency aka “Fiat Currency” paradigms (Federal Reserve Notes) commodities don’t require government force for them to be “widely accepted”. 2) You want your currency to have “stored value”. At a minimum you want it to have the ability to be left alone for long periods of time and still have the same value years later. With a good strong currency it would actually not be surprising to see it increase in value the longer it sits. 3) A strong currency has a “Unit of Measure”. Meaning there is an accurate and dependable standard by which you can account for its worth (1 oz. gold= $1,282.30 or 77oz. silver or €1086.70). The ability to have a criterion for which you can engage other commodities or currencies whether they are local or international goes to prove its merit not only as commodity but also as a currency.

Now that you have a blue print for what makes a strong reliable currency lets put some common barter items to the test. Lets start off with Medicine; While drugs, antibiotics and other pharmaceutical applications can be super valuable especially to the right person still in of its self doesn’t make it a great barter item.  Medicine is not widely accepted especially here in the US where it is highly subsidized and usually has a very specific clientele base (meaning bilateral trades will be very difficult). It does not have stored value due to its half-life and the fact that it has a set expiration date. Lastly it does not have a strong “Unit of Measure” by which an accurate calculation that can be made of its worth compared to that which would be bartered for it (How many eggs would an 800mg of Motrin be worth?). Next lets look at toilet paper, everyone uses toilet paper. It could be stored for long periods of time and remain relatively the same in quality. However it has absolutely no “Unit of Measure” nor is it widely accepted in the sense of commodity. It’s a luxury item with a relatively low priority in regards to human needs.

This leads us directly into the last thing I want to discuss which is Gresham’s Law. Gresham’s Law is a monetary principle that’s states that “bad money drives out good money”. For example, if there are two forms of commodity money in circulation, which are accepted by law or by perceived value as having a similar face value, the more valuable commodity will disappear from circulation. Gresham’s Law is the economic standard in currency valuation. We have seen this played out historically through the use of debasement. Especially if we look at the coinage act of 1965. Getting the most “bang for your buck” so to speak has been the objective of mankind since the beginning of time (Uses and Abuses of Gresham’s Law in the History of Money by Dr. Robert A. Mundell, 1999 Nobel Laureate). The same is true of bartering, people engaging in commerce will look to trade their lesser valuable commodities and items (alcohol, cigarettes, first aid supplies, jewelry, ammunition, water filters etc.) for the items they need or want.

When we look Bartering, and the concepts of commodities and more importantly economics from a post-WROL lens the most important thing we should do is to be realistic. Realistic about your economic abilities, realistic about the energy you are willing to put into engaging in commerce. Most importantly be realistic about the strength (“Widely Accepted”, “stored value”, “Unit of Measure”) of the commodity or barter items you plan to use when SHTF.

 

 

The post The Truth about Bartering Series – Part 3 appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Prepping For Seniors: First Aid And Safety Tips You Need To Know

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Being weak, small or old is not necessarily a weakness in a disaster situation if you have enough knowledge, skills and the proper mindset to survive. Skills and knowledge take time to acquire, and so is the mindset that makes you strong and able to survive when the world around you is falling apart.

Knowledge is a supply that you can carry with you freely. It doesn’t weight anything and it can’t be stolen. If you want to stay safe, you need to know how to stay healthy and deter those people who think you’re too weak to protect yourself.

Read this article for a bunch of helpful tips that will help you stay safe and sound in time of need!

7 First Aid Survival Tips for Seniors

Knowing how to recognize and treat common sicknesses and injuries is a skill that any prepper should master. Being a senior might make the things worse, as rapid treatment could make the difference between life and death.

Chances are good that many people won’t know symptoms or have any supplies to treat injuries, so you can potentially save lives just by using what you know and what you have in your first aid kit. Here are a few tips that may help.

Have a First Aid Manual

First aid manuals are full of how-to’s, pictures, and lists of symptoms for common ailments such as dehydration or infection. Having a manual to refer to can help keep things clear in your head or help you identify maladies faster than you normally would.

Carry one with you in your survival kit and in your bug-out bag. While you’re at it, toss in a book of homeopathic remedies and edible medicinal herbs.

Take a First Aid/CPR Class

These are often offered for free at your local emergency services offices or home extension offices. They teach you how to treat a variety of injuries and ailments including cuts, burns, breaks, dehydration, infection, punctures and eye injuries. Encourage your friends and family to take the course with you.

CPR may be a separate class but is well worth your time. You’ll learn how to revive somebody who isn’t breathing and/or doesn’t have a heartbeat. Even if you can’t revive them, keeping oxygen flowing to their brain will help them survive without brain damage until you can get them to a hospital.

Have Emergency Contact Cards or Bracelets

These can be as simple as index cards that you keep in your wallet. Bracelets can be made at local pet stores that you can wear on a bracelet. List your name, emergency contact info, medical conditions, allergies, and medications.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Numbers and medication names can be difficult to remember if your injured or even scared, so having them written down may save your life or the life of a loved one.

Keep Your Emergency First Aid Kit Stocked

We’ve already discussed what you should have in your kit but make sure that everybody in the house knows that it’s for emergencies only.

It won’t do you any good in a SHTF situation if somebody robs all of the band aids and hearing aid batteries out of it instead of getting those from the regular household supply.

Keep Tabs on Local Weather Events

If you’ve lived in an area all of your life, you likely know what types of severe weather events to expect. Know the difference between storm watches (weather patterns are such that a storm may form) and storm warnings (an event has already formed and is on the way).

If you’re traveling, educate yourself on the types of weather events that you may encounter in vacationland. Check their local weather before you leave so that you’ll know what to expect and can be prepared regardless of where you’re at.

Be Tech-Savvy

In a time of emergency, text messaging and data services such as internet connections may be more reliable than traditional phone calls. If you know how to use these services, you may be more apt to have a means of communication than if you’re relying on a phone line.

Stay Hydrated

Your body loses water through breathing, sweating, urinating and defecating. If you don’t replace this water regularly (2-3 liters per day), you’ll die quickly. Knowing the signs of dehydration are crucial so that you can recognize it in yourself or in others. They are:

  • Dark colored urine with a strong “pee” smell
  • Not urinating as often as usual
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Dark or sunken eyes
  • Your skin doesn’t “snap back” when you pinch your arm
  • Mood swings
  • Slow capillary refill – when you squeeze down on your fingernail, the white should go away immediately when you release it. If not, drink!
  • Being thirsty. This may seem like a no-brainer, but if you’re feeling thirst, you’re already dehydrated.
  • Decrease in sweating
  • Swollen or shriveled tongue

It’s also imperative that you maintain adequate nutrition because your body requires minerals and vitamins to properly absorb water, maintain healthy blood pressure and just survive.

Self-Defense for Seniors

When it comes to defending yourself, you have a couple of advantages that may make up for your slightly slower reflexes. First, the older you are, the more an attacker is going to underestimate you. They going to be more likely to assume that you’re an easy mark just because you’re older or perhaps physically challenged.

Second, they’re going to expect you to be afraid. If you don’t show fear, it’s possible that you can throw them off-kilter long enough to buy yourself a few extra, precious seconds.

There are a few things that you can do to make this time count.

Take a Martial Arts Class

Though this may sound silly to you, the health benefits of martial arts are out of this world. It helps prevent muscle atrophy and bone loss and it keeps your connective tissues healthy. It also has the added benefit of giving you some extra skills that you can use to defend yourself if SHTF.

No matter what your fitness level is or what your physical abilities are, there are martial arts classes designed to meet your needs. The secret is to find a good trainer, and if there isn’t a senior’s martial arts class in your area, talk to a sensei about starting one. If you’re interested, most likely other seniors in your area are, too!

A huge advantage to a senior’s martial arts or self-defense class is that you’ll meet other seniors interested in learning to defend themselves. It’s likely that some of them will be doing it for the same reason that you are – prepping for SHTF.

Put out some feelers and you may just find some valuable allies that will be willing to join forces with you. That can be invaluable.

Learn to Use Your Brain as a Weapon

If your home is invaded in a survival situation, it may be more pertinent to use your head rather than your fists to defend yourself until you can gain the upper hand. For instance, trick the person into believing that you’re weaker than you really are.

Find non-traditional weapons that are handy such as your cane, a lamp, or even an ashtray. Make your first attempt count because you may not get another shot.

Offer to get your “money” from your purse and reach for you weapon instead. Don’t bother pulling it out; a gun will fire just fine though the bottom of your bag.

Consider Buying Non-Traditional Weapons

In addition to your standard guns, there are common items that have now been weaponized to help older people level the playing field. There are stun canes  that look like a regular cane but actually have stun-gun capabilities when engaged. There are cell phones like that, too.

Just about anything can be used as a weapon. Canned food, keys, a pen, lamps, rocks; really whatever you can get your hands on will be better than nothing but again, make your first move count by aiming for the throat, nose, head, groin or eyes if possible.

Carry your standard weapon, too. Pepper spray or your gun won’t do you any good if they’re in the upstairs drawer. It’s time to survive so be ready at all times.

Bring as Little Attention to Your Place as Possible

If your place is already boarded up and unattractive-looking, don’t bring any more attention to the fact that you’re there than necessary. Make trips outside during times that nobody is likely to see you.

If you can, build a path that’s blocked from public view in advance. Using shrubbery or fencing will allow you a greater amount of privacy to come and go on your property undetected.

If you’re cooking with wood, try to use your stove before dawn and after dusk, times when the smoke is less likely to be seen.

Plan in Advance

The worst time to figure out how you’re going to respond in any given situation is when you’re actually in that situation.

Have an action plan based upon numerous scenarios and practice what to do in each situation. By doing this, you’ll identify possible holes in your plan and you’ll also be prepared to act instead of react when faced with the real-life problem.

Sometimes the best self-defense is to back down and escape. It’s OK to run if you need to; if you’re faced with certain death or the need to leave your home, by all means, leave! If evacuation is part of your plan, you may want to hide a stockpile away from your home in a place such as a storage unit.

Also, pack a bug-out bag with all of the necessary supplies that you’ll need to get you to your bug-out location.

Take a Weapons Course or Join a Shooting Club

Knowing how to use your weapon is one thing but being comfortable with it is another. Taking a weapons course is a great way to safely learn how your gun works and how best to use it. You’ll also learn its shortcomings, which is just as important as knowing its strengths.

Joining a local shooting club has a few advantages. First, the more you load and fire your gun, the more comfortable you’ll be with it when it comes time to defend yourself. Gun clubs are also great places to meet like-minded people.

If you’re interested in being part of a community prepping network, chances are good that you’ll meet fellow preppers at a gun club. Just cautiously feel around. If nothing else, you might make some friends.

There are many ways to learn how to defend yourself but the most important thing to remember is that you need to stick to the plan of attack (or escape) once you’ve committed to it. Train your skills and use your age as an advantage to stay safe!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia.

How to Make and Use a Long Lever Bow Drill Set

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by Todd Walker

The Bushcraft Journal, a free online magazine, has a wealth of articles dealing with outdoor self-reliance. This post is based on a recent article by Gary Johnston of Jack Raven Bushcraft.

How to Make and Use a Long Lever Bow Drill Set - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

Editor’s Note: If you see any ads linked (double underlined) in this article, please let me know. They shouldn’t be there. I’m wondering if it’s only happening on my computer. Thanks! ~ Todd

As Gary mentions in his article, many people would like to learn to make fire by friction with a bow and drill but many not have the physical stamina to twirl up an ember. Others may have bad knees or other injures which prevent them from ever attempting fire by friction. This method alleviates knee pain and weak wrists.

Here are the steps our students at RISE Academy used to make fire using this method…

Long Lever Bow Drill Set

Step 1: Gather the Stuff

  • Bearing block: About a yard long log and 3-4 inches in diameter
  • A platform like a firewood round knee-high
  • Long bow about chest high for multiple bowers
  • String for bow and normal stuff you’d use for regular bow drill fire – tinder, welcome mat, etc.

Cut a 36 inch long, 3-4 inch diameter, tree to be used as the bearing block. Flatten the underside on one end of the log. Carve a pivot hole about 3 to 5 inches in from one end of the long bearing block. We found a wide pivot hole about 1/4 inch deep to be about right. We used a hearth and spindle (cedar on cedar) which the students found produced embers in the traditional bow drill set.

In the video below, we show two separate groups of students successfully using this long lever bow drill set. It makes for a great team building or family project.

Step 2: Attach Bearing Block to Tree/Pole

How to Make and Use a Long Lever Bow Drill Set - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

The bearing block attached to a bamboo riser on the student-built outdoor classroom.

Lash the other end of the long lever to a tree or pole. Use a square lashing or tie knots until it holds to the anchor point level with the top of the spindle. The long lever bearing block takes advantage of mass and mechanical advantage to easily apply downward pressure on the spindle during bowing. In fact, I applied too much pressure in the beginning which caused problems.

Step 3: The Longer Bow

How to Make and Use a Long Lever Bow Drill Set - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

Sixth graders using the longer bow.

For two or more people doing the bowing, use a longer bow to achieve more spindle rotations per stroke. By yourself, stick to a normal arm-length bow. And yes, this method works well if you’re spinning solo. The anchored bearing block steadies the point of contact against my shin – which is one of the struggles I see a lot with first-time friction fire makers.

Load the spindle into the long bow, place the spindle into the hearth board divot, and mate the top of the spindle to the long lever bearing block. The person “driving” the bearing block will place his/her foot on the hearth board resting on the stump. Steady the bearing block against the shin with two hands.

How to Make and Use a Long Lever Bow Drill Set - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

Extra length at the end of the lever bearing block give ample room to connect with the shin.

You can also set this entire rig up without elevating the hearth board. It’s certainly kinder on the knees when elevated.

Step 4: Twirl an Ember

For a group effort, have two bowers hold opposite ends of the loaded long bow. Oh, have them stand offset to the plane of the bow so nobody gets a stick in the gut. Start the pull/push slowly to gain a rhythm like a lumberjack crosscut saw competition. As the charred dust builds into the hearth board notch, pick up the speed in bowing.

How to Make and Use a Long Lever Bow Drill Set - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

Getting into a rhythm

If the first two bowers tire, and you have alternates waiting, the bearing block “driver” gives the command to switch. Including all the hands builds teamwork and ownership to the effort. While the switch takes place, check the condition of the char dust in the notch. Even if it is smoking on its own, allow the other bowers a turn in spinning.

Step 5: Blow the Ember into Flame 

Celebrate your creation of a fire egg (ember) and allow it to grow by fanning it with your hand. High-fives all around! No need to hurry as you will likely produce a larger-than-normal amount of char dust in the hearth board notch.

How to Make and Use a Long Lever Bow Drill Set - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

A nice pile of smoldering char dust!

Once the fire egg is resting in its nest of tinder material, have each team member take a turn blowing the ember into flame. At that moment when heavy, white smoke billows from the nest, get your camera ready to capture the magic of fire from scratch!

How to Make and Use a Long Lever Bow Drill Set - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

Road-kill pine straw and cattail fluff for the win!

How to Make and Use a Long Lever Bow Drill Set - TheSurvivalSherpa.com

Almost there.

Place the burning nest in the fire pit and add prepared kindling for the fire to eat. Let the high-fives and fist-bumps begin! Your team has just created fire by friction and welded bonds of friendship never to be forgotten!

Keep Doing the Stuff of Self-Reliance,

Todd

P.S. – You can also keep up with the Stuff we’re Doing on TwitterPinterestGoogle +YouTubeInstagram, and Facebook… and over at our Doing the Stuff Network.

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Copyright © by Survival Sherpa: In light of the recent theft of all my content by a pirate site, my sharing policy has changed. I do not permit the re-posting of entire articles from my site without express written consent by me. My content on this site may be shared in digital form (200 words or less) for non-commercial use with a link back (without no-follow attribute) to the original article crediting the author. All photos, drawings, and articles are copyrighted by and the property of Survival Sherpa. You are more than welcome to share our photos and articles on social media for educational purposes as long as you link back to the original article/photo with credit to the author.

7 Items For Your Bugout Bag You Never Knew Existed

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“Of packing of many bags there is no end.” I think Ecclesiastes said that. His quote may have been a bit different, but the king was getting at the same idea. The bugout bag is an evolution. You must not look at your bugout bag as a stagnant entity. If you do, it will provide … Read more…

The post 7 Items For Your Bugout Bag You Never Knew Existed was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

101 Paracord Projects

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If you’re a paracord enthusiast, then I have the ultimate article for you. PrepperZine made a list of 101 paracord projects complete with a table of contents, instructions, pictures, and videos. He even lets you know the difficulty level of the project and how long it should take. This is pretty much the best paracord […]

The post 101 Paracord Projects appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

101 Paracord Projects

If you’re a paracord enthusiast, then I have the ultimate article for you. PrepperZine made a list of 101 paracord projects complete with a table of contents, instructions, pictures, and videos. He even lets you know the difficulty level of the project and how long it should take. This is pretty much the best paracord […]

The post 101 Paracord Projects appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

101 Paracord Projects

If you’re a paracord enthusiast, then I have the ultimate article for you. PrepperZine made a list of 101 paracord projects complete with a table of contents, instructions, pictures, and videos. He even lets you know the difficulty level of the project and how long it should take. This is pretty much the best paracord […]

The post 101 Paracord Projects appeared first on Urban Survival Site.