House is holding heat great and a stitches update

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I have been blown away by how well the house holds heat since the windows and siding are complete.  My computer room now gets into the mid-70’s F. and retains the heat even after the wood stove burns out.  Of course it has not turned to cold in the valley since all the work was done but with the old windows heat would just leak out if we did not have plastic on the windows.  Mom and I are using a lot of the mill ends and smaller limbs for small fires and just to keep the firebox going through the day.  The only problem with that sort of fire is I’ll need to buy more of the mill ends for the rest of winter (for kindling) and too use next spring.  I have the materials for another wood rack and one more load of wood ordered for delivery this month.  That last load should fill up the main wood storage area and I’m storing the mill ends in a separate area that is easy access for adding more wood if needed this winter of spring.

I started painting the front door a grey semi-gloss that matches the color of the gables and frame work around the windows.  It is going to take a couple of coats of paint to cover up the old red door.  The worst part is the old door hardware looks kind of terrible against the new paint.  I have been looking at new locks and door levers rather than just the standard knobs.  Eventually I’d like to change all the doors to the lever type handles as they look great and are much easier for me to operate with my CIDP.  One thing I have become aware of since getting disabled is how much easier life can be if you retro fit faucets, door handles and other (ADA approved) hardware.  What is great is most of the hardware has a retro-look that fits with me going back to the original look of a 1910-20’s Craftsman House.

Update on the stitches: Every thing is looking good according to the doc in a box.  In a week I’ll get the stitches removed though it may take up to 6 weeks the cut to fully heal and give me another interesting scar.  The Doc in a box even asked where I got the bandage I was using to cover the cut.  The Walgreen’s brand of 3 inch x 4 inch knee/elbow bandage works great for covering a large cut and is very easy to apply.  I’m not sure if this is correlation or causation but when I started using Curad’s Anti-microbial silver solution  I noticed a significant reduction of pain around the injury site compared to using the little packets of anti- Bacterial cream I got from Doc in a box.  I believe but can not prove that the silver solution gel made a huge difference on how quickly this cut started healing.

Not to much more to add other than I got some tree limbs to cut up, more leaves to clean up and I have to install all of my solar motion lights.

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 I was tooling around YouTube this afternoon and came across a few videos on food storage. One of them showed a guy who was unboxing some rice he put away six years ago. It was in a mylar bag, vacuum sealed, and tucked into a five-gallon bucket. I admire that approach, but I gotta say….my experience has been that rice is pretty much the only food that you can store “poorly” and still have something edible. I have, literally, a 15 gallon blue barrel of rice from Y2k that has had nothing done to it except being poured into a clean barrel and had the lid screwed on. Thats it…no oxy absorbers, no nitrogen flush, no nothing…and it stored just fine and seemed to cook up and taste fine ten years later.

Does that mean that was a good way to store it? Of course not. But it does show that some foods can have a more…casual…approach and be just fine. I would imagine that because of my climate (arid mountain region with very low moisture) I can get away with that sort of thing. I wouldnt want to try it in Louisiana or similar environs.

I mention it because I’ve been going through some of my stored stuff and taking stock of how it has fared. I’ve not run across anything I’d discard except for some MRE cookies that tasted quite rancid. Other than that, most everything seems to store just fine, although I store it in the classic “cool dark place” that is the classically optimum environment for food storage.

I’ve come across a couple canned goods, over the years, that didn’t last the way they were supposed to but they are pretty infrequent. Food poisoning (the real kind…not the I-let-the-ppizza-sit-out-overnight kind, I’m talking about the botulism kind) is not something to mess with and even if that bulging can isn’t loaded down with botulism you’ll still probably get so sick you’ll wish it had killed you after all. So…screw it…it’s a $2 can of tomato sauce..chuck it. I guarantee you, when you’re driving the porcelain bus at 2:30am you’d happily pay $2 to not have spent the last 40 minutes doing intestinal somersaults.

The changing of the season from fall into winter always puts me in the mind to go play amongst the stored food and supplies. Dunno why, it just does.

Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (10/29/17)

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Here are the top 7 articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks. But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 10/22/17 – 10/28/17

Peace
Todd

Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (10/29/17)

Here are the top 7 articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks. But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 10/22/17 – 10/28/17

Peace
Todd

How Sketching Like a Sniper Can Help Your Situational Awareness

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How Sketching Like a Sniper Can Help Your Situational Awareness It seems like the survival and preparedness community cannot harp on situational awareness enough. The problem is that you have to be open to the fact that it’s a pretty boring subject. It’s also one that doesn’t really have a lot of subcategories. GET YOUR …

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The post How Sketching Like a Sniper Can Help Your Situational Awareness appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

30 Chores You Should Do On Your Homestead This Autumn

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30 Chores You Should Do On Your Homestead This Autumn Preparation is preparation. While some preps may be about creating a home that is ready for disaster there is also a bit of upkeep that makes sense as well. You need to do many things on a homestead or even a suburban home if you …

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The post 30 Chores You Should Do On Your Homestead This Autumn appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

How to Install a Wood Stove

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How to Install a Wood Stove The cold winter is quickly approaching. I was talking to Glen Martin a survival author and owner of the Prepper Broadcasting Network. On Wednesday he was watching the first snow fall in his area. We humans have been fighting off the cold forever. Our struggles through the ice age, …

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Don’t Just “Fall Back” This Month! Get Prepped for the Winter!

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Every fall, Americans across the country gain an extra hour each day when they “fall back” and reset their clocks one hour later with the end of Daylight Savings Time.

Don't Just Fall Back This Month Get Prepped for the Winter via The Survival Mom

Our family enjoyed that extra hour of sleep, especially since the temperatures outside have turned chilly and those warm, cozy blankets had us wrapped in Dreamland, not wanting to wake or get out of bed!

Whenever Daylight Savings Time rears its ugly head (I am no fan of this insane plan to “gain” an hour), I assign the kids to go around the house and change all clocks, watches, and then the clocks in our vehicles. That Daylight Savings Time day is the perfect time to review all our preps and get ready for cold weather.

Something else we do is prepare for winter power outages. Since the days are so much shorter, the chances of sitting around in a cold and very dark house are a lot greater. Sources of light is very important, both for practical reasons and for comfort. The light source I recommend for each room is a Luci solar lantern.

This handy lantern charges quickly by whatever light happens to be in a room. Sometimes I set it near a window to charge and other times, it charges just from the ambient light around it. The lantern is inflatable and, therefore, collapses to a very small size. This is handy because I want the lantern to be in bedside tables and in handy spots in our living room, family room, and kitchen. During Hurricane Harvey, this is the lantern that provided a great source of light for reading and taking care of household chores. Read more about the Luci Solar Lantern here.

Besides changing the clocks and making sure each room has an emergency light source, DST is also a reminder to double check preps for cooler weather.

Prepping for the winter

  1. Unpack all emergency kits/Bug Out Bags. Check for stale food, leaks in containers, clothing, and shoes that no longer fit. If you’ve discovered a new “must have” for your kit, now is the time to add it.
  2. Repack all emergency kits and bags for the winter. Include hand and foot warmers, gloves, wool caps, extra wool socks, long johns (my silk long johns have lasted at least 2 decades and still keep me warm), a small emergency stove/heater.
  3. Educate yourself about staying warm. Learn how to triple your warmth!
  4. While you’re at it, take a look at the emergency kit/supplies you keep in your car. For the winter you may need to add an ice scraper and brush, a sturdy snow shovel, a box of kitty litter. Throw a pair of waterproof boots in the trunk. Roll up a couple of wool blankets and store them under the back seats.
  5. Add an immersion heater to every vehicle emergency kit. This one item alone, powered by your car battery, will allow you to melt snow to have a water source, heat up water to add to things like hot chocolate mix or soup mix, and have warm water for sanitation.
  6. This article includes many details for prepping your car for breakdowns and being stranded in winter weather.
  7. Test your generator and make sure you have enough fuel to last at least 2-3 weeks. If you are looking to add one to your preparedness gear, learn how to buy your first generator. Also watch this free webinar from Preppers University, with all kinds of important points for buying a home generator, or maybe, deciding it isn’t for you.
  8. Hit a few thrift stores or yard sales and buy extra blankets. They have so many uses during the winter, aside from the obvious. Here are all the different ways I put blankets to work, especially in the winter!
  9. Very cold weather will likely freeze any emergency water containers in your vehicles. This article gives a few tips for working around that.
  10. In a power outage, how would you cook a meal? This week, track down any and all off-grid stoves, whether a solar oven, a gas grill, a hibachi, or DIY rocket stove and make sure you have the fuel necessary to cook a few meals in an emergency.
  11. Equip your kids’ coat pockets with hand and foot warmers and, for signaling, LED flashlights and whistles. Get hand warmers here!
  12. Review your kids and grandkids winter-readiness, overall. Do they know what to do if they get lost in the snow or caught in a chilly rainstorm? Do they know how to signal for help? Answers to these questions and more are in this article, “Everything You Need to Know About Winter Survival for Kids“.
  13. Think about a cold weather scenario that might strand you or a family member at the workplace, and put together a workplace emergency kit.

What do you do to prepare for winter weather?

Don't Just Fall Back This Month Get Prepped for the Winter via The Survival Mom

This article was updated.

If It’s True That Art Reflects Life We’re in a Very Dark Place

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Has anyone else noticed the need that ‘artists” have to be more and more outrageous lately?  It seems like many people can’t be happy unless they are finding greater ways … Read the rest

The post If It’s True That Art Reflects Life We’re in a Very Dark Place appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

Top 7 Survival Tips for Long Hunts

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Top 7 Survival Tips for Long Hunts

The majority of deer hunters who prep for a huge expedition sometimes forgets about one thing: Preparing for survival. You can never be fully prepared for a hunt without taking the proper steps to pack and organize what’s needed. And it isn’t just about what to pack, but physically and mentally preparing yourself for the outdoors as well. But how can you do that?

 I’ll be showing you the essential steps to help you get started when preparing for a hunting expedition.

Top Survival Tips for Long Hunts

1. Study the Fields

You shouldn’t only study the fields during the hunting expedition itself! Before anything else, you should take the proper steps into choosing the best area for hunting, based on the size and animal population.

  Once you have chosen the place to hunt in, study the area if you have the chance. This will give you the opportunity to create effective strategies and prepare your hunting blinds or set up tree harnesses. Also, it gives you time to find your way around the fields, so you avoid getting lost.

 Take advantage of the off-peak seasons to acquaint yourself with the area, learning the turf and knowing what to expect regarding trails, animals, and weather.

2. Physical and Mental Preparation

You’re going to have to ready your body for the long hunting expedition. It isn’t just a walk in the park! Start training and polishing up your shooting skills, learning about stealth and increasing your endurance. I recommend you to start trail-walking or hiking with a heavy pack, as you will be doing the same when hunting. If you need to lose weight to build strength and endurance, then start an effective meal plan and diet that still fills you with energy.

 Also, keep in mind that hunting isn’t a comfortable luxury vacation. Mentally prepare yourself to get down and dirty, with inclement weathers and discomfort along the way.

3. Getting Your License and Registration

One thing many beginner hunters forget to research on would be how to acquire a license and to study the rules of both the state and hunting area. Red tape may ruin your hunt, and if you have no license, you waste time preparing and traveling for the expedition. Even weeks before you go hunting, get a hunting license. If you plan on going to different states, research on how to acquire the license and how long processing would take (since handling may be different).

Check the regulations in the hunting area as well, as it can vary from season and state. They may have bag limits or weapon restrictions. You won’t want to unload or not be able to use certain guns while on the field because you didn’t study the rules thoroughly.

4. Training With Your Weapons

Like mentioned, you must be physically prepared as well. No matter how reliable your guns are, it won’t make up your lack of skills. That’s why it’s best to polish them up and start target practicing. Act as if you were in the hunt itself, wearing the heavy pack and doing your best to load, target, and shoot for the kill.

 You should also start stealth exercises with your gun, try to be as quiet and with no sudden movements that can mess with your aim. If you plan on hunting from longer distances, I recommend you to invest in a scope and scope mount, which will help magnify the game and make targeting more accurate.

5. Prepping Your Weapons Before the Hunt

Prep your weapons before the hunt, unloading it during the travels and loading it before entering the fields. Sharpen knives and polish off your weapons before leaving, doing a test run to ensure that everything is in tiptop shape and ready to be used for the expedition.

 When hunting with a firearm, zero-in the gun from the distances you usually do. Usually, hunters would zero-in at 100 yards and during the weather similar to the conditions of the hunting area for better accuracy. Also, always check loose screws and to stock up on ammo to avoid having to go home earlier because of no weapon to use.

 

 If hunting with a bow, check its strings and cables. You may need to replace it. Sight-in the bow with field points as well. And just like using your weapons, give it a test run and take a few shots, testing its accuracy and ensuring that the bows and cables are intact.

6. Assembling a Survival Kit (And knowing how to use it!)

Like what I said earlier, a survival kit is an absolute must, may you be merely camping or on a legit hunting expedition. Prepare for the worst and pack the essential items you’ll need for survival, which includes:

             •           Fully-charged phone or communication device

            •           Lighter or matches

            •           Flashlights with extra batteries

            •           First aid kit

            •           Emergency food supplies

            •           Water purifier

            •           Map and compass

            •           Emergency blanket

            •           Signaling devices, like flares

 Have a concrete plan of what may happen in case you come across a dangerous situation. To prevent this from happening, study the fields, plan your hunt on good weather, and be aware of your surroundings.

  Every few hours, update someone with your location and coordinates, may it be a family member or fellow hunter. Also, acquaint yourself with self-defense skills in case you come across animals who may attack you unexpectedly. Again, it’s better to be safe than sorry, and there is the possibility of not being able to use the gun in times of trouble.

7. Getting Your Gear and Gathering Supplies  

Besides your survival kit, you should have the proper hunting gear and supplies to keep you energized and ready for the hunt.

 Clothing and food is a priority. Prepare clothes that coordinate with the predicted weather to either stay warm or cool. Opt for camouflage patterns made of breathable material that has you move around freely and with comfort. You should also prepare the clothing you will be wearing before the hunt, spraying non-odor sprays to remain undetected.

 As for food, pack canned goods or instant foods that you can quickly open and consume immediately. Pack sweets and other satiating foods that give you energy, such as chocolates, trail mix, or anything with sugar and carbs.

 I recommend you to have a meal plan as well, so you can properly ration your food and avoid running out of it too early. Packing in advance also assures that you do not forget anything before the hunt.

 Make a checklist of all essential items and pack it correctly. Use ziplock bags for fire starting materials, medicine, and other devices that may get damaged if ever it gets wet. When organizing the things in your backpack, start off with the heaviest items and work your way up to the lightest and essential items you’ll be using immediately on the top.

Wrapping It Up

Hunting isn’t just about investing in the best hunting blind or spending oodles of money on material tools and equipment. Though the quality of your equipment helps, it all boils down to preparedness in your skills and utilizing them when on the fields.

 Hopefully, these tips and preparation and survival will help you out. Remember to pack smart and make wise choices when outdoors.

Author Bio:

Mitchell Wood is an avid hunter and freelance writer. He loves spending time in the field with his rifle more than almost anything else, and occupies his off-time discussing deer and their habits online. He is a founder of muskethunting.com

 

The post Top 7 Survival Tips for Long Hunts appeared first on American Preppers Network.

SHTF Pest Control!

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SHTF Pest Control!

SHTF Pest Control
Micheal Kline “Reality Check” Audio player below!

I do not know of a single human on this planet who enjoys mosquitoes, ticks, roaches, or creepy crawlies. Barring the entomologist in the world, being outside with bugs can mess up a perfect camping trip. Fortunately, there are many options to spray around and life is good. However, in a grid down scenario, we will not have the luxury of heading to the local big box and getting a new can of mosquito, roach, or wasp spray.

Continue reading SHTF Pest Control! at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Hunting with Spears….

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: A guest contribution from Evan Michaels at Know Prepare Survive to The Prepper Journal. And a Happy and Safe Veteran’s Day to all who have served, to those that currently serve and their loved ones who make their service possible with their love and support.

As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly receive a $25 cash award as well as be entered into the Prepper Writing Contest with a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.

There’s something raw and primitive about hunting. It takes us back to our roots.
 

I am not a fisherman. Or a doctor. Or a very good listener. Where was I going with that…

Right, fishing.

The closest I have ever been to catching a fish with a rod and reel was hooking a bat that decided to investigate my bait as I cast the line.

That is not to say that I have never eaten fish I caught myself.

I once caught a fish with a spear that I made myself. Which is so much more manly than a silly stick and string.

  

I know you probably think that I’m some amazing Bear Grylls-esque mountain man that would make Paul Bunyan look like a hipster. And you’d be mostly correct.

But if you want to learn how to make your own spear and hunt prey like an Alpha male (or female, I don’t discriminate) like me, you’ve come to the right place.

What Will You Need?

All you’re going to need to make your very own spear is a straight stick, a knife, and maybe some other stuff.

 

The stick is pretty obvious but you DO have a knife, right? Every survivalist should carry a knife with them at all times (except at sporting events and family gatherings).

If you call yourself a survivalist and you find yourself in the woods without a knife, you better have gotten kidnapped and left for dead. Because that’s the only excuse.

The Spear-it Stick

The most exciting method of hunting with a spear is to lash your knife to a branch and make a pokey stick out of it.

You may have a chance of losing your knife if you do this, so be sure to have a spare. If you only have one knife (tsk tsk), I’ll cover what you can do later.

To make a knife-stick, you only need three things:

A knife – You want to use a moderately large knife with a fixed blade, no pocket knives or folding blades.

A branch – The branch should be straight and of reasonable thickness. It should be comfortable to hold and not droop from the weight of the knife, so about 3 inches in diameter and three to five feet long. Hardwood is preferred. Fresh, green wood is not preferred.

Cord or other lashing material – Almost anything will work for this, from paracord to shoelaces to sinew.

How to Make a Hunting Spear/Knife Stick

Step 1. Prepare the branch. You want it to be as straight and smooth as possible, so trim off any bits that stick out and cut down any knots. You may also want to remove the bark. Woof woof.

Step 2. Make a shelf on the branch to hold the knife. Take the end of the wood that will hold the knife, and lay the knife handle against it, with the blade parallel to the wood and pointing away from it (duh). Mark how far down the knife lays on the branch.

 Good Shelf; not so good a knife for this purpose.

Now take your knife and use it to split the end of the wood down the middle. I would recommend batoning, a very useful skill for anyone who wants to use a knife in the woods.

If you are unfamiliar, basically you insert a fixed blade knife into the wood close to the base of the blade, then use a stick or mallet to strike the spine and handle to split the wood apart. Make sure to use a sturdy knife.

Once you reach the marked point, cut into the wood from the outside and break off that half. You should have a more or less L shape in the wood which fits your knife.

Step 3. Place the knife handle into that shelf, then take your cordage and lash the knife to the branch as securely as possible.

Seriously, wrap that sucker tight. If it is loose, it will affect your stabbing skills, you can lose your knife, and you’ll look like a total dweeb.

Congratulations! You have a spear you can use for hunting.

Pro Tip: If your knife starts to get dull after all of this sawing and hacking, you can use your watch band to sharpen it!

Different Spear Types

Primitive Spear

If you only have one knife and don’t want to attach it to the end of a stick, you can create a primitive spear.

That’s right, there’s an even more primitive way to make a spear than just tying a knife to a stick.

Step 1. Instead of creating the shelf and lashing the knife to the branch, you take one end of the branch and whittle it to a sharp point. Carve into the wood towards the tip, away from you.

Like before, you’re going to want to use a sturdy piece a wood that’s relatively straight, about as big around as a shovel handle and as long or longer than a shovel handle. You don’t have a shovel handle, do you? Because that would be perfect.

Step 2. When you’re whittling your spear point, be sure to make the pointy bit at least 6 inches long. Try to make it look like one of those yellow #2 pencils from school, but bigger.

Optional Step 3. For a stronger tip, insert the point under the coals of a campfire and slowly rotate. You do not want to burn the wood, but rather harden it using the heat. It still will not be as sharp as a knife spear and will not last as long, but should still be able to penetrate a deer’s hide.

Boar Spear

Wild pigs can be a good source of food, but they are a fair amount more dangerous than a lot of wild animals. A wounded boar is a vindictive beast, and they will move towards you, pushing the spear through themselves!

To keep the hunter safe, boar spears tend to have a cross brace a little ways below the head of the spear. To make one of these:

Step 1. Make a spear (primitive or knife-stick)

Step 2. Use your knife to create a V shaped notch in the wood of the spear shaft, and a corresponding V shaped notch in a branch of similar thickness (though only about a foot long.)

Step 3. Align the notches and lash the two pieces of wood together. Do not skimp on the cordage, as you want this brace to be strong. Just remember, it’s got to hold an angry wild pig with tusks from goring you. Kind of want to wrap it a little better now, huh?

Now, if you spear a boar and it tries to gore you, the brace will prevent it from getting close.

The brace also has the added advantage of preventing the spear from sticking too far into the animal, so you can pull it out and strike again if necessary.

A boar spear should also be thicker and longer than one made to be thrown.

Pro Tip: If a boar is charging at you, plant the butt of your spear into the ground and aim the pointy end at, you guessed it, the rampaging mutant pig. This will use the boar’s momentum to do all of the hard work of getting the pig on a stick for you and keep you from getting any pesky splinters. Or, you know, getting gored.

Fishing Spear

These spears are shorter and lighter than the other types, as you do not need a long reach or to keep an animal at bay.

Plus, you’re going to miss A LOT so the heavier your spear is, the faster you’re going to tire out.

You can use a lighter version of the primitive spear for this. Same concept, smaller stick.

When hunting with a fishing spear, you wait above the surface of the water, and try to impale fish as they swim under you.

Remember, light refracts as it travels through water. You will have to adjust your aim. Practice poking the spear in the water to learn how you will have to change your aim.

It might be good practice to “spear” underwater rocks. I would, ah, use one of your “mistake spears” for that, though.

Advanced Fishing Spear

Have a little bit more time, or having difficulty fishing with a simple spear? There is a more advanced fishing spear method. Creating it still requires using a knife, but you do not need to attach it to the shaft.

Step 1. Take your branch, and wrap a few inches of cord around, about a foot down from the end of the spear. This will help keep the shaft from splitting.

Step 2. Take your knife, and baton about halfway down to the cord. Remove your knife, now baton perpendicular to the split you created, so you create four points. Go all the way down to a few inches above the cord, then use your knife to baton the other pieces the rest of the way.

Step 3. Now take two twigs, about the size of your pinky and a little longer than the branch is wide, and jam them down between the split pieces of the wood so they splay out. Secure them in place with the cord.

Step 4. Now take your knife and carve sharp tips into the four points. With four times the tips, you are more likely to spear that fish!

Hunting with a Spear

There are two basic ways of hunting with a spear. They are similar to hunting with other weapons, but you have to get closer. These methods are stalking and still hunting.

Stalking is when you sneak up close to the animal. When using a spear, you have to get very close. This is easier with boar than with deer, especially during the heat of the day when the pigs are trying to cool themselves, but is still not easy.

 Shovel handle with a milled blade.

Still hunting is when you lay in wait for the prey to come to you. Learn where the deer trails are and lay in wait upwind of them so your stink doesn’t scare off the prey. That’s also good dating advice.

Hiding in a tree close to a deer trail may be a good idea as well, as deer have a tendency to not look for predators above them. The downside then is that you have a harder time striking at their vital organs.

No matter whether you are stalking or still hunting, there are also two ways you can use to strike your prey. Lunging with the spear is effective, and allows you to strike again if you miss or need to, but requires you to be VERY close.

Throwing your spear naturally lets you attack from a longer range, but if you miss then you will not have a second chance. Plus you just threw your weapon away, which is a bad idea if you face something which fights back, like boar.

To practice throwing your spear, create a second primitive spear and throw that one until you are comfortable.

Could you stalk or ambush prey with a just a knife, without a spear? Sure, it is possible. But it will be much more difficult and more dangerous. The shaft of the spear increases not only your reach but also your leverage, making the weapon much more effective.

So if you decide to hunt boar with just a knife, take out life insurance, write your will, have someone hold your beer, and send me the video.

Author Bio (unedited)

Evan Michaels is a jerk. He generally enjoys playing with fire, running with sharp objects, and watching SEC football. He also writes for Know Prepare Survive with some other jerks. You’d probably like it. (Editors Comment: How many times can YOU watch Alabama football?)

 

The post Hunting with Spears…. appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Hunting with Spears….

Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: A guest contribution from Evan Michaels at Know Prepare Survive to The Prepper Journal. And a Happy and Safe Veteran’s Day to all who have served, to those that currently serve and their loved ones who make their service possible with their love and support.

As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly receive a $25 cash award as well as be entered into the Prepper Writing Contest with a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.

There’s something raw and primitive about hunting. It takes us back to our roots.
 

I am not a fisherman. Or a doctor. Or a very good listener. Where was I going with that…

Right, fishing.

The closest I have ever been to catching a fish with a rod and reel was hooking a bat that decided to investigate my bait as I cast the line.

That is not to say that I have never eaten fish I caught myself.

I once caught a fish with a spear that I made myself. Which is so much more manly than a silly stick and string.

  

I know you probably think that I’m some amazing Bear Grylls-esque mountain man that would make Paul Bunyan look like a hipster. And you’d be mostly correct.

But if you want to learn how to make your own spear and hunt prey like an Alpha male (or female, I don’t discriminate) like me, you’ve come to the right place.

What Will You Need?

All you’re going to need to make your very own spear is a straight stick, a knife, and maybe some other stuff.

 

The stick is pretty obvious but you DO have a knife, right? Every survivalist should carry a knife with them at all times (except at sporting events and family gatherings).

If you call yourself a survivalist and you find yourself in the woods without a knife, you better have gotten kidnapped and left for dead. Because that’s the only excuse.

The Spear-it Stick

The most exciting method of hunting with a spear is to lash your knife to a branch and make a pokey stick out of it.

You may have a chance of losing your knife if you do this, so be sure to have a spare. If you only have one knife (tsk tsk), I’ll cover what you can do later.

To make a knife-stick, you only need three things:

A knife – You want to use a moderately large knife with a fixed blade, no pocket knives or folding blades.

A branch – The branch should be straight and of reasonable thickness. It should be comfortable to hold and not droop from the weight of the knife, so about 3 inches in diameter and three to five feet long. Hardwood is preferred. Fresh, green wood is not preferred.

Cord or other lashing material – Almost anything will work for this, from paracord to shoelaces to sinew.

How to Make a Hunting Spear/Knife Stick

Step 1. Prepare the branch. You want it to be as straight and smooth as possible, so trim off any bits that stick out and cut down any knots. You may also want to remove the bark. Woof woof.

Step 2. Make a shelf on the branch to hold the knife. Take the end of the wood that will hold the knife, and lay the knife handle against it, with the blade parallel to the wood and pointing away from it (duh). Mark how far down the knife lays on the branch.

 Good Shelf; not so good a knife for this purpose.

Now take your knife and use it to split the end of the wood down the middle. I would recommend batoning, a very useful skill for anyone who wants to use a knife in the woods.

If you are unfamiliar, basically you insert a fixed blade knife into the wood close to the base of the blade, then use a stick or mallet to strike the spine and handle to split the wood apart. Make sure to use a sturdy knife.

Once you reach the marked point, cut into the wood from the outside and break off that half. You should have a more or less L shape in the wood which fits your knife.

Step 3. Place the knife handle into that shelf, then take your cordage and lash the knife to the branch as securely as possible.

Seriously, wrap that sucker tight. If it is loose, it will affect your stabbing skills, you can lose your knife, and you’ll look like a total dweeb.

Congratulations! You have a spear you can use for hunting.

Pro Tip: If your knife starts to get dull after all of this sawing and hacking, you can use your watch band to sharpen it!

Different Spear Types

Primitive Spear

If you only have one knife and don’t want to attach it to the end of a stick, you can create a primitive spear.

That’s right, there’s an even more primitive way to make a spear than just tying a knife to a stick.

Step 1. Instead of creating the shelf and lashing the knife to the branch, you take one end of the branch and whittle it to a sharp point. Carve into the wood towards the tip, away from you.

Like before, you’re going to want to use a sturdy piece a wood that’s relatively straight, about as big around as a shovel handle and as long or longer than a shovel handle. You don’t have a shovel handle, do you? Because that would be perfect.

Step 2. When you’re whittling your spear point, be sure to make the pointy bit at least 6 inches long. Try to make it look like one of those yellow #2 pencils from school, but bigger.

Optional Step 3. For a stronger tip, insert the point under the coals of a campfire and slowly rotate. You do not want to burn the wood, but rather harden it using the heat. It still will not be as sharp as a knife spear and will not last as long, but should still be able to penetrate a deer’s hide.

Boar Spear

Wild pigs can be a good source of food, but they are a fair amount more dangerous than a lot of wild animals. A wounded boar is a vindictive beast, and they will move towards you, pushing the spear through themselves!

To keep the hunter safe, boar spears tend to have a cross brace a little ways below the head of the spear. To make one of these:

Step 1. Make a spear (primitive or knife-stick)

Step 2. Use your knife to create a V shaped notch in the wood of the spear shaft, and a corresponding V shaped notch in a branch of similar thickness (though only about a foot long.)

Step 3. Align the notches and lash the two pieces of wood together. Do not skimp on the cordage, as you want this brace to be strong. Just remember, it’s got to hold an angry wild pig with tusks from goring you. Kind of want to wrap it a little better now, huh?

Now, if you spear a boar and it tries to gore you, the brace will prevent it from getting close.

The brace also has the added advantage of preventing the spear from sticking too far into the animal, so you can pull it out and strike again if necessary.

A boar spear should also be thicker and longer than one made to be thrown.

Pro Tip: If a boar is charging at you, plant the butt of your spear into the ground and aim the pointy end at, you guessed it, the rampaging mutant pig. This will use the boar’s momentum to do all of the hard work of getting the pig on a stick for you and keep you from getting any pesky splinters. Or, you know, getting gored.

Fishing Spear

These spears are shorter and lighter than the other types, as you do not need a long reach or to keep an animal at bay.

Plus, you’re going to miss A LOT so the heavier your spear is, the faster you’re going to tire out.

You can use a lighter version of the primitive spear for this. Same concept, smaller stick.

When hunting with a fishing spear, you wait above the surface of the water, and try to impale fish as they swim under you.

Remember, light refracts as it travels through water. You will have to adjust your aim. Practice poking the spear in the water to learn how you will have to change your aim.

It might be good practice to “spear” underwater rocks. I would, ah, use one of your “mistake spears” for that, though.

Advanced Fishing Spear

Have a little bit more time, or having difficulty fishing with a simple spear? There is a more advanced fishing spear method. Creating it still requires using a knife, but you do not need to attach it to the shaft.

Step 1. Take your branch, and wrap a few inches of cord around, about a foot down from the end of the spear. This will help keep the shaft from splitting.

Step 2. Take your knife, and baton about halfway down to the cord. Remove your knife, now baton perpendicular to the split you created, so you create four points. Go all the way down to a few inches above the cord, then use your knife to baton the other pieces the rest of the way.

Step 3. Now take two twigs, about the size of your pinky and a little longer than the branch is wide, and jam them down between the split pieces of the wood so they splay out. Secure them in place with the cord.

Step 4. Now take your knife and carve sharp tips into the four points. With four times the tips, you are more likely to spear that fish!

Hunting with a Spear

There are two basic ways of hunting with a spear. They are similar to hunting with other weapons, but you have to get closer. These methods are stalking and still hunting.

Stalking is when you sneak up close to the animal. When using a spear, you have to get very close. This is easier with boar than with deer, especially during the heat of the day when the pigs are trying to cool themselves, but is still not easy.

 Shovel handle with a milled blade.

Still hunting is when you lay in wait for the prey to come to you. Learn where the deer trails are and lay in wait upwind of them so your stink doesn’t scare off the prey. That’s also good dating advice.

Hiding in a tree close to a deer trail may be a good idea as well, as deer have a tendency to not look for predators above them. The downside then is that you have a harder time striking at their vital organs.

No matter whether you are stalking or still hunting, there are also two ways you can use to strike your prey. Lunging with the spear is effective, and allows you to strike again if you miss or need to, but requires you to be VERY close.

Throwing your spear naturally lets you attack from a longer range, but if you miss then you will not have a second chance. Plus you just threw your weapon away, which is a bad idea if you face something which fights back, like boar.

To practice throwing your spear, create a second primitive spear and throw that one until you are comfortable.

Could you stalk or ambush prey with a just a knife, without a spear? Sure, it is possible. But it will be much more difficult and more dangerous. The shaft of the spear increases not only your reach but also your leverage, making the weapon much more effective.

So if you decide to hunt boar with just a knife, take out life insurance, write your will, have someone hold your beer, and send me the video.

Author Bio (unedited)

Evan Michaels is a jerk. He generally enjoys playing with fire, running with sharp objects, and watching SEC football. He also writes for Know Prepare Survive with some other jerks. You’d probably like it. (Editors Comment: How many times can YOU watch Alabama football?)

 

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Finally, a Real Court Claim Against Clinton, Podesta, Iwan, Wasserman Schulz, Huma Abedin, Weiner

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This is kind of amazing, I believe this filing to be by the George Webb of YouTube fame who has been sniffing down the “rat trails” of corruption.    It appears to a substantive legal claim requiring significant investment.

The name the defendants and describe wide ranging claims related to the “throwing” of the DNC nomination to Clinton, the breach of fiduciary responsibility, the data breaches and criminal acts of the Iwan brothers and more including fraudulent money movements and misuse of Federal property.   He ties in espionage and shady Uranium deals.

Webb Civil Filing Document

SPOT Messenger

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I always take my SPOT messenger and cell phone with me when I head out to the backcountry; it’s part of my ten essentials.

On a recent trip I sent three “I’m OK” status messages.  My first message was sent at 0900,

then 0915 and a third at about 1000.

I always send at least two messages to my family.  I am on the check in list too just to verify my unit is working.

I found that one message was received at  roughly 1020 but nothing else.

When I returned home one message (one of three) was received at 1600.  The last message was received the next afternoon.  This is the first time that I have had such time late message reception.

I called the manufacturer to sort out what happened.

Most importantly learned that the satellite service for SPOT was degraded that day.

I also learned that the internet provider (AOL.com) was having technical issues receiving and processing SPOT messages.  I then put my .gmail account as an authorized service.

I tested  the messenger from home and received my transmitted data almost immediately.

The manufacturers customer service was excellent.  All my questions were answered. 

For more information and suggestions for using your messenger visit:SPOT Tips


How To Turn Salt Water Into Drinking Water

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Everyone living in a coastal area should learn this skill. If you run out of drinking water and there’s a drought or you have no access to lakes or rivers, you might have to gather water from the ocean. The cruel irony of planet Earth is that there is water almost everywhere, but less than […]

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