Unusual Earthquakes, One of The Biggest EQ in Norweigan Sea Ever, Indian Triple Junction, California

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Unusual Earthquakes, One of The Biggest EQ in Norwegian Sea Ever, Indian Triple Junction, California

This is unusual EQ behavior continuing prior weeks of odd earthquake events and recently a return to normalcy. But not Anymore. Advise to check emergency supplies and equipment. Stay topped off with gasoline, Propane, Firewood

How to Butcher a Chicken

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Chicken slaughter is often a tough topic for new, and even experienced, chicken keepers. Even if you theoretically know how to butcher a chicken, actually doing it is another matter entirely.

Even though we all know where meat comes from and what has to happen for it to make it to our tables, there is some part of us that wants to pretend it just magically showed up at the grocery store or farmer’s market booth.

Part of becoming a backyard butcher is facing your meat consumption habits head on.

The most important advice we can give you on butchering your first chicken is, don’t overcomplicate the process.

Historically, backyard butchering was the norm. It didn’t take weeks of planning and preparation. It just took the will to do it, a little skill, and some basic tools.

Do Your Homework

Most of us didn’t grow up learning these skills, so we do have to do a little homework to prepare in advance.

But, unless you want to spend an unnecessary fortune or will be processing a ton of chickens, you probably want to make your process very similar to what your grandma’s (or great grandma’s) would have been.

There is an art to home butchery that comes only with experience.

Your first time butchering will be rough on you and possibly on your chicken.

In fact, even when you have become very skilled at doing it, it will probably still be rough on you.

You are taking a life, and if you don’t recognize the sentience of the being on the other side of that transaction, then maybe you need to seek psychological help!

That said, if you have been buying chicken at the grocery store, you have already been an active participant in slaughtering birds that were likely treated with less dignity and respect than you have shown the chickens you will be processing.

For meat eaters, home butchering could be one of the least ethically compromising decisions you can make.

Philosophical considerations aside, let’s talk about a few practical aspects of processing chickens.

Slaughter Planning

A clean kill starts with good planning. You need to decide how you are going to do it and what tools you are going to use.

Three Methods

Using a kill cone and sharp knife to slit a chicken’s throat on both sides is most common for small poultry processors. When using this method, some people put a straw bale under the cone area to collect the blood.

Since this is not a job you want to have to do twice on the same chicken, make it a habit to cut to the bone on both sides.

Chickens often try to back out of the cone in response to having their throats slit, so hold the head tightly and don’t let go until the chicken is no longer moving. This also prevents blood from splattering and making a big mess as dying chickens twitch.

You can also decapitate your chickens using a sharp knife and a butcher block or tree stump.

This method is easier if you have one person to hold the chicken and another to do the beheading.

One blogger decapitates her chickens using a feed bag to hold and then hang chickens during and after the kill. This method works really well and saves you the cost of a kill cone. Straw bale blood collection works in this scenario too.

You can also break a chicken’s neck. This method requires no tools for the kill, but as the blood is not drained during the process, it makes for a messier evisceration process. So be prepared to collect or clean the blood when you take the chicken to the table for evisceration.

Whichever method you use, speed and accuracy is critical. Watching videos of other successful kills and studying pictures in advance can help mentally prepare you for the task.

The neck has valuable stock meat and flavor, so the closer you can make your cut or break to the head, the more you get to keep.

Be Well-Prepared Prior to Culling

Set up your station before you start.

  • Slaughtering at home can be messy, so a lot of us opt to do it outside.
  • Having a hose with a sprayer makes it easy to keep things clean.
  • A work table makes evisceration easier.
  • Having some kind of hook for hanging to defeather helps.
  • If you plan to scald, you need a burner to heat your water.
  • You may also need electricity if you use a plucker.
  • Some people like to set up a three-bucket cleaning station, with soapy water, bleach water (1 Tablespoon per gallon), and fresh water to use to clean your knife and other equipment as needed during processing.
  • You also want to choose a location with good drainage so you don’t end up with chicken blood and scraps stinking up your backyard.

Plucking

Once you’ve dispatched your chicken, the next step is to defeather the carcass.

There are a couple ways to do this:

  • You can skin, dry-pluck, scald, and hand pluck.
  • You can scald and machine pluck.

Skinning

Some people skin the entire bird. However, for many, the skin is delicious and worth the extra work. You can check out this blog posting for a look at the process.

Dry-Plucking

Dry-plucking is exactly what it sounds like. You simply pull out the feathers after slaughtering.

It helps to hang the bird by the feet and pull down to extract the feathers.

The rule of thumb on defeathering the body is to pull away from the direction the feathers grow in. For wings, you need to hold the tip of the wing and then grip and pull the feathers straight out. Tail feathers are also easier to pull straight out.

Scalding

You can also scald a chicken before plucking, which makes it much easier to pull out the feathers.

You need a pot big enough to hold your entire chicken, a pair of tongs for dipping and stirring, and a thermometer (e.g., a fry thermometer) so you make sure you get the water to 135–145°F for scalding dry birds.

If I am processing a large flock, I like to use a garden hose to rinse my poultry thoroughly before scalding so the water does not need to be changed as frequently.

When I soak before scalding, I aim for a water temperature between 145–155°F since the cold water from the rinse, retained in the feathers, will drop my scalding pot temperature.

Also, birds like the Cornish Cross which have been breed for easier defeathering and are processed at a younger age scald well at around 135°F, and more heavily feathered birds are easier to pluck if scalded on the higher side of the scale.

  • If you’ve got your water temperature right, it takes about one to three minutes for the feathers to loosen. Use the tongs to move the chicken around, up, and down in the pot to make sure the hot water penetrates the feathers and reaches the skin.
  • After the first minute, tug on the body feathers with your tongs every 15–20 seconds to check.
  • As soon as the feathers are easy to pull, take the chicken from the pot, hang the carcass, and begin defeathering as described for dryplucking.
  • Pluck quickly for best results.
  • Also, don’t leave the chickens in the water too long, as they begin to cook and the feathers get harder to pluck.

Plucking manually, whether you scald or not, is about the hardest part of the process. It takes time and there are always some small feathers you have to pluck out with tweezers, torch off, or shave off with a straight razor.

If you’ll be processing chickens regularly, machine defeathering is a good option. You can build your own, like the Whizbang Plucker. Or, if that’s outside your budget and time constraints, you can buy drill attachments like the one that Marjory found at the Mother Earth News Fair a few years back. See her quick video about it here.

I like to think of plucking as a kind of meditation. And, sometimes, having company helps pass the time.

You can use the feathers for craft projects like jewelry, writing quills, and Halloween costumes. And anything you don’t use can be composted. Feathers are very high in nitrogen.

Evisceration

Once the feathers are removed, your next step is to eviscerate (remove the internal organs).

This is also usually the time you remove the feet, head (if not decapitated), and oil glands. Once you get the hang of it, evisceration is pretty easy to do. But it’s easier to learn if you have a coach or watch a few good videos, like this one with Joel Salatin.

Also, if you get your copy of the Mother Earth News Summit hosted by Marjory Wildcraft, it includes presentations from Joel Salatin and Patricia Foreman on raising and processing chickens. Patricia’s presentation on processing has very detailed pictures to make the process accessible to newcomers.

After you have a basic idea of the process, then keep in mind these few tips to have a successful first experience.

  • Use a clean cutting board or table. Plastic or stainless steel surfaces are easier to clean and disinfect, so they are recommended.
  • Have a hose at the ready in the event of accidental contamination, such as could be caused by cutting the intestines and contaminating your chicken area or work table with feces or by nicking the gall bladder when removing it from the liver.
  • Lungs don’t always come out clean in scalded chickens, so rinse the interior of the carcass and use your fingers to scrape out residual lung tissue if necessary.
  • Chill the heart, liver, and gizzard as soon as possible. The quality of organ meat degrades quickly once it comes in contact with air.

There are a lot of different techniques used to remove the head and feet, so feel free to use whatever works for you.

One method is to cut the feet above the orange socks and around the knee joint. Then, fold the knee in the opposing direction to loosen the tendon and cut through it. After that, twist and cut until the foot is off.

For the neck, you can cut the meat around the spine, twist the neck once around and then slice through the ligature.

Chilling, Aging, and Storing

Chilling

If you are processing poultry professionally, your goal after evisceration is to chill your meat to an internal temperature of 40°F as quickly as possible. That usually means plopping it into a cooler of ice water, like you would a bottle of champagne.

The longer it takes for a chicken to cool down, the more risk there is for bacterial contamination of the meat. And unless you happen to have a flash freezer at home, ice water baths are the fastest, safest, and cheapest way to chill your meat at home.

Ideally, you want to leave your carcass in ice water for about one hour per pound of carcass to make sure it is properly chilled.

Aging and Storing

At that point, you can package your chicken and place it in your refrigerator for aging or in your freezer for storing.

Whether you age your meat right after processing or after you defrost it, your meat will be more tender if you give it a day or two to “rest” at refrigerator temperatures. You can do double-duty by letting it rest in marinade before cooking, as well.

Some people keep chicken in their freezer for years. But, for best results, you should eat chicken within six months of processing.

Safety and Sanitation

When it comes to keeping things safe at a molecular level during processing, the No. 1 rule is to use common sense.

  • If you plan to process more than a chicken or two at a time, you’ll want to clean all your surfaces and equipment at least every couple hours.
  • If you suspect any kind of contamination (e.g., chicken feces, fly-by droppings from a wild bird, etc.), stop and sanitize.
  • A tablespoon of bleach in a gallon of water makes a good sanitizer.
  • Use clean towels for handwashing.
  • Avoid touching your face or other body parts while processing.
  • Sharpen your knife before each kill and as needed during processing.

Again, use common sense. If your basic hygiene is bad, you could pass on norovirus and other nasty stuff, but only if you also fail to properly cook the meat before eating. Poor hygiene while processing and unsafe cooking procedures are both necessary for bad things to happen.

Just use your brain, and you’ll be ok!

You want to raise your own chickens, which means you’re probably a smart person. So use your own good judgment to keep risks out of your process.

Appreciation

After you raise, kill, and process your own chickens, take a few minutes to sit down, think about the experience, and figure out what worked, what didn’t, and how you want to do it better next time.

Then remember all that went into it—from picking your breed, to brooding your chicks, to moving them around in your pasture tractor, to watching them chase grasshoppers in your lawn.

Be amazed at all you learned in the process.

Celebrate your success in raising high-quality food for you and your family.

And of course, give thanks for the way nature provides, for the chickens who will grace your table, for anyone who helped you along the way, and for the fact that you have healthy food to eat and choices about how to provide for yourself.

The post How to Butcher a Chicken appeared first on The Grow Network.

Quote of The Day

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“What kind of preacher goes around carrying a pistol and shoots like that?”-reporter

“A well prepared one”- Preacher

After the preacher took out his revolver and engaged a drive by shooting on the church wounding one. On the rather interesting USA series Damnation.

Posted for my buddy Bayou Renaissance Man

Weekly Watchman & Current Events – November 14, 2017

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This weekly post provides you with a select section of Current Events and Prophecy Update videos from current prophecy teachers. Be prayerful and line everything up against the Word of God.

But when these things begin to take place, stand up and lift up your heads, because your redemption is near!  Luke 21:28 HCSB

Disclaimer: I don’t agree with everything I post here.  However, I try to keep an open mind and definitely don’t want to be like the religious leaders of Jesus’ day that had the Son of God right in front of them, but didn’t recognize Him because He didn’t come the way they thought He would come!  Stay Alert!

In this week’s WW:

  • Jacob Prasch THIS WEEK IN PROPHECY – 11/13/17
  • John Haller’s Prophecy Update “World in Disarray” – 11/12/17
  • Amir Tsarfati – Where is America in Bible Prophecy? – 11/13/17
  • JD Farag – Guest Pastor Billy Crone: The satanic Invasion of Church Last Days – 11/10/17
  • Jason A – America in 2018 | Nobody is Talking About This!
  • Calvary Melbourne Australia – SYRIA DECLARES VICTORY OVER ISLAMIC STATE – 11/12/17

Jacob Prasch THIS WEEK IN PROPHECY – 11/13/17

 

John Haller’s Prophecy Update “World in Disarray” – 11/12/17

 

Amir Tsarfati – Where is America in Bible Prophecy? – 11/13/17

 

JD Farag – Guest Pastor Billy Crone: The satanic Invasion of Church Last Days – 11/10/17

 

Jason A – America in 2018 | Nobody is Talking About This!

 

Calvary Melbourne Australia – SYRIA DECLARES VICTORY OVER ISLAMIC STATE – 11/12/17

 

Peace,
Todd

More questions about Bitcoin

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Message:

Hello, Fernando. I was wondering more & more about Bitcoin, but I can’t find too much clear information about it- everything starts in the middle & doesn’t seem too concerned about telling you how not to get snagged-up with it (ex: looking like a drug dealer or a money launderer). Would you people tell me some more about it? I would hate to miss a good investment, but I don’t even get how it IS an investment- it doesn’t seem like there’s any company that distributes it, so how can there be any stock? And why not just make your own?

A-

Hello A,

Again, I’m no Bitcoin expert by any stretch of the imagination but I’ll try to answer some of your questions.

Bitcoin is a currency, a virtual one at that but some Bitcoin does not make you a drug dealer any more than having a roll of 20s in your pocket makes you one. Don’t let the mainstream media agenda intended to stigmatize Bitcoin get to you. In any case, ALL large financial groups are into Bitcoin at this point, so don’t feel bad about doing it yourself.

Second, it is not an investment. Investments generate profit. Buying Bitcoin will only get you… Bitcoin. Like gold, it can go up or down and you selling at the right time may leave you with a profit but it’s a currency, not an investment.

Finally, you CAN make your own. You can mine Bitcoin with your computer. The problem is that by its own nature Bitcoin is HARD to mine, meaning you need a lot of computer power to mine it so that its profitable and compensates the electric power you are using to generate it. People used to buy mining computers to mine Bitcoin and many still do. How profitable it is today is hard to say. All I know is that you need some initial investment for the mining computers and electric power better be rather affordable where you are.

As I said before, I think Bitcoin is extremely interesting but it’s not on the same line as gold and silver, which have been around for thousands of years. Can it be the gold of the future generation? Maybe, but don’t put into it anything you can’t afford to lose. That would be my advice.

As for buying Bitcoins, I suggest you do a lot of google and reading first. Chances are you’ll end up in Coinbase or maybe Localbitcoins. No, I don’t have any association of any kind with either one, they are just some of the most common names that pop up.

Good luck!

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Briggs Myers Personality Types — Know Thyself

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I did a few Myers Briggs personality tests. They were interesting. I found that the ones that gave repetitive results, were the ones that had a sliding scale of response, like 7 choices, instead of just 2.

My most likely category is ENTJ which is less than 1 in 50 people, the second most rare category.

Here is one with a “spectrum” response rather than a “binary” response (yes/no)

https://www.truity.com/test/type-finder-research-edition

http://similarminds.com/personality_test.html

I didn’t do this one, but it looks interesting

https://www.themuse.com/advice/14-free-personality-tests-thatll-help-you-figure-yourself-out 


ENTJ – “Field Marshall”. The basic driving force and need is to lead. Tend to seek a position of responsibility and enjoys being an executive. 1.8% of total population.

Take Free Jung Personality Test
Personality Test by SimilarMinds.com

——————————————————————

===================================================

All from one site

MOTIV Personality Test (info)
Short Test (55 items)
Hybrid Test (60 items)

R-Drive Personality Test (info)
Short Test (65 items)
Advanced Test (165 items)*

Global 3 Personality Test
Short Test (30 items)
Advanced Test (126 items)

Big 5 / Global 5 / SLOAN Tests (info)
Short Test (50 items)
Word Test (60 words)
Word Choice Test (30 pairs)
Big 30 Test (155 items)
Big 45 Test (225 items)

Enneagram Personality Test (info)
Variant Test (25 items)
Short Test (50 items)
Word Test (45 words)
Advanced Test (131 items)
Enneagram+Jung (108 items)

Compatibility Tests (info)
Multiuser (2+ users)
Enneagram (self reporting)
Jung (self reporting)
Big Five (self reporting)

Phototyping tests
Personality Item Test (15+ items)
Jung Type Test (15+ items)

Non-Serious Tests (info)
Famous Leader Test (9-45 items)
Classic Movie Test (9-45 items)

Right Left Brain Tests (info)
Short Test (30 items)
Word Test (30 words)
Word Choice Test (25 pairs)

Jung Tests I-E S-N F-T J-P** (info)
Short Test (60 items)
Old Short Test (48 items)
Cognitive Functions Test (60 items)*
Word Test (48 words)
Word Choice Test (24 pairs)
Jung+Enneagram (108 items)

Other Personality System Tests (info)
Personality Disorder Test (55 items)
Maslow Inventory Test (36 items)
Locus of Control Test (30 items)
Freudian Inventory Test (36 items)
Eysenck Personality Test (46 items)
Cattell 16 Factor Test (85 items)
Career Inventory Test (58 items)
Geographic Personality Test (33 items)
Indie Personality Test (30 items)
Cerebral Personality Test (30 items)

Multi-Perspective Tests (info)
Jung (48 items)*
Advanced Jung (144 items)*

Intelligence Tests (info)
Visual Pattern Test (15 items)
Number Pattern Test (15 items)
Vocabulary Test (<10 minutes)

Personality Tools (info)
Word Association Test
Ask The Oracle

*beta version

Batteries, Small NiMH Rechargeable

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Humans are not designed to live without light at night, we must have it to survive in today’s world of crime and violence. A Preppers best friend for lighting and communications in an extended grid-down situation are rechargeable batteries to keep these needed devices going.
Some of us have small generators to run lights and refrigeration, even heat for the home during a short term grid down. But long term, when your gas is gone and gas stations are closed, the only thing left is your own solar system. A 200 watt system can run small portable 12v refrigerators (Dometic), and recharge all your batteries for lighting and communications. This size of system is inexpensive and easily be made portable.

All my critical battery powered flashlights lights and radios are powered with “AA” rechargeable batteries. I only choose “AA” size because it makes battery stocking easy as this one size powers all my critical devices.

Like all prepping items, they need periodic review and maintenance (such as recharging) even if not used. NiMH (nickel–metal hydride) type batteries will self-discharge when not in use. The self-discharge amount varies with new technologies, from 10% to 50% with most only 20%. So once a year, and for me that is the beginning of hurricane season. I recharge (top-off) all my NiMH batteries so they are ready to do their job with full power.

When purchasing new NiMH, try to buy the same manufacturer brand and the ones with the largest mA (milliamp hours) or stored power (amps). Today that’s generally the 2300mA or 2500mA size.

What is ‘mA’ (milliamp hour)?

It’s a unit of electric current equal to one thousandth (1000) of an ampere. The SI base unit for electric current is the ampere. One ampere, is equal to 1000 milliamps, or 1 amps.

Example:

A 2500 mA battery equals 2.5 amps of stored power.

A 1500 mA battery equals 1.5 amps of stored power.

Rechargers:

I use two types of chargers, a fast recharger and the other is a smart recharger.

The fast recharger;

is just that, fast. It can recharge for “AA” batteries in as little as 15 minutes!

The smart recharger;

has a ‘conditioning’ charge. After a number of battery uses, the NiMH can develop a ‘memory’ or it thinks it is fully recharged but it’s not. The battery will tell the charger it’s full and the charger then stops the recharge cycle. The smart charger has a special conditioning charge function, user selected, will automatically discharge the battery completely, then recharge the battery to 100% of its’ rated (milliamps) capacity. Note that this conditioning charge is far slower than the fast recharger.

Below are the two chargers I use and recommend.

Important Note:

Every NiMH battery will have its’ mA capacity printed on the side. DO NOT MIX mA capacities either in the charger or in the device they’re used in. Why? Because the batteries have a chip (computer) in each one. This chip talks to the charger and lets the charger know when it is full and doesn’t need any more recharging. The typical charger has a four bay or battery capacity. If you put into the charger three, 2500 mA and one 1500 mA battery, the lower mA battery will be recharged first but, what happens is when the 1500 mA talks to the charger and says it’s full the charger will shut-off the cycle. What happens to the three 2500 mA batteries? They will only be charged to 1500 mA. Only charge the same mA batteries at the same time be it 1, 2, 3 or 4 of the same mA batteries.

Quick NiMH battery Facts:

Charge cycles: Up to 700 times

Charge retention: Lasts up to 12 months

The CCRANE Quick Charger (Smart Charger)

CCRANE showing charger compartment. Will charge one or up to four at a time of “AAA”, “AA”, “C” or “D” size batteries. Either NiMH or NiCad batteries.

Energizer Quick Charger (15 minute charge cycle)

Shown is a 2500 mA battery label. All rechargeable batteries will be labeled with their mA capacity. I also date each battery when purchased for overall age reference.

Both chargers, come with a 110v wall plug/cord and a 12v plug/cord for charging off your power port in your car or solar system if you have one. If 110v grid is down you can recharge your batteries from your car battery.

How to Skin and Cut Up a Squirrel in 9 Steps

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How to Skin and Cut Up a Squirrel in 9 Steps There has long been a negative connotation when it comes to the humble squirrel. People just don’t like the idea of eating squirrels. It has to do with their proximity to us and I think it also has something to do with accusations that …

Continue reading »

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Apollo Grow Tent Review: How Solid Are These Tents?

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The post Apollo Grow Tent Review: How Solid Are These Tents? is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

When it comes to buying a grow tent it can be a little overwhelming indoor gardeners because of how many different manufacturers, sizes, features are available. So I’ve taken the time to write this review in order to present one of the best built and low cost tents on the market and help you figure … Read more

The post Apollo Grow Tent Review: How Solid Are These Tents? is by
Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

21 Things For Pandemic Survival

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A pandemic may incapacitate (and/or terminate) a significant portion of the population. It may cripple our infrastructure due to the lack of people working during the outbreak. It will likely leave you without groceries and other services for the duration (months or longer). If a deadly virus were to infect the population and spread easily from person to person, a pandemic (worldwide outbreak of disease) could begin. No one can predict when a pandemic might occur. Are you ready to self quarantine for 30, 60, 90, 120 days? Re-posted and updated for your information, given the Plague outbreak:   Surviving

The post 21 Things For Pandemic Survival appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Food Dehydrator – How To Find The Best One For You

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Food DehydratorDehydrated food is one of the best survival snacks you should get your hands on.

Dehydrating food is an ancient technique that’s still widely used around the world. And owning a food dehydrator makes it insanely easy to add these snacks to your survival food supply over time.

Drying your own food is an important and worthwhile survival skill to master.

It gives you the ability to turn fresh foods into long-lasting survival snacks at an extremely low cost.

Because we all know, buying large amounts of beef jerky, dried fruits and fish from the store takes a small fortune. It’s much better and easier on the budget to dry your own foods using a food dehydrator.

Plus, your food drying options are almost limitless. You can literally dehydrate anything: fruits, veggies, meats, fish, you name it.

When it comes to dehydrating foods, though, there’s a lot of information and options available. Tons of tips and tricks, lots of good ideas, and hundreds of food dehydrators on the market.

For someone new to food dehydration, the scope of options can seem intimidating.

But don’t worry, that’s why here.

We’re going to deep dive into:

  • Why You Should Dehydrate Food
  • How To Dehydrate Food (ancient techniques)
  • How To Find The Best Food Dehydrator
  • What and How To Dehydrate With Your New Dehydrator
  • Maintaining Your Food Dehydrator
As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

dried meats strips

Why DIY Dry?


Food dehydration has been around for tens of thousands of years. The earliest evidence of people doing it is from 12,000 BC!

That means we have been drying snacks for far longer than we’ve been living in cities. That’s how you know it’s such a practical survival skill.

Food dehydration was practiced by people who survived in the ancient wild. Hunters and gathers who wandered across barren, uncivilized lands.

But Why?

First, dehydrated food lasts a whole lot longer than fresh food.

By drying it, you’re removing almost all moisture from the product. Mold, yeast, and bacteria need water, oxygen, and warmth to grow. So, by eliminating moisture from the equation, you’re helping to prevent food spoilage.

So dehydrating food increases its shelf life exponentially.

For example, a fresh banana from the store will last on a countertop for about a week. But if you slice up and dry that same banana into banana chips, it will keep for months (or even years). And you’re retaining almost all it’s original nutritional value.

Food dehydrating is like stopping the food aging process!

Which leads us to the second reason why you should dehydrate food – dried foods are packed with nutrients.

Sure, potato chips last for a long time too. But eating a lot of potato chips is bad compared to eating dried slices of fruits and veggies.

Foods you dehydrate – fruits, veggies, meats, etc. – keep most of their nutritional value.

That ‘s great news if you’re ever caught in an emergency and need nutrients, but don’t have access to fresh foods. With a healthy stock of dehydrated food, you will not have to worry.

And last but not least, dehydrated foods taste great.

Something about sucking all the moisture out of things changes their flavor significantly. It’s why dried mango chips don’t taste like fresh mangos, and why beef jerky doesn’t taste like regular beef.

Dehydrating food is both smart for survival and a delicious everyday snack!

Any food that lasts a long time, is healthy, and tastes good is a perfect survival food source. And dehydrating your own food will save you money.

Sun Dried Tomatoes

How To Dry Food


The easiest modern method for dehydrating your food is to use an electric dryer. But we will get to those devices shortly.

But can still dehydrate food without the need for a high tech food dehydrator.

Our ancestors have been drying food for most of human history – long before electrical sockets and batteries came along.

How Did They Do It?

Two main ways.

Using The Power Of The Sun

The first is still popular today – especially with tomatoes: sun drying.

It’s a straightforward process that begins with selecting good produce. The best ingredients will make the best-dried produce.

Fruits should be cut into thin slices. And veggies (which have lower acid levels and spoil faster) should be cut into cubes, or diced.

Spread your cut produce out on paper-lined trays or, better yet, cloth covered wooden frames. Protect the food from insects using cheesecloth.

Set the trays outside, and turn the food occasionally for even dehydration.

At night, bring the drying produce inside. And if rainy weather moves in you can save your batch with some last minute oven-drying.

Another conventional method for sun drying is to hang foods on a string, protected with cheesecloth or a screen.

The benefit to doing this is you do not have to turn the produce as often as it dries.

Now placing your food in direct sunlight or a shaded area will affect the finished product.

Most foods dried in the shade retain both color and flavor better. But it takes longer.

Food dried in direct sunlight will dry a lot faster.

Some people recommend “pasteurizing” your dried food, once it’s finished drying. You can do this by popping it into the oven (at 175-degrees F). Ten minutes for veggies, and fifteen for fruits.

Using The Power Of The Wind

The second method for drying food is wind drying.

Place the food slices on a mesh tray outside letting the power of the wind suck out the moisture.

Obviously, for this method to work, you need consistent wind.

Luckily, dehydrating in the wind does not need a hurricane force winds. In fact, you can wind dry your food inside with a fan.

Just place the trays or racks of goodies in front of the fan and let it sit. Chemistry will do the rest.

Storing Your Dehydrated Foods

After your food is all dried out and ready to store, get yourself some plastic bags.

Zip-locks work, but the best option is to use a quality vacuum sealer, so all the air and moisture is out of the storage container.

Another option is to use mylar bags and oxygen absorbers to remove the oxygen after it’s sealed.

Always make sure your storage container is air-tight and void of moisture!

If any humidity gets locked in with the food, it will spoil. And there’s nothing worse than breaking into your survival food to discover your dried snacks have gone bad when you need them most.

Finding The Best Food Dehydrator For Survival


While using the sun or the wind to dehydrate your food is free, but it’s definitely not the most efficient method to dehydrate. Not anymore, at least.

Electric food dryers speed up the drying process exponentially. Plus they help produce much more consistent and reliable results.

They are simply the best way to dehydrate food.

And there are tons of them out there!

No matter what size, style, or price you’re looking for, there’s a food dehydrator out there for you.

Here are a few of the most popular food dehydrators that are best for survival and preparedness:

Nesco FD-75A Snackmaster Pro 

This is our favorite and the food dehydrator we recommend.

The Nesco Snackmaster Pro food dehydrator has a thermostat that allows you to dry different foods at the proper temperature for that food (95º-160º F).

It includes 600 watts of drying power.

The Nesco comes with 5 trays, but you can also expand this unit all the way up to 12 trays (trays are 13 1/2″ in diameter).

Opaque exterior supports blocking of harmful light which can destroy the nutritional content of food being dehydrated.

This unique drying system forces air down the exterior pressurized chamber (not through the trays). The hot air is forced horizontally across each individual tray, converging on the core for fast, even and nutritious drying.

So there’s no flavor mixing and no need to rotate trays.

An all-around excellent food dehydrator that one of the most popular ones at a great price.

Check Out Today’s Price

Gourmia GFD1950 Digital Food Dehydrator

If you want to go big, this is your best option.

With nine trays, this is a huge dehydrator, capable of drying lots of food at one time.

The Gourmia GFD1950 has a digital timer and transparent front door so you can keep an eye on the progress of your dehydration.

Check Out Today’s Price

Excalibur 3900 Tray Deluxe Dehydrator

This family-sized option is hard to beat.

It offers 15-square feet of drying space, spread out over nine trays that stack vertically on top of one another.

The Excalibur 3900 trays are easy to clean poly screens and the unit comes with a built-in adjustable thermostat.

This allows you to adjust the temperature/speed at which you dry your foods.

Check Out Today’s Price

Nutrichef Food Dehydrator Machine

The Nutrichef is an easy to use dehydrator does its job at the press of a single button.

It comes with five removable trays that stack vertically.

The Nutrichef Dehydrator is compact and fits comfortably on a countertop or table.

But because of its smaller size, you’re limited on how much food you can dry at any given time.

Check Out Today’s Price

Food Dehydrator Hanging Drying Net

Not all modern-day food dehydrators require electricity!

This simple hanging net food dehydrator provides users with a non-electric drying alternative.

It can be used for sun drying or wind drying and comes with a protective netting to keep bugs out and let the sunshine in.

The Hanging Net Drying Dehydrator includes four shelves and compresses down into almost nothing for super-easy storage.

Not just that, but at this price, it’s by far the most affordable option on this list.

Check Out Today’s Price

Food Dehydrator Rating Chart


Dehydrated Fruit

What To Dry And How to Dry It


Food dehydration is not limited by many factors.

If it is fresh, and it has moisture in it, you can probably dehydrate it.

That means fish, meat, fruits, and vegetables are all fair game. But the process is different for each, and for some foods, you can add spices for a little flavor boost.

Fruits

Apples, mangos, pears, bananas, plantains, tomatoes, grapes, peaches, oranges, dates, etc.

Dehydrating fruit takes, on average, 8-12 hours of dry time to reach full dehydration. And you should let them cool for about 60 minutes before packaging. This allows any excess moisture evaporate.

Some people spice their apples with a little bit of cinnamon sugar before placing them in the dryer. This sweetens up an already delectable treat.

The same can be done for just about any fruit, before dehydration and packaging.

Vegetables

Broccoli, cauliflower, celery, carrots, corn, peas, potatoes, etc.

As with fruits, veggies take about 8-12 hours to dehydrate fully and should be given an hour to cool.

With veggies, you can get creative with your spices as well. Add some chili powder, cayenne pepper, onion powder, garlic salt, or black pepper to spice things up.

Meats

Pork, beef, venison, rabbit, turkey, chicken, pheasant, etc.

Meats take longer than anything else to dehydrate because of the texture of the flesh.

Allow from 6-24 hours for meat, depending on the thickness and type.

Don’t be afraid to try different kinds of spices to alter the flavors of your meat. Dried salted pork is a popular favorite. But you can also rub venison or beef in a red chili rub, or a garlic lime infusion.

Fish

Freshwater fish, saltwater fish, shellfish, cephalopods, etc.

Fish lands between veggies, fruits, and meats, on the dry-time scale. Fish should be left to dry between 10-15 hours.

Wind drying is popular with fish because there are often consistent winds near oceans and lakes.

You should add salt to dry your fish. And not just for flavor’s sake, but also because it adds extra preservative qualities to the meat.

Salting fish doubles down on the preservative power of your dehydration process.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

Dehydrated Mushroooms

Maintaining Your Dehydrator


Just like any other kitchen appliance, dehydrators need regular maintenance. Luckily, most modern dehydrators make this easy.

The most significant thing to watch out for is shelf cleanliness.

After each dry, remove all the shelves and wash them to remove any leftover food particles. For some dehydrators, this is easier than for others.

That’s why when shopping for a food dehydrator you should look for ones with washable shelves. Otherwise, you’ll be doing most of the cleanup by hand.

It’s also good to scrub the inside of your dehydrator after a few uses.

Drying foods can leave a slight residue on the inside of your dehydrator that builds up over time. If left for long enough, the residue could start to change the flavors of future foods you dry.

For example, your dehydrated fish might get a fruity smell. Or your dried veggies might develop a fishy taste. No one wants that!

The solution is easy: once every three or so uses, thoroughly scrub the inside of your dehydrator.

The Final Word


Stocking up on non-perishable survival food for an emergency or a disaster is an absolute must. But some survival foods don’t taste all that great. And a lot of them lack the necessary nutrients to get you through a dangerous survival situation.

Dehydrated foods offer a tasty, healthy, long-lasting way around that problem.

It gives you the ability to preserve food you grew, foraged for, caught or hunted yourself.

Knowing how to use the wind and the sun to do this is very useful in survival situations.

But having your own modern electric dryer is even better. It speeds up the process and makes for more consistent, reliable results.

Invest in a food dehydrator and start stocking up!

It’s so easy.

Just start drying every week, and build your food stockpile of dehydrated foods will grow. And when disaster strikes, you will be thankful to have all that tasty dried food at your fingertips.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.
Will Brendza

The post Food Dehydrator – How To Find The Best One For You appeared first on Skilled Survival.

Food Dehydrator – How To Find The Best One For You

Food DehydratorDehydrated food is one of the best survival snacks you should get your hands on.

Dehydrating food is an ancient technique that’s still widely used around the world. And owning a food dehydrator makes it insanely easy to add these snacks to your survival food supply over time.

Drying your own food is an important and worthwhile survival skill to master.

It gives you the ability to turn fresh foods into long-lasting survival snacks at an extremely low cost.

Because we all know, buying large amounts of beef jerky, dried fruits and fish from the store takes a small fortune. It’s much better and easier on the budget to dry your own foods using a food dehydrator.

Plus, your food drying options are almost limitless. You can literally dehydrate anything: fruits, veggies, meats, fish, you name it.

When it comes to dehydrating foods, though, there’s a lot of information and options available. Tons of tips and tricks, lots of good ideas, and hundreds of food dehydrators on the market.

For someone new to food dehydration, the scope of options can seem intimidating.

But don’t worry, that’s why here.

We’re going to deep dive into:

  • Why You Should Dehydrate Food
  • How To Dehydrate Food (ancient techniques)
  • How To Find The Best Food Dehydrator
  • What and How To Dehydrate With Your New Dehydrator
  • Maintaining Your Food Dehydrator
As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

dried meats strips

Why DIY Dry?


Food dehydration has been around for tens of thousands of years. The earliest evidence of people doing it is from 12,000 BC!

That means we have been drying snacks for far longer than we’ve been living in cities. That’s how you know it’s such a practical survival skill.

Food dehydration was practiced by people who survived in the ancient wild. Hunters and gathers who wandered across barren, uncivilized lands.

But Why?

First, dehydrated food lasts a whole lot longer than fresh food.

By drying it, you’re removing almost all moisture from the product. Mold, yeast, and bacteria need water, oxygen, and warmth to grow. So, by eliminating moisture from the equation, you’re helping to prevent food spoilage.

So dehydrating food increases its shelf life exponentially.

For example, a fresh banana from the store will last on a countertop for about a week. But if you slice up and dry that same banana into banana chips, it will keep for months (or even years). And you’re retaining almost all it’s original nutritional value.

Food dehydrating is like stopping the food aging process!

Which leads us to the second reason why you should dehydrate food – dried foods are packed with nutrients.

Sure, potato chips last for a long time too. But eating a lot of potato chips is bad compared to eating dried slices of fruits and veggies.

Foods you dehydrate – fruits, veggies, meats, etc. – keep most of their nutritional value.

That ‘s great news if you’re ever caught in an emergency and need nutrients, but don’t have access to fresh foods. With a healthy stock of dehydrated food, you will not have to worry.

And last but not least, dehydrated foods taste great.

Something about sucking all the moisture out of things changes their flavor significantly. It’s why dried mango chips don’t taste like fresh mangos, and why beef jerky doesn’t taste like regular beef.

Dehydrating food is both smart for survival and a delicious everyday snack!

Any food that lasts a long time, is healthy, and tastes good is a perfect survival food source. And dehydrating your own food will save you money.

Sun Dried Tomatoes

How To Dry Food


The easiest modern method for dehydrating your food is to use an electric dryer. But we will get to those devices shortly.

But can still dehydrate food without the need for a high tech food dehydrator.

Our ancestors have been drying food for most of human history – long before electrical sockets and batteries came along.

How Did They Do It?

Two main ways.

Using The Power Of The Sun

The first is still popular today – especially with tomatoes: sun drying.

It’s a straightforward process that begins with selecting good produce. The best ingredients will make the best-dried produce.

Fruits should be cut into thin slices. And veggies (which have lower acid levels and spoil faster) should be cut into cubes, or diced.

Spread your cut produce out on paper-lined trays or, better yet, cloth covered wooden frames. Protect the food from insects using cheesecloth.

Set the trays outside, and turn the food occasionally for even dehydration.

At night, bring the drying produce inside. And if rainy weather moves in you can save your batch with some last minute oven-drying.

Another conventional method for sun drying is to hang foods on a string, protected with cheesecloth or a screen.

The benefit to doing this is you do not have to turn the produce as often as it dries.

Now placing your food in direct sunlight or a shaded area will affect the finished product.

Most foods dried in the shade retain both color and flavor better. But it takes longer.

Food dried in direct sunlight will dry a lot faster.

Some people recommend “pasteurizing” your dried food, once it’s finished drying. You can do this by popping it into the oven (at 175-degrees F). Ten minutes for veggies, and fifteen for fruits.

Using The Power Of The Wind

The second method for drying food is wind drying.

Place the food slices on a mesh tray outside letting the power of the wind suck out the moisture.

Obviously, for this method to work, you need consistent wind.

Luckily, dehydrating in the wind does not need a hurricane force winds. In fact, you can wind dry your food inside with a fan.

Just place the trays or racks of goodies in front of the fan and let it sit. Chemistry will do the rest.

Storing Your Dehydrated Foods

After your food is all dried out and ready to store, get yourself some plastic bags.

Zip-locks work, but the best option is to use a quality vacuum sealer, so all the air and moisture is out of the storage container.

Another option is to use mylar bags and oxygen absorbers to remove the oxygen after it’s sealed.

Always make sure your storage container is air-tight and void of moisture!

If any humidity gets locked in with the food, it will spoil. And there’s nothing worse than breaking into your survival food to discover your dried snacks have gone bad when you need them most.

Finding The Best Food Dehydrator For Survival


While using the sun or the wind to dehydrate your food is free, but it’s definitely not the most efficient method to dehydrate. Not anymore, at least.

Electric food dryers speed up the drying process exponentially. Plus they help produce much more consistent and reliable results.

They are simply the best way to dehydrate food.

And there are tons of them out there!

No matter what size, style, or price you’re looking for, there’s a food dehydrator out there for you.

Here are a few of the most popular food dehydrators that are best for survival and preparedness:

Nesco FD-75A Snackmaster Pro 

This is our favorite and the food dehydrator we recommend.

The Nesco Snackmaster Pro food dehydrator has a thermostat that allows you to dry different foods at the proper temperature for that food (95º-160º F).

It includes 600 watts of drying power.

The Nesco comes with 5 trays, but you can also expand this unit all the way up to 12 trays (trays are 13 1/2″ in diameter).

Opaque exterior supports blocking of harmful light which can destroy the nutritional content of food being dehydrated.

This unique drying system forces air down the exterior pressurized chamber (not through the trays). The hot air is forced horizontally across each individual tray, converging on the core for fast, even and nutritious drying.

So there’s no flavor mixing and no need to rotate trays.

An all-around excellent food dehydrator that one of the most popular ones at a great price.

Check Out Today’s Price

Gourmia GFD1950 Digital Food Dehydrator

If you want to go big, this is your best option.

With nine trays, this is a huge dehydrator, capable of drying lots of food at one time.

The Gourmia GFD1950 has a digital timer and transparent front door so you can keep an eye on the progress of your dehydration.

Check Out Today’s Price

Excalibur 3900 Tray Deluxe Dehydrator

This family-sized option is hard to beat.

It offers 15-square feet of drying space, spread out over nine trays that stack vertically on top of one another.

The Excalibur 3900 trays are easy to clean poly screens and the unit comes with a built-in adjustable thermostat.

This allows you to adjust the temperature/speed at which you dry your foods.

Check Out Today’s Price

Nutrichef Food Dehydrator Machine

The Nutrichef is an easy to use dehydrator does its job at the press of a single button.

It comes with five removable trays that stack vertically.

The Nutrichef Dehydrator is compact and fits comfortably on a countertop or table.

But because of its smaller size, you’re limited on how much food you can dry at any given time.

Check Out Today’s Price

Food Dehydrator Hanging Drying Net

Not all modern-day food dehydrators require electricity!

This simple hanging net food dehydrator provides users with a non-electric drying alternative.

It can be used for sun drying or wind drying and comes with a protective netting to keep bugs out and let the sunshine in.

The Hanging Net Drying Dehydrator includes four shelves and compresses down into almost nothing for super-easy storage.

Not just that, but at this price, it’s by far the most affordable option on this list.

Check Out Today’s Price

Food Dehydrator Rating Chart


Dehydrated Fruit

What To Dry And How to Dry It


Food dehydration is not limited by many factors.

If it is fresh, and it has moisture in it, you can probably dehydrate it.

That means fish, meat, fruits, and vegetables are all fair game. But the process is different for each, and for some foods, you can add spices for a little flavor boost.

Fruits

Apples, mangos, pears, bananas, plantains, tomatoes, grapes, peaches, oranges, dates, etc.

Dehydrating fruit takes, on average, 8-12 hours of dry time to reach full dehydration. And you should let them cool for about 60 minutes before packaging. This allows any excess moisture evaporate.

Some people spice their apples with a little bit of cinnamon sugar before placing them in the dryer. This sweetens up an already delectable treat.

The same can be done for just about any fruit, before dehydration and packaging.

Vegetables

Broccoli, cauliflower, celery, carrots, corn, peas, potatoes, etc.

As with fruits, veggies take about 8-12 hours to dehydrate fully and should be given an hour to cool.

With veggies, you can get creative with your spices as well. Add some chili powder, cayenne pepper, onion powder, garlic salt, or black pepper to spice things up.

Meats

Pork, beef, venison, rabbit, turkey, chicken, pheasant, etc.

Meats take longer than anything else to dehydrate because of the texture of the flesh.

Allow from 6-24 hours for meat, depending on the thickness and type.

Don’t be afraid to try different kinds of spices to alter the flavors of your meat. Dried salted pork is a popular favorite. But you can also rub venison or beef in a red chili rub, or a garlic lime infusion.

Fish

Freshwater fish, saltwater fish, shellfish, cephalopods, etc.

Fish lands between veggies, fruits, and meats, on the dry-time scale. Fish should be left to dry between 10-15 hours.

Wind drying is popular with fish because there are often consistent winds near oceans and lakes.

You should add salt to dry your fish. And not just for flavor’s sake, but also because it adds extra preservative qualities to the meat.

Salting fish doubles down on the preservative power of your dehydration process.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

Dehydrated Mushroooms

Maintaining Your Dehydrator


Just like any other kitchen appliance, dehydrators need regular maintenance. Luckily, most modern dehydrators make this easy.

The most significant thing to watch out for is shelf cleanliness.

After each dry, remove all the shelves and wash them to remove any leftover food particles. For some dehydrators, this is easier than for others.

That’s why when shopping for a food dehydrator you should look for ones with washable shelves. Otherwise, you’ll be doing most of the cleanup by hand.

It’s also good to scrub the inside of your dehydrator after a few uses.

Drying foods can leave a slight residue on the inside of your dehydrator that builds up over time. If left for long enough, the residue could start to change the flavors of future foods you dry.

For example, your dehydrated fish might get a fruity smell. Or your dried veggies might develop a fishy taste. No one wants that!

The solution is easy: once every three or so uses, thoroughly scrub the inside of your dehydrator.

The Final Word


Stocking up on non-perishable survival food for an emergency or a disaster is an absolute must. But some survival foods don’t taste all that great. And a lot of them lack the necessary nutrients to get you through a dangerous survival situation.

Dehydrated foods offer a tasty, healthy, long-lasting way around that problem.

It gives you the ability to preserve food you grew, foraged for, caught or hunted yourself.

Knowing how to use the wind and the sun to do this is very useful in survival situations.

But having your own modern electric dryer is even better. It speeds up the process and makes for more consistent, reliable results.

Invest in a food dehydrator and start stocking up!

It’s so easy.

Just start drying every week, and build your food stockpile of dehydrated foods will grow. And when disaster strikes, you will be thankful to have all that tasty dried food at your fingertips.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.
Will Brendza

The post Food Dehydrator – How To Find The Best One For You appeared first on Skilled Survival.

Food Dehydrator – How To Find The Best One For You

Food DehydratorDehydrated food is one of the best survival snacks you should get your hands on.

Dehydrating food is an ancient technique that’s still widely used around the world. And owning a food dehydrator makes it insanely easy to add these snacks to your survival food supply over time.

Drying your own food is an important and worthwhile survival skill to master.

It gives you the ability to turn fresh foods into long-lasting survival snacks at an extremely low cost.

Because we all know, buying large amounts of beef jerky, dried fruits and fish from the store takes a small fortune. It’s much better and easier on the budget to dry your own foods using a food dehydrator.

Plus, your food drying options are almost limitless. You can literally dehydrate anything: fruits, veggies, meats, fish, you name it.

When it comes to dehydrating foods, though, there’s a lot of information and options available. Tons of tips and tricks, lots of good ideas, and hundreds of food dehydrators on the market.

For someone new to food dehydration, the scope of options can seem intimidating.

But don’t worry, that’s why here.

We’re going to deep dive into:

  • Why You Should Dehydrate Food
  • How To Dehydrate Food (ancient techniques)
  • How To Find The Best Food Dehydrator
  • What and How To Dehydrate With Your New Dehydrator
  • Maintaining Your Food Dehydrator
As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

dried meats strips

Why DIY Dry?


Food dehydration has been around for tens of thousands of years. The earliest evidence of people doing it is from 12,000 BC!

That means we have been drying snacks for far longer than we’ve been living in cities. That’s how you know it’s such a practical survival skill.

Food dehydration was practiced by people who survived in the ancient wild. Hunters and gathers who wandered across barren, uncivilized lands.

But Why?

First, dehydrated food lasts a whole lot longer than fresh food.

By drying it, you’re removing almost all moisture from the product. Mold, yeast, and bacteria need water, oxygen, and warmth to grow. So, by eliminating moisture from the equation, you’re helping to prevent food spoilage.

So dehydrating food increases its shelf life exponentially.

For example, a fresh banana from the store will last on a countertop for about a week. But if you slice up and dry that same banana into banana chips, it will keep for months (or even years). And you’re retaining almost all it’s original nutritional value.

Food dehydrating is like stopping the food aging process!

Which leads us to the second reason why you should dehydrate food – dried foods are packed with nutrients.

Sure, potato chips last for a long time too. But eating a lot of potato chips is bad compared to eating dried slices of fruits and veggies.

Foods you dehydrate – fruits, veggies, meats, etc. – keep most of their nutritional value.

That ‘s great news if you’re ever caught in an emergency and need nutrients, but don’t have access to fresh foods. With a healthy stock of dehydrated food, you will not have to worry.

And last but not least, dehydrated foods taste great.

Something about sucking all the moisture out of things changes their flavor significantly. It’s why dried mango chips don’t taste like fresh mangos, and why beef jerky doesn’t taste like regular beef.

Dehydrating food is both smart for survival and a delicious everyday snack!

Any food that lasts a long time, is healthy, and tastes good is a perfect survival food source. And dehydrating your own food will save you money.

Sun Dried Tomatoes

How To Dry Food


The easiest modern method for dehydrating your food is to use an electric dryer. But we will get to those devices shortly.

But can still dehydrate food without the need for a high tech food dehydrator.

Our ancestors have been drying food for most of human history – long before electrical sockets and batteries came along.

How Did They Do It?

Two main ways.

Using The Power Of The Sun

The first is still popular today – especially with tomatoes: sun drying.

It’s a straightforward process that begins with selecting good produce. The best ingredients will make the best-dried produce.

Fruits should be cut into thin slices. And veggies (which have lower acid levels and spoil faster) should be cut into cubes, or diced.

Spread your cut produce out on paper-lined trays or, better yet, cloth covered wooden frames. Protect the food from insects using cheesecloth.

Set the trays outside, and turn the food occasionally for even dehydration.

At night, bring the drying produce inside. And if rainy weather moves in you can save your batch with some last minute oven-drying.

Another conventional method for sun drying is to hang foods on a string, protected with cheesecloth or a screen.

The benefit to doing this is you do not have to turn the produce as often as it dries.

Now placing your food in direct sunlight or a shaded area will affect the finished product.

Most foods dried in the shade retain both color and flavor better. But it takes longer.

Food dried in direct sunlight will dry a lot faster.

Some people recommend “pasteurizing” your dried food, once it’s finished drying. You can do this by popping it into the oven (at 175-degrees F). Ten minutes for veggies, and fifteen for fruits.

Using The Power Of The Wind

The second method for drying food is wind drying.

Place the food slices on a mesh tray outside letting the power of the wind suck out the moisture.

Obviously, for this method to work, you need consistent wind.

Luckily, dehydrating in the wind does not need a hurricane force winds. In fact, you can wind dry your food inside with a fan.

Just place the trays or racks of goodies in front of the fan and let it sit. Chemistry will do the rest.

Storing Your Dehydrated Foods

After your food is all dried out and ready to store, get yourself some plastic bags.

Zip-locks work, but the best option is to use a quality vacuum sealer, so all the air and moisture is out of the storage container.

Another option is to use mylar bags and oxygen absorbers to remove the oxygen after it’s sealed.

Always make sure your storage container is air-tight and void of moisture!

If any humidity gets locked in with the food, it will spoil. And there’s nothing worse than breaking into your survival food to discover your dried snacks have gone bad when you need them most.

Finding The Best Food Dehydrator For Survival


While using the sun or the wind to dehydrate your food is free, but it’s definitely not the most efficient method to dehydrate. Not anymore, at least.

Electric food dryers speed up the drying process exponentially. Plus they help produce much more consistent and reliable results.

They are simply the best way to dehydrate food.

And there are tons of them out there!

No matter what size, style, or price you’re looking for, there’s a food dehydrator out there for you.

Here are a few of the most popular food dehydrators that are best for survival and preparedness:

Nesco FD-75A Snackmaster Pro 

This is our favorite and the food dehydrator we recommend.

The Nesco Snackmaster Pro food dehydrator has a thermostat that allows you to dry different foods at the proper temperature for that food (95º-160º F).

It includes 600 watts of drying power.

The Nesco comes with 5 trays, but you can also expand this unit all the way up to 12 trays (trays are 13 1/2″ in diameter).

Opaque exterior supports blocking of harmful light which can destroy the nutritional content of food being dehydrated.

This unique drying system forces air down the exterior pressurized chamber (not through the trays). The hot air is forced horizontally across each individual tray, converging on the core for fast, even and nutritious drying.

So there’s no flavor mixing and no need to rotate trays.

An all-around excellent food dehydrator that one of the most popular ones at a great price.

Check Out Today’s Price

Gourmia GFD1950 Digital Food Dehydrator

If you want to go big, this is your best option.

With nine trays, this is a huge dehydrator, capable of drying lots of food at one time.

The Gourmia GFD1950 has a digital timer and transparent front door so you can keep an eye on the progress of your dehydration.

Check Out Today’s Price

Excalibur 3900 Tray Deluxe Dehydrator

This family-sized option is hard to beat.

It offers 15-square feet of drying space, spread out over nine trays that stack vertically on top of one another.

The Excalibur 3900 trays are easy to clean poly screens and the unit comes with a built-in adjustable thermostat.

This allows you to adjust the temperature/speed at which you dry your foods.

Check Out Today’s Price

Nutrichef Food Dehydrator Machine

The Nutrichef is an easy to use dehydrator does its job at the press of a single button.

It comes with five removable trays that stack vertically.

The Nutrichef Dehydrator is compact and fits comfortably on a countertop or table.

But because of its smaller size, you’re limited on how much food you can dry at any given time.

Check Out Today’s Price

Food Dehydrator Hanging Drying Net

Not all modern-day food dehydrators require electricity!

This simple hanging net food dehydrator provides users with a non-electric drying alternative.

It can be used for sun drying or wind drying and comes with a protective netting to keep bugs out and let the sunshine in.

The Hanging Net Drying Dehydrator includes four shelves and compresses down into almost nothing for super-easy storage.

Not just that, but at this price, it’s by far the most affordable option on this list.

Check Out Today’s Price

Food Dehydrator Rating Chart


Dehydrated Fruit

What To Dry And How to Dry It


Food dehydration is not limited by many factors.

If it is fresh, and it has moisture in it, you can probably dehydrate it.

That means fish, meat, fruits, and vegetables are all fair game. But the process is different for each, and for some foods, you can add spices for a little flavor boost.

Fruits

Apples, mangos, pears, bananas, plantains, tomatoes, grapes, peaches, oranges, dates, etc.

Dehydrating fruit takes, on average, 8-12 hours of dry time to reach full dehydration. And you should let them cool for about 60 minutes before packaging. This allows any excess moisture evaporate.

Some people spice their apples with a little bit of cinnamon sugar before placing them in the dryer. This sweetens up an already delectable treat.

The same can be done for just about any fruit, before dehydration and packaging.

Vegetables

Broccoli, cauliflower, celery, carrots, corn, peas, potatoes, etc.

As with fruits, veggies take about 8-12 hours to dehydrate fully and should be given an hour to cool.

With veggies, you can get creative with your spices as well. Add some chili powder, cayenne pepper, onion powder, garlic salt, or black pepper to spice things up.

Meats

Pork, beef, venison, rabbit, turkey, chicken, pheasant, etc.

Meats take longer than anything else to dehydrate because of the texture of the flesh.

Allow from 6-24 hours for meat, depending on the thickness and type.

Don’t be afraid to try different kinds of spices to alter the flavors of your meat. Dried salted pork is a popular favorite. But you can also rub venison or beef in a red chili rub, or a garlic lime infusion.

Fish

Freshwater fish, saltwater fish, shellfish, cephalopods, etc.

Fish lands between veggies, fruits, and meats, on the dry-time scale. Fish should be left to dry between 10-15 hours.

Wind drying is popular with fish because there are often consistent winds near oceans and lakes.

You should add salt to dry your fish. And not just for flavor’s sake, but also because it adds extra preservative qualities to the meat.

Salting fish doubles down on the preservative power of your dehydration process.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

Dehydrated Mushroooms

Maintaining Your Dehydrator


Just like any other kitchen appliance, dehydrators need regular maintenance. Luckily, most modern dehydrators make this easy.

The most significant thing to watch out for is shelf cleanliness.

After each dry, remove all the shelves and wash them to remove any leftover food particles. For some dehydrators, this is easier than for others.

That’s why when shopping for a food dehydrator you should look for ones with washable shelves. Otherwise, you’ll be doing most of the cleanup by hand.

It’s also good to scrub the inside of your dehydrator after a few uses.

Drying foods can leave a slight residue on the inside of your dehydrator that builds up over time. If left for long enough, the residue could start to change the flavors of future foods you dry.

For example, your dehydrated fish might get a fruity smell. Or your dried veggies might develop a fishy taste. No one wants that!

The solution is easy: once every three or so uses, thoroughly scrub the inside of your dehydrator.

The Final Word


Stocking up on non-perishable survival food for an emergency or a disaster is an absolute must. But some survival foods don’t taste all that great. And a lot of them lack the necessary nutrients to get you through a dangerous survival situation.

Dehydrated foods offer a tasty, healthy, long-lasting way around that problem.

It gives you the ability to preserve food you grew, foraged for, caught or hunted yourself.

Knowing how to use the wind and the sun to do this is very useful in survival situations.

But having your own modern electric dryer is even better. It speeds up the process and makes for more consistent, reliable results.

Invest in a food dehydrator and start stocking up!

It’s so easy.

Just start drying every week, and build your food stockpile of dehydrated foods will grow. And when disaster strikes, you will be thankful to have all that tasty dried food at your fingertips.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.
Will Brendza

The post Food Dehydrator – How To Find The Best One For You appeared first on Skilled Survival.

Food Dehydrator – How To Find The Best One For You

Food DehydratorDehydrated food is one of the best survival snacks you should get your hands on.

Dehydrating food is an ancient technique that’s still widely used around the world. And owning a food dehydrator makes it insanely easy to add these snacks to your survival food supply over time.

Drying your own food is an important and worthwhile survival skill to master.

It gives you the ability to turn fresh foods into long-lasting survival snacks at an extremely low cost.

Because we all know, buying large amounts of beef jerky, dried fruits and fish from the store takes a small fortune. It’s much better and easier on the budget to dry your own foods using a food dehydrator.

Plus, your food drying options are almost limitless. You can literally dehydrate anything: fruits, veggies, meats, fish, you name it.

When it comes to dehydrating foods, though, there’s a lot of information and options available. Tons of tips and tricks, lots of good ideas, and hundreds of food dehydrators on the market.

For someone new to food dehydration, the scope of options can seem intimidating.

But don’t worry, that’s why here.

We’re going to deep dive into:

  • Why You Should Dehydrate Food
  • How To Dehydrate Food (ancient techniques)
  • How To Find The Best Food Dehydrator
  • What and How To Dehydrate With Your New Dehydrator
  • Maintaining Your Food Dehydrator
As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

dried meats strips

Why DIY Dry?


Food dehydration has been around for tens of thousands of years. The earliest evidence of people doing it is from 12,000 BC!

That means we have been drying snacks for far longer than we’ve been living in cities. That’s how you know it’s such a practical survival skill.

Food dehydration was practiced by people who survived in the ancient wild. Hunters and gathers who wandered across barren, uncivilized lands.

But Why?

First, dehydrated food lasts a whole lot longer than fresh food.

By drying it, you’re removing almost all moisture from the product. Mold, yeast, and bacteria need water, oxygen, and warmth to grow. So, by eliminating moisture from the equation, you’re helping to prevent food spoilage.

So dehydrating food increases its shelf life exponentially.

For example, a fresh banana from the store will last on a countertop for about a week. But if you slice up and dry that same banana into banana chips, it will keep for months (or even years). And you’re retaining almost all it’s original nutritional value.

Food dehydrating is like stopping the food aging process!

Which leads us to the second reason why you should dehydrate food – dried foods are packed with nutrients.

Sure, potato chips last for a long time too. But eating a lot of potato chips is bad compared to eating dried slices of fruits and veggies.

Foods you dehydrate – fruits, veggies, meats, etc. – keep most of their nutritional value.

That ‘s great news if you’re ever caught in an emergency and need nutrients, but don’t have access to fresh foods. With a healthy stock of dehydrated food, you will not have to worry.

And last but not least, dehydrated foods taste great.

Something about sucking all the moisture out of things changes their flavor significantly. It’s why dried mango chips don’t taste like fresh mangos, and why beef jerky doesn’t taste like regular beef.

Dehydrating food is both smart for survival and a delicious everyday snack!

Any food that lasts a long time, is healthy, and tastes good is a perfect survival food source. And dehydrating your own food will save you money.

Sun Dried Tomatoes

How To Dry Food


The easiest modern method for dehydrating your food is to use an electric dryer. But we will get to those devices shortly.

But can still dehydrate food without the need for a high tech food dehydrator.

Our ancestors have been drying food for most of human history – long before electrical sockets and batteries came along.

How Did They Do It?

Two main ways.

Using The Power Of The Sun

The first is still popular today – especially with tomatoes: sun drying.

It’s a straightforward process that begins with selecting good produce. The best ingredients will make the best-dried produce.

Fruits should be cut into thin slices. And veggies (which have lower acid levels and spoil faster) should be cut into cubes, or diced.

Spread your cut produce out on paper-lined trays or, better yet, cloth covered wooden frames. Protect the food from insects using cheesecloth.

Set the trays outside, and turn the food occasionally for even dehydration.

At night, bring the drying produce inside. And if rainy weather moves in you can save your batch with some last minute oven-drying.

Another conventional method for sun drying is to hang foods on a string, protected with cheesecloth or a screen.

The benefit to doing this is you do not have to turn the produce as often as it dries.

Now placing your food in direct sunlight or a shaded area will affect the finished product.

Most foods dried in the shade retain both color and flavor better. But it takes longer.

Food dried in direct sunlight will dry a lot faster.

Some people recommend “pasteurizing” your dried food, once it’s finished drying. You can do this by popping it into the oven (at 175-degrees F). Ten minutes for veggies, and fifteen for fruits.

Using The Power Of The Wind

The second method for drying food is wind drying.

Place the food slices on a mesh tray outside letting the power of the wind suck out the moisture.

Obviously, for this method to work, you need consistent wind.

Luckily, dehydrating in the wind does not need a hurricane force winds. In fact, you can wind dry your food inside with a fan.

Just place the trays or racks of goodies in front of the fan and let it sit. Chemistry will do the rest.

Storing Your Dehydrated Foods

After your food is all dried out and ready to store, get yourself some plastic bags.

Zip-locks work, but the best option is to use a quality vacuum sealer, so all the air and moisture is out of the storage container.

Another option is to use mylar bags and oxygen absorbers to remove the oxygen after it’s sealed.

Always make sure your storage container is air-tight and void of moisture!

If any humidity gets locked in with the food, it will spoil. And there’s nothing worse than breaking into your survival food to discover your dried snacks have gone bad when you need them most.

Finding The Best Food Dehydrator For Survival


While using the sun or the wind to dehydrate your food is free, but it’s definitely not the most efficient method to dehydrate. Not anymore, at least.

Electric food dryers speed up the drying process exponentially. Plus they help produce much more consistent and reliable results.

They are simply the best way to dehydrate food.

And there are tons of them out there!

No matter what size, style, or price you’re looking for, there’s a food dehydrator out there for you.

Here are a few of the most popular food dehydrators that are best for survival and preparedness:

Nesco FD-75A Snackmaster Pro 

This is our favorite and the food dehydrator we recommend.

The Nesco Snackmaster Pro food dehydrator has a thermostat that allows you to dry different foods at the proper temperature for that food (95º-160º F).

It includes 600 watts of drying power.

The Nesco comes with 5 trays, but you can also expand this unit all the way up to 12 trays (trays are 13 1/2″ in diameter).

Opaque exterior supports blocking of harmful light which can destroy the nutritional content of food being dehydrated.

This unique drying system forces air down the exterior pressurized chamber (not through the trays). The hot air is forced horizontally across each individual tray, converging on the core for fast, even and nutritious drying.

So there’s no flavor mixing and no need to rotate trays.

An all-around excellent food dehydrator that one of the most popular ones at a great price.

Check Out Today’s Price

Gourmia GFD1950 Digital Food Dehydrator

If you want to go big, this is your best option.

With nine trays, this is a huge dehydrator, capable of drying lots of food at one time.

The Gourmia GFD1950 has a digital timer and transparent front door so you can keep an eye on the progress of your dehydration.

Check Out Today’s Price

Excalibur 3900 Tray Deluxe Dehydrator

This family-sized option is hard to beat.

It offers 15-square feet of drying space, spread out over nine trays that stack vertically on top of one another.

The Excalibur 3900 trays are easy to clean poly screens and the unit comes with a built-in adjustable thermostat.

This allows you to adjust the temperature/speed at which you dry your foods.

Check Out Today’s Price

Nutrichef Food Dehydrator Machine

The Nutrichef is an easy to use dehydrator does its job at the press of a single button.

It comes with five removable trays that stack vertically.

The Nutrichef Dehydrator is compact and fits comfortably on a countertop or table.

But because of its smaller size, you’re limited on how much food you can dry at any given time.

Check Out Today’s Price

Food Dehydrator Hanging Drying Net

Not all modern-day food dehydrators require electricity!

This simple hanging net food dehydrator provides users with a non-electric drying alternative.

It can be used for sun drying or wind drying and comes with a protective netting to keep bugs out and let the sunshine in.

The Hanging Net Drying Dehydrator includes four shelves and compresses down into almost nothing for super-easy storage.

Not just that, but at this price, it’s by far the most affordable option on this list.

Check Out Today’s Price

Food Dehydrator Rating Chart


Dehydrated Fruit

What To Dry And How to Dry It


Food dehydration is not limited by many factors.

If it is fresh, and it has moisture in it, you can probably dehydrate it.

That means fish, meat, fruits, and vegetables are all fair game. But the process is different for each, and for some foods, you can add spices for a little flavor boost.

Fruits

Apples, mangos, pears, bananas, plantains, tomatoes, grapes, peaches, oranges, dates, etc.

Dehydrating fruit takes, on average, 8-12 hours of dry time to reach full dehydration. And you should let them cool for about 60 minutes before packaging. This allows any excess moisture evaporate.

Some people spice their apples with a little bit of cinnamon sugar before placing them in the dryer. This sweetens up an already delectable treat.

The same can be done for just about any fruit, before dehydration and packaging.

Vegetables

Broccoli, cauliflower, celery, carrots, corn, peas, potatoes, etc.

As with fruits, veggies take about 8-12 hours to dehydrate fully and should be given an hour to cool.

With veggies, you can get creative with your spices as well. Add some chili powder, cayenne pepper, onion powder, garlic salt, or black pepper to spice things up.

Meats

Pork, beef, venison, rabbit, turkey, chicken, pheasant, etc.

Meats take longer than anything else to dehydrate because of the texture of the flesh.

Allow from 6-24 hours for meat, depending on the thickness and type.

Don’t be afraid to try different kinds of spices to alter the flavors of your meat. Dried salted pork is a popular favorite. But you can also rub venison or beef in a red chili rub, or a garlic lime infusion.

Fish

Freshwater fish, saltwater fish, shellfish, cephalopods, etc.

Fish lands between veggies, fruits, and meats, on the dry-time scale. Fish should be left to dry between 10-15 hours.

Wind drying is popular with fish because there are often consistent winds near oceans and lakes.

You should add salt to dry your fish. And not just for flavor’s sake, but also because it adds extra preservative qualities to the meat.

Salting fish doubles down on the preservative power of your dehydration process.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

Dehydrated Mushroooms

Maintaining Your Dehydrator


Just like any other kitchen appliance, dehydrators need regular maintenance. Luckily, most modern dehydrators make this easy.

The most significant thing to watch out for is shelf cleanliness.

After each dry, remove all the shelves and wash them to remove any leftover food particles. For some dehydrators, this is easier than for others.

That’s why when shopping for a food dehydrator you should look for ones with washable shelves. Otherwise, you’ll be doing most of the cleanup by hand.

It’s also good to scrub the inside of your dehydrator after a few uses.

Drying foods can leave a slight residue on the inside of your dehydrator that builds up over time. If left for long enough, the residue could start to change the flavors of future foods you dry.

For example, your dehydrated fish might get a fruity smell. Or your dried veggies might develop a fishy taste. No one wants that!

The solution is easy: once every three or so uses, thoroughly scrub the inside of your dehydrator.

The Final Word


Stocking up on non-perishable survival food for an emergency or a disaster is an absolute must. But some survival foods don’t taste all that great. And a lot of them lack the necessary nutrients to get you through a dangerous survival situation.

Dehydrated foods offer a tasty, healthy, long-lasting way around that problem.

It gives you the ability to preserve food you grew, foraged for, caught or hunted yourself.

Knowing how to use the wind and the sun to do this is very useful in survival situations.

But having your own modern electric dryer is even better. It speeds up the process and makes for more consistent, reliable results.

Invest in a food dehydrator and start stocking up!

It’s so easy.

Just start drying every week, and build your food stockpile of dehydrated foods will grow. And when disaster strikes, you will be thankful to have all that tasty dried food at your fingertips.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Family First Food Planning Guide. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.
Will Brendza

The post Food Dehydrator – How To Find The Best One For You appeared first on Skilled Survival.

5 Tips to Prevent Sleep Deprivation

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5 Tips to Prevent Sleep Deprivation

5 Tips to Prevent Sleep Deprivation

 Six to eight hours of sleep every day is the amount of rest we need to keep our brain and body healthy and prepared for any challenge. When we’re young, we could manage with less sleep. But as we age, our ability to tolerate the sleep deprivation effects diminishes drastically. And when we find ourselves in a survival situation, the lack of proper sleep will influence us even more than in our usual daily life.

Continue reading 5 Tips to Prevent Sleep Deprivation at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Bug Out Locations!

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Bug Out Locations!

Bug Out Locations
Forrest Garvin “The Prepping Academy” Audio player below!

There are various scenarios from the possibility of natural disasters to post-apocalyptic chaos that prompt people to find secret locations where they can exist off the grid. When there’s a natural disaster that covers quite a large area – like a hurricane, the necessity arises of moving elsewhere where you have food, water and a place to stay until things are back to normal.

Continue reading Bug Out Locations! at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

The Truth About Guns, God And The Second Amendment

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The latest mass shooting to grab the media’s attention, in the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas, has sparked the national debate about firearms once again.

That “debate” which ebbs and flows with the news, is really a one-sided one, with proponents of gun control taking advantage of every one of these horrific events to try and further their political agenda. Those of us who support our Second Amendment rights merely stand our ground and let them wail and posture for the cameras.

It really doesn’t seem like those who are after gun control care much about the victims of these killings, other than as props for use in pushing their agenda.

I have yet to hear of one of them writing a letter of condolence (not a letter looking for support) to the families of victims. Nor have I heard of any of them taking action to support the survivors. Maybe some have, but I haven’t heard of it.

Actions of that type are likely to come out of those of us on the right anyway. The left is more than ready to give their time and money to social activism, but study after study has shown that it is the conservatives in this country who actually support non-profit organizations which help people.

So why the debate? Much of it is driven by fear.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

Everyone I know, who is in favor of gun control, is afraid of guns. Maybe there are some out there who aren’t, but the vast majority of them have never held a gun in their lives, are totally convinced that guns are evil incarnate, and therefore are convinced that anyone who would touch or own a gun has to be evil as well.

A Conflict Based on Ignorance

Ignorance in the gun control crowd is rabid. We see this constantly, as politicians, reporters and other public figures make mistake after mistake in their tirades against the evil of guns.

They are able to get away with false narratives, like calling semi-automatic rifles “assault weapons” and talking about the “gun show loophole,” simply because their audience doesn’t know any more about guns than they do.

This is part of what the people at the top, those behind the gun control movement are counting on. As with many such political movements, much is dependent on convincing the population that a lie is the truth. Hitler, who took over Germany with lies, put it best: “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” The left has repeated their lies often enough, that people are quoting them right and left, without fact-checking what they are saying.

Some of these glaring facts revolve around the AR-15 sporting rifle, which has come to the forefront of the debate once again. An AR-15 is no more deadly than any other semi-automatic rifle, and much less deadly than some. Yet it is constantly villanized by those on the left. Why? Because it looks scary.

Granted, the two latest mass shootings to gain the media’s attention both featured AR-15 rifles. The Las Vegas shooter used AR-15s, equipped with bump stocks to kill 58 and wound almost ten times that many. Likewise, the Sutherland Springs killer used an AR-15. But what the mainstream media is intentionally overlooking, is that the man who stopped the Sutherland Springs also used an AR-15 rifle.

While these two examples tend to paint the AR-15 in a bad light, statistically the AR-15 is rarely used in crimes. For that matter, rifles are rarely used in crimes. Most crimes involving firearms are committed using pistols, simply because a rifle is too bulky to carry around and conceal.

Yet it is the AR-15 that the left is consistently trying to make illegal. Why is that? I would have to say that only a part of that is its “scary” appearance. The rest of the reason is that staging a revolution requires rifles; you really can’t do it with just pistols.

If we look at gun control as part of the left’s total agenda, then getting rifles, especially semi-automatic rifles that are styled after military ones, out of the hands of ordinary, law-abiding citizens, makes sense.

Why Do We Need Our Guns?

I would contend that we need those rifles even more today than ever before. Not only do we need them for the original intent of the Second Amendment, that of protecting our country from enemies, both foreign and domestic, but also to protect ourselves and those around us.

My reasoning for this is that the threat of terrorism, especially Islamic terrorism is higher today than it has ever been before. Even though most of those terrorist attacks happen in other countries, we have seen a higher number of them here in the US, since the rise of ISIS. Now, with ISIS losing territory in the Middle East, they’re putting more effort into their terrorist operations. So we can expect to see more fanatical Muslims committing atrocities here at home.

While these terrorists have a plethora of weapons to choose from, the most popular weapons in the terrorist community are bombs and the AK-47 rifle. This is largely due to the ready availability of the AK-47 rifle, worldwide.

Here in the US they aren’t as common, but the AR-15 is. So, chances are, terrorists working in the United States will use AR-15s, just as they did in San Bernardino, California.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t relish the idea of going up against a terrorist armed with any rifle, with only a pistol in my hand. I’d do it if I had to, but I sure wouldn’t be happy about it. The advantage that rifle would give them would make it much riskier for me, greatly increasing my chances of dying in the exchange.

While I’m willing to take that risk, I’d rather minimize it as much as possible. Being a martyr trying to protect society really isn’t the way I want to go.

As part of ISIS’ increase in international terrorism, they’ve announced that they are going to be targeting Christian churches. So there’s a very good chance that we will be seeing an increased number of churches being attacked in the future.

It’s obvious why Muslim terrorists would target Christian churches. After all, ISIS has been targeting Christians in the Middle East. Today, there isn’t one single native Christian in Mosul, after being under the control of ISIS forces for three years. They sought out and killed every Christian, as part of their “holy war.” As they have throughout history, Muslims kill those who don’t convert to their religion.

But the mass killings which have happened in American churches in recent years haven’t been motivated by ISIS or any other terrorist organization.

Some have been racially oriented hate crimes and others fall into the same category as mass shootings in schools, theaters and other places where people congregate. Churches are targeted, because they seem like a place where people aren’t likely to be armed, a de facto “gun free zone,” whether they are legally one or not.

This idea of churches being a gun free zone makes sense, as guns and the violence that they are used to cause seems, on the surface, to be the opposite of what the church stands for.

But those of us who know the Holy Scriptures know that the right of self-defense was given by God, not by the government. What is known as the Castle Doctrine comes straight out of the Bible, in Exodus 22:2, where God says that those who kill in self-defense are not guilty of murder.

Part of the confusion comes from the most common translation of the Sixth Commandment as “Thou shalt not kill.” But in reality, the word that is translated in our Bibles as “kill” is really “murder” or “homicide.” There’s a very clear distinction between killing in self-defense and committing homicide.

I doubt that there are many killers who actually read the Bible, let alone become biblical scholars. So the prevailing idea that churches are gun free zones will prevail.

Some Christians will enforce this idea, being amongst the crowd of those who are afraid of guns. But as Democrats love to say about us conservatives, we stick to our Bibles and our guns. So, few Christians are likely to go along with the idea of disarming the church, just to appear more holy.

The Lighthouse Mexico Church of God, in Oswego, New York, a strongly liberal state, put it the best. Their church sign read “Locked and Loaded. We are not a gun free zone” in the wake of the Sutherland Springs shooting. Like other churches across the country, they are taking proactive steps to ensure that their congregation isn’t the next victim of a mass shooting.

Video first seen on Fox News.

Less than six weeks before the Sutherland Springs shooting, an armed gunman entered the Burnette Chapel Church of Christ, in Antioch, Tennessee, killing one woman and leaving six others wounded. This was apparently a racially-charged hate crime, done in retaliation to a similar crime in 2015.

Other than motive, the big difference between these two crimes was how they were stopped. In both cases, the killer’s reign of terror was put to an end by a good guy with a gun; something the left doesn’t want to admit exists.

But in Tennessee, the killer was confronted by armed church members, while in Texas, the killer wasn’t confronted until he walked out of the church sanctuary. Apparently, there was nobody in the congregation who was armed, a surprising turn of events for Texas.

What Are We Going to Do About This?

Most churches are like shooting fish in a barrel. Killers have a high concentration of targets in a small area. Even if they don’t aim well, chances are that their shots will hit someone.

There is little chance of many escaping their attention too, as the number of egress points is limited, especially in smaller churches. If the killer stands in the door of a small church, which is normally in the back of the sanctuary, there may not be any effective way to escape.

Larger churches have the advantage of space, as well as more exists the congregation can use. There are also more places to hide in a large church, offering that option. But the big advantage that large churches have is that of finances. They can afford to hire armed security personnel, many of whom are off-duty police officers.

Smaller churches, many of who are barely making it financially, can’t afford this option. But there are few churches in the country, which do not have gun owners in attendance. The big question is how many of those gun owners have concealed carry licenses, allowing them the legal right to bring their guns to church with them.

I’ll guarantee you this… there were more guns in American Churches this past Sunday, than there have ever been before. Christians are people of faith; but they are also practical people.

They don’t just cling to their Bibles and their guns because of some love for them, but because they recognize their need for guns and Bibles in their lives. Many Christians wouldn’t think of going to church without their Bibles, and now many Christians won’t think of going to church without their guns as well.

This is a change for the better. It reduces the options for potential mass murderers by one. I hope that adherents of other faiths follow suit. As a society, we won’t be able to get rid of these mass murderers, until we eliminate the venues that they use. That means having armed, trained people on hand, who are able to put a stop to the carnage.

It also means that churches need to put a plan together; one which allows the armed members of their congregations the opportunity to defend themselves and everyone around them. They will be more effective, if they can work together.

They will also be more effective if the congregation knows how to react, so as to not get in their way. One of the hardest things about defending a church or other crowded location from shooters is people running in fear, right into the line of fire.

The advice that is normally given in an active shooter situation is fairly good. Those options are to flee, hide or fight. If a church has armed members who are able to defend the congregation, they have the fight part under control. It’s up to everyone else to do the run or hide part.

But they have to do it in such a way as to not get in the way of those who are fighting. In many cases, the best thing that unarmed people can do is to get down on the floor, making themselves a small target and getting out of the way of those who are trying to defend them.

This is where many churches are likely to fall short. In an effort to not scare the congregation, they aren’t going to teach their people how to react to a shooting situation. Sadly, this means that they will actually be making things more dangerous for their congregants.

In my mind, it’s better to scare them a little, and ensure that their safety. This is the safest way to survive!

This article has been written by Bill White for Survivopedia.com.

What You Can Do NOW To Prepare For Thanksgiving To Decrease Stress!

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With just over a week to go, it is time to get ready for Thanksgiving! Having to prepare an entire feast for your immediate family can be stressful enough on a typical day, but when you add in extended family,

The post What You Can Do NOW To Prepare For Thanksgiving To Decrease Stress! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Which Chicken Breed Is Right For You?

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Which chicken breed is right for you? I have never owned a chicken in my life, so I asked a friend, Jorie, to write about them because she raises them with her family. First of all, I like the free-range idea and controlling where the feed comes from that they are fed. I feel strongly that we need to be self-reliant, and if we have the knowledge of raising one or more chickens that’s one step ahead of the game, so to speak. My girls grew up on egg salad sandwiches. Eggs are high in protein and fairly inexpensive. I live in a controlled HOA so I couldn’t raise chickens, but I would love to learn more about which breed would be good for people to raise. If you can learn how to raise a chicken or two you can barter the eggs and be ahead of the game!

If you are interested in owning chickens, this will be a helpful guide to learning about each breed and its personality. Chickens are great as pets, but also are an essential part of your homestead. There are so many chicken breeds in today’s society, so which chicken is right for you and your particular homestead? Here are ten different chicken breeds and some fun facts about each one. Egg Salad Recipe by Linda.  The best way to cook hard boiled eggs: Hard Boiled Eggs by Linda

Chicken Breed Choices:

1. Rhode Island Red

Rhode Island Reds are the most popular breed to buy. They are one of the easiest breeds to own and won’t take up much space! They produce brown medium-sized eggs and have beautiful rust-colored feathers. Fun fact about this bird: the Rhode Island Red is Rhode Islands state bird.

2. Leghorn

Leghorns were introduced in the 1800’s and originated in Italy. This breed lays a good amount of white eggs each year and is very active. If you have children, Leghorns may not be the best to buy as they are not easily tamed. Unlike many breeds, Leghorns come in a variety of colors.

3. Buff Orpington

Buff Orpingtons are large birds who have beautiful coats of feathers. These good looking chickens make great pets because they are friendly, but their egg production is slower than other breeds. Keep that in mind while deciding what your purpose for owning chickens is.

4. Plymouth Rock

Plymouth Rocks are very active birds. They have a decent egg production and are extremely friendly. They are at their best in a free-range environment with lots of space. Children will love feeding them with their hands!

5. New Hampshire

Named after a beautiful state on the East coast, New Hampshire’s are hefty and produce large brown eggs for their owners. This breed tends to be competitive and aggressive, so make sure you are buying this breed for their egg production.

6. Araucana

Araucanas are known for producing ‘blue’ eggs. The unique color and large size of eggs are two reasons to buy these sweet chickens! There is no historical documentation of where these birds originated from, but they were commonly seen in South America throughout the early twentieth century.

7. Silkie

Silkies are frankly, well, adorable! These sweet chickens make great pets but only produce about three eggs per week. If anyone is getting chickens strictly for eggs, these might not be the chickens for you! But if you are looking for a lovable and easily tamed chicken, Silkies are perfect for you.

8. Brahma

The Brahma chicken is one of the largest breeds. Originating from Shanghai, these chickens are massive and create brown eggs. There are three different colors this breed comes in: light brown, white, or cream.

9. Australorp

The Australorp is a human-friendly breed, but not necessarily the friendliest around other chickens. If you buy an Australorp, it is recommended to keep them separate from other chickens in your coop. They start laying eggs around 22-24 weeks old.

10. Speckled Sussex

This breed is the heaviest layers, producing more than 300 eggs annually. In contrast to their weight, they don’t need a large space. They do fairly well in confined areas, but with every animal, they need the time out in the open as well. They have specks of white on their feathers, giving them their unique name.

Overall, chickens are a great addition to any homestead. They are a comfort to have because of their egg production, but also because they are lovable animals! They are great to have because anyone can have one, whether your homestead is acres wide, or you are operating a backyard homestead. Use the tips above when choosing the breed that is right for you!

My Favorite Things:

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How to Prepare Your Soil for Planting Tomatoes

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: A guest post from Angela Williams to The Prepper Journal. After all, it is spring south of the equator! As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly receive a $25 cash award as well as be entered into the Prepper Writing Contest with a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today

 

It is every farmer’s dream to produce firm, sweet and blemish free tomatoes. However, just like vegetable farmers, tomatoes farmers face numerous disappointments such as poor quality, low produce, and diseases. Many of such factors are related to the soil quality, its nutritional level and also its PH level. Therefore, proper preparation of the soil is one of the success keys towards healthy tomato plants as well as a bountyful harvest. The following are tips on how to prepare the soil for planting tomatoes.

  • Identify the space for planting the tomatoes

Tomato seedlings require strong and direct light for them to grow well. In case you want to plant them in open ground, choose an area where the plants can get at least 6 hours of direct sunlight. If one is growing tomatoes in a greenhouse, it is quite hard for them to get adequate natural light, therefore, one can use artificial lighting to ensure that the plants get light for 14-18 hours every day.

  • Identify the soil type

Different plants require different types of soil. Tomatoes require well-drained, deep and loamy soil since they have a branching root system that penetrates the ground to a depth of up to four feet. Such soil should be rich with silt, sand, and clay. One great way to improve the structure, cultivability and nutrition retention level of gardening soil is through the use of compost. Most gardening stores sell compost. However, since compost consists of broken down organic matter, one can make it with ease using yard clippings, leaves, or waste from fruit and vegetables.

  • Test the PH level

Different types of soils have varied PH level.  One can purchase a soil test kit from a garden store. When the PH level is low, it means that the soil is acidic and a level 7 indicates that the soil is neutral. Tomatoes flourish in soil that is slightly acidic with a PH range of 6.2-6.8. Soil’s PH level is easily adjustable. In case the PH level is too high, add some sulfur to lower it. On the other hand, for low PH, add lime to the soil.

  • Add nutrients to the soil

 

For tomatoes to grow well, the soil should have a balance of nutrients such as potassium, phosphorous, and nitrogen. Nitrogen contributes towards healthy leaves and prevents them from yellowing. To increase the level of nitrogen one can either use organic or inorganic materials. Organic sources of nitrogen include fish meal, compost, leaf mold and alfalfa meal. On the other hand, inorganic sources of nitrogen include ammonium sulfate, calcium nitrate, anhydrous ammonia and sodium nitrate. Potassium is also crucial since it helps tomatoes with disease resistant and allows them to grow strong and at a fast growth rate. In case the potassium level is low, use rock sand, wood ash, granite, and potassium sulfate. Phosphorous helps tomatoes develop strong roots and also helps in seed formation. Low phosphorus levels lead to tomatoes with reddened stems and stunted growth. One should use products such as bone meal, compost, rock phosphate or super-phosphate.

  • Till the soil to a fine grain

Tilling is considered an old tradition and many people have done away with it. However, tilling offers ample benefits. Such benefits include the aeration of the soli, mixing of nutrients, organic materials, and fertilizers. Tilling also helps to chop and kill weeds that compete with plants in consuming water and nutrients. Rolling garden carts, wheelbarrows or tractors over the garden squeezes the air out of the soil, thus the need for tilling. At times, crust surfaces may form on top of soil which acts as a hindrance towards the penetration of the water. In such a case, tilling softens the surface, allows water to penetrate with ease and also makes the soil soft enough for the tomato roots to penetrate with ease.

  • Dig holes or trenches

After confirming the soil type, PH and nutrients levels, dig trenches or deep holes. Spacing the trenches or the holes is crucial since it prevents overcrowding of the plants. Ensure a space of 2 feet or 0.6 meters between each seedling and also maintain the same spacing between the rows. Maintain this spacing for the plant to branch out and also to allow for the proper circulation of air. Overcrowding tomato plants inhibit the growth and place them at a high risk of getting diseases. Consider the height of the seedlings when digging the holes since two-thirds of the seedling is required to be buried in the ground. If the seedlings are tall, make deep holes, but if they are short, one should dig shallow ones. Unlike other kinds of seedlings that die when planted deep into the soil, tomatoes are different since they sprout roots along the buried stem. The additional roots absorb more minerals that lead to healthy plants, strengthens the plant so that it can support more fruits and also helps it survive hot weather conditions.

Though it is every tomato farmers dream to yield a bounty harvest, many farmers face problems such as diseases as well as low output. However, such problems are related to the soil, and therefore there is great need to prepare the soil before planting tomatoes.

One of the things to consider when preparing the soil for planting tomatoes is the space. Tomatoes do well in open areas that receive at least six hours of direct light daily and also with good circulation of air.

To recap, it is crucial to consider the soil type since tomatoes do well in well-drained, deep and loamy soil. The PH level of the soil also contributes immensely to the health of the plant since tomatoes thrive within a PH range of 6.2 to 6.8. It is vital to consider whether the soil has nutrients since tomatoes require phosphorous, potassium and nitrogen. In case the soil is low in nutrients one can either use organic or inorganic means to boost the soil. It is also important to till the soil since it helps to mix nutrients, air the soil and make it soft for water and tomato roots to penetrate with ease. Lastly, one needs to dig holes or trenches for planting the seedling. Finally, ensure there is 2 feet of space between the rows and also between the holes since, again, tomatoes require enough space to branch out.

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