Review – Roadside Emergency Kit

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Survivalhax.com has done it again. They have released a 92 piece, affordable, fairly complete, Roadside Emergency Kit. Now you make ask, based on that last sentence, “What do you mean by fairly complete?”. Before I Read More …

The post Review – Roadside Emergency Kit appeared first on Use Your Instincts To Survive.

More on Thanksgiving

MORE ON THANKSGIVING (but no more until next year, I promise!)
[Nyerges is the author of “How to Survive Anywhere,” “Foraging California,” “Enter the Forest” and other books.  He leads courses in the native uses of plants.  He can be reached at Box 41834, Eagle Rock, CA 90041, or www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance..com]
I met a man who began to discuss with me my Thanksgiving column, about the historical origins of Thanksgiving, and what happened, and what didn’t happen.
“I was a little puzzled after I read it,” Burt told me.  “I wanted to know more.  I understand that the first historical Thanksgiving may have not happened the way we are told as children,” he told me, “but how did we get to where we are today?  What I understood from your column was that there are historical roots, and that we today remember those roots and try to be very thankful, but the connection was unclear.”  Burt and I then had a very long conversation.
A newspaper column is typically not long enough to provide the “big picture” of  the entire foundation of such a commemoration, as well as all the twists and turns that have occurred along the way. But here is the condensed version of what I told my new friend Burt.
First, try reading any of the many books that are available that describe the first so-called “first Thanksgiving” at the Plymouth colony that at least attempts to also show the Indigenous perspective.  You will quickly see that this was not simply the European pilgrims and the native people sitting down to a great meal and giving thanks to their respective Gods, though that probably did occur.  In fact, the indigenous peoples and the newcomers had thanksgiving days on a pretty regular basis.
As you take the time to explore the motives of the many key players of our so-called “first Thanksgiving,” in the context of that time, you will see that though the Europeans were now increasingly flowing into the eastern seaboard, their long-term presence had not been allowed – until this point. Massasoit was the political-military leader of the Wampanoag confederation, which was the stronger native group in the area.  However, after disease had wiped out many of the native people, Massasoit was worried about the neighboring long-time enemies – the Narragansett — to the west. The gathering of the European leaders of the Plimouth Colony and Massasoit and entourage had been more-or-less brokered by Tisquantum (aka Squanto) who spoke English. 
Yes, there had been much interaction between the new colonists and native people for some time, and this gathering of 3 days in 1621 was intended to seal the deal between the colonists aligning with Massasoit.  The exact date is unknown, but it was sometime between September 21 and November 9.
Yes, historians say that a grand meal followed, including mostly meat.  The colony remained and there was relative peace for the next 10 to 50 years, depending on which historians were correct in their reading of the meager notes.  The historical record indicates that the new colonists learned how to hunt, forage, practice medicince, make canoes and moccasins, and much more, from the indigenous people. Even Tisquantum taught the colonists how to farm using fish scraps, ironically, a bit of farming detail he picked up during his few years in Europe.
Politicians and religious leaders continued to practice the giving of thanks, in their churches and in their communities, and that is a good thing. They would hearken back to what gradually became known as the “first Thanksgiving” in order to give thanks for all the bounty they found and created in this new world, always giving thanks to God!  But clearly, the indigenous people would have a very different view of the consequences of this 1621 pact, which gradually and inevitably meant the loss of their lands and further decimation of their peoples from disease.  Of course, there was not yet a “United States of America,” and it was with a bit of nostalgia and selective memory that we refer to this semi-obscure gathering of two peoples as some sort of foundational event in the development of the United States. And it is understandable from the perspective of a national mythology that the native people were forgotten and the “gifts from God” remembered. 
My new friend Burt was nodding his head, beginning to see that there was much under the surface of this holiday. I recommended that he read such books as “1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus” by Mann,  “Native American History: Idiot’s Guide” by Fleming, and others.
As I still believe, giving thanks is a good thing – good for the soul and good for the society.  Just be sure to always give thanks where it is due!
Eventually, in the centuries that followed, Thanksgiving was celebrated on various days in various places.  George Washington declared it an official Thanksgiving in 1789.  However, the day did not become standardized as the final Thursday each November until 1863 with a proclamation by Abraham Lincoln.
The gross commercialization of Thanksgiving is a somewhat recent manifestation of the way in which we have tried to extract money from just about anything.  One way to break that cycle is to just choose to do something different.
When I used to visit my parents’ home for annual Thanksgiving gatherings, I disliked the loud arguing and banter, the loud TV in the background, and the way everyone (including me) ate so much that we had stomach aches!  I felt that Thanksgiving should be about something more than all that.  I changed that by simply no longer attending, and then visiting my parents the following day with a quiet meal.  It took my parents a few years to get used to my changes, but eventually they did.
This year, before the actual Thanksgiving day, I enjoyed a home-made meal with neighbors and friends. Before we sat down to eat, everyone stated the things they are thankful-for before the meal. Nearly everyone cited “friends and family,” among other things.  It was quiet, intimate, and the way that I have long felt this day should be observed.  Yes, like most holidays we have a whole host of diverse symbols, and Thanksgiving is no different.  And like most modern holidays, their real meanings are now nearly-hopelessly  obscured by the massive commercialism.  Nevertheless, despite the tide that is against us, we can always choose to do something different.   
Holidays are our holy days where we ought to take the time to reflect upon the deeper meanings.  By so doing, we are not necessarily “saving” the holiday, but we are saving ourselves.  As we work to discover the original history and meanings of each holiday, we wake up our minds and discover a neglected world hidden in plain sight.

More on Thanksgiving

MORE ON THANKSGIVING (but no more until next year, I promise!)
[Nyerges is the author of “How to Survive Anywhere,” “Foraging California,” “Enter the Forest” and other books.  He leads courses in the native uses of plants.  He can be reached at Box 41834, Eagle Rock, CA 90041, or www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance..com]
I met a man who began to discuss with me my Thanksgiving column, about the historical origins of Thanksgiving, and what happened, and what didn’t happen.
“I was a little puzzled after I read it,” Burt told me.  “I wanted to know more.  I understand that the first historical Thanksgiving may have not happened the way we are told as children,” he told me, “but how did we get to where we are today?  What I understood from your column was that there are historical roots, and that we today remember those roots and try to be very thankful, but the connection was unclear.”  Burt and I then had a very long conversation.
A newspaper column is typically not long enough to provide the “big picture” of  the entire foundation of such a commemoration, as well as all the twists and turns that have occurred along the way. But here is the condensed version of what I told my new friend Burt.
First, try reading any of the many books that are available that describe the first so-called “first Thanksgiving” at the Plymouth colony that at least attempts to also show the Indigenous perspective.  You will quickly see that this was not simply the European pilgrims and the native people sitting down to a great meal and giving thanks to their respective Gods, though that probably did occur.  In fact, the indigenous peoples and the newcomers had thanksgiving days on a pretty regular basis.
As you take the time to explore the motives of the many key players of our so-called “first Thanksgiving,” in the context of that time, you will see that though the Europeans were now increasingly flowing into the eastern seaboard, their long-term presence had not been allowed – until this point. Massasoit was the political-military leader of the Wampanoag confederation, which was the stronger native group in the area.  However, after disease had wiped out many of the native people, Massasoit was worried about the neighboring long-time enemies – the Narragansett — to the west. The gathering of the European leaders of the Plimouth Colony and Massasoit and entourage had been more-or-less brokered by Tisquantum (aka Squanto) who spoke English. 
Yes, there had been much interaction between the new colonists and native people for some time, and this gathering of 3 days in 1621 was intended to seal the deal between the colonists aligning with Massasoit.  The exact date is unknown, but it was sometime between September 21 and November 9.
Yes, historians say that a grand meal followed, including mostly meat.  The colony remained and there was relative peace for the next 10 to 50 years, depending on which historians were correct in their reading of the meager notes.  The historical record indicates that the new colonists learned how to hunt, forage, practice medicince, make canoes and moccasins, and much more, from the indigenous people. Even Tisquantum taught the colonists how to farm using fish scraps, ironically, a bit of farming detail he picked up during his few years in Europe.
Politicians and religious leaders continued to practice the giving of thanks, in their churches and in their communities, and that is a good thing. They would hearken back to what gradually became known as the “first Thanksgiving” in order to give thanks for all the bounty they found and created in this new world, always giving thanks to God!  But clearly, the indigenous people would have a very different view of the consequences of this 1621 pact, which gradually and inevitably meant the loss of their lands and further decimation of their peoples from disease.  Of course, there was not yet a “United States of America,” and it was with a bit of nostalgia and selective memory that we refer to this semi-obscure gathering of two peoples as some sort of foundational event in the development of the United States. And it is understandable from the perspective of a national mythology that the native people were forgotten and the “gifts from God” remembered. 
My new friend Burt was nodding his head, beginning to see that there was much under the surface of this holiday. I recommended that he read such books as “1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus” by Mann,  “Native American History: Idiot’s Guide” by Fleming, and others.
As I still believe, giving thanks is a good thing – good for the soul and good for the society.  Just be sure to always give thanks where it is due!
Eventually, in the centuries that followed, Thanksgiving was celebrated on various days in various places.  George Washington declared it an official Thanksgiving in 1789.  However, the day did not become standardized as the final Thursday each November until 1863 with a proclamation by Abraham Lincoln.
The gross commercialization of Thanksgiving is a somewhat recent manifestation of the way in which we have tried to extract money from just about anything.  One way to break that cycle is to just choose to do something different.
When I used to visit my parents’ home for annual Thanksgiving gatherings, I disliked the loud arguing and banter, the loud TV in the background, and the way everyone (including me) ate so much that we had stomach aches!  I felt that Thanksgiving should be about something more than all that.  I changed that by simply no longer attending, and then visiting my parents the following day with a quiet meal.  It took my parents a few years to get used to my changes, but eventually they did.
This year, before the actual Thanksgiving day, I enjoyed a home-made meal with neighbors and friends. Before we sat down to eat, everyone stated the things they are thankful-for before the meal. Nearly everyone cited “friends and family,” among other things.  It was quiet, intimate, and the way that I have long felt this day should be observed.  Yes, like most holidays we have a whole host of diverse symbols, and Thanksgiving is no different.  And like most modern holidays, their real meanings are now nearly-hopelessly  obscured by the massive commercialism.  Nevertheless, despite the tide that is against us, we can always choose to do something different.   
Holidays are our holy days where we ought to take the time to reflect upon the deeper meanings.  By so doing, we are not necessarily “saving” the holiday, but we are saving ourselves.  As we work to discover the original history and meanings of each holiday, we wake up our minds and discover a neglected world hidden in plain sight.

Season’s Beatings: The 2017 Black Friday Video Hall of Shame

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Another year, another humiliating Black Friday in the bag.

American shoppers continued to embarrass themselves in the eyes of the world during this year’s brawl shopping extravaganza. While smart shoppers … Read the rest

The post Season’s Beatings: The 2017 Black Friday Video Hall of Shame appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

Investigating Drone Laws

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drone_laws_rules_faa

Drones have many uses beyond their military potential. They can be used to deliver packages (as proposed by laws-for-drones-faa-rulesAmazon Prime Air), cover sports from fresh, exciting angles (FOX Sports being one), even performing tasks through terrains too rough for humans to navigate – like planting trees in Myanmar or aiding a search for missing people.

Why should you care? You might be interested in piloting a drone yourself (either for surveillance in rural areas like a farm or for fun); you might just want to find out more, or you might even be one of the unlucky people who find themselves on the wrong end of a voyeur’s drone surveillance like a couple charged in February 2017 for spying on their neighbors in Orem, Utah, USA.  Here’s a closer look at worldwide drone laws…

What Drones Are

Drones are controlled remotely, either by a human or an autopilot system, and they’re also referred to as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Remotely Piloted Aerial Systems or Unmanned Aircraft Systems. That’s UAVs, RPASes and UASes for short. An article from Public Radio International notes that whether it’s considered a toy or more dangerous device depends on what it’s being used for and how.

The USA

According to the Federal Aviation Authority’s website, drones can be flown recreationally under two different laws.  Under The Special Rule for Model Aircraft (Public Law 112-95 Section 336) you’re only allowed to fly for recreational purposes and within an obvious line of sight; you’re also obligated to give way to manned aircraft, and if you’re within five miles of the nearest airport, you have to let the airport and traffic control tower know beforehand.  By law, there’s also a weight restriction of “no more than 55lbs (approximately 24, 95kg) unless certified by a community-based organization”.

Under the FAA’s Small UAS Rule (14 CFR Part 107), your drone has to be registered with the FAA and the pilot will need an FAA Remote Pilot Certificate. Operational requirements can be downloaded directly from the FAA’s website.

Safe Airspace

Some airspace (including residential areas, military areas and sports events) are restricted for obvious reasons. drone_law_faa_rulesThe same (generally worldwide) goes for public areas (like parks), closed areas (indoors), near airports (unless arranging with the airport and air traffic control towers) and busy, public spots – yes, this is to avoid the obvious risk of injury by drone.  This seems to count world-wide. Here are some apps and websites that keep track of airspace safe (or not) for drones.

Also Read: The Case for Drones

In fact, the FAA released a study in 2017 documenting drones dropping from the sky and their potential to injure the people below them. If you’re going to fly one, fly it safely.

FAA’s Where to Fly
No Fly Drones (United Kingdom)
Swiss Map (Switzerland)
DroneMate App (Worldwide)
DroneMate for Android (Worldwide)

United Kingdom

Drones in the UK fall under the Civil Aviation Act 1982 and the Air Navigation Order 2009.  Smaller drones are classed as 20kg (approximately 44.09 lbs) and don’t need permission from the authorities to fly, providing they keep it flying where it can be seen and fly safely. Drones with cameras attached are prohibited from flying 150m (approximately 492, 13 ft) from a “congested area”, or 50m (approximately 162, 04 ft) from a person or vehicles not being driven by the owner/pilot of the drone. And, of course, you’re not allowed to “drop animals or objects” from a drone that could potentially damage property or hurt anyone.

Related: Drones For Security

Drones between 20kg and 150 are required to register for a permit according to LOC.gov, and the pilot must have a “certificate of worthiness” and a licensed flight crew, too.

Drone Insurance

Drones are valuable (and accidents happen). Would you pilot a plane that wasn’t insured? Luckily, many insurance companies have started offering a form of specialized insurance aimed at drones. Here’s a look at some of the options out there to get your UAVs insured.

Hollard (South Africa)
Insure my Drone
DJI
AIG UAS Insurance

Watching the Laws

Some law practices have specialized branches aimed at drone law. This might come in handy if you’re unsure about a certain aspect of drone law, if you get harassed by a drone or if you yourself are accused of anything drone-related. Keep an eye on worldwide drone laws through these sites, which are updated regularly.

Master List of Drone Laws (from UAV Coach)
Drone Law Journal (USA)
Drone Safe UK
Drone Law Japan

Please Visit Sponsors of SHTFBlog.com

Epic Smart Shield ad - self reliance with product with frame - 600x200

pure pitcher vs brita made in usa made in china 99.99 WITH blue ribbon 600x200 USA survival cache 01

 

Investigating Drone Laws

Click here to view the original post.

drone_laws_rules_faa

Drones have many uses beyond their military potential. They can be used to deliver packages (as proposed by laws-for-drones-faa-rulesAmazon Prime Air), cover sports from fresh, exciting angles (FOX Sports being one), even performing tasks through terrains too rough for humans to navigate – like planting trees in Myanmar or aiding a search for missing people.

Why should you care? You might be interested in piloting a drone yourself (either for surveillance in rural areas like a farm or for fun); you might just want to find out more, or you might even be one of the unlucky people who find themselves on the wrong end of a voyeur’s drone surveillance like a couple charged in February 2017 for spying on their neighbors in Orem, Utah, USA.  Here’s a closer look at worldwide drone laws…

What Drones Are

Drones are controlled remotely, either by a human or an autopilot system, and they’re also referred to as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Remotely Piloted Aerial Systems or Unmanned Aircraft Systems. That’s UAVs, RPASes and UASes for short. An article from Public Radio International notes that whether it’s considered a toy or more dangerous device depends on what it’s being used for and how.

The USA

According to the Federal Aviation Authority’s website, drones can be flown recreationally under two different laws.  Under The Special Rule for Model Aircraft (Public Law 112-95 Section 336) you’re only allowed to fly for recreational purposes and within an obvious line of sight; you’re also obligated to give way to manned aircraft, and if you’re within five miles of the nearest airport, you have to let the airport and traffic control tower know beforehand.  By law, there’s also a weight restriction of “no more than 55lbs (approximately 24, 95kg) unless certified by a community-based organization”.

Under the FAA’s Small UAS Rule (14 CFR Part 107), your drone has to be registered with the FAA and the pilot will need an FAA Remote Pilot Certificate. Operational requirements can be downloaded directly from the FAA’s website.

Safe Airspace

Some airspace (including residential areas, military areas and sports events) are restricted for obvious reasons. drone_law_faa_rulesThe same (generally worldwide) goes for public areas (like parks), closed areas (indoors), near airports (unless arranging with the airport and air traffic control towers) and busy, public spots – yes, this is to avoid the obvious risk of injury by drone.  This seems to count world-wide. Here are some apps and websites that keep track of airspace safe (or not) for drones.

Also Read: The Case for Drones

In fact, the FAA released a study in 2017 documenting drones dropping from the sky and their potential to injure the people below them. If you’re going to fly one, fly it safely.

FAA’s Where to Fly
No Fly Drones (United Kingdom)
Swiss Map (Switzerland)
DroneMate App (Worldwide)
DroneMate for Android (Worldwide)

United Kingdom

Drones in the UK fall under the Civil Aviation Act 1982 and the Air Navigation Order 2009.  Smaller drones are classed as 20kg (approximately 44.09 lbs) and don’t need permission from the authorities to fly, providing they keep it flying where it can be seen and fly safely. Drones with cameras attached are prohibited from flying 150m (approximately 492, 13 ft) from a “congested area”, or 50m (approximately 162, 04 ft) from a person or vehicles not being driven by the owner/pilot of the drone. And, of course, you’re not allowed to “drop animals or objects” from a drone that could potentially damage property or hurt anyone.

Related: Drones For Security

Drones between 20kg and 150 are required to register for a permit according to LOC.gov, and the pilot must have a “certificate of worthiness” and a licensed flight crew, too.

Drone Insurance

Drones are valuable (and accidents happen). Would you pilot a plane that wasn’t insured? Luckily, many insurance companies have started offering a form of specialized insurance aimed at drones. Here’s a look at some of the options out there to get your UAVs insured.

Hollard (South Africa)
Insure my Drone
DJI
AIG UAS Insurance

Watching the Laws

Some law practices have specialized branches aimed at drone law. This might come in handy if you’re unsure about a certain aspect of drone law, if you get harassed by a drone or if you yourself are accused of anything drone-related. Keep an eye on worldwide drone laws through these sites, which are updated regularly.

Master List of Drone Laws (from UAV Coach)
Drone Law Journal (USA)
Drone Safe UK
Drone Law Japan

Please Visit Sponsors of SHTFBlog.com

Epic Smart Shield ad - self reliance with product with frame - 600x200

pure pitcher vs brita made in usa made in china 99.99 WITH blue ribbon 600x200 USA survival cache 01

 

Investigating Drone Laws

drone_laws_rules_faa

Drones have many uses beyond their military potential. They can be used to deliver packages (as proposed by laws-for-drones-faa-rulesAmazon Prime Air), cover sports from fresh, exciting angles (FOX Sports being one), even performing tasks through terrains too rough for humans to navigate – like planting trees in Myanmar or aiding a search for missing people.

Why should you care? You might be interested in piloting a drone yourself (either for surveillance in rural areas like a farm or for fun); you might just want to find out more, or you might even be one of the unlucky people who find themselves on the wrong end of a voyeur’s drone surveillance like a couple charged in February 2017 for spying on their neighbors in Orem, Utah, USA.  Here’s a closer look at worldwide drone laws…

What Drones Are

Drones are controlled remotely, either by a human or an autopilot system, and they’re also referred to as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Remotely Piloted Aerial Systems or Unmanned Aircraft Systems. That’s UAVs, RPASes and UASes for short. An article from Public Radio International notes that whether it’s considered a toy or more dangerous device depends on what it’s being used for and how.

The USA

According to the Federal Aviation Authority’s website, drones can be flown recreationally under two different laws.  Under The Special Rule for Model Aircraft (Public Law 112-95 Section 336) you’re only allowed to fly for recreational purposes and within an obvious line of sight; you’re also obligated to give way to manned aircraft, and if you’re within five miles of the nearest airport, you have to let the airport and traffic control tower know beforehand.  By law, there’s also a weight restriction of “no more than 55lbs (approximately 24, 95kg) unless certified by a community-based organization”.

Under the FAA’s Small UAS Rule (14 CFR Part 107), your drone has to be registered with the FAA and the pilot will need an FAA Remote Pilot Certificate. Operational requirements can be downloaded directly from the FAA’s website.

Safe Airspace

Some airspace (including residential areas, military areas and sports events) are restricted for obvious reasons. drone_law_faa_rulesThe same (generally worldwide) goes for public areas (like parks), closed areas (indoors), near airports (unless arranging with the airport and air traffic control towers) and busy, public spots – yes, this is to avoid the obvious risk of injury by drone.  This seems to count world-wide. Here are some apps and websites that keep track of airspace safe (or not) for drones.

Also Read: The Case for Drones

In fact, the FAA released a study in 2017 documenting drones dropping from the sky and their potential to injure the people below them. If you’re going to fly one, fly it safely.

FAA’s Where to Fly
No Fly Drones (United Kingdom)
Swiss Map (Switzerland)
DroneMate App (Worldwide)
DroneMate for Android (Worldwide)

United Kingdom

Drones in the UK fall under the Civil Aviation Act 1982 and the Air Navigation Order 2009.  Smaller drones are classed as 20kg (approximately 44.09 lbs) and don’t need permission from the authorities to fly, providing they keep it flying where it can be seen and fly safely. Drones with cameras attached are prohibited from flying 150m (approximately 492, 13 ft) from a “congested area”, or 50m (approximately 162, 04 ft) from a person or vehicles not being driven by the owner/pilot of the drone. And, of course, you’re not allowed to “drop animals or objects” from a drone that could potentially damage property or hurt anyone.

Related: Drones For Security

Drones between 20kg and 150 are required to register for a permit according to LOC.gov, and the pilot must have a “certificate of worthiness” and a licensed flight crew, too.

Drone Insurance

Drones are valuable (and accidents happen). Would you pilot a plane that wasn’t insured? Luckily, many insurance companies have started offering a form of specialized insurance aimed at drones. Here’s a look at some of the options out there to get your UAVs insured.

Hollard (South Africa)
Insure my Drone
DJI
AIG UAS Insurance

Watching the Laws

Some law practices have specialized branches aimed at drone law. This might come in handy if you’re unsure about a certain aspect of drone law, if you get harassed by a drone or if you yourself are accused of anything drone-related. Keep an eye on worldwide drone laws through these sites, which are updated regularly.

Master List of Drone Laws (from UAV Coach)
Drone Law Journal (USA)
Drone Safe UK
Drone Law Japan

Please Visit Sponsors of SHTFBlog.com

Epic Smart Shield ad - self reliance with product with frame - 600x200

pure pitcher vs brita made in usa made in china 99.99 WITH blue ribbon 600x200 USA survival cache 01

 

G.E.R.D. (Severe Acid Reflux) Off The Grid

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Acid Reflux Off The Grid

G.E.R.D.

Acid Reflux

In this high-stress world, you probably know someone who suffers from G.E.R.D. (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease). “Gastro-“ refers to your stomach; “-esophageal” refers to the tube that runs from it to your throat. Acid “reflux” is essentially acid that escapes the stomach and can go all the way up to your throat. G.E.R.D. is a severe form of acid reflux that can ruin a person’s quality of life.

Normally, an area called the “lower esophageal sphincter” (LES) is what separates the contents of the very acidic stomach from entering the esophagus. In G.E.R.D., the LES allows food to enter the stomach but fails to close tightly enough to keep juices from going back up, causing what we call “heartburn” and other symptoms.

Up to 20 per cent of the U.S. population suffers from some form of G.E.R.D., which means that it’s likely that the medic will eventually encounter this issue in a remote setting or survival scenario. Off the grid, we won’t have the stress that goes with the modern rat race, but there will be more basic issues just as concerning like “where’s my next meal coming from?”.

hiatal hernia

Hiatal Hernia

G.E.R.D. may occur in those with a “hiatal hernia”. This condition occurs when the top of the stomach moves up through a weak area in the diaphragm (the muscle that separates chest from abdomen and helps you breathe). As such, acid can more easily leave the stomach.

Although the stomach has a lining that can handle acidic environments, the esophagus becomes inflamed when exposed to too much. The lining becomes weakened and can erode, a condition known as an “ulcer”. Ulcers can occur in the esophagus, stomach, and upper part of the small intestine.

To make the diagnosis of ulcer or acid reflux disease as opposed to, say, chest pain from heart issues, the timing of the discomfort is important. Ulcer and acid reflux discomfort occurs soon after eating but is sometimes seen several hours after a meal. It can be differentiated from other causes of chest pain in another way: it gets better by drinking milk or taking antacids. As you can imagine, this wouldn’t do much for heart problems. Also, it often worsens when lying down or eating acidic foods. In the worse cases, such as with ulcers, blackish stools may be seen or vomiting may occur that looks like coffee grounds. This is a sign of bleeding high up in the GI tract.

ulcers

ulcers

Certain lifestyle changes are often helpful for people with G.E.R.D. Eating smaller meals (say, 5 a day) and avoiding acidic foods before bedtime may help prevent reflux. Give your stomach at least 3 hours to empty before you lie down or add a pillow or two behind your shoulders, head, and neck.

You would think chewing gum would increase stomach acid; chewing gum, however, produces saliva: Saliva acts to buffer acid.  Also, you swallow the saliva, which might force some of that acid further down the esophagus.

Spicy foods may worsen G.E.R.D.

Spicy foods may worsen G.E.R.D. (image by pixabay)

Your patient may benefit from avoiding certain foods. These commonly include:

  • Acidic fruit (for example, oranges or other citrus)
  • Fatty food
  • Coffee
  • Certain teas
  • Tomatoes
  • Onions
  • Peppermint
  • Chocolate
  • Alcohol
  • Spicy foods

Medicines like aspirin, ibuprofen, and others may also cause stomach issues. As well, smoking is thought to worsen G.E.R.D.

One thing about milk: although it may be helpful as a treatment, avoid regular milk intake and stick with low-fat, as high levels of fat ingestion may actually increase stomach acid. Obese individuals seem to suffer more from this problem:  Excess abdominal fat can press against the stomach, forcing acids up into the esophagus. Weight loss may help, something that’s likely in survival scenarios.

Medications that commonly relieve acid reflux include calcium, magnesium, aluminum, and bismuth antacids such as Tums, Maalox, Mylanta or Pepto-Bismol, as well as other medications such as Ranitidine (Zantac), Cimetidine (Tagamet), and Omeprazole (Prilosec). These medications are available in non-prescription strength and are easy to accumulate in quantity.

In modern times, G.E.R.D. can be definitively identified by procedures such as upper G.I. endoscopy, X-ray tests like an upper GI series, and other high technology. Of course, off the grid, these aren’t an option.

There are many alternative remedies reported to be helpful to deal with G.E.R.D. Home remedies for acid reflux include:

Organic apple cider vinegar: Mix one tablespoon in four ounces of water, drink before each meal.

Aloe Vera juice: Mix one ounce in two ounces of water before a meal.

Baking soda: Mix one tablespoon in a glass of water and drink right away when you begin to feel heartburn

Glutamine: An amino acid that has an anti-inflammatory effect and reduces acid reflux. It can be found in milk and eggs.

Melatonin might be useful  for some (more study is needed on this one).

I’m sure you have some home remedies of your own.

Off the grid, many stoic individuals in the preparedness community may be unlikely to tell the medic about something they consider trivial, like heartburn. Someone in pain, however, loses sleep and work efficiency. Always question these people to find out what their symptoms are. You might be able to help.

Joe Alton MD

Dr. Alton

Dr. Alton

Find out more about G.E.R.D. and 150 medical issues in tough times by checking out the 2017 Book Excellence Award winner in medicine “The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way”.

5 Great Gardening Gift Ideas For The Gardener In Your Life!

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Searching for some great Christmas gardening gift ideas for the gardener in your life? It’s hard to find folks more passionate about their hobbies than gardeners. So why not celebrate their love of all things growing with a thoughtful garden

The post 5 Great Gardening Gift Ideas For The Gardener In Your Life! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Ready for Anything: 4 Emergency-Preparedness Tips to Live By

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Emergencies may be a rare occurrence, but when one strikes, you can’t retroactively prepare for it. If you haven’t prepared for this type of situation, you’ll be one of the many people scrambling to get supplies and figure out what to do. Fortunately, by following a few simple emergency-preparedness tips, you’ll be ready for anything.

Pack an Emergency Kit

You never know where you’ll be in an emergency, which is why you need an emergency kit that goes wherever you go. Since this can’t be too large, you’ll need to stick to the essentials, including a first-aid kit, flashlight, radio and water. If you typically drive places, you can store this in your car. Otherwise, you can store it in a backpack or bag. Another benefit of having an emergency kit is you won’t need to pack anything if an emergency forces you to leave your home.

Keep and Maintain a Water Pump

Being able to pump your own water is a huge benefit in an emergency. You won’t be reliant on a water company, which could go down in certain situations. Even if you don’t use your water pump regularly, make sure you work with a company like Quad Fluid Dynamics Inc. or someone similar to check it out on occasion to ensure that it’s in good working order.

Store Extra Food and Water at Home

You don’t want to be one of the people waiting in line for hours to buy water before a natural disaster strikes or immediately after. It’s a major hassle and there’s the risk that stores will run out of the supplies you need. You don’t need much space to store a few extra cases of water and cans of food, both of which will keep for years.

Have Emergency Plans Ready and Committed to Memory

All the preparation in the world can go to waste if you haven’t considered what you’ll do in an emergency. You’ll need to make up plans on the fly in a stressful situation. Instead, have plans ready for exactly what you’ll do in different emergency scenarios. You should have one plan for an emergency that strikes when you’re away from home and two plans for an emergency that strikes when you’re at home—one where you remain in your home and ride it out, and another when you’re forced to leave.

You don’t need to devote your life to prepping to be ready for an emergency. The tips above are easy to implement and will keep you safe in a variety of situations.

Author Bio

Kara Masterson is a freelance writer from West Jordan, Utah. She graduated from the University of Utah and enjoys writing and spending time with her dog, Max. 

The post Ready for Anything: 4 Emergency-Preparedness Tips to Live By appeared first on American Preppers Network.

How to Survive a Blizzard in Your Vehicle

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How to survive a blizzard if you get stranded in your vehicle. Smart to plan and think ahead, just in case! | via www.TheSurvivalMom.com

How do you survive if you become trapped in your vehicle during a blizzard? With winter fast approaching, this is a good question.

The last few years have seen unseasonably cold and snowy winters in the U.S. Along with sustained cold temperatures, many regions experienced blizzard conditions including heavy snowfall and accumulation, combined with strong winds. Numerous areas were affected, including thousands of miles of roads ranging from major commuter highways down to narrow, twisty mountain roads. This became a recipe for motorists getting stuck in their vehicles during these tough weather conditions and they did.

Blizzards and winter storms are generally forecast by our nation’s weather services. What is not easily predicted is the true amount of snow, wind speeds, and the areas where snow and ice will accumulate.

This means that if you live in or are traveling through to an area that gets winter snow storms, regardless of whether it is urban, suburban or rural, you need to be prepared. Whenever I pack an emergency kit for my car, my backpack, or throw a few EDC items together, I keep in mind the 5 S’s of Survival: shelter, sanitation, survival, sustenance, security. You can read about those in depth here

Here’s how to survive a blizzard in your car.

Winterize Your Vehicle, personal gear, and emergency equipment

Your Vehicle

  • Get your vehicle winterized including, engine, radiator, and windshield washer fluids. Don’t forget new wiper blades as well.
  • Have your battery checked.
  • Get your tires checked. Do they have enough tread to last the winter or do you need to change them for all season or snow tires?
  • Put your tire chains or traction mats in the trunk.
  • Print out this free download of what you should keep in a vehicle emergency kit.

TIP- Scheduled vehicle maintenance can often catch potential problems before they happen.

Emergency Equipment

  • Verify that you have a windshield scraper, tow rope, jumper cables, flares, or portable emergency roadway lights. If you have a larger vehicle, in particular, make sure your tow rope is up to the task. You don’t want a 10,000 lb. rated tow rope to pull out an Escalade, but you don’t need a 30,000 lb. one for a VW Bug.
  • Include a small folding shovel and bag of sand or cat litter (the old cheap kind, not the newer clumping kind) in case you get stuck and need to dig out or provide extra traction for your tires.
  • Check your first aid kit and replenish any used supplies.

Personal Gear

  • Winterize your emergency gear with a couple of space blankets as well as one wool blanket or sleeping bag. The cheap mylar space blankets are great to have, but they rip easily so you might want to splurge on the reusable, higher-quality ones to keep in your car.
  • Make sure your emergency kit includes, among other things, glow sticks, knife or multi-tool, duct tape, flashlight, extra batteries, a lighter, matches, candles for melting snow, pen and paper.
  • It’s important to have a metal cup or can for melting snow into water. Even an empty soup can will do, provided its metal. Most H2O containers will freeze once your vehicle cools down.
  • Store some extra water and high energy foods or snacks like protein bars in the vehicle.
  • Pack a small gear bag with extra clothing. Jacket, hat, socks, and gloves are a minimum – preferably wool or something high tech and waterproof. If you dress up for work, add a complete change of appropriate winter clothing, including snow boots. I also add a couple packs of chemical hand and foot warmers.

If You Become Stranded

First and foremost, keep calm and stay focused on what you need to do to survive.

Stay With Your Vehicle

It is much easier to spot a vehicle than it is a person. Only leave to seek help if you have 100 yards (a football field) of visibility or more and you have a clear, visible objective to go for. Do not just get out and start walking along the roadway hoping someone will find you. That is a good way to freeze to death, literally.

Make Your Car as Visible as Possible, Quickly!

This is a priority. Turn on your emergency flashers and dome lights while your engine is running. Tie something bright, like a bandanna, to your antenna or roof rack, if you have one, or hang something bright out a window. If you have glow sticks, put one on both your front and back windows. A mylar blanket stretched over the roof of your car and secured on by sides by the car doors will make a giant reflector for anyone flying overhead. All these steps will make your vehicle (and you) much more visible, even when it is snowing and blowing heavily. Finally, when the snow has stopped, raise the hood of your car.

Call 911 and a Friend

After you are sure you are stuck and in danger of being snowed in, do not hesitate to call 911. Answer all questions and follow all directions given by the 911 operator. Your life may literally depend on it.

After your 911 call, or if you can’t get through to the operator, contact a family member or friend and give them the details of what has happened to you. If you haven’t reached emergency services, have them call for you. Remember, you are in a blizzard and who knows how long phone service will stay up or the battery in your phone will last.

Stay Warm

Turn on your engine for 10 minutes every hour and run the heater at full blast. (Keep your tailpipe clear of snow.) At the same time, crack open a downwind window just a little to let in fresh air and prevent carbon monoxide build up.

Put on extra clothing if you have it, especially a jacket, hat, socks, and gloves (see above). Do you have a winter emergency kit in your vehicle? If so, take out the space blanket, wool blanket, and/or sleeping bag and wrap it around you. If you have all or some of these coverings, layer up. Use them all, but not to the point of overheating.

If you don’t have a winter emergency kit, use things like maps, magazines, newspapers and even removable car mats for insulation under and around you.

If you are traveling with someone snuggle up, huddle, and share the body heat. A bivvy like this one is both water and windproof and designed to reflect back your body heat. It is far more durable and useful than the mylar survival blankets, although they do have their uses.

Get moving

OK, so it is a little hard to run in place in most vehicles. But it is important for mind and body to keep your blood circulating and muscles from stiffening up. You can clap your hands and stomp your feet. Move your arms and legs. Do isometric exercises and don’t stay in any one position for very long.

Fuel Your Body

Eat and drink regularly. Not a lot, just snack, so that your body doesn’t pull too much blood from your extremities to digest your food. Follow the instructions in this article to keep water unfrozen in your car.

Beware!

If you are stuck for any prolonged period of time, there are three things to be on guard for carbon monoxide poisoning, hypothermia, and frostbite. The good news is these threats are fairly easily dealt with if you take action to protect yourself, as soon as possible. Keep a window slightly open periodically (usually when you run your vehicle engine) to allow just a little fresh air in. This will combat carbon monoxide build up. As for hypothermia and frostbite, layer up with your extra clothing and coverings, keep moving (see above), take in liquids and food frequently and in small amounts-snack. Stay moving and stay fueled!

Keep Motivated and FocusedThink, Act and Survive!

The longer you are stuck in your vehicle, the easier it becomes be to get demotivated, thinking help will never come. It is vital that you keep a positive mental attitude. This one thing will strengthen your will to live. Stay focused on the positive things you need to do to promote your rescue and your survival. Attitude is everything in survival. Like the will to live, keeping and cultivating a positive mental attitude (PMA)  is central to your success. I would wager more emergencies have gone from bad to worse because of a lack of PMA, usually caused by fear and panic followed by depression and apathy.

Things to do to promote a positive mental attitude, defeat fear and control panic as well as ward off depression and the onset of hopelessness and apathy:

  1. Once you deal with any immediate and urgent safety or medical issues, Stop! Take a moment and be still.
  2. Focus on your breathing. Breathe slowly and deeply. This promotes relaxation and helps reduce anxiety.
  3. Slow down your thinking. Focus on positive thoughts and feelings. Fear and panic are at their strongest when your mind is racing and your imagination is running rampant with negative thoughts and ideas. Drive these thoughts from your mind.
  4. Create your survival plan. Focus on what you need to do to survive.
  5. Get busy and be proactive. Concentrate on the fundamental things you need to do and keep doing while you are stuck in your vehicle.
  6. Improvise: Be willing to think outside the box as you create your survival plan and act on it. Look around and be creative in the use of your resources at hand.
  7. Adapt: A blizzard means COLD! Adjust to your circumstances and surroundings, possibly including huddling for warmth with people you normally, literally keep at arm’s length. Be willing and able to tolerate discomfort. Know your strengths and weaknesses: mental, emotional, and physical. Push your limits, endure what is necessary, and make “I will survive” your mantra. Stay Strong.

The vast majority of survival events, including getting stuck in a blizzard are short-lived – less than 24 hours. That said, during any major weather event including blizzards, road crews, law enforcement, and sometimes even rescue teams are out looking for stranded motorists. However, there is a lot you can do to help keep yourself safe and alive until help arrives or you are able to rescue yourself.  Remember, first and foremost, you are responsible for your safety and survival.

If you’d like to read more on the subject, this article has instructions for assembling a Winter Survival Food Kit (very handy for every vehicle) and additional tips to survive stranded in your car.

 

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6 Tricks For Self-Defense Everyone Should Know

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From everyday life to times of social unrest, everyone should know at least a few tricks for self-defense. The worst thing you can do is be a passive target to those who intend to hurt you.

Keep reading to get the self-defense tricks that help you stay safe and survive a bad situation.

As with anything else related to self-defense, there are no shortcuts. Spend some time each day honing your skills, and you will have a better chance of tipping any dangerous encounter in your favor.

Situation Awareness

There is no such thing as a punch, kick, weapon or move that will work if you aren’t aware of what is going on around you. but are you paying enough attention to what’s going on around, so you wouldn’t be caught on wrong foot and pay with your life for it?

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

If you can’t afford to take classes that teach these skills, or don’t know where to start, you can use the color code system below in order to help you tailor your responses to any given situation.

Level 1 – White

At this level, you are paying little, if any attention to what is going on around you. Should something happen, you will more than likely startle and then waste precious seconds panicking or coping with being spooked.

While you may feel perfectly safe staring at your smart phone while walking, or looking down at the ground, it sends a signal to criminals that you are an easy target.  When you are away from home or any public setting, you should never be at Level 1.

Level 2 – Yellow

In this stage, you are still relaxed, but paying attention to everything going on around you without necessarily focusing on it. You will be cataloging unusual garments for the time of year, erratic behavior, evidence of concealed weapons, signs that an argument has occurred, or anything else that might be problematic.

People around you are fully aware that they have been seen and cataloged, but not necessarily feel threatened or unnerved by your actions. A criminal, however, will realize they cannot startle you, so they will look for an easier target.  This is the ideal state to be in when away from home or in a public setting.

Level 3 – Orange

At this level, you conclude that a specific threat may be present and are figuring out how to neutralize it.  Because this level does induce some stress, staying in it too long can make you appear hyper-vigilant.  It does take a bit of skill to disguise this level of awareness.  At this stage you can still choose to avoid a fight or take steps to escape.

Level 4 – Red

At this stage, you either commit to escaping or fighting. You will feel a surge of adrenalin, and may experience tunnel vision, loss of hearing, panicking, and uncontrolled actions.   Even though this is the optimal level for fighting or escaping, you must practice managing and controlling your adrenalin surges in order to succeed.

If you are going to be an effective and successful fighter, there is no getting around the need for practice over time.  Failure at this stage can lead you straight into Level 5 both suddenly and without warning.

Never forget that even if you start off doing well in a Level Red threat situation, you can still lose control if you haven’t trained hard and honed your responses to the unexpected or the overwhelming.

Level 5 – Black

This final stage of threat management is one marked by blind panic and shut down. You will be at the mercy of your attacker, and the situation.  If you survive, the incident will more than likely trigger PTSD responses for the rest of your life.

Your Mindset is Important

In order to survive a violent encounter, you must be one step ahead of your attacker. If you have a sense of disbelief about the risks to your life, then you will not fight as hard, and will more than likely lose.

3 Second SEAL Test Will Tell You If You’ll Survive A SHTF Situation

While you should not overestimate your attacker to the point where you panic and freeze, it never hurts to believe that you might die in the encounter.

Many hunters, experienced hikers, and others who frequently spend time in nature know that there are certain things you must do to avoid being attacked by wild animals. Typically, the things you do early on in the encounter vary depending on the species.

In a similar way, when another person is about to attack you, there are things you should do to help prevent the attack from happening.

Rather than running away from a prospective attacker, you should advance on them. This response by a prospective victim can catch an attacker off guard and disrupt the belief that you are weak, afraid, and easy to dominate.  At this stage, you can either launch an attack of your own, or seek to escape.

Don’t Be Overwhelmed by Lacking a Weapon

Anything can be used as a weapon if you don’t have one. If you are looking to improvise, anything that is harder than your knuckles and sharper than your finger nails could be a good weapon. A cane, umbrella, or a pen can all deliver crippling or lethal blows if you know how to wield them.

As a basic rule of engagement for these weapons:

  • Hard or heavy objects should be smashed against bone.
  • Pointed objects should be stabbed into soft tissue.
  • As you advance in technique, both weapon types can deliver increased effect by aiming for nerve junctions or other sensitive areas.

Using Your Body as a Weapon

Aside from studying martial arts and taking self-defense classes, there are some simple things to avoid, as well as things you can do to make the most of your current skills.

Kicking

Typically, kicking is only effective if you are at the right distance from the adversary. Depending on the height of your kick and the target area, you can easily miss, or worse yet, wind up with your attacker grabbing your foot or leg and using it to pull you down.

If you must kick, avoid kicking with your leg alone, as this is the least powerful way to deliver a blow. Instead, kick from your hips and put the full power of your body into the kick.  Always aim for the body part nearest you.

Knees make an excellent target because your attacker may be focusing on your upper body, and not paying as much attention to feet and legs.  Once you successfully hit your attacker’s knees, he/she will be well on the way to losing the fight.

Punching

A straight punch is an effective way to stop a frontal attack. To get the most from this punch, push from the ball of your foot and thrust your hip and fist forward at the same time. When your fist hits the target, the contact area should be the part of your index finger and the knuckle of your middle finger; not your ring and pinky finger knuckles.

A rotation punch differs only in that you start off by holding your fist in an upright position near your hip, and your arm should be fully extended and driving into the target at time of impact.  As you step forward, rotate your forearm so that your fist is in the proper position at the time of impact.  You must step forward to put the most power into a rotation punch.

Use the Triangle Trick for Defense

To use the “Triangle Trick”, start off by imagining that your body is divided into a right and left side, with a center area that goes from head to toe. Your attacker will more than likely aim for targets around the center line.

When moving, try to avoid simply going forward or backward. Your goal is to move your center line around, which means you must zig-zag from side to side, pivot, or use other means to disrupt the location of your center line.  Ideally, you should seek to move along a “triangle” so that both the location and distance to your center line changes constantly.

Follow and Aim for Weak Points

No matter how big or well trained your attacker is, there are weak points that can be hit and lead to disabling pain or loss of muscular control.  When defending yourself, aim for the following weak body parts: eyes, nose, ears, throat, kneecaps, and groin.

You can also hit an attacker at the ankles, behind the knees, above the elbows, and along the forearms.

There are also several other pressure points that you can learn about in martial arts training.

The human skull is also a powerful weapon.  Headbutts are very useful when someone grabs you from behind.  Try bashing his face with the back of your head. It is easier than elbowing the attackers ribs or stomping their toes.

Self Defense Moves

When you are in a confrontation you may have one or two (at most) moves before an attacker gets full control of you. Do everything in your power to inflict injury and conserve as much energy as possible to get away.

The following self defense movements are suitable for men, women, and teens to use:

  • Poke or gouge at the attacker’s eyes with your fingers, knuckles, keys, or any sharp object.
  • Strike the attacker’s nose with the heel of your palm to strike up under the nose. If your attacker is behind you, hit his/her nose from the front or side with your elbow. Either way, your target is the nasal bones.
  • Neck – The side of the neck offers a big target area with plenty of options.  Use a knife hand strike (hold all your fingers out straight and held tight together with thumb slightly tucked and bent at the knuckle) to the sides of the neck, or a punch straight to the windpipe.  For even more injury, thrust your elbow into your attacker’s throat while pitching the weight of your body forward.
  • Knees – Are vulnerable from every angle and very easy to kick without the risk of your foot being grabbed.  To cause knee injury, or to partly incapacitate your attacker, kick the side of the knee. Kicking the front of the knee can cause more injury, but is less likely to cause imbalance.
  • Groin – If the attacker is too close to punch, you may still be able to launch a knee kick to the groin.  To make the most of this move, the bony part of your knee (not your thigh) should hit the groin area of your attacker.  Before using the knee kick, try to grab the attacker between the the neck and shoulders and hold on to as much skin, muscle, and clothing as possible.  This will give you more leverage to kick harder.

You can also use a front kick to the groin. Start by pushing forward from your hips, bend your striking leg knee, and keep your heel back. To complete the move, extend your knee and leg forcefully to impact the attacker’s groin with the top of your foot. Move your leg back to it’s original position as quickly as possible.

Getting Out of a Bear Hug Attack

If you are grabbed from behind and your shoulders are restrained, resist the instinct to grab the attacker’s elbows and trying to pry their arms away from your body.  Your best defense is to drop as low as you can toward the ground and squirm as much as possible to wriggle out of the attacker’s hold.

Make yourself as difficult as possible to control by lowering your center of gravity. This makes you more stable and harder to lift.  You want to be as difficult as possible to control.  It also gives you a new angle to knee strike, groin kick, or throw a punch to the attacker’s eyes, throat, neck, nose, or ears.

Defending Yourself Against Choke Attacks

If someone has their hands or arms wrapped around your neck, you have less than 8 seconds before you begin to lose consciousness. Do not waste them with futile moves such as trying to pull the attacker’s hands off your neck.

Instead, if the attacker is in front of you, bring your hands up between his/her arms and push hard at the radial nerve junction above or below the elbow. Strike at the attacker’s eyes, neck, or throat to weaken the hold and escape.

Video first seen on DarkMagician70.

If you are caught in a choke hold from behind, you can also try hitting the radial nerve junction, or use the steps in this video.

Video first seen on Darrick Bynum.

Simple Weapons and Distraction Aides

Almost anything can be used as a weapon or a distraction device when the need arises.  The trick is to make it look like it is not a weapon so that it can be carried anywhere openly.  Here are a few that  are easy to find and keep with you:

Magazine or newspaper

Roll magazines or newspapers and use them to jab or strike at the eye, nose, or throat. If you are going into a bad area, pre-roll these items and keep them tight by using rubber bands. Carry them under your arm, and be ready to use them.

Flashlight

A small pocket flashlight about 6” long makes a good defensive weapon.  In some states if these flashlights have a strike bezel, they are classified as weapons and may not be legal to carry concealed.

Nevertheless, even a flashlight without a strike bezel can do a good bit of damage. To get the most out of a flashlight as a weapon, target the eyes, nose, or throat.

Canes

A good cane makes an excellent weapon.  It can give you more reach, can hit harder, and give you more leverage to disarm or trip an attacker.  The trick is to pick a cane that doesn’t look like a weapon.

Find one made of hardwood with a brass derby handle.  If you are using a cane as a self defense weapon, pretend to have a slight limp. Putting a small coin in one of your shoes will make it easier to create this effect.

Pens

Any pen can be used as a weapon. Simply grab the pen in your fist so that an inch or two sticks out from the pinky side of your fist. Use the pen to stab or punch holes in fleshy parts of your attacker’s body, or strike at sensitive nerve junctions.

Loose pocket change or folded bills

Money can be used to distract an attacker. When the attacker demands your money, give it to him by throwing it quickly into their face and screaming free money.  This can distract the attacker long enough for you to get away.

Starting off with a few easy things is important, however you must always continue learning and expanding your self defense skill set. They might seem hard to acquire, but the effort will be paid off eventually by helping you and your family to stay alive!

This article has been written by Fred Tyrell for Survivopedia.

Reminiscing

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I remember when I was a kid, the book that turned me onto survivalism was, I believe, ‘Alas Babylon’, although I think that at about the same time I managed to fall into Ahern’s ‘Survivalist’ series. I genuinely can’t recall which one was first, but I did a book report on ‘Alas Babylon’ so I think that was the one that started the ball rolling. Time frame? Mmmm…1980.

I was a fascinating time to be alive. Some of you might remember it. Jimmy Carter, a prototype Obama, was president. In normal circumstances he probably would never have made it into national politics but the previous administration had the taint of Nixon about it and at that point it wouldn’t have been terribly difficult to beat a Republican candidate. (Trivia: Gerald Ford, the incumbent, was the only person to be President who was not elected to the Presidency or to the Vice-President position.) As it turned out, the malaise of the Carter administration, with it’s foreign policy debacles and economic issues, laid the groundwork for Reagan to sweep into office on the platform of “Are you better off now than you were four years ago?”

But…prior to Ronnie, it was stagflation, mortgage interest rates were around 11%(!!!!), and the Soviets were still a real threat. Against that backdrop there was a rebirth of the preparedness ‘movement’ that hadn’t really been seen since the Cuban Missile Crisis days. The big apocalypse du jour was World War Three. I was only peripherally aware of it as a 13-year old kid. But looking back, wow, was it a bizarre time. Everyone who was anyone had an AR-15 and a 1911 of some flavor. The SKS and AK rifles were virtually unheard of unless your dad brought one back from his trip to Vietnam. Your only source of 7.62×39 was Normal or Lapua. ALICE gear and woodland camo ruled the world. MRE’s were still nascent. For the dedicated survivalist, Mountain House was your food, Buck or Gerber was your knife, Radio Shack was your comms, and your AR and 1911were made by Colt. Period. Social media? The classifieds in Soldier of Fortune and, later,  American Survival Guide were about it.

Nowadays it is so amazingly different.  A lot of guys still choose the AR but but there’s at least a dozen makers. Same for the 1911. And, ironically, Colt is usually not the preferred source for either. Mountain House remains the industry leader but there are a few other players in that very narrow market. Communications options nowadays go past the ubiquitous CB radios of the 70’s. And the internet….well….the internet lets anyone get all the cool, esoteric, hard-to-find gear that, when I was a kid, to weeks or months to get.

Is there anything cool from the 70’s/80’s era of survivalism that was better then than now? Well, machine guns, for sure. The 1986 ban really screwed that up. Other than that, I don’t think there’s much in the survivalist arena from that era that isn’t better now. Of course, at this point, you’d have bloody near 40 years of being a survivalist under your belt.

And how did those threat analyses turn out anyway? Well, the Soviet Union imploded in a fit of self-actualization, nuclear winter became even less likely, and World War Three, as we had understood what it would be, pretty much vanished. The new threats were an overreaching government and a New World Order.

Then, of course, Y2K popped up on the horizon and those of use with basements full of MRE’s had something new to get worked up about. News media showed people who went all-in and sold their condos in Los Angeles to buy chunks of desert in Nevada that they could fence off and get ready to bunker down in. Annnnnnnnnnnnnnnd…..Y2K came and went with nary a blip.

A year goes by and we get the main act in the upcoming Global War On Everything as the World Trade Centers become landfill filler. For the next few years the big threat is terrorism and, for the more astute, a global economic slump that seems to be lurking in the background.

A few more years go by and 2008 becomes the year that the financial world bursts into flames. The housing bubble bursts, everyone’s retirement savings get a massive haircut, and people start getting nervous. Homes get foreclosed on and, within a few years, automakers demand government bailouts to prevent us all from living under bridges and eating our babies. (Because, somehow, if Chevrolet goes bust it means the end of the world.)

A few Infowars types get loud about the defunct Mayan calendar and 2012 is predicted as being the year we all finally get to use our freeze drieds and homemade toilet paper. 2012 passes with no major humanity-threatening disasters.

Bird flu, SARS, and one or two other variants rear their head and for a while the trendy apocalypse-du-jour is bird flu. Later it would be Peak Oil. After that, its the white horseman’s second bite at the apple and the new panic is ebola. The world trembles and….we’re still here.

But…in the interim of all those years, there were plenty of disasters and small-scale apocalypses. Hurricanes, earth quakes, forest fires, economic downturns, and that sort of thing came along and while they didn’t threaten humanity as a whole, for some people it was the end of the world.

The moral, if there is one, I suppose, is that the end of our world has been predicted and missed for as long as we’ve been around. The end of your world, however, is far, far, far more likely and possible.

I’ve yet to have to eat freeze drieds, channel my inner roof Korean, or man roadblocks and hang looters. However, I’ve had way too many occasions to need my emergency fund, stored fuel, extra clothes, or first aid kits. So…yeah..no end of THE world events, but there have been a few end of MY world events. Fortunately, being prepared for the former usually covers the latter.

Despite the world not devolving into Mad Max territory, I see no reason not to keep keeping on…it makes me sleep better, feel more secure, and when hiccups in my life do happen it keeps me from having to make hard choices.

 

 

Reminiscing

I remember when I was a kid, the book that turned me onto survivalism was, I believe, ‘Alas Babylon’, although I think that at about the same time I managed to fall into Ahern’s ‘Survivalist’ series. I genuinely can’t recall which one was first, but I did a book report on ‘Alas Babylon’ so I think that was the one that started the ball rolling. Time frame? Mmmm…1980.

I was a fascinating time to be alive. Some of you might remember it. Jimmy Carter, a prototype Obama, was president. In normal circumstances he probably would never have made it into national politics but the previous administration had the taint of Nixon about it and at that point it wouldn’t have been terribly difficult to beat a Republican candidate. (Trivia: Gerald Ford, the incumbent, was the only person to be President who was not elected to the Presidency or to the Vice-President position.) As it turned out, the malaise of the Carter administration, with it’s foreign policy debacles and economic issues, laid the groundwork for Reagan to sweep into office on the platform of “Are you better off now than you were four years ago?”

But…prior to Ronnie, it was stagflation, mortgage interest rates were around 11%(!!!!), and the Soviets were still a real threat. Against that backdrop there was a rebirth of the preparedness ‘movement’ that hadn’t really been seen since the Cuban Missile Crisis days. The big apocalypse du jour was World War Three. I was only peripherally aware of it as a 13-year old kid. But looking back, wow, was it a bizarre time. Everyone who was anyone had an AR-15 and a 1911 of some flavor. The SKS and AK rifles were virtually unheard of unless your dad brought one back from his trip to Vietnam. Your only source of 7.62×39 was Normal or Lapua. ALICE gear and woodland camo ruled the world. MRE’s were still nascent. For the dedicated survivalist, Mountain House was your food, Buck or Gerber was your knife, Radio Shack was your comms, and your AR and 1911were made by Colt. Period. Social media? The classifieds in Soldier of Fortune and, later,  American Survival Guide were about it.

Nowadays it is so amazingly different.  A lot of guys still choose the AR but but there’s at least a dozen makers. Same for the 1911. And, ironically, Colt is usually not the preferred source for either. Mountain House remains the industry leader but there are a few other players in that very narrow market. Communications options nowadays go past the ubiquitous CB radios of the 70’s. And the internet….well….the internet lets anyone get all the cool, esoteric, hard-to-find gear that, when I was a kid, to weeks or months to get.

Is there anything cool from the 70’s/80’s era of survivalism that was better then than now? Well, machine guns, for sure. The 1986 ban really screwed that up. Other than that, I don’t think there’s much in the survivalist arena from that era that isn’t better now. Of course, at this point, you’d have bloody near 40 years of being a survivalist under your belt.

And how did those threat analyses turn out anyway? Well, the Soviet Union imploded in a fit of self-actualization, nuclear winter became even less likely, and World War Three, as we had understood what it would be, pretty much vanished. The new threats were an overreaching government and a New World Order.

Then, of course, Y2K popped up on the horizon and those of use with basements full of MRE’s had something new to get worked up about. News media showed people who went all-in and sold their condos in Los Angeles to buy chunks of desert in Nevada that they could fence off and get ready to bunker down in. Annnnnnnnnnnnnnnd…..Y2K came and went with nary a blip.

A year goes by and we get the main act in the upcoming Global War On Everything as the World Trade Centers become landfill filler. For the next few years the big threat is terrorism and, for the more astute, a global economic slump that seems to be lurking in the background.

A few more years go by and 2008 becomes the year that the financial world bursts into flames. The housing bubble bursts, everyone’s retirement savings get a massive haircut, and people start getting nervous. Homes get foreclosed on and, within a few years, automakers demand government bailouts to prevent us all from living under bridges and eating our babies. (Because, somehow, if Chevrolet goes bust it means the end of the world.)

A few Infowars types get loud about the defunct Mayan calendar and 2012 is predicted as being the year we all finally get to use our freeze drieds and homemade toilet paper. 2012 passes with no major humanity-threatening disasters.

Bird flu, SARS, and one or two other variants rear their head and for a while the trendy apocalypse-du-jour is bird flu. Later it would be Peak Oil. After that, its the white horseman’s second bite at the apple and the new panic is ebola. The world trembles and….we’re still here.

But…in the interim of all those years, there were plenty of disasters and small-scale apocalypses. Hurricanes, earth quakes, forest fires, economic downturns, and that sort of thing came along and while they didn’t threaten humanity as a whole, for some people it was the end of the world.

The moral, if there is one, I suppose, is that the end of our world has been predicted and missed for as long as we’ve been around. The end of your world, however, is far, far, far more likely and possible.

I’ve yet to have to eat freeze drieds, channel my inner roof Korean, or man roadblocks and hang looters. However, I’ve had way too many occasions to need my emergency fund, stored fuel, extra clothes, or first aid kits. So…yeah..no end of THE world events, but there have been a few end of MY world events. Fortunately, being prepared for the former usually covers the latter.

Despite the world not devolving into Mad Max territory, I see no reason not to keep keeping on…it makes me sleep better, feel more secure, and when hiccups in my life do happen it keeps me from having to make hard choices.

 

 

Reminiscing

I remember when I was a kid, the book that turned me onto survivalism was, I believe, ‘Alas Babylon’, although I think that at about the same time I managed to fall into Ahern’s ‘Survivalist’ series. I genuinely can’t recall which one was first, but I did a book report on ‘Alas Babylon’ so I think that was the one that started the ball rolling. Time frame? Mmmm…1980.

I was a fascinating time to be alive. Some of you might remember it. Jimmy Carter, a prototype Obama, was president. In normal circumstances he probably would never have made it into national politics but the previous administration had the taint of Nixon about it and at that point it wouldn’t have been terribly difficult to beat a Republican candidate. (Trivia: Gerald Ford, the incumbent, was the only person to be President who was not elected to the Presidency or to the Vice-President position.) As it turned out, the malaise of the Carter administration, with it’s foreign policy debacles and economic issues, laid the groundwork for Reagan to sweep into office on the platform of “Are you better off now than you were four years ago?”

But…prior to Ronnie, it was stagflation, mortgage interest rates were around 11%(!!!!), and the Soviets were still a real threat. Against that backdrop there was a rebirth of the preparedness ‘movement’ that hadn’t really been seen since the Cuban Missile Crisis days. The big apocalypse du jour was World War Three. I was only peripherally aware of it as a 13-year old kid. But looking back, wow, was it a bizarre time. Everyone who was anyone had an AR-15 and a 1911 of some flavor. The SKS and AK rifles were virtually unheard of unless your dad brought one back from his trip to Vietnam. Your only source of 7.62×39 was Normal or Lapua. ALICE gear and woodland camo ruled the world. MRE’s were still nascent. For the dedicated survivalist, Mountain House was your food, Buck or Gerber was your knife, Radio Shack was your comms, and your AR and 1911were made by Colt. Period. Social media? The classifieds in Soldier of Fortune and, later,  American Survival Guide were about it.

Nowadays it is so amazingly different.  A lot of guys still choose the AR but but there’s at least a dozen makers. Same for the 1911. And, ironically, Colt is usually not the preferred source for either. Mountain House remains the industry leader but there are a few other players in that very narrow market. Communications options nowadays go past the ubiquitous CB radios of the 70’s. And the internet….well….the internet lets anyone get all the cool, esoteric, hard-to-find gear that, when I was a kid, to weeks or months to get.

Is there anything cool from the 70’s/80’s era of survivalism that was better then than now? Well, machine guns, for sure. The 1986 ban really screwed that up. Other than that, I don’t think there’s much in the survivalist arena from that era that isn’t better now. Of course, at this point, you’d have bloody near 40 years of being a survivalist under your belt.

And how did those threat analyses turn out anyway? Well, the Soviet Union imploded in a fit of self-actualization, nuclear winter became even less likely, and World War Three, as we had understood what it would be, pretty much vanished. The new threats were an overreaching government and a New World Order.

Then, of course, Y2K popped up on the horizon and those of use with basements full of MRE’s had something new to get worked up about. News media showed people who went all-in and sold their condos in Los Angeles to buy chunks of desert in Nevada that they could fence off and get ready to bunker down in. Annnnnnnnnnnnnnnd…..Y2K came and went with nary a blip.

A year goes by and we get the main act in the upcoming Global War On Everything as the World Trade Centers become landfill filler. For the next few years the big threat is terrorism and, for the more astute, a global economic slump that seems to be lurking in the background.

A few more years go by and 2008 becomes the year that the financial world bursts into flames. The housing bubble bursts, everyone’s retirement savings get a massive haircut, and people start getting nervous. Homes get foreclosed on and, within a few years, automakers demand government bailouts to prevent us all from living under bridges and eating our babies. (Because, somehow, if Chevrolet goes bust it means the end of the world.)

A few Infowars types get loud about the defunct Mayan calendar and 2012 is predicted as being the year we all finally get to use our freeze drieds and homemade toilet paper. 2012 passes with no major humanity-threatening disasters.

Bird flu, SARS, and one or two other variants rear their head and for a while the trendy apocalypse-du-jour is bird flu. Later it would be Peak Oil. After that, its the white horseman’s second bite at the apple and the new panic is ebola. The world trembles and….we’re still here.

But…in the interim of all those years, there were plenty of disasters and small-scale apocalypses. Hurricanes, earth quakes, forest fires, economic downturns, and that sort of thing came along and while they didn’t threaten humanity as a whole, for some people it was the end of the world.

The moral, if there is one, I suppose, is that the end of our world has been predicted and missed for as long as we’ve been around. The end of your world, however, is far, far, far more likely and possible.

I’ve yet to have to eat freeze drieds, channel my inner roof Korean, or man roadblocks and hang looters. However, I’ve had way too many occasions to need my emergency fund, stored fuel, extra clothes, or first aid kits. So…yeah..no end of THE world events, but there have been a few end of MY world events. Fortunately, being prepared for the former usually covers the latter.

Despite the world not devolving into Mad Max territory, I see no reason not to keep keeping on…it makes me sleep better, feel more secure, and when hiccups in my life do happen it keeps me from having to make hard choices.

 

 

Black Friday 2017 Knife & Outdoor Gear Discounts

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Black Friday 2017 Knife & Outdoor Gear Discounts

Welcome to our annual Black Friday Knife & Gear Deal Round up! This year (unlike last year) we have some pretty worthwhile Amazon deals you might want to jump on, though unlike last year, these are very, very few and far between, meaning we simply don’t have much to show you, but those items we will show […]

This is just the start of the post Black Friday 2017 Knife & Outdoor Gear Discounts. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


Black Friday 2017 Knife & Outdoor Gear Discounts, written by Elise Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

What is The American Dream and is it Still Alive?

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We’ve all heard that ‘saying’, “The American dream”. I remember hearing it when I was young. Now many decades later I wonder what it means today and how it has changed. I suspect that the notion of the American dream brings differing thoughts from various people. But just what is it? And what is it that’s unique about the American part? As I write this I’m not going to research and websearch the topic. Instead I’m simply going to refer to my own opinion. I believe that the American dream as originally presented generally relates to how an American has

The post What is The American Dream and is it Still Alive? appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Operational Essential Task Lists for When the “S” Hits the Fan

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ReadyNutrition Readers, this is “Part 2” of our METL series.  To refresh, METL is a military acronym that translates into “Mission Essential Task List.”  Part 1 covered a METL for training and how to prepare yourself and your family in terms of what to study and practice.  This second part gives the tasks you will all need to be proficient in when the “S” hits the fan and everything comes unglued.

Try and understand that this list can be changed and modified to fit the needs of a family and their idiosyncrasies.  Each family is different and unique in terms of physical conditioning, skill-sets, geographic location, and family demographics, there will be different challenges facing each family even in the same disaster.

These are tasks that all the family members…the ones able physically, mentally, and chronologically…should be proficient in.  Let’s do it!

  1. First Aid: Everyone in the family should learn about bandaging and splinting (termed “sticks and rags” in the Army). How to dress a wound, run a simple set of sutures, clear and maintain an airway, perform CPR, treat for heat and cold weather injuries.  About a year ago, we did a series on Field First Aid that you may wish to refer to for a refresher on these tasks.  Also: if you have any family members who have special medical needs…all the rest of your family needs to know how to take care of them…from injections to the administration of oxygen.
  2. Essential Outdoor Survival Skills: Building a Fire, Disinfecting/Treating Water, Construct a Lean-to or Erecting a Tent, Cleaning and Cooking Wild game, fowl, or fish. These are some of the tasks.  Depending on your geographic locale and the season of the year, there may be a substantial number of tasks added that require proficiency.
  3. NBC (Nuclear, Biological, Chemical): training for each member of the family of how to properly seat and use a protective (gas) mask, how to decontaminate skin, clothing, and vehicles, how to read a dosimeter, how to construct and use a Kearney Fallout meter, how to use and read a Radiological Survey Meter (aka: Geiger Counter), how to find and take shelter from fallout, how to protect your equipment from an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse).
  4. Defensive Measures: Complete proficiency with firearms (field stripping, cleaning, zeroing, and marksmanship), how to patrol your property (we just covered that in a recent article), how to perform guard duty, radio watch, and gather local intelligence. How to work as a team with your family members in a defensive perimeter, with clearing a room or building, and how to make an orderly retreat/withdrawal while covering one another.  Emphasis needs to be placed on communications (both radio and visual, such as hand and arm signals).
  5. Map Reading and Land Navigation: Everyone who is able needs to learn to use a compass and read a map. Short and long land navigation exercises (on foot and vehicular) need to be trained.  Day and night land navigation need to be studied and practiced.  The field expedient methods of direction need to be known to all family members, such as finding north with the sun and the shadow-tip method and using the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia at night to find the North Star.  We have covered this information in previous articles at ReadyNutrition.  Everyone needs to know their pace count with and without gear.
  6. Physical Training: The family needs to be physically fit and healthy. Emphasis needs to be placed on calisthenics and/or weightlifting.  A family that is fit is a family that can fight.  Martial skills such as boxing or the oriental fighting arts need to be pursued.  Proper diet, nutrition, and study of both subjects need to be undertaken regularly.
  7. Specialty Skills: include (but aren’t limited to) how to hotwire a vehicle, how to drive a semi/motorcycle/snowmobile/pilot a boat, how to move cross-country in the snow with snowshoes/skis/sleds/toboggans, etc. The specialty skill can pertain to a peculiarity of your geographical region, or it can be a common task you all agree that it would behoove you to learn.

These are your tasks for starters.  These are tasks that everyone needs to know how to do when everything comes apart…to be able to operate as a family and as individuals working for the good of your family.  It is up to you to examine these tasks and build on them as you see fit.  Once they are identified, you can incorporate these tasks that need to be worked on into your Training METL given in the last article.  Keep fighting that good fight, and stay organized with a METL for yourself and your family!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Fighting for Our Lives

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Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

The Prepper Journal is out among them! Fighting tooth and nail, claw by claw, inch, by inch, closer and closer…..to beat someone out of that last KnockOff 96″ 4K, HD LED flat screen with built-in Dolby 5.2 Channel Ultra HD AV Surround Sound! And for the one-day price of $49.99!

 

Armed with our bug-out bag, our range bag, our SHTF bag and our ammo stash we were initially stymied at the entrance trying to lash 5 carts together with Paracord to carry in all we brought with us and then to carry out our “gotta haves” from the battle! But we did not come alone, oh no, we brought some friends!

And a comfy ride home….

NOW is the time to get the Prepper in your life some little gifts and we are down with that! Time is running out. And what better way to practice for a complete EOTWAWKI, SHTF scenario than hitting the brick & mortar Black Friday Sales! After all, Cyber Monday is for comfy on-line shopping – wimps. But this day is the measure of the metal of men’s souls. Let not a sweet smile, a slight and elderly frame or a child’s wide-eyed innocent look stand between you and your mission! Spoils for the victors! Take no prisoners for today we conquer and next month we sweat the incoming credit card bills!

 Don’t worry and be happy! Have a great holiday weekend!

 

 

The post Fighting for Our Lives appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

How to Make Bannock Bread

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As my wife will verify, I do a lot of things in the kitchen, but baking is not normally one of them. Well yesterday, I felt like baking some fresh bread so I decided to make some bannock. Learning how to make bannock has been on my list of things to learn for a while.

How to Make Bannock Bread

Bannock seems to have originated in Scotland, but it became very popular in the wilds of Canada and the American West. It is easy to make and does not even require a pan to cook it. Kids would enjoy learning how to make Bannock bread, as it can be cooked directly on the hot coals.

I cheated a bit and made mine in the kitchen on the stove.  It is an easy way to have hot fresh bread in under thirty minutes. You’ll need the following ingredients.

  • 2 cups of flour (white or wheat) I used one of each.
  • 1 tablespoon of baking powder, I used one without aluminum in it.
  • 1-2 teaspoons of sugar
  • 2 pinches of salt
  • Enough water to mix into stiff dough.
how to make bannock bread

The uncooked patty in the pan

Throw the ingredients into a bowl and mix; you want the dough stiff enough to stick together. The dough was formed into a large patty between 1 and 2 inches thick.  I then threw it in a cast iron frying pan that I had heated some oil in. The dough cooked on one side until I could flip it like a pancake. The backside was then cooked until I could stick a fork in it and it came out clean.  The bread was hot, fresh and delicious.

The bannock may have a few burned spots on the exterior by the time it is cooked, but it will be good on the interior. Now the same recipe can be used outdoors without a pan. Just lay your bread patty directly on the hot coals. When the bottom is done, flip it. When the bread is finished brush the ashes off and enjoy.

how to make bannock bread

The finished bannock ready to come out of pan.

You can make variations of this bread by adding raisins or other dried fruits. Bannock bread cooks fast and requires less fuel than other forms. The pioneers knew how to cook Bannock bread and now you do, too! Enjoy!

Howard

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