Link – Airbnb: Underground missile bunker

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ESKRIDGE, Kan. (AP) — A Cold War-era missile silo in rural northeast Kansas that housed a nuclear warhead 65 years ago and was later converted into an underground mansion is now finding a new lease on life as an Airbnb location.

Thats a brilliant way to pay for the place, although you completely lose the privacy…but, then again, how private can a missile silo be when everyone knows it was there?

Curious? I was too. Here’s the link to Airbnb.

I have no reason to ever go to Kansas but if I did I would definitely spend the money for a night in this thing so i could wander around and examine it.

Survival Medicine Hour: Natural Burn Remedies, Ingrown Nails, Lone Wolves

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Survival Medicine Hour Podcast #365

lone wolf

Lone Wolf?

Does the “lone wolf” have an advantage or disadvantage in situations where you’re knocked off the grid and long term survival is not a sure thing? Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP discuss the importance of community in tough times, even if it’s just an extended family.

3rd degree burn

3rd degree burn

Plus, after discussing first and second degree burns last week, Dr. Alton, aka Dr. Bones, tackles third degree burns, a difficult challenge for the survival medic, as well as natural burn remedies that might help speed recovery for some of the injured.

off grid ingrown toenail strategy

off grid ingrown toenail strategy

Lastly, minor conditions like ingrown toenails may not seem like much to those who watch The Walking Dead, but they’re a major impediment to work efficiency. Not being able to take a step without pain isn’t likely to increase your chances for survival. Dr. Alton talks about what can be done to prevent and treat this condition off the grid.

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/11/25/survival-medicine-hour-natural-burn-remedies-ingrown-nails-lone-wolves

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad!

Joe and Amy Alton

The Altons

The Altons

Hey, follow us on twitter @preppershow, YouTube at DrBones NurseAmy channel, and Facebook at Doom and Bloom. And check out the Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook on Amazon!

Third Edition

Third Edition

 

 

 

 

 

Top Seven Articles on Prepper Website for the Week! Just In Case You Missed It! (11/12/17)

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Here are the Top Prepper Articles (by clicks) that appeared on Prepper Website over the last week, just in case you missed it! They appear in order, from highest to lowest clicks. But remember, even the article at the bottom still received a lot of clicks!

Top 7 on Prepper Website – Week of 11/5/17 – 11/11/17

 

 

CHECK-OUT PAST WEEKS – CLICK HERE!!!

 

Peace
Todd

Herbs and Spices

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Herbs and Spices 6 in 1 Box Set : Herbs, Gardening, Container Gardening, Homemade Organic Sunscreen, DIY Pickling, Hydroponics was a free Kindle – Now $29!! book when this was posted.

HERBS

A Beginner’s Guide to Dry Your Herbs and Create Your Own Herbal Remedies

The worth and value of each single creation of nature are beyond the capacity of measurement. We cannot imagine the treasure of utility which is hidden in very kind of species created by nature.
It is because nature is sensitive enough towards every need of mankind and has blessed it with useful vicinity.

GARDENING

A Beginner’s Guide to Growing Perennial Vegetables, Herbs and Fruits

Colorful fruits and vegetables can increase the beauty of your garden, but these take lots of time to grow. In traditional gardening, you have to grow plants on an annual basis, but if you want to save your time and money, try perennial plants. Various perennial herbs, vegetables, and fruits are available for your assistance.
You can get their advantage because they have a longer life and can survive for more than two years. These plants, herbs and vegetables can be used for personal and commercial purposes. This book is designed with all essential requirements and information.

CONTAINER GARDENING

Beginner’s Guide to Urban Gardening and Growing Organic Vegetables and Fruits

Container gardening is something that is really catching on. However, without really understanding how to get going with the process, it could be tricky to get the project up and running.
This book will clearly outline the necessary steps by step- help you get this project completed, and at the same time give you specific approaches that can help to achieve success throughout the process.

Homemade Organic Sunscreen

25 Easy and Natural DIY Sunscreen Recipes for Summer 2016

Have you ever thought about how fragile your skin can be? Using chemical sunscreen products can be scary.
The reason for this is that most of these chemicals are composed of potent substances that have the ability to influence the endocrine system.
According to a report given by expert dermatologists, exposure to these chemical substances can cause changes on the skin for the worse! Most of the “healthy” chemical sunscreens that are sold to us often contain nanoparticles associated with increased rate of skin aging, environmental toxicity as well as rampant cases of skin cancers. This is because most of them are composed of masked with Omega-6 rich oils that often interfere with the healthy fat balance in the body thus resisting oxidation.

DIY Pickling

The Ultimate Pickler Guide To Easy, Fresh And Quick Pickle Recipes

So you have decided to something with all of the veggies and fruit you harvest each fall and pickling sounds like the best way to enjoy your harvest well into the winter.
Or, you just love the taste of pickled food, either way, pickling is a great hobby and it is something friends and family can enjoy too; as long as you share your pickled goodies.

Hydroponics

Beginner’s Guide to Self-Sufficient Living and Growing Vegetables Without Soil

Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and it is an important method to grow plants. Terrestrial plants will be grown in a mineral solution with their roots or you can use gravel or perlite as an inert medium.
There are various powerful reasons for commercial growers to use this method, but it is frequently used by domestic gardeners to produce a high yield in a limited space.

Building your Water Storage

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Written by John Hertig on The Prepper Journal.

There are many things which you may need to have if there is an emergency or disaster or social upheaval which shuts down the normal supply chain or results in chaos in the streets.  But one thing which rises near to the top is water.  You need safe water to drink, and if you don’t have any for three days, you are likely to be dead or near death.  No plan for survival is likely to be successful if you don’t arrange for an adequate supply of water.

Water has a lot of uses besides drinking and cooking.  Second most important is cleaning for hygiene and medical procedures.

 

It would be nice if you could arrange to have a 100,000 gallon tank of water, but even if you could physically manage that, it likely would not turn out to be practical for your survival.  Keeping that much water safe from contamination and those who are desperate to poach it for their own use is likely to prove an impractical task.

A practical water “storage” plan has four parts to be considered.

Long term water storage

Short term water storage

Non-potable water storage

Water replenishment

Long Term Water Storage

This is the most important, because it is the one which guarantees you drinkable water no matter how unexpected the situation.  It is also the most problematic because it is big and heavy and can have a fairly short lifespan.  The bigger the supply (the more gallons) the better, but the more problematic it becomes.  In deciding, balance the amount of water you need against the amount you can practically store.  Generally, one gallon per person per day is considered the “normal” requirement for drinking, cooking, and basic hygiene including brushing teeth.  In a hot climate or for people with extra needs, more may be required.  The sum of the amount for each person per day is the amount you need to plan for.  Then figure out how many days you need or can store, whichever is smaller (if you need more, think of ways you could expand your storage).  I would say two weeks would be a “minimum” if at all possible, and much more than two months will likely be a challenge.

There are a number of ways which people store water long term; the most common are pre-packaged individual serving bottles, jugs of five gallons plus or minus, or fifty gallon drums.  The individual bottles are convenient but I recommend against them.  Every bottle I’ve ever had long term eventually distorts inward.  I don’t know why this is, but I suspect that since water does not “get smaller” there is a chemical reaction going on, which I can’t imagine is good.  Or the water is “leaving” the bottle somehow.  Furthermore, you generally don’t know the quality of water they put in there to begin with.  The fifty gallon drums are a pretty good solution, except forget about moving them (they weigh over four hundred pounds each when full).  And you need some kind of pump to get the water out.  My preference is jugs of five to seven gallons, which will weigh about forty to sixty pounds each, just barely manageable for a relatively healthy person.  Smaller jugs (4 gallon, 3 gallon, 2.5 gallon and smaller) are available if you need them for non-standard handling or storage issues, but since each container costs, generally it costs “more” for a lot of small containers than a smaller number of bigger ones.  I like rectangular jugs better than round ones because they store more compactly, and often have faucets available which is so much more convenient (and less likely to spill) than trying to pour from a large jug.  Note that reusing containers which originally were used for some other material should be avoided, or at least cleaned VERY well first.  For that matter, used water containers need a thorough cleaning first as well.

Once you figure out your storage methodology, you need to actually get water into it.  The better the quality of water you start with, the longer it will last.  I prefer to use water from a professional water treatment company, so I know I am starting with the best water possible, but the price of this has skyrocketed to a dollar a gallon at the place I used to use, and they wouldn’t do a quantity discount this time.  About the least quality you want to go with is “decent” tap water if you drink it normally.  It would be a bit odd to store water for bad times you won’t drink in good times.  If you have any question at all about the biological purity of the water you are storing, putting in one teaspoon per five gallons of fresh, standard (no dye or scent or additives) household bleach can help keep biological contamination under control.

It is best to rotate “normal” (tap) water each 6 months; that may not be financially practical (or necessary) if you use the purified water.  I tried some purified water I put away eighteen years ago and it didn’t seem to bother me; although in an emergency situation I’d run it through a good water treatment before drinking it in case any of it has problems.  This is because access to medical care is likely to be limited if it turns out the water became biologically active or contaminated from reaction with the container.

Short Term Water Storage

Water bottles

This name is somewhat misleading.  It does include any non-tap water you use daily, whether bottles or purified.  But more importantly, it is water you acquire “just before” an emergency because the emergency is predicted or you think it will happen, or immediately after the emergency occurs while water is still available.  One really good option for this is an Aquapod or equivalent.  This is a bladder which you put into your tub and fill with water; it usually comes with a pump to get the water out.  Each one can hold on the order of sixty gallons; having one for each tub is a really good idea.

This also includes water you rush out to get from the store in gallon or even individual bottles, where you’ll be using the water quickly enough that any problems with the bottles undergoing chemical reactions are not significant. Use this water first, whether or not the emergency happens or is quickly resolved, because it is not stored effectively and probably will be in your way long term.

Before the event happens, water from the tap should be as good as it usually is (which may not be very good as we saw in Flint).  During and after the event, the water quality can deteriorate into non potability and you may not be informed of this.  This does not mean not to get any which you can, just don’t use it for drinking or critical cleaning without purifying it first.

 Non-Potable Water Storage

It may seem odd to store non-potable water; if you can store non-potable water, why not store potable water there instead?  But you are already storing water which is of questionable potability.  Do you have a standard (tank) water heater?  It is full of water; turn off the input valve as soon as you are aware of a problem, to avoid contaminated water getting in or any water escaping backwards.  Of course, turn off the gas or flip off the circuit breaker.  You can access this water from the cleanout valve at the bottom.  It is wise to flush out the particulates which accumulate at the bottom on a yearly basis; not only will it improve the condition of this source of water, but it will help the water heater to work better and last longer.  And of course there is the water in the tank on the back of every toilet.

In the “good old days”, a waterbed was a good way to store a bunch of water.  In order to prevent problems, you needed to keep it dosed with some blue stuff, which made it a bad idea to drink it.  For this, as for any source of non-potable or even questionable water, having water purification capability (>>> see series on water purification here <<<) is important.

Storing rain water is a good idea, unless you live in one of those places which thinks the rain on your property belongs to the government and makes “harvesting” it illegal.

A swimming pool is an ok way to store a whole bunch of water, but you need to take steps now (installing some kind of cover) to minimize contamination and evaporation after a crisis; it should also improve the pool experience under normal conditions.  Be aware that it will attract people desperate for water since it is hard to hide.  Make sure you restrict access to the degree practical, not only to protect the water, but to keep uninvited people and unsupervised kids out to comply with laws and keep lawsuits and drowning to a minimum.  A pool alarm might be a good idea, although I’ve heard that many are not reliable, either having lots of false alarms or failing to sense all intrusions.

 

 Water Replenishment

This hardly qualifies as “storage”, but it recognizes that storing more than a few months of water is a real challenge.  If you have a well, make sure you have a manual pump or other way to get water out of the well if there is no power available.  A stream or river, or a lake which is replenished is good to have access to; although other people can contaminate it, deliberately or accidentally, or possibly “use it up” or use it as “bait” to lure people in to be robbed or worse.  If this is part of your plans, make sure you have effective containers to transport the water from the source to where you need it.  If it is on your land, consider running piping from the water source to your house for convenience; best would be if it were buried to protect it from vandalism and freezing.

Whenever you use water, you may end up with “used” water.  This is often classified as “grey water” or “black water”.  Grey water from sinks and showers is usually not dangerous and can be used for irrigation and non-critical cleaning and can be relatively easily purified to potability.  Black water is typically from toilets or other sources of extensive contamination and generally is not practical to use for anything.  Grey water should be collected or used appropriately.

Water harvesting is a good source of water in places with a lot of rainfall.  This involves having gutters all the way around your roof, leading down into barrels or other storage tanks.  Of course, gutters are a pain to maintain, but you can keep this to a minimum by having a good gutter guard installed to keep much of the solids out of the gutter.  Of course, there are some communities which are so autocratic that they make it illegal to harvest rain water.  I probably would not live in such a place because it is unlikely that is their only problem, but if I were there, I suspect I would have gutters which just output to the ground, but with all the parts necessary to harvest that water “in storage”.  In a crisis, I’d hook it up.  If possible, I would have the storage containers buried or hidden so that not only would the chances of legal harassment be minimized, but theft of the water as well.

In a crisis, the government may “hand out” water.  This is a risky option, as governments usually don’t have your (the individual’s) best interests at heart.  If you have to leave your place where everything you have is located unprotected, go a significant distance, wait in line, and register to get some water, it seems the risk/reward ratio is not favorable to you.  Unless the distribution point is close by and there is no “tracking” of the water provided, it would be better to provide for your own water to the degree possible, and keep out of sight and under the radar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Building your Water Storage appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

Building your Water Storage

Written by John Hertig on The Prepper Journal.

There are many things which you may need to have if there is an emergency or disaster or social upheaval which shuts down the normal supply chain or results in chaos in the streets.  But one thing which rises near to the top is water.  You need safe water to drink, and if you don’t have any for three days, you are likely to be dead or near death.  No plan for survival is likely to be successful if you don’t arrange for an adequate supply of water.

Water has a lot of uses besides drinking and cooking.  Second most important is cleaning for hygiene and medical procedures.

 

It would be nice if you could arrange to have a 100,000 gallon tank of water, but even if you could physically manage that, it likely would not turn out to be practical for your survival.  Keeping that much water safe from contamination and those who are desperate to poach it for their own use is likely to prove an impractical task.

A practical water “storage” plan has four parts to be considered.

Long term water storage

Short term water storage

Non-potable water storage

Water replenishment

Long Term Water Storage

This is the most important, because it is the one which guarantees you drinkable water no matter how unexpected the situation.  It is also the most problematic because it is big and heavy and can have a fairly short lifespan.  The bigger the supply (the more gallons) the better, but the more problematic it becomes.  In deciding, balance the amount of water you need against the amount you can practically store.  Generally, one gallon per person per day is considered the “normal” requirement for drinking, cooking, and basic hygiene including brushing teeth.  In a hot climate or for people with extra needs, more may be required.  The sum of the amount for each person per day is the amount you need to plan for.  Then figure out how many days you need or can store, whichever is smaller (if you need more, think of ways you could expand your storage).  I would say two weeks would be a “minimum” if at all possible, and much more than two months will likely be a challenge.

There are a number of ways which people store water long term; the most common are pre-packaged individual serving bottles, jugs of five gallons plus or minus, or fifty gallon drums.  The individual bottles are convenient but I recommend against them.  Every bottle I’ve ever had long term eventually distorts inward.  I don’t know why this is, but I suspect that since water does not “get smaller” there is a chemical reaction going on, which I can’t imagine is good.  Or the water is “leaving” the bottle somehow.  Furthermore, you generally don’t know the quality of water they put in there to begin with.  The fifty gallon drums are a pretty good solution, except forget about moving them (they weigh over four hundred pounds each when full).  And you need some kind of pump to get the water out.  My preference is jugs of five to seven gallons, which will weigh about forty to sixty pounds each, just barely manageable for a relatively healthy person.  Smaller jugs (4 gallon, 3 gallon, 2.5 gallon and smaller) are available if you need them for non-standard handling or storage issues, but since each container costs, generally it costs “more” for a lot of small containers than a smaller number of bigger ones.  I like rectangular jugs better than round ones because they store more compactly, and often have faucets available which is so much more convenient (and less likely to spill) than trying to pour from a large jug.  Note that reusing containers which originally were used for some other material should be avoided, or at least cleaned VERY well first.  For that matter, used water containers need a thorough cleaning first as well.

Once you figure out your storage methodology, you need to actually get water into it.  The better the quality of water you start with, the longer it will last.  I prefer to use water from a professional water treatment company, so I know I am starting with the best water possible, but the price of this has skyrocketed to a dollar a gallon at the place I used to use, and they wouldn’t do a quantity discount this time.  About the least quality you want to go with is “decent” tap water if you drink it normally.  It would be a bit odd to store water for bad times you won’t drink in good times.  If you have any question at all about the biological purity of the water you are storing, putting in one teaspoon per five gallons of fresh, standard (no dye or scent or additives) household bleach can help keep biological contamination under control.

It is best to rotate “normal” (tap) water each 6 months; that may not be financially practical (or necessary) if you use the purified water.  I tried some purified water I put away eighteen years ago and it didn’t seem to bother me; although in an emergency situation I’d run it through a good water treatment before drinking it in case any of it has problems.  This is because access to medical care is likely to be limited if it turns out the water became biologically active or contaminated from reaction with the container.

Short Term Water Storage

Water bottles

This name is somewhat misleading.  It does include any non-tap water you use daily, whether bottles or purified.  But more importantly, it is water you acquire “just before” an emergency because the emergency is predicted or you think it will happen, or immediately after the emergency occurs while water is still available.  One really good option for this is an Aquapod or equivalent.  This is a bladder which you put into your tub and fill with water; it usually comes with a pump to get the water out.  Each one can hold on the order of sixty gallons; having one for each tub is a really good idea.

This also includes water you rush out to get from the store in gallon or even individual bottles, where you’ll be using the water quickly enough that any problems with the bottles undergoing chemical reactions are not significant. Use this water first, whether or not the emergency happens or is quickly resolved, because it is not stored effectively and probably will be in your way long term.

Before the event happens, water from the tap should be as good as it usually is (which may not be very good as we saw in Flint).  During and after the event, the water quality can deteriorate into non potability and you may not be informed of this.  This does not mean not to get any which you can, just don’t use it for drinking or critical cleaning without purifying it first.

 Non-Potable Water Storage

It may seem odd to store non-potable water; if you can store non-potable water, why not store potable water there instead?  But you are already storing water which is of questionable potability.  Do you have a standard (tank) water heater?  It is full of water; turn off the input valve as soon as you are aware of a problem, to avoid contaminated water getting in or any water escaping backwards.  Of course, turn off the gas or flip off the circuit breaker.  You can access this water from the cleanout valve at the bottom.  It is wise to flush out the particulates which accumulate at the bottom on a yearly basis; not only will it improve the condition of this source of water, but it will help the water heater to work better and last longer.  And of course there is the water in the tank on the back of every toilet.

In the “good old days”, a waterbed was a good way to store a bunch of water.  In order to prevent problems, you needed to keep it dosed with some blue stuff, which made it a bad idea to drink it.  For this, as for any source of non-potable or even questionable water, having water purification capability (>>> see series on water purification here <<<) is important.

Storing rain water is a good idea, unless you live in one of those places which thinks the rain on your property belongs to the government and makes “harvesting” it illegal.

A swimming pool is an ok way to store a whole bunch of water, but you need to take steps now (installing some kind of cover) to minimize contamination and evaporation after a crisis; it should also improve the pool experience under normal conditions.  Be aware that it will attract people desperate for water since it is hard to hide.  Make sure you restrict access to the degree practical, not only to protect the water, but to keep uninvited people and unsupervised kids out to comply with laws and keep lawsuits and drowning to a minimum.  A pool alarm might be a good idea, although I’ve heard that many are not reliable, either having lots of false alarms or failing to sense all intrusions.

 

 Water Replenishment

This hardly qualifies as “storage”, but it recognizes that storing more than a few months of water is a real challenge.  If you have a well, make sure you have a manual pump or other way to get water out of the well if there is no power available.  A stream or river, or a lake which is replenished is good to have access to; although other people can contaminate it, deliberately or accidentally, or possibly “use it up” or use it as “bait” to lure people in to be robbed or worse.  If this is part of your plans, make sure you have effective containers to transport the water from the source to where you need it.  If it is on your land, consider running piping from the water source to your house for convenience; best would be if it were buried to protect it from vandalism and freezing.

Whenever you use water, you may end up with “used” water.  This is often classified as “grey water” or “black water”.  Grey water from sinks and showers is usually not dangerous and can be used for irrigation and non-critical cleaning and can be relatively easily purified to potability.  Black water is typically from toilets or other sources of extensive contamination and generally is not practical to use for anything.  Grey water should be collected or used appropriately.

Water harvesting is a good source of water in places with a lot of rainfall.  This involves having gutters all the way around your roof, leading down into barrels or other storage tanks.  Of course, gutters are a pain to maintain, but you can keep this to a minimum by having a good gutter guard installed to keep much of the solids out of the gutter.  Of course, there are some communities which are so autocratic that they make it illegal to harvest rain water.  I probably would not live in such a place because it is unlikely that is their only problem, but if I were there, I suspect I would have gutters which just output to the ground, but with all the parts necessary to harvest that water “in storage”.  In a crisis, I’d hook it up.  If possible, I would have the storage containers buried or hidden so that not only would the chances of legal harassment be minimized, but theft of the water as well.

In a crisis, the government may “hand out” water.  This is a risky option, as governments usually don’t have your (the individual’s) best interests at heart.  If you have to leave your place where everything you have is located unprotected, go a significant distance, wait in line, and register to get some water, it seems the risk/reward ratio is not favorable to you.  Unless the distribution point is close by and there is no “tracking” of the water provided, it would be better to provide for your own water to the degree possible, and keep out of sight and under the radar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Building your Water Storage appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2017-11-25)

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(finally got the metal roof on the barn project…a relief with winter coming soon!)   This weekly post is an open-forum, though preferably focusing on what we all did this week for our prepping & preparedness. Comment and voice your thoughts, opinions, accomplishments, concerns, or questions for others on any general topic of preparedness. Is this your first-time commenting? Then let’s hear from you too!   ———————————– Note: For articles posted during the week we appreciate that you stay on-topic with your comments. For off-topic comments, post them in the most recent Saturday open-forum: What did you do for your

The post What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2017-11-25) appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

How To Survive A Dog Attack

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I live in a very large neighborhood where I go jogging on a regular basis, and every now and then, a dog runs into the road and starts barking at me. If it’s small or friendly-looking, I just ignore it and keep jogging. But a few times, I’ve had a very vicious-looking start toward me, […]

The post How To Survive A Dog Attack appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

Review: Pak-Lite compact backpacker/survival nine volt LED flashlight

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A good, reliable flashlight is essential, IMHO. And getting one that is light, convenient to carry and reliable means you will most likely take it along on dayhikes or longer excursions. I found this Pak-Lite at a preparedness show, and it is worth taking a look at.

Fabrics for Survival!

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Fabrics for Survival!

Fabrics for Survival!
Micheal Kline “Reality Check” Audio player below!

In this show, we will be looking at the science behind the phrase ‘cotton kills’ and will learn what fabrics work best in the wet and the cold. If you love those 50/50 shirts made from cotton-poly blends then I have bad news. They will still kill you, although it may take a little longer.

Listen to this broadcast or download “Fabrics for Survival” in this player!

Continue reading Fabrics for Survival! at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.