Growing Microgreens and Sprouts Indoors All Winter Long (Video)

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fresh-arugula-micro-greensAs the temperatures drop and the days get shorter, I’ve heard from several gardeners up north that they are packing it up for the year and winterizing their gardens.

But even up north, there’s one easy way to keep some fresh greens coming all winter long–with just a few containers and a little bit of your open counter space.

Microgreens are a great option for keeping your vitamin intake up over the winter. In addition to being tasty and trendy, they pack a big nutritional punch. A study published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry looked at 25 common varieties of microgreens and found that they generally have higher concentrations of healthful vitamins and carotenoids than their mature counterparts. Red cabbage microgreens had the highest concentration of vitamin C, and green daikon radish microgreens had the most vitamin E.

Check out this video about growing microgreens and sprouts indoors:

If you want to give this a try and you’re looking for a cheap and easy way to get started, read this article from our writing contest: Easy and Fresh Micro Greens and Herbs All Year Round. You’ll find one example of a no-frills way to get this done–without needing to buy anything but seeds.

(This post was originally published November 17, 2015.)

The post Growing Microgreens and Sprouts Indoors All Winter Long (Video) appeared first on The Grow Network.

Growing Microgreens and Sprouts Indoors All Winter Long (Video)

fresh-arugula-micro-greensAs the temperatures drop and the days get shorter, I’ve heard from several gardeners up north that they are packing it up for the year and winterizing their gardens.

But even up north, there’s one easy way to keep some fresh greens coming all winter long–with just a few containers and a little bit of your open counter space.

Microgreens are a great option for keeping your vitamin intake up over the winter. In addition to being tasty and trendy, they pack a big nutritional punch. A study published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry looked at 25 common varieties of microgreens and found that they generally have higher concentrations of healthful vitamins and carotenoids than their mature counterparts. Red cabbage microgreens had the highest concentration of vitamin C, and green daikon radish microgreens had the most vitamin E.

Check out this video about growing microgreens and sprouts indoors:

If you want to give this a try and you’re looking for a cheap and easy way to get started, read this article from our writing contest: Easy and Fresh Micro Greens and Herbs All Year Round. You’ll find one example of a no-frills way to get this done–without needing to buy anything but seeds.

(This post was originally published November 17, 2015.)

The post Growing Microgreens and Sprouts Indoors All Winter Long (Video) appeared first on The Grow Network.

I got a load of pine delivered.

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All of the wood racks are full and I have some wood I stacked in the walk way between the wood racks that I still need to get stacked.   The weather is supposed to be clear and somewhat cool so I have a few days to get all the wood stacked for winter.

Very nice gal dropped off the wood but it took me 3.5 hours to get most of the wood stacked and my body is only good for about 2.5 hours worth of that kind of physical work.  Mom came out and helped me finish getting all the wood inside of the wood storage area.  One great thing about this wood delivery I got one wood rack about half full of kindling size wood  plus a box of kindling dropped off from the wood delivery folks.  Thank goodness there is no need to chop up kindling for awhile as it will probably take me two days to recover from stacking wood!

A couple of the new round curtain rods got hung and so far they are working out great.  Even the curtains that use the hooks are moving easier compared to the cheap rectangular type rods.  I recommend that you space the curtain rod brackets a few inches wider than the old bracket hardware. You can spread out your curtains and the window seems larger but you can still close off the window for privacy or to retain heat.

I sewed, actually I just darned up some holes in some sweats.  I have tried repairing the holes before but I used very cheap thread from a dollar store sewing kit.  Lets just say the previous repair jobs were less than satisfactory.  Hard to blame the “sewing kits” as they are for temporary fixes.  Buy good quality thread is probably a no brainier for those of you that sew, but as a newbie to the fabric repair thing it has been an educational experience for me.

My kitty cottage does not seem to have a day time resident or sun basker but the food is eaten and we are trying to keep fresh water for the cats that wander through the yard.  A couple of the cats have let us touch them so not all are feral.  The yard might just be a good spot for the cats to be safe and grab a snack.

The house Mom is looking at has a couple of issues discovered via the home inspector.  Mom likes the house but she either wants the issues fixed or the price dropped so she can fix the issues.  No biggie either way as I really don’t want to help her move winter again.  Moving sucks bad enough without adding ice and snow to the mix.

 

I got a load of pine delivered.

All of the wood racks are full and I have some wood I stacked in the walk way between the wood racks that I still need to get stacked.   The weather is supposed to be clear and somewhat cool so I have a few days to get all the wood stacked for winter.

Very nice gal dropped off the wood but it took me 3.5 hours to get most of the wood stacked and my body is only good for about 2.5 hours worth of that kind of physical work.  Mom came out and helped me finish getting all the wood inside of the wood storage area.  One great thing about this wood delivery I got one wood rack about half full of kindling size wood  plus a box of kindling dropped off from the wood delivery folks.  Thank goodness there is no need to chop up kindling for awhile as it will probably take me two days to recover from stacking wood!

A couple of the new round curtain rods got hung and so far they are working out great.  Even the curtains that use the hooks are moving easier compared to the cheap rectangular type rods.  I recommend that you space the curtain rod brackets a few inches wider than the old bracket hardware. You can spread out your curtains and the window seems larger but you can still close off the window for privacy or to retain heat.

I sewed, actually I just darned up some holes in some sweats.  I have tried repairing the holes before but I used very cheap thread from a dollar store sewing kit.  Lets just say the previous repair jobs were less than satisfactory.  Hard to blame the “sewing kits” as they are for temporary fixes.  Buy good quality thread is probably a no brainier for those of you that sew, but as a newbie to the fabric repair thing it has been an educational experience for me.

My kitty cottage does not seem to have a day time resident or sun basker but the food is eaten and we are trying to keep fresh water for the cats that wander through the yard.  A couple of the cats have let us touch them so not all are feral.  The yard might just be a good spot for the cats to be safe and grab a snack.

The house Mom is looking at has a couple of issues discovered via the home inspector.  Mom likes the house but she either wants the issues fixed or the price dropped so she can fix the issues.  No biggie either way as I really don’t want to help her move winter again.  Moving sucks bad enough without adding ice and snow to the mix.

 

Message to the The Border Mail Newspaper!

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Firearm locked onto stranger’s stomach after GPS makes a wrong turn.

This is blatant biased reporting, the title should read ” A 70 year old pensioner defending herself charged with an offence”

How in the hell was this lady to know these people did not mean her harm? Indeed, how do we know they did not intend her harm? A woman alone is faced with several people on her doorstep & she is genuinely concerned for her safety. We only have the word of these intruders that they were lost, would you believe a story like that?! We still only have their word that they did not intend a home invasion & that the gun was aimed directly at them!

This is morally wrong, this woman SHOULD have the human right to take precautions to keep herself safe. These government anti-self defence laws need changing or scrapping. People are suffering home invasions all the time now, people are getting injured, raped & murdered & the government denies us the right to purchase or carry ANYTHING specifically intended for our defence or the defence of our families.
You should be fighting for our rights to defend ourselves, not fighting against our human rights.

Keith H. Burgess.

If you believe that citizens should have the right to use a gun for self defence against a home invasion, then please email or write the Border Mail regarding this article in their newspaper.

Editorial – newsroom@bordermail.com.au 

A 70-year-old pensioner defends herself & gets charged with an offense!!!

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Now this is morally wrong in all ways. This woman could not possibly know that these people were simply lost & meant no harm, indeed, WE don’t know this for sure. Is the law saying that this woman should open her door to strangers not knowing if they may mean her harm? This woman did the right thing in regards to protecting herself, WHY should she take the strangers word that they were lost & meant no harm? What would you expect a home invader to say facing a women holding a shotgun?!


These government anti-self defence laws are wrong in every way & they need changing or scrapping. We should have a human right to take precautions to protect ourselves when we feel that we may be under threat. This woman seriously & genuinely felt that she was in some danger & took precautions. No one was harmed. Now her gun has been confiscated so she is no longer able to defend herself. DO YOU THINK THIS IS MORALLY RIGHT?

http://www.bordermail.com.au/story/5098903/firearm-locked-onto-strangers-stomach-after-gps-makes-a-wrong-turn/

Schrade SCHF38 Frontier Knife: Great value knife for $30

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The Schrade SCHF38 is a solid, full tang knife.

It has a sabre grind, quarter inch thick blade which lends itself nicely for tougher use such as batoning and chopping.

I believe that a survival knife should fall in that category of “sharpened prybar”, capable of cutting, chopping, prying, hammering, digging, or axing its way through anything on its way and this knife does that.

The blade is 5.8” long, but given the mass it has it’s a good chopper for its size.  On the other hand, with a fat blade like this you don’t have the finer edge you’d find on a thinner blade, so while it does cut it’s no carving knife. A bit of work reprofiling the bevel can certainly improve its performance though.
The blade is 1095 carbon steel and my sample was correctly heat treated without any visible chips or dents after batoning and chopping.

The tip of this knife is VERY strong.

The knife comes with basic but functional nylon sheath, a diamond sharpener and a rather nice quality ferro rod. Given the price, its surprising the amount of stuff you get for your money besides a sturdy blade made of quality carbon steel such as 1095, found in Becker and ESEE knives costing two or three times more.

Schrade SCHF38 Frontier Full Tang Drop Point Fixed Blade Knife

Schrade SCHF38 Frontier $30.97

The only con I can think of is the handle. Trying to please the horde of youtube commandos Schrade went nuts with jimping on this thing, using it both on the front and back of this knife’s handle. Jimping is… I don’t want to offend so lets leave it there.  If they had left it as is without the stupid jimping this knife would have been a 10/10 in the budget knife category.

The good news is that scales are easily removable and making your own scales capable of covering the jimping isnt that hard. I already ordered a couple micarta scales which I’ll be using on mine. I’ll post pics once its done. As it is, it’s still very much usable as a survival or emergency blade but I’d rather do without the jimping for extended use sessions without gloves.

I just checked and the SCHF 38 Frontier is currently selling for $30.97. That’s a steal and wouldn’t hesitate to order a couple to beat around or to include in survival kits.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

The Fuck-it Point

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As I see it we have to keep on trying to improve our own environment, & keep trying to inform others. Are we a minority? Probably, but we are so distant from one another it is hard to tell. Looking at all those millions of people in our cities you wonder if life could ever be any other way for them, how can they possibly change their environment?

We are doing the right thing right now, it may not be perfect, but it is the best we can do with what we have to work with. Like this video says, we have to survive the system whilst trying to change it. Personally I don’t see it changing, we do the best we can to delay the inevitable, we teach our kids & our grandkids how to survive what is to come. Governments are corrupt & greedy for power & money & the majority of people will vote for that government over & over again. They don’t want to know about global warming, it is too big for them to handle. They don’t want to hear about the genocide in West Papua, it is so removed from their lifestyle, their way of life. They are too busy trying to keep up with the Jones’s to worry about the demise of a people a world away.

 I think before anything is done to save this planet it will all hit the fan. Maybe it won’t start in our countries, maybe the protests & riots will start somewhere else & start to spread. Maybe one day there will be enough people who see the light & say f**k it, enough is enough.
Keith.

Svord Peasant Friction Folding Bushcraft Knife Review

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Svord Peasant Friction Folding Bushcraft Knife Review

The Svord Peasant knife is a century old design that was brought back to the mainstream by B.W. Baker. This is a knife I have used and owned for a good long while, but have always been on the fence with regards to reviewing it. In practical terms: this is a very, very basic folding […]

This is just the start of the post Svord Peasant Friction Folding Bushcraft Knife Review. Continue reading and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments!


Svord Peasant Friction Folding Bushcraft Knife Review, written by Thomas Xavier, was created exclusively for readers of the survival blog More Than Just Surviving.

Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides

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The post Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Coleus is a gorgeous type of ornamental plant with a very complicated naming history! In 1763, coleus was part of the Ocimum genus. Later, it was recognized as its own genus of plants. Part of the Lamiaceae family, the genus name Coleus was eventually retired and these plants were incorporated as part of the Plectranthus … Read more

The post Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides

The post Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Coleus is a gorgeous type of ornamental plant with a very complicated naming history! In 1763, coleus was part of the Ocimum genus. Later, it was recognized as its own genus of plants. Part of the Lamiaceae family, the genus name Coleus was eventually retired and these plants were incorporated as part of the Plectranthus … Read more

The post Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides

The post Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Coleus is a gorgeous type of ornamental plant with a very complicated naming history! In 1763, coleus was part of the Ocimum genus. Later, it was recognized as its own genus of plants. Part of the Lamiaceae family, the genus name Coleus was eventually retired and these plants were incorporated as part of the Plectranthus … Read more

The post Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides

The post Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Coleus is a gorgeous type of ornamental plant with a very complicated naming history! In 1763, coleus was part of the Ocimum genus. Later, it was recognized as its own genus of plants. Part of the Lamiaceae family, the genus name Coleus was eventually retired and these plants were incorporated as part of the Plectranthus … Read more

The post Coleus: How To Grow And Care For Plectranthus Scutellarioides is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

What Is Your Default Emergency Mode?

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What Is Your Default Emergency Mode?

What Is Your Default Emergency Mode?
Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio player below!

This special show is going in a different direction than originally planned. A number of things happened over the past week that have relevance to prepping that need to be said.

Listen to this broadcast or download “What Is Your Default Emergency Mode” in player below!

Last week, I talked about ideas for herbal and diy holiday gift ideas.

Continue reading What Is Your Default Emergency Mode? at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

What Life Is Like for a Million People in Puerto Rico Who STILL Don’t Have Power

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If you ever wondered what it would look like if the grid collapsed here on the mainland, the island of Puerto Rico is a tragic, real-life case study. These stories … Read the rest

The post What Life Is Like for a Million People in Puerto Rico Who STILL Don’t Have Power appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

Have You Considered Your SHTF Communications Plan?

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  Be Honest About Your Current Communications Plan For most preppers quantifying is a problem. We buy stuff and we store stuff, but do we have a true definition of what “prepared” is?  The truth about being prepared is that we cannot quantify what we will need. I will let you in on a little […]

The post Have You Considered Your SHTF Communications Plan? appeared first on Preparing for shtf.

Survival Gear Checklist – 27+ Items to Get You Started

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Getting started with gear is another one of those overwhelming and potentially expensive challenges for the the beginning prepper. Today I would like to suggest a starter list of 15 items that can be purchased, in total, for $350 or less. Don’t have $350 to spare. No worries. Purchase one item a week or one item a month. Along the way you will find other items and soon you will have a nice kit, ready to go when the big one strikes or the flood waters hit.

Crank-Up Radio: This model from Kaito Electronics will set you back about $50. It comes with all the features that you need in an emergency situation such as a multi-band AM/FM and shortwave radio, 7 NOAA weather channels, a five LED adjustable reading lamp, and a multi-function LED flashlight that can be used in both both a normal bright color mode and red color for emergency use. All of these features can be operated indefinitely without external power using a hand crank. There is a solar panel that charges the built-in batteries or you can use AA batteries or you can plug the radio into a USB device.

Other options? The Etón American Red Cross Self-Powered Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger for about $34.

Movie Monday – The Colony Season 1 Episode 2

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The Colony Season 1 Episode 2

The Colony is a “survival experiment” broadcast on The Discovery Channel, in which ten people (and later more) must rebuild after a simulated viral outbreak kills most of the human population. They are given several blocks of abandoned industrial park bordering the Los Angeles River in downtown Los Angeles, where they are allowed to do anything they want and scavenge any supplies they can find.

Emphasis is placed on dealing with resource scarcity, novel uses of common (and not-so-common) found items to provide for the group in such a situation, and weighing the survival of other groups against the survival of one’s own (i.e. stealing). There are several semi-scripted encounters with others (various wanderers, raiders, and a trader), which demonstrate possible social interactions in such an environment and the play between compassion (give them food because it’s the right thing to do?) and pragmatism (keep it for yourself because you need it more?). All actors are forbidden to directly harm the Colonists (lest they risk an insurance nightmare and subsequent cancellation), but panic, emotion, and malnutrition (on the Colonists’ side) meant that accidents could still happen.














 These films are presented as an exception to the copyright act as fair dealing for the purpose of research, private study, education, parody or satire. See bill c-42 article 29.

Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded

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(Ken’s Stihl chainsaw (and my new battery powered electric))   Guest article by Bogan Why a Gas powered Chainsaw? This article is tailored toward a preparedness-minded individual who has little to no exposure to the gas (petrol) powered chainsaw, but who foresees the need. Pros: They make short work of big projects involving wood: downing trees, clearing roads (getting home or to your BOL), firewood and more. Cons: They make noise and smell – which may attract undesirable attention after WROL hits. Also, like any gas powered machinery, they take a bit of work to maintain. I will

The post Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded

(Ken’s Stihl chainsaw (and my new battery powered electric))   Guest article by Bogan Why a Gas powered Chainsaw? This article is tailored toward a preparedness-minded individual who has little to no exposure to the gas (petrol) powered chainsaw, but who foresees the need. Pros: They make short work of big projects involving wood: downing trees, clearing roads (getting home or to your BOL), firewood and more. Cons: They make noise and smell – which may attract undesirable attention after WROL hits. Also, like any gas powered machinery, they take a bit of work to maintain. I will

The post Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded

(Ken’s Stihl chainsaw (and my new battery powered electric))   Guest article by Bogan Why a Gas powered Chainsaw? This article is tailored toward a preparedness-minded individual who has little to no exposure to the gas (petrol) powered chainsaw, but who foresees the need. Pros: They make short work of big projects involving wood: downing trees, clearing roads (getting home or to your BOL), firewood and more. Cons: They make noise and smell – which may attract undesirable attention after WROL hits. Also, like any gas powered machinery, they take a bit of work to maintain. I will

The post Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded

(Ken’s Stihl chainsaw (and my new battery powered electric))   Guest article by Bogan Why a Gas powered Chainsaw? This article is tailored toward a preparedness-minded individual who has little to no exposure to the gas (petrol) powered chainsaw, but who foresees the need. Pros: They make short work of big projects involving wood: downing trees, clearing roads (getting home or to your BOL), firewood and more. Cons: They make noise and smell – which may attract undesirable attention after WROL hits. Also, like any gas powered machinery, they take a bit of work to maintain. I will

The post Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded

(Ken’s Stihl chainsaw (and my new electric))   Guest article by Bogan Why a Gas powered Chainsaw? This article is tailored toward a preparedness-minded individual who has little to no exposure to the gas (petrol) powered chainsaw, but who foresees the need. Pros: They make short work of big projects involving wood: downing trees, clearing roads (getting home or to your BOL), firewood and more. Cons: They make noise and smell – which may attract undesirable attention after WROL hits. Also, like any gas powered machinery, they take a bit of work to maintain. I will be posting

The post Chainsaw Introduction for the Preparedness-Minded appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Surviving Winter: 10 Easy Ways To Cut Your Electricity Bills

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Each time you get your electric bill, it is sure to be a revolting experience. If you live in a highly regulated community, have little property to work with, or live in an apartment, it may seem like you will never find a way to generate sufficient electricity.

Fortunately, there are some things you can do with relative ease to cut your electric usage by 50% or more.

Target the Most Power Hungry Devices First

If you stop and think about where the most electricity is being used in your home, you’ll immediately name:

  • electric hot water heater
  • air conditioner
  • electric heaters
  • central heating blower
  • electric cooking stove
  • refrigerator
  • washer/dryer
  • dishwasher

As you look at this list, you may feel even more helpless because it may seem like there is no way to cut back on the usage of these appliances and still live comfortably. There are actually several ways to cut your electric usage from these devices with relatively little effort and almost no cost.

You may need to make a few adjustments to how you go about each day, it will be more than worth the effort.

Turn the Hot Water Heater on Only Once a Day

If you have an electric hot water heater, chances are it runs around the clock. Do you really need hot water at 2 am?  Is it really necessary for that heater to be going on and off all day long, even when you aren’t home or using the water at all?

Some people can afford the expense of a flash heater that produces hot water only as needed, you may find it necessary to improvise.

The easiest thing you can do is take a look at your power box. The hot water heater uses more current, so it has a circuit breaker all its own. If you cannot afford an electrician, or don’t’ have access to the hot water heater’s power switch, simply throw the circuit breaker that goes to the heater. When you need hot water, simply set the breaker so that current can flow to the heater again.

At the beginning, you will need to figure out how much time it takes for a tank of water to heat up.

For example, if it takes one hour to heat the water up, then you would turn the heater on one hour before you do the dishes, take a shower, or use the hot water for some other purpose. Once the water is hot enough or you are ready to use it, simply shut the heater back off.

Insulate the Hot Water Heater

If you aren’t comfortable with turning the hot water heater on and off, then you can at least insulate the heater. All you need is fireproof sheet insulation for this purpose. In fact, most hardware stores sell insulation for this purpose.

Depending on how cold the area is where the hot water heater is located, you may want to wrap the insulation around the heater more than once. Just make sure the insulation does not touch any electrical parts or areas that need to be left open for one reason or another.

As an additional note, if you do decide to turn the heater on and off manually, you can still increase your savings by insulating the heater. Whether the heater is located in a cold basement, or is in some other out of the way place, the insulation will reduce the amount of heat escaping from the unit.

This will also cut down on the amount of time required to heat the water, which, in turn, can only help reduce your electric bill.

Click HERE to Get the World’s Smallest Battery, That Powers Your House For More Than 2 Days!

Use a Wet Fabric Barrier in Front of Box Fans

If you thought the hot water heater was an energy hog, chances are you don’t feel much better about the air conditioner.

So when temperatures soar into the 90’s or into the triple digits, then you will need to do something to cool down your home or risk getting very sick. In many cases, you can reduce your air conditioner usage by 30% or more by taking advantage of box fans and moisture.

Evaporating water leads to cooling until such a time when the air can no longer take in more water. This point is determined, in part, by the temperature of the air. If you are using box fans, you can increase the capacity for cooling by putting a screen of wet fabric in front of them. Use thin to sheer fabrics that will dry easily in the draft from the fan.

For the sake of saving space, and creating an increased flow of cool air, you can also try making an “air conditioner” from a 5 gallon bucket fan and a desktop fan.

fan should fit without falling

This design can be adapted to fit all different sized fans and areas.  In fact, if you are looking to build an air conditioner on a budget, you can even use buckets from the dollar store, and cheap fans from the flea market.

Take Advantage of Solar Window Sill Coffee

While you are in the process of taming major energy hogs such as the heating and cooling systems, look at any appliances you use as a matter of routine. Many people are truly amazed at how much electricity it takes to make a pot of coffee in an electric coffee maker, and then keep it warm.

Unless you are in a household where four or five people want a cup of coffee all at the same time, it will make more sense to brew your coffee on a window sill. There are a number of solar powered coffee makers that will produce a single cup of coffee, or keep it warm for several hours.

Just put these solar coffee makers in a windowsill and fill them with water and coffee.  Even if you still need a cup of coffee from a conventional coffee maker before the sun comes up, you can still use the solar powered coffee maker for the rest of the day.

If you don’t mind instant coffee, you don’t even need a dedicated window sill coffee maker to get a hot cup of coffee. Take a mason jar and paint it dull black. Set the jar in a small box made of aluminum foil, and let the heat and light from the sun land on the aluminum foil. As the sun hits the foil, it will bounce onto the blackened mason jar. The black paint will absorb the heat, which will warm up the water inside the vessel. Once the water is hot enough, all you need to do is add the coffee.

Solar Cooking in the Summer

Chances are, during the summer months, you won’t be as interested in hot meals. You may also exchange using the stove top and oven for the microwave. Even if you have a small, low wattage microwave, it will still use a good bit of power.

You can achieve the same results as you would get on your stove top or conventional oven by using a solar cooker. To get started, you can experiment with a cardboard box and some tinfoil. Later on, as you get accustomed to solar cooking, you may want to build something that remains in one place.

Aside from being healthier and cheaper than using a microwave, solar cookers can also be adapted for drying foods in bulk. If you have a garden, or go to local farms during peak crop seasons, this is the perfect way to dry foods for usage later on.

Try Thermos Cooking

Have you ever noticed that there is not taking the place of a bowl of oats, a plate of spaghetti, or a cup of hot soup? There is no reason to give up your crock pot, you can use thermos cooking for some meals, as well as for warming up others.

Video first seen on TheModernSurvivalist.

Basically, instead of cooking food or heating it up all the way on the stove, you let it finish to cook in an insulated vessel such as a thermos.

To get the most from this form of cooking, keep the following in mind:

  • Typically, you will save anywhere from 3 to 10 minutes of active heating time depending on the food type
  • Meat, eggs, and other foods that can carry disease should still be cooked to the proper internal temperature and for the proper duration.  While you may want to mix them with other foods for warm up, they should not be cooked using thermos cooking methods.  For the most part, you will be somewhat limited to pasta, grains, beans, and pre-cooked soups.
  • As pasta cooks, it continues to absorb water. You will have to watch carefully to make sure it doesn’t absorb too much water while it is sitting in the thermos.  Different pasta shapes will also absorb water at different rates.  Elbows tend to take longer to turn into mush than spaghetti strands, so it may be best to master them before moving onto other shapes.
  • A good quality thermos with good insulation will be more effective than a cheaper one. Remember, it is the insulative properties of the thermos that will enable the food to continue “cooking” using the heat already contained by the food.
  • You may need to use different sized thermoses based on the amount of food you plan on preparing.  Remember, air inside the thermos will also heat up. Therefore, if you don’t want the food to lose all of the heat it contains, it is best to use a smaller sized thermos for smaller amounts of food.

Insulate Your Refrigerator

If you have children at home, then you know just how much electricity is being used each time the refrigerator door is opened or closed. While you can’t do much of anything about this particular problem, you can take steps to make sure the cold temperatures are preserved as much as possible.

As with insulating the hot water heater, you will be amazed at how much electricity you can save when you insulate the refrigerator. In this case, you can save 10 – 20% of your total electric usage by adding insulation boards onto the sides and top of the refrigerator. Remember to insulate the doors to save even more.

When it comes to reducing the electrical usage for your refrigerator, it may also help to take a look at where it is located. For example, is it located near the stove, heat registers, or some other area where heat builds up? If so, move it to a colder or draftier part of the kitchen. Not only will the refrigerator will be in a naturally cooler place, it may even warm that corner up a bit with the heat released from the device’s operations.

Use Salt and Ice in the Freezer

Unlike your hot water heater, it isn’t so easy to simply shut the refrigerator off and remain confident that foods will remain at a safe temperature. A refrigerator or freezer may go for as much as 24 – 48 hours in an emergency situation, but it doesn’t mean you should make a habit of shutting the fridge off for this long.

On the other hand, there are some things you can do to keep foods frozen even if the temperature setting is a good bit higher than what you would normally use.

Once you get accustomed to this method, you may also be able to shut the refrigerator down altogether for a few hours at a time and still not have to worry about added electrical usage to regain a suitable temperature. Just make sure that the compressor unit and other parts will not be damaged by being shut off and on in this manner.

Storing foods in ice mixed with salt will keep them in good condition for several days even without electricity. When combined with insulating the outside of the refrigerator unit, you may be able to cut freezer usage by as much as 50%.

As an added bonus, since the freezer always takes more energy than the refrigerator, you can have peace of mind knowing that you cut back on a major part of electricity usage for this particular appliance. From there, all you will need to do is figure out how you will cut back on the refrigerator side of the unit.

Some options may include buying a very small, energy efficient refrigerator unit and insulating it to get the most from it so that you don’t have to worry about the larger unit taking up so much electricity.

Put Computers and Other Appliances on a Power Strip

Computers, printers, and all sorts of other electronic devices draw small amounts of current even if the power switch is shut off.  While it may not seem like much at first glance, it can add up to as much as $20.00 or more per year.

This constant flow of electricity through TVs, monitors, and other appliances can also wear out power switched and shorten the life of the device. The easiest and cheapest thing you can do is put all your appliances on a power strip, and then shut down the switch on the strip when you are done using the devices.

Today, you can also purchase good quality power strips with fuses and circuit breakers on them that will help protect your devices from brownouts and power surges.  If you decide to experiment with generating power later on, these power strips can truly be very handy and save you a bit of money.   Just be sure to replace them on a regular basis, as the surge protection parts can degrade over time and fail when you need them most.

As you set up your system of surge protectors, you may also want to add timers. Let’s say you decide to put the coffee maker, toaster, or other appliance commonly used for making breakfast on a power strip. An external timer that doesn’t use electricity to count down can still be used to make sure the device(s) have power so they start up at the proper time.

Trying to find ways to cut back on the electric bill can seem like a daunting task. Whether you are stymied by the power usage for large appliances or small ones, there are always ways to cut back without losing all that you gain from having electricity.

While you are formulating plans to generate power, you can still take these simple steps to save electricity and see how they work for you. Once your electric bill starts going down, you are sure to be more motivated than ever to see how much more you can cut, and then see how best to meet the electricity needs for what is left on your list.

Keep looking for new ways to reduce your costs, as it will help your long term prepping!

 

 

This article has been written by Carmela Tyrell for Survivopedia.

Cutting Techniques: Four Knife Cuts That You As A Cook Should Know

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Working in a kitchen is not a child’s play, and those who work are completely aware of this. Cooking in the kitchen could be boring or fun. Those who find it boring are not experimenting at all, which is not right because kitchens are like laboratories. People should experiment with different food items in order […]

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You Know Jesus As Your Savior … Do You Know Him As Adonai?

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     Christians are able to identify Jesus as their Savior because [they will tell you], He died for their sins. I’m not sure they all recognize the enormity of that statement, or the concept that because of the Divine Nature of God, and who He is, we all deserve damnation and death for sinning against our Holy God (Romans 1:32 and 3:23). Therefore, Jesus “dying” for our sins means He took the punishment of all God’s Creation who rejected Him.  That is a debt we can never repay, either independently or corporately.
     And the New Testament gives us a very clear picture of Jesus as our Savior in Acts 5:31, God exalted Him to His right hand as Prince and Savior and Deliverer, in order to grant repentance to Israel, and [to grant] forgiveness of sins.  This grace through faith is also extended to us because we are grafted in as God’s sanctified people.  But Jesus is worthy of an additional title, if you will, as expressed in Luke 2:11, For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.
     It is common for Christians to refer to Jesus as their Lord.  But there is a more accurate description of who He is in the Hebrew … Adonai.  The title Lord for Jesus comes from the Greek Kurios, a translation of Adonai. And this word “Adonai” means Lord, Master, Owner.  It is also important to see that Jesus’s name in Hebrew, Yeshua Ha-Mashiach (Jesus Chist) is YHWH “come in the flesh”.  So, to say that Jesus Christ is Lord is to declare that He is YHWH (Adonai), Himself. 
     But Adonai is more than a name or a title.  It essentially speaks of the relationship we have with YHWH.  It is God’s total possession of my life through my submission (surrender) to Him. We get a good picture of this in the Bible with the relationship between Abram and God. In Genesis 14, God has delivered Abram through the War of the Kings and he (Abram) announces to the King of Sodom that it is El Elyon (the God Most High) who has given him the victory. It is then in Genesis 15:2, that the name Adonai first appears.  Abram addressed God as Adonai or Master, understanding that the Master has the right of possession, and the one possessed is charged with submission to God, his Master. The Bible affirms this in Genesis 15:6, Then Abram believed in (affirmed, trusted in, relied on, remained steadfast to) the Lord (Adonai); and He counted (credited) it to him as righteousness (doing right in regard to God and man).
     Abram understood this Master/servant relationship.  He knew that the Servant depended on the Master to be faithful in provision, protection, and direction (guidance). We can see this concept reflected in the New Testament with the idea of believers as bondservants. This is a reflection of Jesus as Lord or Master.    

     But I have a question … Do we in the 21st Century still walk in that identity?  Do we acknowledge that Jesus is our Lord and Master and Owner?  The Biblical relationship that “Adonai” signifies means that Jesus has mastership and ownership over us; and it indicates that God is the owner of each member of the human family, which gives Him the authority to claim the unrestricted obedience of us all. 
     Unfortunately, our American history has stained this idea of a master/slave relationship.  But human history need not sully the spiritual portrayal of God’s relationship to us as Adonai.  From a Biblical perspective, Pastor Kenneth Hemphill explains it best: “The relationship of slave and master in the Bible was more often one of love and allegiance. In the Jewish relationship, a slave had more privileges than the hired help. A slave could participate in the Temple sacrifices and was a member of the household. The hired help was excluded from these privileges. The servant is assured that his Master has the resources and ability to care for him. As a member of the master’s household, the master provides for all the servant needs. The servant need not worry about his basic provision. The servant is assured that help and resources are available for him to carry out his duties as a servant. The master provides what is needed, not only for basic needs, but also for the fulfillment of the tasks assigned to the servant. The servant has the privilege of calling upon his relationship with the Master to get the help he needs. Access to the Master is guaranteed, and is only a prayer away”. 
     To some, it may seem that this look at Jesus as Adonai is simply a mundane word study, but I believe the acknowledgement of this concept of Jesus as our Lord, Master, and Owner has great implications for the Body of Christ today.  For far too long, the Church has allowed the culture to dismantle the identity of Christ. As I stated in a previous post, I am concerned that we no longer fear God. And I see Jesus relegated to an equal with other gods, while the Holy Spirit has largely left the Western Church. 
     Sadly, too many Christians don’t read their Bible with any hunger to know the Father or the Son.  And if you don’t know Them, how can you have a relationship with Them, let alone in the proper perspective?  I want to see and know and declare Adonai as Abram did! And it starts today!  
     Yes, Jesus is my Savior, and I know the eternal gift of salvation that He has afforded me!  But I also know Him as Adonai — my Lord … my Master … and He owns me! I acknowledge that I am His servant. And I acknowledge that, as Adonai, Jesus is Owner of all, and we are all stewards who have been declared worthy by Him to serve — and we all count it a privilege to serve. 
      I understand and declare that as Adonai, Jesus is my Master and can supply all my needs, including supernatural empowerment enabling me to serve God.  And, finally, I recognize that I can do anything and all that Jesus, as Adonai, commands me to do. There is no doubt or fear or unbelief in His authority and power — or mine to carry out His commands! 
     Yes, I know Jesus as my Savior, and I truly honor His sacrifice and the gift of eternal life that is mine.  But I never want to diminish His role as Adonai; as my Lord and Master.  Nor do I want to refuse the challenge to live my life as a demonstration of His Lordship in it.  On that day when I stand before Him, and say, “Lord, Lord”, I want Him to smile and say my name, acknowledging that He has known me. And I will cry out, as King David did, “You are my Adonai. I have no good besides You.”

Thanks to the website, Precept Austin, for their references on the meaning and concept of Adonai.
     
Malachi 1:6    A son honors his father, and a servant his master. Then if I am a Father, where is My honor? And if I am a Master, where is the [reverent] fear and respect due Me?’ says the Lord of hosts…
      

Powerful Carpet Cleaner Recipe

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Powerful Carpet Cleaner Recipe If you are looking to do DIY carpet cleaning, this article has a lot of info on carpet cleaning and what you should or shouldn’t use in your carpet. If you have pets, you absolutely do not want to use vinegar! It’s inevitable; stuff spills or you track in mud by mistake on a rainy afternoon. When this happens at your house, don’t get mad (well, maybe just a little bit) or run to the store for expensive cleaning concoctions. Simply become a carpet cleaner mixologist and open your pantry. Not only does this homemade carpet

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101 Feelings Of Joy And Inspiration From My Life

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I hope you will enjoy my 101 feelings of joy and inspiration from my life today. I was born in 1950, I will save you the math, I am 67 years old as of today. I know people have been writing about what they are thankful for recently, but today it’s all about joy and inspiration.  I was born in California and have lived a fairly simple frugal life since the day I was born. I was 18 months old when my birth father was diagnosed with Polio. He was in an iron lung for many months. My older sister and I were farmed out to relatives since my mother had to quickly become the breadwinner. Sometime later, my sister was diagnosed with the same disease but didn’t require an iron lung. 

In case you are really young, this picture below shows what an iron lung looked like when my father was placed in one to help him breathe. Polio causes paralysis and is an infectious disease which in some cases was fatal. Luckily, my father lived but had health issues for the rest of his life. My sister beat the odds and recovered without any ill effects from the disease.

joy
Here’s the deal, I had a rough childhood, but life got better. So let me share my 101 feelings of joy and inspiration with you. My parents divorced and luckily I had a second chance with a stepdad. I really do not like that word, stepdad. He raised me and life took a few curves but I learned to work, to have fun, and laugh. I love to laugh. Those who really know me, know I love to giggle. It’s how I roll. If you started out with a rough life, you can change your destination, I promise. I did.

Listed below are many life events Mark and I have shared together as we’ve been on this adventurous journey together. I hope you can grasp the highs and lows, the learning experiences and the challenges we as a family have survived together. It has been fun highlighting key events that have changed and added to our lives.

101 Feelings Of Joy And Inspiration

  1. I was born to a wonderful mother, Erma.
  2. I had several sisters, yes my mother specialized in girls and I did too!
  3. I remember my 4th-grade teacher named Mrs. Okelberry who loved me, this shy little girl.
  4. I played the accordion, after all, we are Norweigian.
  5. I went roller skating or ice skating at the rink with my sisters and my mom all the time.
  6. I learned to square dance.
  7. I learned to sew.
  8. I learned to cook from scratch.
  9. I learned how to preserve food.
  10. I learned to make bread.
  11. My parents took us up to the mountains every Sunday to cook breakfast and feel the fresh air.
  12. We got a black and white TV one year, oh my gosh, and sound came out of it.
  13. We had a party line, we shared, you know the phone that hung on the wall. We would have to check in to see if the phone was available to use. We shared the phone line with another family down the street.
  14. I went to high school in Las Vegas, Nevada. We had riots my senior year. The funny thing is I learned to be humble that year. I could smile at my “friends” when no one was looking.
  15. I saw the “Beatles” perform, we had to stand on chairs and everyone was screaming with joy. So was I.
  16. I moved to Salt Lake City, Utah when I was 18 years old and rented a bedroom with my sister in a house from “Mrs. Thomas”. She always made the best dinners that made us smile every night. Looking back, this probably helped her pay her bills. I am glad I lived there.
  17. I was lined up with a few blind dates. Oh my gosh, I came from Las Vegas where my high school friends smoked Marijana (I never did, I hated smoking of any kind) to this town of young men looking to marry someone ASAP. LOL!
  18. I said I no longer wanted to be lined up, but then I was lined up with Mark, yep it was love at first sight. He’s the best thing that’s ever happened to me in my life.
  19. We dated about three months, got engaged and married about six months later.
  20. We lived in an apartment for a few months and bought an entire house full of furniture from a couple who lived across the street from Mark’s parents. The couple died within a month of each other. Their kids came in and took all the small family treasures, leaving the rest of the furniture for sale.  We sold my 1968 VW for about $800 and bought the house full of furniture for that same amount. We were able to fill our little basement apartment with all those items. We got a small kitchen set with four chairs, a dining room set with a buffet, table, and eight chairs, a living room set with couch and love seat, and a bedroom set with double bed, dresser, and two small end tables. What a find!
  21. One year later, we bought a house for $18,400.00 with interest at 7-3/4%.
  22. Six weeks before moving we had a daughter born with dark brown hair. The deal was if she was a blonde we’d name her Lynnett, the name of a special high school friend. If she was dark-haired her name would be Allison, the name of one of Mark’s high school friends. She was born looking like a Native American child so Allison it was. Funny, but six weeks later she lost the dark hair and has been blonde ever since.
  23. We bought a used crib and painted it white. I had an old dresser I grew up with and we painted it white to match the crib.
  24. We bought a used car, we could only afford one car because Mark was going to the University of Utah and working parttime to support us.
  25. He took the bus to school and worked two jobs so I could be a stay at home mom.
  26. I babysat kids to help with our monthly expenses.
  27. Mark graduated from the University of Utah with a degree in finance.
  28. A few months after graduation we had our second daughter.
  29. Mark continued working two jobs to make it work so we could have a house and a garden.
  30. Mark shot a deer with his buddies and brought it home and hung it up in the garage. We cleaned it ourselves on the kitchen table. I cannot eat deer now, nope never.
  31. Mark started as a coin wrapping clerk at a bank, then as a teller to get through school with zero debt.
  32. Two years later we had a third daughter.
  33. Mark got a promotion at the bank and we had to sell our home and move to River Heights, Utah. We doubled our money from the first house sale and that allowed us to purchase a brand new home.
  34. The day we moved to River Heights we drove up Sardine Canyon in a severe snow storm and I had white knuckles on that blue station steering wheel. Mark was driving the U-Haul ahead of me.
  35. We moved into a wonderful neighborhood with awesome loving neighbors.
  36. Our home was on a half acre.
  37. We had a huge garden.
  38. We grew strawberries for the neighborhood.
  39. We had our fourth daughter about three years later.
  40. We made great friends in River Heights / Logan, Utah. Joy.
  41. I worked at a Bernina store part time, this is where my love for a good sewing machine began.
  42. Mark worked two jobs in Logan, Utah. He taught people who wanted to be bank tellers how the be good at their jobs.
  43. Mark got a promotion and we moved back to the Salt Lake City, Utah area.
  44. We sold our home in River Heights, Utah about six months after moving. Scary times with two house payments.
  45. We bought a home in Bountiful, Utah. Joy.
  46. We sold that home and bought another home on 7th Avenue near downtown Salt Lake City. Joy.
  47. We lived there a couple years and sold that home and moved to Sandy, Utah. It was on a neat street and we made many friends. Joy.
  48. Then we bought a home in Farmington, Utah. Joy.
  49. The night we moved into this home, the floods of 1983 flooded Farmington and Bountiful, Utah. Our home was okay but we sandbagged many homes and made new friends shoveling mud out of their damaged homes.
  50. We made many great friends in Farmington, Utah.
  51. We bought our first used ski boat. It was a 1979 18 foot open bow Sea Ray. The girls and I learned to water ski. Joy.
  52. We sold this home and built a new home in another subdivision in Farmington, Utah. Joy.
  53. We boated with our friends the Matern’s and other families as well.
  54. I spent too much time cleaning my house.
  55. I went to work for a bank because all the girls were in school and I felt I needed something to do during the day. Guess I’m a “type A” person. Wanted a part-time job, but came home and announced to the family I’d be working fulltime.
  56. Our girls worked at Lagoon and other fast food places.
  57. As they got older and needed transportation, the girls each had to pay for their cars, some of which did not have air conditioning or a radio. But they had a motor that could get them from point A to point B.
  58. We tried to go to Disneyland every couple years. Joy.
  59. I was asked to be a manager of a grocery store branch at another bank.
  60. Three of our girls graduated from Davis High School.
  61. Three of our daughters met their future husbands in Farmington, Utah.
  62. We had three weddings in 18 months. Expensive joy.
  63. I was asked to work in Salt Lake City with an office in two branches of the bank.
  64. We moved to Cottonwood Heights, Utah rather than have both Mark and me commute 25 miles to work.
  65. I started my mortgage company. Joy.
  66. All my daughters worked for the company over the 15 years we had the company.
  67. My awesome son-in-law helped me run Priority Mortgage.
  68. I was inspired to buy advertising by a good friend for the mortgage company.
  69. We took the whole extended family to California to celebrate our 25th wedding anniversary. OJ Simpson took his famous drive down the CA freeways while we were there.
  70. We sold that home and moved to Riverton, Utah. Super joy for me since I wouldn’t have to negotiate those second story stairs.
  71. I “adopted” several grandchildren in that neighborhood. Great friends and memories.
  72. We bought the home we have today in Southern Utah as a second home.
  73. We sold our Riverton, Utah home about five years after buying our second home. I wanted to get away from the snow.
  74. Mark semi-retired.
  75. I semi-retired.
  76. I had both my knees replaced within six weeks of each other. Difficult recovery, but have joy in walking without pain.
  77. I started teaching classes about food storage and emergency preparedness.
  78. I taught classes at kitchen stores on how to make bread, cinnamon rolls, tortillas and so much more.
  79. I started my blog.
  80. My first grandchild graduated from high school.
  81. Our third daughter graduated from Utah State University.
  82. I was asked to write a book. Humbling joy.
  83. My book was published, inspiration from coaches and friends.
  84. I hired a life coach, Lyn Christian of Soul Salt, Inc.
  85. Mark started his own company. Inspiration and lots of joy.
  86. Our second daughter graduated from Brigham Young University.
  87. We went to Tokyo, Japan to watch our granddaughter perform as Belle, Snow White, and Ariel for Disney.
  88. We had a semi-family reunion in Newport Beach, California for Thanksgiving. Super joy.
  89. We had more grandchildren graduate from high school.
  90. We have grandchildren traveling the world.
  91. We have grandchildren performing in musicals.
  92. We love the climate and beautiful red rock landscapes of Southern Utah.
  93. Mark plays golf twice a week with a group of about 20 great friends. I encourage him to stay involved with physical things he loves since his body still works.
  94. I really miss my Riverton friends but have made some special friends here too. I’ve found retirement to be very different than what I expected and what you see depicted on TV and in the movies. Days can get a little long with less to do to fill the time.
  95. I do a lot of research on the Internet as part of my time to write appropriate things for my blog.
  96. Mark is involved in the local Exchange Club. He loves the association, friendships, and community service projects.
  97. Mark stays busy in his calling in the church. He loves his stewardship over the young children and teenagers too.
  98. We enjoy hearing from our granddaughter who is serving a church mission in the Seattle, WA area. She returns home soon and has had a life-changing time the past 17 months.
  99. We enjoy traveling to visit the kids and their families. Each family is in a different stage and set of circumstances. We appreciate them wanting us around to share experiences. Having 17 grandchildren is a true blessing in our lives. Each one is different, but bring us joy in so many ways.
  100. We struggle to watch family and friends age, face health challenges, and succumb to ill health and accidents. Having two sisters in law make the move to assisted living quarters has been a real eye-opener and motivation to eat healthy foods and work to simplify our lives by disposing of the “stuff” we have. I don’t want my kids to have to deal with it in case something happens to Mark or to me.
  101. We cherish our lives together. Although we have many different interests (I don’t golf and he won’t frequent Starbucks), we have traveled to many exciting locations, loved raising four beautiful daughters, try to support the grandkids and their various teams, schools, and events. Life is so good!

May you look at the joy and inspiration in your life and look at the good you have done for others. Life is what we make it. May God bless this world.

How To Make Bread by Linda

My book “Prepare Your Family For Survival”

The post 101 Feelings Of Joy And Inspiration From My Life appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

101 Feelings Of Joy And Inspiration From My Life

Click here to view the original post.

I hope you will enjoy my 101 feelings of joy and inspiration from my life today. I was born in 1950, I will save you the math, I am 67 years old as of today. I know people have been writing about what they are thankful for recently, but today it’s all about joy and inspiration.  I was born in California and have lived a fairly simple frugal life since the day I was born. I was 18 months old when my birth father was diagnosed with Polio. He was in an iron lung for many months. My older sister and I were farmed out to relatives since my mother had to quickly become the breadwinner. Sometime later, my sister was diagnosed with the same disease but didn’t require an iron lung. 

In case you are really young, this picture below shows what an iron lung looked like when my father was placed in one to help him breathe. Polio causes paralysis and is an infectious disease which in some cases was fatal. Luckily, my father lived but had health issues for the rest of his life. My sister beat the odds and recovered without any ill effects from the disease.

joy
Here’s the deal, I had a rough childhood, but life got better. So let me share my 101 feelings of joy and inspiration with you. My parents divorced and luckily I had a second chance with a stepdad. I really do not like that word, stepdad. He raised me and life took a few curves but I learned to work, to have fun, and laugh. I love to laugh. Those who really know me, know I love to giggle. It’s how I roll. If you started out with a rough life, you can change your destination, I promise. I did.

Listed below are many life events Mark and I have shared together as we’ve been on this adventurous journey together. I hope you can grasp the highs and lows, the learning experiences and the challenges we as a family have survived together. It has been fun highlighting key events that have changed and added to our lives.

101 Feelings Of Joy And Inspiration

  1. I was born to a wonderful mother, Erma.
  2. I had several sisters, yes my mother specialized in girls and I did too!
  3. I remember my 4th-grade teacher named Mrs. Okelberry who loved me, this shy little girl.
  4. I played the accordion, after all, we are Norweigian.
  5. I went roller skating or ice skating at the rink with my sisters and my mom all the time.
  6. I learned to square dance.
  7. I learned to sew.
  8. I learned to cook from scratch.
  9. I learned how to preserve food.
  10. I learned to make bread.
  11. My parents took us up to the mountains every Sunday to cook breakfast and feel the fresh air.
  12. We got a black and white TV one year, oh my gosh, and sound came out of it.
  13. We had a party line, we shared, you know the phone that hung on the wall. We would have to check in to see if the phone was available to use. We shared the phone line with another family down the street.
  14. I went to high school in Las Vegas, Nevada. We had riots my senior year. The funny thing is I learned to be humble that year. I could smile at my “friends” when no one was looking.
  15. I saw the “Beatles” perform, we had to stand on chairs and everyone was screaming with joy. So was I.
  16. I moved to Salt Lake City, Utah when I was 18 years old and rented a bedroom with my sister in a house from “Mrs. Thomas”. She always made the best dinners that made us smile every night. Looking back, this probably helped her pay her bills. I am glad I lived there.
  17. I was lined up with a few blind dates. Oh my gosh, I came from Las Vegas where my high school friends smoked Marijana (I never did, I hated smoking of any kind) to this town of young men looking to marry someone ASAP. LOL!
  18. I said I no longer wanted to be lined up, but then I was lined up with Mark, yep it was love at first sight. He’s the best thing that’s ever happened to me in my life.
  19. We dated about three months, got engaged and married about six months later.
  20. We lived in an apartment for a few months and bought an entire house full of furniture from a couple who lived across the street from Mark’s parents. The couple died within a month of each other. Their kids came in and took all the small family treasures, leaving the rest of the furniture for sale.  We sold my 1968 VW for about $800 and bought the house full of furniture for that same amount. We were able to fill our little basement apartment with all those items. We got a small kitchen set with four chairs, a dining room set with a buffet, table, and eight chairs, a living room set with couch and love seat, and a bedroom set with double bed, dresser, and two small end tables. What a find!
  21. One year later, we bought a house for $18,400.00 with interest at 7-3/4%.
  22. Six weeks before moving we had a daughter born with dark brown hair. The deal was if she was a blonde we’d name her Lynnett, the name of a special high school friend. If she was dark-haired her name would be Allison, the name of one of Mark’s high school friends. She was born looking like a Native American child so Allison it was. Funny, but six weeks later she lost the dark hair and has been blonde ever since.
  23. We bought a used crib and painted it white. I had an old dresser I grew up with and we painted it white to match the crib.
  24. We bought a used car, we could only afford one car because Mark was going to the University of Utah and working parttime to support us.
  25. He took the bus to school and worked two jobs so I could be a stay at home mom.
  26. I babysat kids to help with our monthly expenses.
  27. Mark graduated from the University of Utah with a degree in finance.
  28. A few months after graduation we had our second daughter.
  29. Mark continued working two jobs to make it work so we could have a house and a garden.
  30. Mark shot a deer with his buddies and brought it home and hung it up in the garage. We cleaned it ourselves on the kitchen table. I cannot eat deer now, nope never.
  31. Mark started as a coin wrapping clerk at a bank, then as a teller to get through school with zero debt.
  32. Two years later we had a third daughter.
  33. Mark got a promotion at the bank and we had to sell our home and move to River Heights, Utah. We doubled our money from the first house sale and that allowed us to purchase a brand new home.
  34. The day we moved to River Heights we drove up Sardine Canyon in a severe snow storm and I had white knuckles on that blue station steering wheel. Mark was driving the U-Haul ahead of me.
  35. We moved into a wonderful neighborhood with awesome loving neighbors.
  36. Our home was on a half acre.
  37. We had a huge garden.
  38. We grew strawberries for the neighborhood.
  39. We had our fourth daughter about three years later.
  40. We made great friends in River Heights / Logan, Utah. Joy.
  41. I worked at a Bernina store part time, this is where my love for a good sewing machine began.
  42. Mark worked two jobs in Logan, Utah. He taught people who wanted to be bank tellers how the be good at their jobs.
  43. Mark got a promotion and we moved back to the Salt Lake City, Utah area.
  44. We sold our home in River Heights, Utah about six months after moving. Scary times with two house payments.
  45. We bought a home in Bountiful, Utah. Joy.
  46. We sold that home and bought another home on 7th Avenue near downtown Salt Lake City. Joy.
  47. We lived there a couple years and sold that home and moved to Sandy, Utah. It was on a neat street and we made many friends. Joy.
  48. Then we bought a home in Farmington, Utah. Joy.
  49. The night we moved into this home, the floods of 1983 flooded Farmington and Bountiful, Utah. Our home was okay but we sandbagged many homes and made new friends shoveling mud out of their damaged homes.
  50. We made many great friends in Farmington, Utah.
  51. We bought our first used ski boat. It was a 1979 18 foot open bow Sea Ray. The girls and I learned to water ski. Joy.
  52. We sold this home and built a new home in another subdivision in Farmington, Utah. Joy.
  53. We boated with our friends the Matern’s and other families as well.
  54. I spent too much time cleaning my house.
  55. I went to work for a bank because all the girls were in school and I felt I needed something to do during the day. Guess I’m a “type A” person. Wanted a part-time job, but came home and announced to the family I’d be working fulltime.
  56. Our girls worked at Lagoon and other fast food places.
  57. As they got older and needed transportation, the girls each had to pay for their cars, some of which did not have air conditioning or a radio. But they had a motor that could get them from point A to point B.
  58. We tried to go to Disneyland every couple years. Joy.
  59. I was asked to be a manager of a grocery store branch at another bank.
  60. Three of our girls graduated from Davis High School.
  61. Three of our daughters met their future husbands in Farmington, Utah.
  62. We had three weddings in 18 months. Expensive joy.
  63. I was asked to work in Salt Lake City with an office in two branches of the bank.
  64. We moved to Cottonwood Heights, Utah rather than have both Mark and me commute 25 miles to work.
  65. I started my mortgage company. Joy.
  66. All my daughters worked for the company over the 15 years we had the company.
  67. My awesome son-in-law helped me run Priority Mortgage.
  68. I was inspired to buy advertising by a good friend for the mortgage company.
  69. We took the whole extended family to California to celebrate our 25th wedding anniversary. OJ Simpson took his famous drive down the CA freeways while we were there.
  70. We sold that home and moved to Riverton, Utah. Super joy for me since I wouldn’t have to negotiate those second story stairs.
  71. I “adopted” several grandchildren in that neighborhood. Great friends and memories.
  72. We bought the home we have today in Southern Utah as a second home.
  73. We sold our Riverton, Utah home about five years after buying our second home. I wanted to get away from the snow.
  74. Mark semi-retired.
  75. I semi-retired.
  76. I had both my knees replaced within six weeks of each other. Difficult recovery, but have joy in walking without pain.
  77. I started teaching classes about food storage and emergency preparedness.
  78. I taught classes at kitchen stores on how to make bread, cinnamon rolls, tortillas and so much more.
  79. I started my blog.
  80. My first grandchild graduated from high school.
  81. Our third daughter graduated from Utah State University.
  82. I was asked to write a book. Humbling joy.
  83. My book was published, inspiration from coaches and friends.
  84. I hired a life coach, Lyn Christian of Soul Salt, Inc.
  85. Mark started his own company. Inspiration and lots of joy.
  86. Our second daughter graduated from Brigham Young University.
  87. We went to Tokyo, Japan to watch our granddaughter perform as Belle, Snow White, and Ariel for Disney.
  88. We had a semi-family reunion in Newport Beach, California for Thanksgiving. Super joy.
  89. We had more grandchildren graduate from high school.
  90. We have grandchildren traveling the world.
  91. We have grandchildren performing in musicals.
  92. We love the climate and beautiful red rock landscapes of Southern Utah.
  93. Mark plays golf twice a week with a group of about 20 great friends. I encourage him to stay involved with physical things he loves since his body still works.
  94. I really miss my Riverton friends but have made some special friends here too. I’ve found retirement to be very different than what I expected and what you see depicted on TV and in the movies. Days can get a little long with less to do to fill the time.
  95. I do a lot of research on the Internet as part of my time to write appropriate things for my blog.
  96. Mark is involved in the local Exchange Club. He loves the association, friendships, and community service projects.
  97. Mark stays busy in his calling in the church. He loves his stewardship over the young children and teenagers too.
  98. We enjoy hearing from our granddaughter who is serving a church mission in the Seattle, WA area. She returns home soon and has had a life-changing time the past 17 months.
  99. We enjoy traveling to visit the kids and their families. Each family is in a different stage and set of circumstances. We appreciate them wanting us around to share experiences. Having 17 grandchildren is a true blessing in our lives. Each one is different, but bring us joy in so many ways.
  100. We struggle to watch family and friends age, face health challenges, and succumb to ill health and accidents. Having two sisters in law make the move to assisted living quarters has been a real eye-opener and motivation to eat healthy foods and work to simplify our lives by disposing of the “stuff” we have. I don’t want my kids to have to deal with it in case something happens to Mark or to me.
  101. We cherish our lives together. Although we have many different interests (I don’t golf and he won’t frequent Starbucks), we have traveled to many exciting locations, loved raising four beautiful daughters, try to support the grandkids and their various teams, schools, and events. Life is so good!

May you look at the joy and inspiration in your life and look at the good you have done for others. Life is what we make it. May God bless this world.

How To Make Bread by Linda

My book “Prepare Your Family For Survival”

The post 101 Feelings Of Joy And Inspiration From My Life appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

Five Scary Signs That Your Health May Be Rapidly Declining

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Most people try to avoid the thought of what their lives would be like if their health failed. But for those who are brave enough to have those thoughts, they probably don’t have an accurate perception of what it’s really like to be near death’s door and in need of medical attention. They’ll likely base their assumptions on what they’ve seen in movies, and dread the day they develop an inexplicable cough or debilitating nausea.

In the real wold however, the signs that indicate poor health often aren’t very obvious. Here’s what you should really look out for:

  1. If you’re beginning to lose your sense of smell, look out. Studies have shown that people who have trouble smelling or have lost that sense completely, have a drastically higher mortality rate. Their chances of dying over a 5 year period are somewhere between 2-4 times higher than people who can still smell.
  2. A loss of appetite, particularly among seniors, is a common symptom seen in people before they die of natural causes. That’s because the human metabolism begins a precipitous drop before death occurs. Mortality rates typically rise if the appetite loss continues for more than six months.
  3. One little known sign of declining health is poor grip strength. Obviously, there can be other causes. It’s safe to assume that if your grip isn’t what it used to be, you could just be getting older. It’s no secret that we all lose muscle mass as we age. But if you’ve experienced a dramatic loss of grip strength, then you have a much higher chance of dying by any cause. More importantly, people who have weak grip strength have a significantly higher chance of suffering from a stroke or a heart attack.
  4. If you’re not treating your body right by smoking, not eating healthy food or exercising regularly etc, over time your heart rate and blood pressure is going to increase. We all know that this isn’t a good sign, but most people don’t realize how significant the ramifications are. An examination of 46 studies that collectively involved over 2 million people, found that those who have a resting heart rate that exceeded 80 beats per minute had a 45% higher risk of mortality by any cause.
  5. One of the easiest ways to tell if you’re in bad health isn’t a symptom, but a test that can be administered anywhere. It’s called the SRT test, which measures your physical mobility, and has been proven to show your chance of dying from any cause over a five-year period. The goal of the test is to sit down on the floor and stand back up without using any support. If you can cross your feet, sit down and standup without any support, you get 10 points. You lose a point for each hand, arm, or knee you use to support yourself. Each point you have represents a 21% lower chance of dying over a five-year period, but if you score three or less, than your chances of dying of any cause is five times higher.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Top 6 Ideas For Creating Survival Shelters In The Wild

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Today we are going to go over one of the most vital things to know when spending time outdoors for an extended period. That’s right, knowing how to build various survival shelters can save your life when spending time outside, fighting against the harsh weather. Survival experts have long known about an idea called the … Read more…

The post Top 6 Ideas For Creating Survival Shelters In The Wild was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.