9 Overlooked, Vital Skills For A Post-EMP World

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While having the right equipment and supplies is normally considered essential to survival, having the right skills trumps them both. You can make up for an equipment or supply shortage by having enough skills, but it’s much harder to do the reverse. Eventually, your supplies will run out. Then what will you do?

Typically, we break most of these skills down into two basic categories: wilderness survival skills and homesteading skills. The general idea behind homesteading skills is that if we aren’t trying to survive in the wilderness, then we need to convert our homes into homesteads in order to survive. There are a few other skills, such as medicine, which don’t fall into either of these categories, but most of the survival skills we all work to learn can really be put in one or the other.

But I’d like to propose a third category of skills — one that will be highly necessary if we are ever attacked by an EMP. Those skills are the ones which will be necessary so that we can rebuild society. Our ability to survive long-term, especially our ability to survive as the United States of America, will depend largely on our ability to rebuild our society and the technology that makes it possible.

Make no mistake about this: If we are unable to rebuild our society, there are others who will be glad to move in and take over. For millennia, countries that became weak were conquered and absorbed by those who were strong. Technology was a large part of this, as military technology had a lot to do with determining a country’s strength.

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In our weakened, post-EMP state, with millions of people dying off, the United States would be prime pickings for anyone who would want to attack. That is, unless we were able to rebuild our country, before the military ran out of beans, bullets and fuel to defend us.

So here are the skills which I see as the most important, in order to make the United States of America survive as a country, which will hopefully help us to survive as individuals as well.

1. Medicine

One of the first things we will be forced to confront as a society is the massive number of people who will die due to the lack of proper medical attention. A fair percentage of our society is dependent upon regular doses of medicines to treat chronic conditions. Without those medicines, these people will begin to die off, causing the first wave of people dying after the attack.

Alternative medicine will be especially important during this time; when local stocks of medicines run out, there will be little that can be done to replenish them. Doctors will find themselves scrambling to find the natural remedies that were used 100 years ago, before the pharmaceutical industry grew so large. Those with this knowledge will suddenly find themselves sought after and respected by the medical industry.

2. Chemistry

Without the ability to mass-manufacture medicines and transport them across country, the only medicines that will be produced will be simpler medicines that are produced locally. While much of this will probably be natural medicine, the ability to produce chloroform and other simple medicines will be invaluable.

3. Agriculture

Food production will have to be localized, ignoring the massive agricultural industry that we have today, as well as the massive food production industry. According to the report of the EMP Commission, the largest number of people who will die during the first year after the EMP will be of starvation. The only chance those people have is for local farmers to pick up the slack and produce food locally.

This does not just mean growing produce and grain, although that is an extremely important component. It also means animal husbandry, breeding and growing animals for meat.

4. Practical Engineering

We are, to a large part, a nation of things. Without electrical power, many of those things will no longer work, even though they will still exist. Engineering will be extremely important in a post-EMP world; not from the point of view of designing new things, as finding ways of making the old things work. This will most likely require extensive modifications.

While our country has thousands of engineers, few are good at this type of engineering. An engineer who is only used to designing integrated circuit chips isn’t going to have much to do in a post-EMP world. But one who is used to working hands-on, finding ways of doing things, will be in high demand.

When you consider that we will need to figure out how to draw our own wire and build out own generators on a local level, in order to have electricity back in our cities, you can see how important this will be. These same engineers will probably be working out modifications for farm equipment, to run off of steam or animal power and modifying vehicles, so that the engines will run off of alternate fuels and without computers.

5. Telephony

The oldest form of electronic communications we had was the telegraph. That was quickly replaced by telephones. If we are going to restore communications, these skills will be needed. But I’m not talking about the telephony of today, which is largely dependent on computers; rather, I’m talking about the telephony of yesteryear, with an operator connecting your call.

6. Electrical Power Production

Restoring society will require the ability to produce electrical power on a local level, more than anything else. This will mean building and rebuilding small power production plants, including hydroelectric plants and coal plants.

More than that, there will be the problem of rebuilding the distribution grid. Once again, that will have to start on a local level, which will then begin to be connected together, as transformers can be built and new power lines can be made.

7. Electronics

There will be warehouses full of electronic equipment that will survive the EMP, even if there isn’t much equipment in use that survives it. Some will be able to be used as is, but much will probably need to be modified, in order to use it for purposes other than its original intent. There will be a lot of local modification going on, requiring people who know how to read a schematic and solder a connection.

8. Blacksmithing & Machining

Manufacturing the equipment to draw wire and wind transformers on a local level will be a huge challenge. First, an engineer will have to design the equipment, then it will have to be built. Since we won’t have the factories available that we do today, that’s going to mean going back to the old methods, with blacksmiths forming things out of metal and machinists who can modify those metal parts.

Of course, this will all have to be done with manpower or animal power, as there won’t be any electricity to run motors. That means that the first job these people will have to do is modify modern equipment, so that it can be run off of animal power or water power.

9. Mechanics

I mentioned modifying cars to run off of alternate fuels and without computers to control the engines. While we will need engineers working on this, we will also need the practical knowledge of mechanics, who know the engines better than anyone. These mechanics may very well need the services of the blacksmiths and machinists, in order to modify parts to meet the need.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Inexpensive Ways To Help Potted Plants Survive Winter

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Inexpensive Ways To Help Potted Plants Survive Winter

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Raise your hand if you’ve ever scored a massive deal at your local nursery at the end of the gardening season. Keep your hand up if those massive deals were on half-dead plants in plastic containers.

I did that once. I couldn’t resist all those dirt-cheap perennials that would keep me in strawberry rhubarb pies until my dotage. But I should have known better. I’m always in overwhelm mode in late summer and fall, trying to keep up with the plants that still need tending as well as with harvesting and preserving produce and getting ready for winter. Taking on another task, like figuring out where to plant perennials and actually getting them into the ground, was not a smart idea. And so, confession time: I didn’t plant any of them. They just sat there in their flimsy plastic pots all winter. In the spring, the peonies somehow, miraculously, sent out shoots and I got those into the ground. The rest looked beyond hope and I tossed them into the compost pile.

I’ve since learned that there are ways to overwinter plants in pots regardless of whether they’re geriatric escapees from the nursery or potted plants that you’ve had in your garden all season long.

Why Not Just Overwinter in Pots?

There are several reasons why plants have a hard time surviving the winter in containers–and most are related to the plant’s roots.

First, roots are typically hardy to two zones warmer than the plant. If, for instance, your plant is hardy to Zone 4, the roots are only hardy to Zone 6. Roots don’t have to be as tough because they’re protected by the soil. However, the small amount of soil in a pot doesn’t provide enough insulation to adequately protect roots.

Second, pots are more susceptible to freeze/thaw cycles because that small amount of soil can warm up very quickly. If you live in a colder zone, plant roots will freeze regardless of whether the plant is in the ground or in a pot. If the roots are hardy to your zone, frozen roots are part of the plant’s life cycle and nothing to worry about. However, while roots might freeze, they don’t go dormant. When the ground warms up enough, tender new roots will grow. But those young roots don’t have the ability to withstand colder temperatures; they will die when it gets cold again. This process of producing new roots that die off shortly afterward can seriously weaken the plant. It’s actually better for roots to remain consistently frozen (or at least consistently cold) all winter long.

Third, if your containers are left on a flat surface the frost, ice, and snow that accumulates on the pot’s soil can lead to root rot. As temperatures fluctuate, that frozen moisture thaws and saturates the pot. Once the temperatures dip again, the wet soil freezes. And the next time a thaw cycle hits, more ice and snow thaws and is added to the pot’s already saturated soil.

There’s no doubt that potted plants have it tough in the winter. But as the story of my peonies shows, they can pull through extended cold spells. Still, rather than just cross your fingers and hope for the best, there are things you can do to help your potted plants make through the winter.

Bring Them Inside

This seems like the most obvious suggestion, but you need to be careful about where exactly you move your plants to. Since most perennials require a period of dormancy, you can’t move them into a warm sunny window and treat them like houseplants (the exception here are geraniums). An unheated garage or shed is ideal, but a cool basement can also work. If you overwinter your perennials this way, you’ll need to water them whenever the soil gets completely dry.

Use a Sheltered Outdoor Spot

If you don’t have a suitable indoor spot, or if you have too many pots to find space for, another option is to move them to a sheltered outdoor location and cover them with mulch.

The best spot is on the north side of your house, garage, or shed. Lining up pots along a house (or heated garage) wall will provide them with some consistent warmth, while also blocking the sun on warmer days to minimize freeze/thaw cycles.

For extra protection, bury the pots in mulch–and at this time of year, it’s easy enough to find leaves for that job.

Wrap Them Up

While gardeners may wrap above-ground growth–like shrubs, hydrangeas, and rosebushes–in burlap over the winter, potted plants have a different issue. As explained earlier, it’s usually not the plant growth that needs protecting in a pot–it’s the roots. You can insulate and protect your roots by wrapping the pots in bubble wrap, burlap, or old sheets.

Bury Them, Pot and All

This is the most labor-intensive option, but it gives your plants the best chance of survival. And while it still involves some sort of planting, it doesn’t have to be as strategic as choosing a permanent place for the plant.

Depending on the number of plants you have, dig a hole or a trench in your garden or compost pile. The depth of the hole depends on how large your pots are. Ideally, the pots should be laid–or at least tilted–on their sides to prevent thawed moisture from accumulating on top. Once placed in the trench, the pots should be covered with mulch, or lightly covered up with soil. If you don’t have the space–or the time–to dig a big enough trench and need to leave the pots upright, bury only two-thirds of the container to improve drainage.

Potted plants do need a little bit of extra help to make it through the winter, but they’ll reward those efforts in the spring. What are your tried and true tricks for overwintering potted plants? Tell us in the comments below.

What advice would you add? Share it in the section below: 

7 ‘Miracle’ Herbal Teas For Cold & Flu Season

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7 ‘Miracle’ Herbal Teas For Cold & Flu Season

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This time of year it feels like there are germs everywhere you go. During these months of cold and flu season, we need to be prepared for any illnesses that come into our house. Part of being prepared means having your supply of herbal teas ready to use when they are needed.

One of the best things about herbal teas is they are extremely easy to make and they can be made as you need them. They are also wonderful because they can be tailored to your needs by using the herbs you have on hand and prefer. Even when you are not sick a good cup of herbal tea can be just what you need to relax. Herbal teas can be used as preventatives, to treat symptoms, and to shorten the duration of your illness.

Fast, All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effects!

Almost all of these teas can be mixed in bulk batches and stored in airtight containers for later use. Unless otherwise noted, all of these teas can be made the same way by putting 4 to 6 tablespoons of herbal tea mixture in the bottom of a quart jar. Pour boiling water over the top of the herbs and cover the jar. Steep the mixture for 30 to 45 minutes. Strain the herbs out and sip throughout the day. Excess tea can be refrigerated for 24 hours.

1) Immune Boosting Chai Tea

You can drink this Chai Tea daily throughout the year. It will help build your immune system. It also tastes wonderful. Astragalus and reishi are great herbs for preventing colds and the flu. This tea can be mixed in bulk in advance. The reishi and astragalus can be added before brewing since they are large pieces that do not mix in well with the rest of the herbs.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons dried ginger root

2 tablespoons dried orange peel

1 tablespoon cinnamon chips

1 teaspoon peppercorns

½ teaspoon hulled cardamom or two crushed cardamom pods

¼ teaspoon cloves

10 to 20 grams astragalus

6 to 9 grams sliced reishi

1 ½ quarts of water

Put all the ingredients in a pot or slow cooker. Boil and then lower the heat. Let simmer for one hour. Strain the herbs out. You can add milk or honey for added flavor. If made in the slow cooker, heat on low for 8 hours. The prepared tea can be kept in a sealed jar in the fridge for one day and reheated as needed.

2) Immune Boosting Tea

This tea is great for boosting your immune system because it is high in Vitamin C. This tea contains both elderberries and rosehips. Elderberries are well known for their cold and flu fighting properties, but many people do not think of rosehips which have approximately 40 times more vitamin C than some citrus fruits.

Ingredients:

1 part dried elderberries

1 part rosehips

¼ part cinnamon chips

¼ part ginger root

3) Honey Lemon Ginger Jar

This tea is different than many herbal teas. This tea is made in a jar and stored in the fridge until used. The liquid mixture is placed in warm water and can be drunk just as other herbal teas. This tea gives you many unique benefits of honey. Honey has antifungal, antibacterial, and antiviral properties.

Ingredients:

1 cup of raw honey

1-2 sliced lemons

1-inch piece of ginger

Wash and slice your lemon. Slice your ginger. It is not necessary to peel the ginger, although if you want to you can peel it with a spoon. Put the lemon and ginger in a jar and seal tightly. Then, place in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours before using it. To make the tea, spoon 1-2 teaspoons into a cup of warm water and stir. Drink this tea immediately. This mixture can be stored in the fridge for around 2 months.

4) Elderflower Fever Reducing Tea

The elderflower is part of the same plant as the useful elderberry, and it is great for reducing fevers. This tea is great for children. With children, we often worry about their fever getting high and not going down. This elderflower tea is a great remedy if you are worried about fever.

Ingredients:

1 part catnip

1 part elderflower

1 part spearmint

5) Echinacea Tea

Echinacea is a beautiful flowering herb that is easy to grow. If you do not grow it yourself, you can easily buy it. Echinacea is a great herb to help stop a cold in its tracks. Start drinking this tea at the first sign of a cold and it can shorten the duration of your cold.

Ingredients:

1 part echinacea roots, leaves, and/or flowers

1 part spearmint

1 part lemon balm

6) Ginger Tea

Ginger is an amazing medicinal herb. It can help so many symptoms of all kinds of illnesses. This herb is so powerful that Rosalee de la Forêt says that “if you only had one herb to choose from during a cold or the flu, ginger may be the one”. This herb is great for congestion, sore throats, and warming up from the chills. It is also a wonderful herb for calming the stomach and helping reduce nausea.

Ingredients:

1-inch long piece of ginger (grated or minced) or 2 teaspoons of cut dried ginger

Splash of lemon

Spoonful of honey

Boiled Water

Place ginger, lemon, and honey in a cup or jar. Pour water over these and cover. Let this steep for 10 to 15 minutes. Strain your tea. If your tea is too strong, you can add more water to dilute it.

7) Soothing Ginger Spice Tea

This tea has a lot of different ingredients. Many of them are things we keep in our kitchen and use in regular cooking. Each one of these herbs and spices has healing properties that we don’t expect. Cinnamon is full of antioxidants. Cloves will help with coughs and get rid of the nasty phlegm that comes with colds and flu. Turmeric can help ease up stomach symptoms that often accompany the flu.

Ingredients:

3 cups of water

Juice from half a lemon

1 stick of cinnamon

¾ inch of ginger sliced

¼ teaspoon cloves

½ tablespoon turmeric

1 small pinch of cayenne pepper

Honey to sweeten your tea as desired

Add all of the ingredients into a pot except the honey. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Strain tea. Pour into a cup and add honey as desired.

Drinking these herbal teas can help not only reduce the symptoms of a cold or flu, but they can also help prevent getting sick by building up your immune system. Herbal teas will also shorten the length of your illness. Prepare and store these herbal mixtures before illness arrives, so at the first sign of sickness you are ready to make a healing cup of tea.

References

Anthis, Christina. (2014 September 18). Ten Homemade Herbal Teas for Cold and Flu Season. https://theherbalacademy.com/ten-homemade-herbal-teas-for-cold-and-flu-season/. Retrieved November 14, 2016.

Attwell, Ciara. (2015 February 23). Honey Lemon Ginger Jar – Natural Cold and Flu Remedy. http://www.myfussyeater.com/honey-lemon-ginger-jar-natural-cold-flu-remedy/. Retrieved November 14, 2016.

Chatelaine. (2014 November 11). Soothe cold and flu symptoms with this tea. http://www.chatelaine.com/health/wellness/flu-fighting-tea/. Retrieved November 14, 2016.

Nancy. ( 2013 August 9). How to Make Your Own Echinacea Tea. http://livininthegreen.blogspot.com/2013/08/how-to-make-your-own-echinacea-tea.html?m=1. Retrieved November 14, 2016.

De la Forêt, Rosalee. (n.d.) Learning Herbs. Herbal Cold Care Natural Remedies for Cold and Flu Season.

7 ‘Miracle’ Herbal Teas For Cold & Flu Season

7 ‘Miracle’ Herbal Teas For Cold & Flu Season

Image source: Pixabay.com

This time of year it feels like there are germs everywhere you go. During these months of cold and flu season, we need to be prepared for any illnesses that come into our house. Part of being prepared means having your supply of herbal teas ready to use when they are needed.

One of the best things about herbal teas is they are extremely easy to make and they can be made as you need them. They are also wonderful because they can be tailored to your needs by using the herbs you have on hand and prefer. Even when you are not sick a good cup of herbal tea can be just what you need to relax. Herbal teas can be used as preventatives, to treat symptoms, and to shorten the duration of your illness.

Fast, All-Natural Pain Relief With No Nasty Side Effects!

Almost all of these teas can be mixed in bulk batches and stored in airtight containers for later use. Unless otherwise noted, all of these teas can be made the same way by putting 4 to 6 tablespoons of herbal tea mixture in the bottom of a quart jar. Pour boiling water over the top of the herbs and cover the jar. Steep the mixture for 30 to 45 minutes. Strain the herbs out and sip throughout the day. Excess tea can be refrigerated for 24 hours.

1) Immune Boosting Chai Tea

You can drink this Chai Tea daily throughout the year. It will help build your immune system. It also tastes wonderful. Astragalus and reishi are great herbs for preventing colds and the flu. This tea can be mixed in bulk in advance. The reishi and astragalus can be added before brewing since they are large pieces that do not mix in well with the rest of the herbs.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons dried ginger root

2 tablespoons dried orange peel

1 tablespoon cinnamon chips

1 teaspoon peppercorns

½ teaspoon hulled cardamom or two crushed cardamom pods

¼ teaspoon cloves

10 to 20 grams astragalus

6 to 9 grams sliced reishi

1 ½ quarts of water

Put all the ingredients in a pot or slow cooker. Boil and then lower the heat. Let simmer for one hour. Strain the herbs out. You can add milk or honey for added flavor. If made in the slow cooker, heat on low for 8 hours. The prepared tea can be kept in a sealed jar in the fridge for one day and reheated as needed.

2) Immune Boosting Tea

This tea is great for boosting your immune system because it is high in Vitamin C. This tea contains both elderberries and rosehips. Elderberries are well known for their cold and flu fighting properties, but many people do not think of rosehips which have approximately 40 times more vitamin C than some citrus fruits.

Ingredients:

1 part dried elderberries

1 part rosehips

¼ part cinnamon chips

¼ part ginger root

3) Honey Lemon Ginger Jar

This tea is different than many herbal teas. This tea is made in a jar and stored in the fridge until used. The liquid mixture is placed in warm water and can be drunk just as other herbal teas. This tea gives you many unique benefits of honey. Honey has antifungal, antibacterial, and antiviral properties.

Ingredients:

1 cup of raw honey

1-2 sliced lemons

1-inch piece of ginger

Wash and slice your lemon. Slice your ginger. It is not necessary to peel the ginger, although if you want to you can peel it with a spoon. Put the lemon and ginger in a jar and seal tightly. Then, place in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours before using it. To make the tea, spoon 1-2 teaspoons into a cup of warm water and stir. Drink this tea immediately. This mixture can be stored in the fridge for around 2 months.

4) Elderflower Fever Reducing Tea

The elderflower is part of the same plant as the useful elderberry, and it is great for reducing fevers. This tea is great for children. With children, we often worry about their fever getting high and not going down. This elderflower tea is a great remedy if you are worried about fever.

Ingredients:

1 part catnip

1 part elderflower

1 part spearmint

5) Echinacea Tea

Echinacea is a beautiful flowering herb that is easy to grow. If you do not grow it yourself, you can easily buy it. Echinacea is a great herb to help stop a cold in its tracks. Start drinking this tea at the first sign of a cold and it can shorten the duration of your cold.

Ingredients:

1 part echinacea roots, leaves, and/or flowers

1 part spearmint

1 part lemon balm

6) Ginger Tea

Ginger is an amazing medicinal herb. It can help so many symptoms of all kinds of illnesses. This herb is so powerful that Rosalee de la Forêt says that “if you only had one herb to choose from during a cold or the flu, ginger may be the one”. This herb is great for congestion, sore throats, and warming up from the chills. It is also a wonderful herb for calming the stomach and helping reduce nausea.

Ingredients:

1-inch long piece of ginger (grated or minced) or 2 teaspoons of cut dried ginger

Splash of lemon

Spoonful of honey

Boiled Water

Place ginger, lemon, and honey in a cup or jar. Pour water over these and cover. Let this steep for 10 to 15 minutes. Strain your tea. If your tea is too strong, you can add more water to dilute it.

7) Soothing Ginger Spice Tea

This tea has a lot of different ingredients. Many of them are things we keep in our kitchen and use in regular cooking. Each one of these herbs and spices has healing properties that we don’t expect. Cinnamon is full of antioxidants. Cloves will help with coughs and get rid of the nasty phlegm that comes with colds and flu. Turmeric can help ease up stomach symptoms that often accompany the flu.

Ingredients:

3 cups of water

Juice from half a lemon

1 stick of cinnamon

¾ inch of ginger sliced

¼ teaspoon cloves

½ tablespoon turmeric

1 small pinch of cayenne pepper

Honey to sweeten your tea as desired

Add all of the ingredients into a pot except the honey. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Strain tea. Pour into a cup and add honey as desired.

Drinking these herbal teas can help not only reduce the symptoms of a cold or flu, but they can also help prevent getting sick by building up your immune system. Herbal teas will also shorten the length of your illness. Prepare and store these herbal mixtures before illness arrives, so at the first sign of sickness you are ready to make a healing cup of tea.

References

Anthis, Christina. (2014 September 18). Ten Homemade Herbal Teas for Cold and Flu Season. https://theherbalacademy.com/ten-homemade-herbal-teas-for-cold-and-flu-season/. Retrieved November 14, 2016.

Attwell, Ciara. (2015 February 23). Honey Lemon Ginger Jar – Natural Cold and Flu Remedy. http://www.myfussyeater.com/honey-lemon-ginger-jar-natural-cold-flu-remedy/. Retrieved November 14, 2016.

Chatelaine. (2014 November 11). Soothe cold and flu symptoms with this tea. http://www.chatelaine.com/health/wellness/flu-fighting-tea/. Retrieved November 14, 2016.

Nancy. ( 2013 August 9). How to Make Your Own Echinacea Tea. http://livininthegreen.blogspot.com/2013/08/how-to-make-your-own-echinacea-tea.html?m=1. Retrieved November 14, 2016.

De la Forêt, Rosalee. (n.d.) Learning Herbs. Herbal Cold Care Natural Remedies for Cold and Flu Season.

5 Tips For The Novice Concealed Carrier

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5 Tips For The Novice Concealed Carrier

Image source: Pixabay.com

First of all, welcome to the world of concealed carrying! Most concealed carriers would agree that carrying a weapon will make you feel safer and more prepared if the unthinkable happens. Still, there are a few things that are easily forgotten, especially if you are also fairly new to firearms.

1. How to Conceal

While it seems extremely obvious, how to conceal your weapon should be a major consideration. Despite what some people will say, there is no one-size-fits-all answer. Some people will prefer to carry appendix, some over their back pocket, and some will use completely different methods to carry. For the new concealed carrier, this could be overwhelming.

In my opinion, the best way for you to carry is whatever you are comfortable with. For me, I prefer carrying over my back pocket, but find that it’s harder for me to conceal the weapon there, based on my body shape. This drove me to consider carrying appendix, which is now how I carry for most of the year.

You Don’t Need A Firearms License For This Weapon!</strong.

Finding the best way for you to concealed carry will almost certainly take trying out multiple holsters. For my first carry weapon, I had four different holsters before I found the right one. It’s like a glass slipper, except for guns, so it’s way more awesome. Trying out multiple holsters to find the most comfortable one is extremely important, because if you aren’t comfortable carrying with one holster, odds are you won’t carry at all.

Another important factor to consider is the time of year. During the summer in hotter areas, a pocket gun, such as a small .380, in a pocket holster will be your best friend. As the weather gets cooler, it will be easier to conceal bigger guns in multiple ways, as you will be wearing more, heavier clothing.

2. Drawing

Keep in mind the fact that carrying a weapon means you have to be prepared to draw it. In the event that the unpredictable happens, the last thing you want is to be fumbling around, unable to efficiently draw your weapon.

My advice would be to practice drawing if you are new to carrying or trying out a new holster. Empty the magazine, clear the weapon, and practice drawing. As you get more proficient, and if the range you shoot at allows for it, start practicing with live ammunition. The more efficiently you can draw your weapon, the more prepared you will be.

3. Thumb Safety

This reminder is aimed specifically at someone that is new to firearms. Keep in mind whether or not the firearm you are carrying has a safety. If it does, and you have to draw it, remember to flip the safety! In a high-stress situation, simple things like this are extremely easy to forget. Once again, practicing drawing and using your weapon will help develop muscle memory.

4. Best Ammo

For someone new to firearms, the different kinds of ammunition can be overwhelming. This could be argued endlessly, but do some research on the best ammo for personal defense and make your own decision. My personal preference is to carry hollow point ammunition. Hollow point bullets are designed to expand when they enter a target, which will cause more damage to a bad guy.

Another thing to keep in mind for someone new to concealed carrying is the time of year. If your potential target is wearing a huge winter coat, you might want some hotter ammunition or a larger caliber weapon to penetrate the extra layers.

5. Extra Ammo

Yet another facet of concealed carrying that could be argued endlessly. My opinion on whether or not to carry extra mags/ammo is that it should be based on your assessed threat level. If I’m just taking my dog on a walk or running to the gas station, I may not carry any extra mags. If I’m going to a more crowded area, like a shopping mall or a grocery store, I’m probably going to grab some extra ammo on the way out the door.

Overall, carrying a concealed weapon is an excellent idea, provided that you know how to safely and accurately operate the weapon you are carrying. For me, the added peace of mind is an awesome feeling.

While there are hundreds of factors that go into concealed carrying, these five reminders are just a few of the basics for someone new to concealed carrying to keep in mind.

What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

Learn these tips for safely sheltering in your vehicle

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A night out does not have to be a life-threatening experience. Drivers who accept the possibility that the unforeseen may happen are drivers who prepare, in advance, for the experience. On the other hand drivers who deny the possibility may find themselves fighting for their lives.

EDC Flashlight / Best Flashlight – In Case Of Power Outage

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At 12:55 today, December 17, 2017 there was a massive power outage at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson Airport. Imagine being inside, in the darkness with a whole bunch of confused people. This is why one of your everyday carry (EDC) items  should be a flashlight.  When traveling, you should carry two or three flashlights and extra batteries. […]

The post EDC Flashlight / Best Flashlight – In Case Of Power Outage appeared first on Vigil Prudence.

Surviving SHTF Holidays

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Best Holiday Survival Guide

Regardless of your current survival or SHTF living situation, it is imperative to maintain a lifestyle as close to surviving christmas“normal” as possible.  This includes maintaining regular long time established family traditions such as recognition of birthdays, anniversaries, and yes, even the holiday seasons.  A big, big part of survival success is being able to establish and maintain a strong psychological balance.

By Dr. John J. Woods, a contributing author to SHTFBlog & Survival Cache

The mere acts of survival existence whether during short term events like a disruptive storm or even a much more serious scenario that requires long term survival, it is critical to keep your wits about you.  Part of this balance includes practicing as many family rituals as possible.  This includes celebrating holidays as much as possible.

Also Read: Black Friday Stupidity

This may sound trite or silly to be honoring a holiday like Christmas when you are busy and stressed trying to keep food, water and fire at the ready.  However, you may be the most skilled survivalist there is, but if your mind begins to play tricks on you, then this initiates the first crack in the foundation of survival mental health.  Celebrating a holiday may help you, your family and or survival team normalize life just a little bit for a little while.

Survival Christmas

Since it is the Christmas holiday season now, I elected to concentrate on how survivalists or non-gridders can planholiday_christmas_survival just some small things to enjoy this special time of year.  Though the treatment of a holiday season can impact us all, it is really essential that family or team members can share some level of special enjoyment this time of year however short lived it may be.

So, you’re likely thinking “Dude, I don’t need no stink’n Christmas to help me to have some joy this time of year.”  Well, dude, you may not be the only one trying to get through it all and a little holiday fun is not going to hurt anybody, that is, if it is done right.  If you have young children or even teenagers around the survival campfire, or fireplace, then you certainly need to do some things to accommodate their feelings of normalcy this time of year and elsewise as well.  I cannot emphasis the psychological benefits yielded by a little holiday cheer.

It’s the Little Things

Whether bugged in or out, there are some simple things to do to celebrate a Christmas holiday.  In this process be sure to include everyone in the preparations regardless of how resistant they might be to the assignments.  It will be essential to engage everyone.

Related: Black Friday Case Study

Since it is Christmas, the easiest initial thing to do would be to decorate the area where you reside.  Don’t count on surviving_the_holidays_shtfburning inside or outside lights, as you still want to maintain a high level of security or even a very low profile presentation.  If your bug in is in a residential neighborhood, then gauge your activities based on what is going on around you.  If your bug out location is more isolated from the outside world, then act accordingly.

None of this precludes the most simple of decorations such as an inside Christmas tree even if it is an artificial version.  The issue is to establish a holiday rally point and what better source than getting everyone to contribute to creating and decorating a Christmas tree.

If there are kids in the survival group, get them to craft some original ornaments to adorn the tree.  Supplement those with some traditional decorations you may have in storage in the attic or basement.  Just seeing some of the old familiar family decorations can have an uplifting effect.

Likewise, put up some bright, colorful decorations around the house, barn, or even the camper or tent.  The purpose here is to let everyone know that life goes on and that even during a SHTF situation there is no reason to sink into a depression or to alter the regular timing of seasonal events.  You may have to scale back, but there are many positive things that can be done to celebrate the holidays at some level.

Honoring Additional Rituals

You and your group may also be religious or recognize a formal faith or belief.  Honor these as well.  Hokie?  For some just a reading from the Bible or other religious book or document can be a mentally soothing experience.  Believe it or not, just the reading of the “Story of Christmas” or the “Night Before Christmas” can be a rewarding reminder of the joy of the season.

Plans can also be made to put together a special holiday meal as well.  Maybe your resources are slim, but even so, many things can be done to prepare a delightful dinner to celebrate the blessings you have.  Try to include a special sweet, treat, pie or dessert.  This is also a good time to think forward about the future and to be thankful for the survival successes you have experienced to date.

Maybe do a round robin sharing of holiday thoughts or appreciations of thankfulness.  A lot of families enjoy singing holiday carols or reciting familiar family stories or renditions of past Christmas’, family lore, or like activities.

Some families even like to take a leisure holiday stroll.  If your circumstances permit such, then a family walk in the woods might be in order.  Such strolls have long been traditional events in Europe.  Be creative and thoughtful to include everyone in the group.

Survival Gifting

Naturally, gifting is a traditional part of the Christmas holiday season.  This does not have to be elaborate, again, christmas_tree_survivalsince your resources may be limited.  Under dire circumstances there may not even be the normal and usual avenue of retail shopping available.  In these cases it is time to be creative to share items you already have that others would love to own, or to make small gifts that are unique and special.  It is the thought that counts after all.

Any kind of tool, knife, water filter or like object makes a good gift to a prepper-survivalist.  Maybe you can spare an extra box of ammo?  It could be you have some gear carry items, a backpack or ammo carrier you can offer as a gift.  Anything for a shooter, gardener, woodworker, mechanic, or cook would be welcomed.

For the kids pull out some old toys, or stuffed animals that you pigeon holed away somewhere.  Now is the time to pull out those extra books, puzzles, games, and clothing items that were socked away just for a SHTF event.  When I was a kid, a new coloring book made my day.

So, tis the season coming up now.  Just because you are hunkered down or recovering from a natural disaster is no reason to skip the season.  Plans to make this holiday season something really special may just turn out to be much more important than you ever thought.

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The Hierarchy Of Friends: Next Level Preparedness

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When I moved to the mountains I came with my family and dogs and knew nobody, which was a less than optimal situation.  While some might subscribe to the lone wolf concept I realize that I cannot be all things, know all things and quite honestly have to sleep sometime.  Friendships must be established with key components being trust and mutual respect.  Yet there are layers, or a hieracrchy that exists within my new circle in that not everyone gets full access as they are role players.  On one end of the scale you might have someone who comes over and shares a meal with my family, discusses preps and checks out my guns (and I could do the same at his place).  On the other end might be someone I train with and could call in a time of need but would definitley not have the level of access as the other individual.

Vetting Process

When dealing with people I think it’s important to vet them, or rather gain an understanding of where they stand on issues and what they bring to the table.  Even things like personality play a factor, are we compatable and can we work as a team.  I do this by sometimes offering up bits of info to start a conversation, or maybe I let them work it from their end.  Regardless here are some of the topics I like to work through.

Practical Preparedness:  This is important as I need someone to be grounded and practical, are you working towards the threats we face here in our community or are you busy digging that bunker for when the bombs start dropping.  I met with one guy who was obsessed with nuclear fallout and EMP’s, while those are certainlly in play I think a more probable scenario would be getting snowed in or working out of a bad fire.

Freedoms:  Thoughts on carrying a gun for protection, property ownership, the use and reach of government at the local and higher levels.

Skills:  Maybe they are a general contractor or just super handy, in the medical field / LEO / engineer / some other sort of trade.  In other words do we have skills that can mesh in order to boost our overall effectiveness, or are they a cubicle type with no real expertise in anything at all.  Not saying there can be a use there but skills are a very important factor.

Consistency:  What are they like over time and multiple interactions.  I’m looking for consistency and depth, a surface player who is limited in scope is not someone I’m interested in.

Comfortable with Ambiguity:  This is probably the hardest to evaluate but the most important.  Are they comfortable in situations that could be considered gray areas, not necessarily breaking the law but interactions / scenarios which test one’s mental agility.  It’s easy to ride around with pro (insert politician) stickers, NRA, 2A all over the windshield on one linear plane of thought.  “I am who I am and think what I think and everyone else be damned because the only right answers are those I subscribe to etc…”  Those folks have a use but are almost as bad as the other end of the spectrum, if you know what I mean.  Mental agility and being able to operate in and around ambiguous situations are not things most are able to do because it pulls them outside of their comfort zone.

The Bottom Line

Develop relationships, know who you can trust and how you can best place them on your own hierarchy list.  Do you eventually give them complete access and vice versa or are they held at a distance yet still part of the team?  What methods or gates have you put in place in order to work this process?  This is next level preparedness, not just stacking ammunition to the roof and slapping a Molon Labe sticker on the back windshield.

 

The Hierarchy Of Friends: Next Level Preparedness

Click here to view the original post.

When I moved to the mountains I came with my family and dogs and knew nobody, which was a less than optimal situation.  While some might subscribe to the lone wolf concept I realize that I cannot be all things, know all things and quite honestly have to sleep sometime.  Friendships must be established with key components being trust and mutual respect.  Yet there are layers, or a hieracrchy that exists within my new circle in that not everyone gets full access as they are role players.  On one end of the scale you might have someone who comes over and shares a meal with my family, discusses preps and checks out my guns (and I could do the same at his place).  On the other end might be someone I train with and could call in a time of need but would definitley not have the level of access as the other individual.

Vetting Process

When dealing with people I think it’s important to vet them, or rather gain an understanding of where they stand on issues and what they bring to the table.  Even things like personality play a factor, are we compatable and can we work as a team.  I do this by sometimes offering up bits of info to start a conversation, or maybe I let them work it from their end.  Regardless here are some of the topics I like to work through.

Practical Preparedness:  This is important as I need someone to be grounded and practical, are you working towards the threats we face here in our community or are you busy digging that bunker for when the bombs start dropping.  I met with one guy who was obsessed with nuclear fallout and EMP’s, while those are certainlly in play I think a more probable scenario would be getting snowed in or working out of a bad fire.

Freedoms:  Thoughts on carrying a gun for protection, property ownership, the use and reach of government at the local and higher levels.

Skills:  Maybe they are a general contractor or just super handy, in the medical field / LEO / engineer / some other sort of trade.  In other words do we have skills that can mesh in order to boost our overall effectiveness, or are they a cubicle type with no real expertise in anything at all.  Not saying there can be a use there but skills are a very important factor.

Consistency:  What are they like over time and multiple interactions.  I’m looking for consistency and depth, a surface player who is limited in scope is not someone I’m interested in.

Comfortable with Ambiguity:  This is probably the hardest to evaluate but the most important.  Are they comfortable in situations that could be considered gray areas, not necessarily breaking the law but interactions / scenarios which test one’s mental agility.  It’s easy to ride around with pro (insert politician) stickers, NRA, 2A all over the windshield on one linear plane of thought.  “I am who I am and think what I think and everyone else be damned because the only right answers are those I subscribe to etc…”  Those folks have a use but are almost as bad as the other end of the spectrum, if you know what I mean.  Mental agility and being able to operate in and around ambiguous situations are not things most are able to do because it pulls them outside of their comfort zone.

The Bottom Line

Develop relationships, know who you can trust and how you can best place them on your own hierarchy list.  Do you eventually give them complete access and vice versa or are they held at a distance yet still part of the team?  What methods or gates have you put in place in order to work this process?  This is next level preparedness, not just stacking ammunition to the roof and slapping a Molon Labe sticker on the back windshield.

 

How To Start A Fire Without Matches Or A Lighter

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Ever wonder what you would do if you had to start a fire without matches or a lighter? It is always best to have multiple ways to start a fire.  Personally I never have matches, I do try to carry a lighter in each car and in each get home bag and each fire kit. […]

The post How To Start A Fire Without Matches Or A Lighter appeared first on Vigil Prudence.

Survival Medicine Hour: EMP author Anthony Furey, Wildfire Survival, More

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Survival Medicine Hour #368

California wildfires

California wildfires

Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP welcome Anthony Furey of the Sun Newspaper Chain to discuss his new book “Pulse Attack: The Real Story Behind the Weapon that can Destroy North America”.

Both the Altons and Mr. Furey are concerned about the risks associated with electromagnetic pulse attacks, when a nuclear weapon is detonated high in the atmosphere. Once thought to be the stuff of post-apocalyptic fiction, North Korea has recently acknowledged the usefulness of such an attack against the United States, and they ability to intiate the event.

All about EMPs

All about EMPs

Plus, wildfires in California are devastating a quarter million acres of forest, as well as destroying homes and causing casualties. What would you do in a wildfire, and can your home be saved? Is there any way to effectively defend against it?

All this and more in the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP! To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2017/12/13/survival-medicine-hour-anthony-furey-emp-author-wildfire-survival

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

Joe and Amy Alton

The Altons

The Altons

Don’t forget to check out the Altons’ 2017 Book Excellence Award Winner in medicine, The Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the Way!

What the U.S. looks like in another World War!

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What the U.S. looks like in another World War!
Host: David Jones “Prepping Up with the Jones “Audio player provided!

On this episode Dave finishes up Small Group Tactical Movement and tells why it is important to have a wide up watch when you are on a movement. He talks about why you should have a running password and when it is used. Dave talks about the items you should take with you on every type of move previously discussed.

Continue reading What the U.S. looks like in another World War! at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

What the U.S. looks like in another World War!

What the U.S. looks like in another World War!
Host: David Jones “Prepping Up with the Jones “Audio player provided!

On this episode Dave finishes up Small Group Tactical Movement and tells why it is important to have a wide up watch when you are on a movement. He talks about why you should have a running password and when it is used. Dave talks about the items you should take with you on every type of move previously discussed.

Continue reading What the U.S. looks like in another World War! at Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Three Layers of 72 Hour Preparedness

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The first 72 hours following any disaster are the most critical, but it’s also during those intial hours that emergency services and personnel are stretched to the limit. With a system of carefully planned 72 Hour Kits, your family can be self-sufficient until help arrives. 72 Hour Kits, or Bug Out Bags, are those handy-dandy, all-in-one […]

KaBar Tactical Spork

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One thing that I always have in all of my bags is a KaBar Tactical Spork.  If you are like me, you live a very busy life, between family and work, after school events, and handling parents/in-laws, you are busy and on the run. Never Leave Home Without One The KaBar spork is totally awesome, […]

The post KaBar Tactical Spork appeared first on Vigil Prudence.

Finding A New Life For An Old Barn – Keeping A Family Treasure Alive

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There is nothing in the world like the charm and aged beauty of an old barn. Especially one that has been in the family for more than 100 years. Our re-built and reclaimed old barn at the farm is simply

The post Finding A New Life For An Old Barn – Keeping A Family Treasure Alive appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Urban Survival: 10 Worst Places To Hide In The City If SHTF

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Even though the stock market is soaring, our nation is in more danger than ever because of extreme natural disasters and rogue factions itching to run riot.

Now consider these problems along with the very real potential for food shortages, an escalation of the war with North Korea, and general increases in contagious diseases.

No matter how much or little prepping you have done, the fact remains something can still catch you off guard at any time. If you are in a city, and need a place to hide, it is very easy to make a bad decision.

Have a look at 10 places you might go to without thinking, and wind up with even more problems than you had before.

Open Areas Above Ground

There are many situations where you will need to get out of the building you are in as quickly as possible. If there is a fire, flood, or the building is struck by some kind of bomb, then you have to get out before the building collapses.

Once you are clear of the building, the worst thing you can do is stay out in the open, as a lot of bad things can happen:

  • Debris and smoke from the building can easily fly in all directions and land on you.
  • If you ran outside because of an earthquake, surrounding buildings may also begin to cave in and send debris in all directions.
  • If the situation involves several buildings, other people will also be panicking and trying to get out of the buildings as fast as possible. You can easily be stampeded or injured as people try to get away from danger as quickly as possible.
  • Do not make the mistake of trying to get in your car and hoping it will shelter you. A car has an even weaker frame than a building. Falling debris can easily crush it and leave you trapped inside. In addition, if there is a bad enough panic, people may literally try to tear your vehicle apart or take other actions to prevent you from leaving the scene.

After you successfully leave a building that you feel is dangerous, the best thing you can do is get underground as quickly as possible.

How To Build a Small Bunker in Your Backyard with $400

Find out in time which manhole covers in your city offer safe access tunnels or other areas to hide in. In general, service tunnels will be safer than subways or other popular public areas in situations where hostile forces are attempting to take over the city.

Upper Floors of Any Building

Unless you are dealing with a hurricane or other flood that prevents you from getting to the ground level, stay away from the upper floors of a building. The upper floors are always the weakest, and also the hardest to escape from on your own.

No matter whether you are afraid of your building being taken over by hostile forces, or you must escape a fire, once you reach the top floor, you can still wind up being trapped. If you must go to the upper floors of a building, try to have the following on hand:

  • A cell phone, pocket mirror, or something else you can use to signal that you need help
  • Heavy duty rope and hooks that you can use to attach the rope to another building. You will need to practice your skills to make it safely from one building to another.
  • An ax for breaking down walls or through roofs An ax can also be used for defense if nothing else is available.

Places With Easily to See Doors or Windows

The ability to get out of a building easily can also spell disaster if unwanted people can get to you and trap you in your location. If you are truly trying to hide from other people, the worst thing you can do is be anywhere near a door or window.

If there is a visible door or window that can be breached, people looking for you or anything of value will try to get in. If you have a panic room or a basement hiding place, maintain their exits without drawing unwanted attention:

  • Use poison ivy, nettles, and other noxious plants to cover secret entrances and exits. This includes exit points coming up from tunnels or other underground locations. Just remember to have coveralls and suitable tools for cutting the vegetation away so that you can make your escape with as little pain as possible.
  • Cover up a back door, side entrance, or window with faux siding. Repaint your home or take other steps to make the covering look as permanent as possible. You should still be able to knock the covering out with ease in time of need. Your goal is to make the window or exit invisible to outside observers. Even if neighbors do remember a window or door in that location, the covering will hopefully make people overlook the area since they will think it is closed off.
  • Try to make at least one exit tunnel in your basement or crawlway to a location at or near the boundary of your property. Be sure you know where all gas and other maintenance lines are so you do not tunnel in those areas.

Near Roadways or Other Traffic Areas

Regardless of the crisis type, people will be trying to escape in their vehicles, and the worst thing you can do is try to hide in a traffic jam or near a crowded roadway.

In these instances, road blocks, surveillance teams, and even hostile forces can see you and control you with relative ease. No matter whether you have plans to get out of the city, or you decide to stay close to home, it is never a good idea to be near roadways or heavy traffic.

If you must use roadways or be near them, you can choose one of two times:

  • First, if you are certain that you can get through a roadblock or other impediment with no problems, then do so when it would be normal for people like you to be passing through the area.
  • Second, you can try to slip through when there is a situation going on. If someone else panics or causes a disruption that leads to a grouping of people around an area away from a passage point, you can try to slip through.

Schools

One has only to look at the number of mass shootings in “gun free” school zones to know they are absolutely the most dangerous places on Earth. Aside from that, never forget that Timothy McVeigh and many others intent on mayhem these days don’t need guns to destroy schools.

People with criminal intent will go there first because they know they will have as much time as they want to carry out their sick plans before someone with a gun gets there to stop them at the scene or apprehend them later on. No matter where you go, if you are in a city and need a safe place to go, avoid schools at all cost.

While most people in the United States don’t give it much thought, schools are also likely to be the target of hostile takeover in a time of riots and other forms of severe national distress. Any criminal or terrorist will flock to a school first because it is poorly defended and helpless children in harm’s way makes for a huge media splash.

Schools are also not the best places to go in the event of a natural disaster. Even though they often have generators and the room to accommodate large numbers of people, many of these buildings are on the verge of being structurally unsound.

Check the maintenance records and needs of local schools, and you may be surprised to find out they may not hold up very well in the face of a hurricane or other severe weather condition. Without a question, if you are in an inner city area or other poor neighborhood, the schools may be in worse condition than other buildings in the area.

Hospitals

In many senses, hospitals are as dangerous as schools, and for the same reasons. Hospitals may have weak or failing building structures, and they also house vulnerable people whose condition may easily grab media attention.

While hospitals do have better security staffing than schools, it may still not be enough to overcome problems created by large numbers of people in panic mode. If the situation is bad enough, people may even try to storm the hospital to steal food, drugs, or anything else than can be of use.

At this time, we would all like to think that in time of need, hospitals will be safe from scavenging and other predatory behaviors because our culture has deeply ingrained values about the sanctity of a medical setting.

That being said, we also live in a culture of sick video games and the unhealthy crossing of many other boundaries. Do not be surprised if at some point hospitals also become prey to predation during times of crisis.

Depending on the situation, hospitals can also be places where you can catch some very dangerous diseases. Right now, hospitals do have better air filtering systems than you would find in other areas. On the other side of the equation, if the cause of the crisis is disease related, that also means people infected will go to the hospital for treatment.

As a result, if you are still healthy, going to the hospital may expose you to the disease unnecessarily.

Churches

When I was growing up, my mother always said “if you are in a bad way and have no place else to turn, go to the church”. While many of the things my mother said have withstood the test of time, I cannot help but question going to a church for safety in time of need.

As with schools, churches have become the target of lunatics and predators seeking to harm the unarmed and the vulnerable.

To add insult to injury, as our society slips closer and closer to complete mass disruption, it is possible that churches will be targeted just to kill off those who avow a specific faith. Our history as far back as time goes is one in which people are ruthlessly slaughtered for their beliefs and affiliations.

Depending on the type of crisis, going to a church for shelter may truly be the worst thing you can do. While a church may offer suitable shelter from a blizzard or other relatively short term situation, I don’t recommend it for matters where civil unrest is expected.

Above Ground Areas of Malls or Other Public Gathering Locations

Large numbers of people in malls or other large public shelters can pose a number of problems. First, under stressful situations, you never know what, when, or how a stampede will get started. As the waves of panic ripple through the crowd, it may be impossible for you to escape.

If you are dealing with any kind of hostile takeover, rest assured that occupying forces will always look to subdue the largest numbers of able bodied people as quickly as possible. This, in turn, means, they will go to the malls and other areas where large numbers of people will prevent evacuation and escape.

Needless to say, if you are concerned about air raids, bombings, or other hostile acts, the enemy will still seek to hit maximize casualties by hitting large and popular public areas.

It is important to remember that underground areas of malls may still provide a safe place to hide in the city. For example, older malls may actually have long forgotten bomb shelters in the basement, or other areas that are fortified enough to ensure some degree of safety.

Therefore, if you have malls nearby, make it a point to see if underground parking garages or other underground facilities housed in the mall may be of use in a time of need.

Temporary Camps

During crisis, there is a natural tendency for people to try and organize in order to regain stability as quickly as possible. Some say temporary camps may be useful in the first hours or days after some natural disasters.

Here are just a few problems that you might face if staying at a temporary shelter in a city for too long:

  • Within a fairly short period of time, criminals and other unsavory people will try to take advantage of the situation, trying to rob you or hurt you. Order can, and does, break down very quickly in temporary camps despite access to food and other basics.
  • As with hospitals, you may also wind up being exposed to many illnesses, which is especially important if the crisis occurs during the flu season or another time when communicable diseases are likely to spread quickly in tight quarters.
  • If extensive areas of the outer society collapse, you will be a sitting duck and forced to go wherever you are told to go. While this may not be a problem if it is our national guard, police, or FEMA officials directing you to a safer location, it can be a huge problem if an invading force or hostile insurgents take over the camp.

Overall, temporary camps set up for crisis management can be of help, especially if you have no bug out plans or do not know where to begin to put your life back together after a large scale crisis.

It is still worth your while to get out of the camp as quickly as possible so that you can avoid problems associated with living in such close contact with others.

Places Where You Do Not Blend in With Others

Many people believe there is safety in numbers. As long as you are wearing the same kinds of clothes and act the same as the local people, then it is possible for you to hide in plain sight even in a big city during a major crisis.

On the other hand, if you don’t fit into the local scenery, then you may become a target for just about anyone that decides they have a reason to attack you. The only way to make sure you will be safe merging into a crowd for any reason during a crisis is to practice your skills now.

Just because you live in a city, that doesn’t mean your local area cannot be hit by massive floods, fires, or hostile takeovers. In fact, if you are in a city during a major crisis, the sheer number of people trying to deal with the situation can easily work against you.

When facing these kinds of situations, you must always think objectively about possible places where you can go to be safe.

Avoiding the ten problem areas listed in this article, and you may have a better chance of survival and find a suitable shelter before it’s too late!

This article has been written by Carmela Tyrell for Survivopedia.

Blake Miller: Compass Accuracy and Why You Should Care

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Accuracy is critical when it comes to hunting rifles, writing news stories and court testimony, but what about that old reliable (?) compass? How accurate is it, and how important can that be? Navigation expert Blake Miller explains what accuracy  standards to look for in magnetic compasses, and why the backcountry traveler should care. by Blake […]

Arctic permafrost thawing faster than ever, US climate study finds

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Climate change/Global warming is fast becoming the world’s biggest survival threat. Wake up Australians before we have to start living underground! What sort of a life would that be?!