Did the “Blob” of Warm Water Kill All The Pacific, or Was It Fukushima?

Click here to view the original post.

Below comments by CodeShutdown
———————————————————

Why its important to disprove the  stochastic theory of low level fallout;  There is an underlying assumption that low level radiation is not a toxic substance…but acts more like a digital switch which randomly (and rarely) mutates a cell that escapes the immune system, turning into cancer.  Like walking in a canyon, you are perfectly fine until a random rock falls on your head.   By applying some math, science can calculate your odds of getting hit by a rock, one in a million chance or something…and it sounds like good odds.  This concept is at the very heart of the science and ideology of the nuclear industry.  Its actually the legal reason nuclear can exist.  Scientists say a certain low probability is an acceptable price to pay for nuclear energy.  From this assumption, they look you straight in the face and say its impossible to prove that fallout caused this or that cancer or heart attack.

But the in-depth research coming from Chernobyl shows that low level radiation is a poison that causes some degree of morbidity or unhealthy metabolic changes in  everything…the body system, the ecological system.  Sometimes this is the rally of the body to put more energy into repair and there is a subsequent resistance to radiation…the hormesis effect. 

Even slight doses of Cs137 can cause significant pathological disorders in human and other animals;
http://chernobyl-today.org/images/storie…h_1995.pdf

Note that the greater radiation from potassium does NOT cause those pathological disorders.

Mouseau and others show an adaptation of some animals in the Chernobyl and Fukushima areas…but importantly, the over-all effect is loss of species diversity, increased deformity and dire changes to the ecosystem. A million birds are killed by a Chernobyl trap effect every year.  (I have to dig out the exact number some other time).  Thus the hormesis effect is no excuse for poisoning the earth, but its also important to recognize it because it helps to disprove the stochastic DNA mutation theory.  How? Hormesis shows that the effect from fallout is a dynamic reaction of complex metabolic changes.  These metabolic reactions are recognized to be seven times more potent at causing genetic damage than the direct radiation hits to DNA.

radiation hitting the cytoplasm is 7 times more mutagenic than hitting the DNA
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/dow…1&type=pdf

This systemic poisoning of the body and ecosystem has an interesting effect;  Animals are eight times more sensitive to radiation effects in nature compared to the controlled conditions of the laboratory.  Woods Hole, Scripps and NOAA need to educate themselves on the advances made in radiation dosimetry of the last 20 years.

animals in the natural habitat are 8 tmies more sensitive to radiation than in isolated lab conditions;
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/art…1X12000240

Winter weather advisory/warning/cataclysm

Click here to view the original post.

The forecast is for some heavy snow in my particular region. I have a four-wheel-drive vehicle with spare fuel, a radio, an extensive emergency kit, and a host of other survival related goodies.

And I’m gonna leave it parked the next few days. Why? Because the secret to becoming an old survivalist is to avoid being in a survival situation to begin with. Rule #1 of surviving a disaster: Dont Be There.

Sure, I could drive around over the weekend, take my time, drive slowly, brake early, signal often, etc. and I’d be fine…until Bob-from-Carolina who cant drive on snow t-bones me at an intersection. Not my fault, Im doing everything right….and you’re at the mercy of every other idiot out there who may be doing everything wrong.

So why buy trouble? I have a house full off food, fuel, internet porn, dry clothes, extra Coke, and some spreadsheets to catch up on. I can stay here and let the world slip-n-slide into wet, cold chaos. There’s very little I can think of thats worth me risking my vehicle, my health, and my limited financial resources to an accident.

Survivalism (or preparedness, if you prefer) is about values and choices. Which is more important..me not having a wrecked car or me having a quart of milk from the store? Sometimes you have to take chances, but if you don’t have to why would you? Gotta pick your battles, man.

But..for those times when you can’t pick your battles and you gotta go to war anyway, be prepared. I don’t want to leave the house in this weather….but if I have to, I can…and I can do it in a way that reduces the risks and reduces the consequences if those risks go the wrong way. But, again, why buy trouble?

In the meantime, one side effect of staying in is that I get time to sit in front of the keyboard and work on these ‘brain droppings’, as Geo. Carlin called writing.

Be safe out there, gang.

Back to the Dark Ages: 3 Months later half of Puerto Rico still without Power

Click here to view the original post.

Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

Hurricane Maria sent Puerto Rico back to the Dark Ages and three months later half of Puerto Rico is still without power and struggling badly. What’s it like to live without power, how people cope and what challenges they face.

Like our previous post, the linked presentation below is also worth the time.

Puerto Rico, back to the dark ages.

Nothing like hands on accounts of actual events to understand for real what SHTF is like.

Notice that in general the areas that struggle the most are the more isolated ones and the ones further away from the main power grid. It is logical that these would be the ones where it is harder to re-establish power for. This contradicts the common “preper” advice of living away from main urban areas.

In the real world there’s no easy, black and white answers. The reality of such events is far more complex, what can be a benefit in some aspects can be a big handicap in other areas.

The trick is to know how to balance and prepare accordingly for whatever compromises you decide to make.

Have a great weekend folks!

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Hellfire on Earth: How to Escape and Survive a Wildfire

Click here to view the original post.

Hellfire on Earth: How to Escape & Survive a Wildfire Last I heard the wildfire in California is the size of Delaware. The whole state! It has already cost about 6.9 billion dollars in damage to the infrastructure. What more could come of this terrifying fire? These are questions all people are asking themselves. They …

Continue reading »

The post Hellfire on Earth: How to Escape and Survive a Wildfire appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Dead Wrong: 26 Survival Myths That Can Get You Killed

Click here to view the original post.

Dead Wrong: 26 Survival Myths That Can Get You Killed Survival myths are one of those terrifying things. They are terrifying because they exist at all. This is accentuated by the internet, in that, these myths can be published and republished by people who have never tried the things they are proclaiming. This puts so …

Continue reading »

The post Dead Wrong: 26 Survival Myths That Can Get You Killed appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

12 Reasons Why You Should Be Thrift Shopping!

Click here to view the original post.

12 Reasons Why You Should Be Thrift Shopping! Frugality is a very important part of preparedness. This is one of those efforts that allows you to save money which allows you to store cash. Frugality also allows you to keep your debt in check. Running up excessive debt trying to buy the latest and the …

Continue reading »

The post 12 Reasons Why You Should Be Thrift Shopping! appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Kid Built Computer Part II Setting up the Kano OS

Click here to view the original post.

This is my son and I powering up his blackberry pi mini computer and setting up the Kano OS. Once again, the footage is wonky, my wife was holding the camera and as this was the first power up of the computer neither of us knew what would happen on screen. Our only problem with […]

The post Kid Built Computer Part II Setting up the Kano OS appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Howdy, Anybody Interested in getting into Off Grid business community.

Click here to view the original post.

So we have been posting on this site for a few years now and still haven’t found anyone interested that actually wants to work towards building a community. So far I’ve built a small cabin from used pallet wood. put an addition on our cabin. built a small carryout restaurant. demolished two houses on another property we acquired close to our homestead.

So once again we are looking for some people to help with the next projects. The plan is to build  a large scale aquaponic greenhouse. We want to grow rainbow trout and freshwater prawns in tanks and veggies in grow beds.

We are located in West Virginia and the county has no building codes for housing and as a matter of fact no commercial zoning, that is how we managed to put in a restaurant on our property. 100% legal.

I have a half acre parcel to sell if someone is interested in not living on our property. it has a solid block foundation that can be built on and has city water,sewer and gas already on it. 

The cabin on our property is small 8’x12′ unfinished inside but could be made livable fairly easy.

What we are looking for is help building the greenhouse and maybe someone that can bake and help cook at the restaurant a few hours a day with pay. Ideally we would like a couple since we only have the one cabin as of now. you can look us @ Facebook.com/1pacostacos for the restaurant.

My hopes are fading as far as outside help goes but here we go again. LOL  

 

The post Howdy, Anybody Interested in getting into Off Grid business community. appeared first on Living Off the Grid: Free Yourself.

Scale Insects: All About Them And How To Get Rid Of Them

Click here to view the original post.

The post Scale Insects: All About Them And How To Get Rid Of Them is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Ew, scale insects! Whether flat against leaves or fruit, or lumpy bumps on branches or stems, this widespread superfamily of insects is well over 8000 species strong. Many of them are agricultural pests, while others prey on trees or other plant life. But they’re all sap-sucking invaders who can spread a wide variety of plant … Read more

The post Scale Insects: All About Them And How To Get Rid Of Them is by
Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Is This Far Enough Off the Grid?

Click here to view the original post.

Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

I know, but we can dream can’t we? This just might work if you want to be your own grid-square. A place with almost unlimited and unobstructed views, enough acreage to sight in your own 105 Howitzer and within driving distance of Lake Tahoe, south east of Reno Nevada, but far enough from the Golden Horde.

You have unobstructed views is all directions, a great house, even a lawn to mow, one that can be converted into a vegetable garden.

Good curb appeal, though there is no curb in the area.

On city power but plenty of space for a generator and a big Faraday cage. Places to raise chickens and rabbits and other livestock.

No restaurants close but it has its own good place to eat:

…and play…

…and keep an eye on the neighbors.

Automated lawn services.

An established vegetable garden.

And the clincher, you never know when food for a week is going to walk into range.

I believe we, each of us, at some point dream of leaving the rat-race behind, not hearing traffic, low-level airplanes, sub-woofers mounted in cars that may fall apart at any moment. Such places do exist for a price.

Click Here to View the Listing

 

 

 

 

The post Is This Far Enough Off the Grid? appeared first on The Prepper Journal.

The 3 Biggest Killers To A Family Budget – Spend Less, Save More!

Click here to view the original post.

When it comes to a family budget, the best way to have more money is to save on what you already spend. We all seem to start off the new year with great family budget goals. Goals such as earning

The post The 3 Biggest Killers To A Family Budget – Spend Less, Save More! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

7 Steps To Prepare Yourself For An Epidemic Outbreak

Click here to view the original post.

Most of the disasters that people prep for involve a threat that you can see and react to with some sense of confidence. Even societal collapse brought about by an economic freefall or government coup still generally presents its threat as other people. However, for an epidemic outbreak, people are only part of the problem. … Read more…

The post 7 Steps To Prepare Yourself For An Epidemic Outbreak was written by Bob Rodgers and appeared first on Prepper’s Will.

Essential Guide On How To Store Seeds In Winter

Click here to view the original post.

You’ve worked hard all year to grow your crop. You’ve preserved enough food of your harvest to get you through winter. You’ve chosen and harvested your seeds and dried them, and now have them safely stored back for winter. Or so you think.

There are a few details that you need to pay attention to if you want to have viable seeds come spring and that’s what we’re going to talk about today.

Dry Your Seeds Well

Hopefully you have a beautiful supply of heirloom or open-pollinated survival seeds just waiting to be planted next spring, so let’s make sure that they make it that long.

The first step in protecting your seeds in the winter is to make sure that they’re dried properly. If you put your seeds in storage before they’re adequately dried, they’ll mold and be worthless.

So how do you tell if your seeds are dry enough? Easy. They will have zero discernable moisture in them whatsoever. Pumpkin and cucumber seeds will snap in half rather than bend. Tomato seeds won’t have any of that gooey layer left on them and when you press your nails into it, it should be firm.

Corn and beans should be hard – you should need a hammer to break them. Pay close attention to the seeds as soon as you dry them because if you see any condensation inside of the bag, take them out immediately and dry them some more or else they’ll mold.

You Can Freeze Seeds

Freezing is actually part of the life cycle for many seeds. It drops from the plant in late summer or early fall then lies under the snow all winter. When the weather gets warm and the temperature of the soil increases, the seed begins to sprout. It’s just the nature of things.

Seed banks store all of their seeds in temperature-controlled, refrigerated or cryogenic chambers, so it’s perfectly fine to refrigerate or freeze seeds as long as you do it properly. The main issue that you have to worry about is moisture. You went to a ton of trouble to dry them. The last thing you need to do is reintroduce moisture back into them.

That’s why you need to break out your cryogenic chamber. What? You don’t have one?

Well luckily, you won’t need one because a home fridge and freezer are just fine. In fact, refrigerating them extends the viable lifespan of seeds considerably and freezing extends their viability to at least five years, and some as long as twenty.

There are a couple of tricks to storing seeds no matter whether you choose to freeze or refrigerate them or not. We’ve already discussed the first step – drying the seeds well. The second step is making sure they stay dry, so you need to store them in an air-tight, water-tight container. A freezer bag is perfectly good for this as long as there are no holes.

Storing Your Seeds

Next, you need to store them in a cool, dry place.

You don’t want to risk moisture reaching your seeds and you don’t want the temperature to fluctuate. Storing in a warm area decreases the lifespan of your seed.

Now that you’ve got the seed in a good storage bag, you want to store them somewhere that the temperature will remain fairly constant.

A cellar is good for this, as is a cool pantry as long as it stays cool.

Freezing is better for this than refrigerating, especially if you’re using your home fridge/freezer that has other food stored in it.

Another good idea is to put it in a chest freezer or an outside fridge that has a freezer that you rarely or never use.

There’s no better way to ensure a constant temperature than to keep them stored in a freezer that’s only opened a few times a year.

Label Your Seeds

This is important for a couple of reasons. First, many of the tiny seeds look alike, at least until you gain some experience. Even then, it’s impossible to tell the difference between varieties of plants. A lettuce seed typically looks like a lettuce seed. Same thing with carrot seeds. You can’t tell the variety just by looking at it.

Another reason that it’s good to label is so that you can practice FIFO – First In, First Out – with your seeds just like you do with your stockpile. Label the container with the seed variety and the year. Some people add a few directions in with the seeds that they’ve gained from experience. It’s even better to start a seed journal to keep track of how your garden grows.

How to Tell if Seeds are Good

This isn’t a perfect indicator, but it’s pretty darned accurate. If you want to tell if the seeds are still good, drop them in water. If they sink, they’re good. If they float, they’re not. Of course, you don’t want to go and get the seeds wet if you’re not going to use them, so just test a few of them. That sounds like common sense, but it’s always better to give too many directions than not enough.

How to Tell How Many of Your Seeds Will Grow

There’s nothing more disappointing as a gardener, or even worse, as a hungry person, than planting seeds that don’t sprout. If you’re depending on your crop to feed yourself and your family, then growing plentiful crops becomes a necessity.

Therefore, you need to know how to tell how many seeds out of a crop are going to grow. You can get a good idea of this by doing a test germination run.

A couple of weeks before you’re ready to plant, put at least 10 seeds from a single batch onto one half of a paper towel then fold the other half of the towel over the seeds. Spray it down with enough water to moisten the towel. It may be helpful to spritz it with a 1:10 bleach to water ratio to keep them from molding.

Place them in the baggie and only partially seal it so that air can still get in. Label the bag and start a record with the date and how many seeds were started. Store it in a warm, dark place and dampen the towel as necessary to keep it from going dry. Within a couple of days, you should start to see germination.

Every day, record how many seeds either germinate or mold and remove those seeds from the bag. All of the seeds will germinate within 14 days if they’re going to.

Next, divide how many seeds germinated by how many seeds you started with and you have a pretty good idea of the germination ratio of your batch. Even if only half of them germinate, but they’re quick about it, you may want to just plant twice the seeds instead of tossing the batch.

If the germination ratio was low and they germinated slowly, you may just want to toss them.

I hope this gave you a good general idea of how to store and ensure the viability of your seeds. If you have any other tips, please feel free to share them in the comments section below.

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia.

Podcast #167: Goal Setting

Click here to view the original post.

December 29th, 2017: In today’s show I talk about the importance of Goal Setting.  There actually a lot of aspects to consider when it comes to goal setting and I want to help direct each of you into the new year with success.  Here are some of the questions we breakdown in today’s podcast:  Do you […]

The post Podcast #167: Goal Setting appeared first on Trayer Wilderness.

Prepper New Year Resolutions 2018

Click here to view the original post.

Soon it will be 2018. How many of us make New Year resolutions? I do believe that it’s a good idea, even if some of them fall by the wayside. It’s a good time to reflect back on where we’ve come from and project to where we’re going. A good time to set some new goals. Preparedness encompasses a very wide variety of life. It’s not just narrowly focused prepping for SHTF. That said, I wonder what some of your preparedness New Year Resolutions are? If you don’t have any yet, you might think about it. It’s good to get

The post Prepper New Year Resolutions 2018 appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Prepper New Year Resolutions 2018

Soon it will be 2018. How many of us make New Year resolutions? I do believe that it’s a good idea, even if some of them fall by the wayside. It’s a good time to reflect back on where we’ve come from and project to where we’re going. A good time to set some new goals. Preparedness encompasses a very wide variety of life. It’s not just narrowly focused prepping for SHTF. That said, I wonder what some of your preparedness New Year Resolutions are? If you don’t have any yet, you might think about it. It’s good to get

The post Prepper New Year Resolutions 2018 appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.