Stuff You’ll Need To Survive A Winter Power Outage

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Stuff You Need To Stockpile To Survive A Winter Power Outage

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It’s a simple fact. Power outages happen. Any outage always presents challenges, but an outage in winter presents a whole new set of challenges.

Some outages affect a city block, others a whole neighborhood or region. The cause is typically an ice storm, and the outages can be far-reaching. In Quebec, Canada, an ice storm left millions without power for up to six months in the cold of the Canadian winter. The result was a desperate lack of resources and support to any who needed any kind of assistance.

Preparing for a Winter Power Outage

A gas-powered generator with an ample supply of gas can make a lot of things easier. If you’re really ambitious, you could have a gas-powered, whole house generator installed. If you’re lacking both, you’ll have to get resourceful

Heat

Fireplace. This is probably the most common heating alterative that people have in their homes. It’s not as efficient as a wood-burning stove, but when there’s no heat, it’s a welcome resource. The ability of a fireplace to provide heat to one room is significant, but you may find that other rooms don’t receive as much heat depending on the size of your house. However, it will keep the rest of the house relatively above freezing, but I would hunker down with family next to the fireplace on couches and sleeping bags. You’ll also want to open cabinets under sinks and make sure bathroom doors are open to prevent pipes from freezing.

Wood burning stove. Perhaps the best alternative heat source and capable of spreading heat beyond one room.

Black blankets in the sun. A curious suggesting from the Emergency Management Agency suggests putting black blankets on the floor where sunlight comes through the windows. The black color absorbs heat and will provide a bit of extra heat to the house.

Dangerous sources of heat include kerosene heaters, gas stoves or charcoal grills. They produce carbon monoxide over time. A gas range can be used occasionally for cooking, but should not be used as a heat source for a long duration.

Lighting

Flashlights with plenty of backup batteries and candles are the lighting options of choice. LED flashlights are a good choice because of the amount of light they cast with a minimal power drain on batteries.

Water

If your water is from a municipal water source, there’s a good chance you’ll still have water in an outage. Municipal water is gravity-fed from tall water tanks, but they need to be refilled from time to time. If you have a well dependent on an electric pump, you’ll have to find alternatives.

  • Stored and filled 5-gallon water bottles.
  • Melt snow and ice in a 5-gallon bucket set in the sun indoors.
  • If you hear a weather report that portends the possibility of an outage, fill your bathtub with water but use it only for flushing the toilet. A bucket in the toilet will give it a good flush.
  • Avoid frozen pipes by letting the faucets slowly drip if you are on municipal water. If the heat in your house is a problem and you have a well, you’re wise to drain the pipes to prevent them from freezing.

Food

  • Refrigerator and freezer. Food will last in a refrigerator for 24 hours and in a freezer for 48 hours if you open the doors minimally. You also can place ice into plastic bags and turn your fridge/freezer into a large cooler.
  • Stock up on foods that don’t require refrigeration or freezing. It’s easy to do. If it’s on the shelf in a store, it will survive a power outage.
  • You have some options here:
    • Outdoor on a grill
    • On a gas range
    • On top of the wood-burning stove
    • Next to the fire in the fireplace in a Dutch oven
  • Refrigerator realities
    • Set to coldest settings if you suspect an outage is possible
    • Coolers in the garage filled with plastic bags of snow and ice
    • Outside in a snowdrift but beware the animals. Use a 5-gallon bucket with a locking lid

Communication

  • Cell phones and the charging challenge. It’s hard to charge a cell phone without electricity, but you could use a car charger in the car, a solar charger about the size of a notebook, a generator or a cell charger power pack.

Bailing out

If you determine the situation is unbearable for you and your family, you’ll need to bail out. This assumes you have somewhere to go that’s at least comfortable like a neighbor, friend or family member who has better resources, or a local shelter housing people and families who are ill-equipped to handle the outage. But before you bail, there are some steps you should take:

  • Drain the water pipes
  • Turn all of your circuit breakers to the off position. This will prevent a power surge when the power come back on. In fact, some people take this step the minute a power outage occurs at any time of year except for a room with a few lamps to signal that the power is back on.
  • Pour anti-freeze into your toilets and drains for every sink, bathtub and shower
  • Make sure all doors and windows are locked, and drapes and curtains drawn
  • Take or dispose of any food in fridge or freezer or other perishables like bread

Preparation is the key

Any power outage presents problems. It’s a good idea to think ahead to what alternative resources you will need during a power outage and make sure you have them in place.

What tips would you add? Share your advice in the section below:

Stuff You’ll Need To Survive A Winter Power Outage

Stuff You Need To Stockpile To Survive A Winter Power Outage

Image source: Pixabay.com

It’s a simple fact. Power outages happen. Any outage always presents challenges, but an outage in winter presents a whole new set of challenges.

Some outages affect a city block, others a whole neighborhood or region. The cause is typically an ice storm, and the outages can be far-reaching. In Quebec, Canada, an ice storm left millions without power for up to six months in the cold of the Canadian winter. The result was a desperate lack of resources and support to any who needed any kind of assistance.

Preparing for a Winter Power Outage

A gas-powered generator with an ample supply of gas can make a lot of things easier. If you’re really ambitious, you could have a gas-powered, whole house generator installed. If you’re lacking both, you’ll have to get resourceful

Heat

Fireplace. This is probably the most common heating alterative that people have in their homes. It’s not as efficient as a wood-burning stove, but when there’s no heat, it’s a welcome resource. The ability of a fireplace to provide heat to one room is significant, but you may find that other rooms don’t receive as much heat depending on the size of your house. However, it will keep the rest of the house relatively above freezing, but I would hunker down with family next to the fireplace on couches and sleeping bags. You’ll also want to open cabinets under sinks and make sure bathroom doors are open to prevent pipes from freezing.

Wood burning stove. Perhaps the best alternative heat source and capable of spreading heat beyond one room.

Black blankets in the sun. A curious suggesting from the Emergency Management Agency suggests putting black blankets on the floor where sunlight comes through the windows. The black color absorbs heat and will provide a bit of extra heat to the house.

Dangerous sources of heat include kerosene heaters, gas stoves or charcoal grills. They produce carbon monoxide over time. A gas range can be used occasionally for cooking, but should not be used as a heat source for a long duration.

Lighting

Flashlights with plenty of backup batteries and candles are the lighting options of choice. LED flashlights are a good choice because of the amount of light they cast with a minimal power drain on batteries.

Water

If your water is from a municipal water source, there’s a good chance you’ll still have water in an outage. Municipal water is gravity-fed from tall water tanks, but they need to be refilled from time to time. If you have a well dependent on an electric pump, you’ll have to find alternatives.

  • Stored and filled 5-gallon water bottles.
  • Melt snow and ice in a 5-gallon bucket set in the sun indoors.
  • If you hear a weather report that portends the possibility of an outage, fill your bathtub with water but use it only for flushing the toilet. A bucket in the toilet will give it a good flush.
  • Avoid frozen pipes by letting the faucets slowly drip if you are on municipal water. If the heat in your house is a problem and you have a well, you’re wise to drain the pipes to prevent them from freezing.

Food

  • Refrigerator and freezer. Food will last in a refrigerator for 24 hours and in a freezer for 48 hours if you open the doors minimally. You also can place ice into plastic bags and turn your fridge/freezer into a large cooler.
  • Stock up on foods that don’t require refrigeration or freezing. It’s easy to do. If it’s on the shelf in a store, it will survive a power outage.
  • You have some options here:
    • Outdoor on a grill
    • On a gas range
    • On top of the wood-burning stove
    • Next to the fire in the fireplace in a Dutch oven
  • Refrigerator realities
    • Set to coldest settings if you suspect an outage is possible
    • Coolers in the garage filled with plastic bags of snow and ice
    • Outside in a snowdrift but beware the animals. Use a 5-gallon bucket with a locking lid

Communication

  • Cell phones and the charging challenge. It’s hard to charge a cell phone without electricity, but you could use a car charger in the car, a solar charger about the size of a notebook, a generator or a cell charger power pack.

Bailing out

If you determine the situation is unbearable for you and your family, you’ll need to bail out. This assumes you have somewhere to go that’s at least comfortable like a neighbor, friend or family member who has better resources, or a local shelter housing people and families who are ill-equipped to handle the outage. But before you bail, there are some steps you should take:

  • Drain the water pipes
  • Turn all of your circuit breakers to the off position. This will prevent a power surge when the power come back on. In fact, some people take this step the minute a power outage occurs at any time of year except for a room with a few lamps to signal that the power is back on.
  • Pour anti-freeze into your toilets and drains for every sink, bathtub and shower
  • Make sure all doors and windows are locked, and drapes and curtains drawn
  • Take or dispose of any food in fridge or freezer or other perishables like bread

Preparation is the key

Any power outage presents problems. It’s a good idea to think ahead to what alternative resources you will need during a power outage and make sure you have them in place.

What tips would you add? Share your advice in the section below:

11 Amazing Ways Squash Can Keep You Healthy

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11 Amazing Ways Squash Can Keep You Healthy

Image source: Pixabay.com

What do you think of when you hear the term “squash?” Maybe it’s last summer’s bumper zucchini crop or the pumpkin that you carved last October? Yes, those are two popular squashes, but there are so many other varieties. In fact, squash is a term that includes literally dozens of fruits – yes, fruits – that share similar characteristics and belong to the plant genus Cucurbita.

Some of the popular squash varieties are butternut, acorn Hubbard, Kabocha, Delicata, Calabaza and spaghetti. Some squashes are identified by the season they are harvested, such as summer and winter squash.

Squash has been cultivated by humans for thousands of years. Archeologists have found evidence of squash being grown in ancient North and South America, and early European settlers found it to be a staple part of the diet of some Native American tribes.

More than just a decorative object for fall harvest season, squash offers many nutritional and health benefits. It is packed with vitamin A and contains a high percentage of vitamins C, E, and B6, niacin, thiamine and folate. Squash also boasts a variety of healthy minerals, including potassium, magnesium, manganese, calcium and iron.

Here are 11 health benefits you can enjoy from adding more squash to your family’s diet.

1. Inflammation reduction. The omega-3 fatty acids and carotenoids (including lutein, zeaxanthin and beta-carotene) in squash can help reduce inflammation in the body. Squash consumption has been linked to less inflammation in conditions such as arthritis, gout, type-2 diabetes, ulcers and cardiovascular disorders.

2. Immunity boost. The vitamins (especially the vitamin A) and minerals found in squash work as antioxidants in the body, helping to neutralize harmful free radicals and offering an important boost to the body’s immune system.

3. Lung health. Vitamin A, which is abundant in squash, has been linked with healthy lungs, and it may offer some protection against emphysema and lung cancer.

4. Diabetes management. Squash is rich in B-complex vitamins, which are important to the metabolism of sugar in the body. In addition, the dietary fiber found in squash, such as pectin, is an important part of the body’s blood sugar regulation process.

5. Infection protection. Have you ever roasted and eaten pumpkin seeds? Squash seeds offer antimicrobial and antifungal benefits, which can protect the body from harmful parasites and certain diseases.

6. Neural health. Folate, which is plentiful in squash, is important to the diet of pregnant women. A lack of folate, or folic acid, has been linked with infant neural tube defects.

7. Cardiovascular health. Minerals, such as magnesium and potassium, that are in squash are important to the heart. As a vasodilator, potassium helps relax the tension of blood vessels and arteries and increase blood flow to the heart. The pectin (fiber) found in squash is important to healthy and strong artery walls, which help reduce the chances of heart attack or stroke.

8. Blood circulation. Squash has high levels of iron and copper, two essential minerals for the body’s red blood cells. Therefore, eating more squash can help reduce anemia and can improve your overall mental and physical energy levels.

9. Better vision. The large amount of beta-carotene found in squash is good for your eyes. Beta-carotene consumption is linked with a reduced risk of macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma and other issues associated with aging eyes.

10. Breathing. A diet that includes squash can help you breathe better. In fact, squash’s antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties can reduce the irritation that causes asthma.

11. Strong bones.  As an important source of zinc, calcium and manganese, squash can help strengthen your bones and reduce your chances of developing osteoporosis.

What would you add to our list? Share your tips in the section below:

 

Sources:

http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/enjoy_the_taste_and_health_benefits_of_winter_squash

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/winter-squash/

The Giant Book of Kitchen Counter Cures, Karen Cicero and Colleen Pierre, Jerry Baker Books, 2001.

12 Seeds You Need To Start NOW For Spring Planting

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12 Seeds You Need To Start NOW For Spring Planting

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For many of us, late January is still cold and snowy, but the days are lengthening, and warmer temperatures are on the way. It’s so tempting to break out the seeds!

But planting seeds too early can backfire unless you have a setup that includes things like heated seed propagation mats, grow lights, and consistent regulated temperatures. I don’t. I do have a terrific enclosed south-facing verandah with lots of windows, but the days are still short here, without the amount of sun many seedlings need. This can make for spindly, weak plants that stretch towards the light, and that are unable to support the weight of their leaves. Also, the temperature is hardly consistent, given the blasts of cold air each time the door is opened.

That said, some seeds can be started by late January with just a little care. Often, these are seeds that germinate slowly, with their seedlings becoming established in mid-late February, when the amount of sunlight and daily temperatures have both increased.

When choosing what to plant this time of year, always check seed packages (or research the varieties you’re planting) to find out the expected number of days to maturity. Then, cross check that with the last expected frost date in your area, which you can find here. Don’t choose seeds that will mature before your last frost date — you need to move your plants outside after the last frost so that they can finish growing outside for the best results and flavor.

General Hint

The top of your refrigerator is often warm enough to replicate a heated propagation mat. If you’re sowing seeds that need heat to germinate, keep them on top of your fridge. Once sprouted, the seedlings should be moved to a window area to get as much sunlight as possible.

Strawberries

It can be tricky to grow strawberries from seeds, but it’s much more fulfilling than buying established plants at a nursery.

The earlier you start strawberry seeds, the more likely you’ll get fruit in the first year. Aim to start in January or even December. That said, strawberries are perennials. If you start late, you’ll still get plants, if not fruit, in the first year.

Strawberry seeds germinate best if they go through a stratification process. Put the whole package of seeds into an airtight plastic bag or container and toss them into the freezer for 3-4 weeks. When you take the seeds out, let them warm up to room temperature before removing them from the bag or container, so that they don’t get condensation on them as they thaw. Then, once planted, keep the cells or containers in a tray that has a thick piece of fabric placed on the bottom. Keep the fabric wet so that the soil in the containers can wick up moisture as needed, without sitting in water. Use bright fluorescent lights to supplement sunshine and keep the temperature between 65-75 °F (18-24 °C). Germination can take one to six weeks. Be patient!

Once strawberry seedlings have their third true leaf, transplant them to bigger pots. Make sure to harden them off before transplanting outside.

Onions, Leeks, and Shallots

It’s best to plant onion, leek, and shallot seeds about 10-12 weeks before the last frost date, which means sowing in January or February works well in most hardiness zones. All three need warmth to sprout; keep sown seeds on a heated propagation mat, on top of the fridge, or tucked under a plastic bag or dome. The seeds should sprout fairly quick, but the seedlings grow quite slowly. Like other plants started indoors, these should be first repotted into larger pots, before being hardened off and transplanted into the garden.

Celery and Celeriac

Celery and celeriac are relatively easy to start from seeds, but it can be a challenge to get these plants to produce in the garden, as they are averse to both cold and heat. If you’re up for the challenge, start in late January or February as the plants need about 90 days from seeding until they’re ready for transplanting. Mix the tiny seeds with sand and then sprinkle that mix on top of your potting soil. Celery is slow to germinate and grow, but it doesn’t require any help (like a heated propagation mat or wet fabric to wick moisture from). All it needs is patience.

Woody Herbs (Oregano, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme)

Herbs with woody stems are usually propagated by cuttings because they grow so slowly from seed. But that’s just what we want when we’re looking for seeds to start in January and February. Of the four herbs listed here, rosemary is the most finicky and hardest to grow from seed. It will need a heated propagation mat or fridge top and should be covered with plastic. Oregano, sage, and thyme, however, have no special requirement other than bright light. Once the seedlings are sturdy enough to handle, transplant them into larger pots. By late April or May, they should be ready to plant outdoors — just be sure to harden them off first.

Chili Peppers

In general, the hotter the pepper, the longer it takes to mature. Hot Rod peppers, for instance, only need 57 days to mature, while Habaneros take a minimum of 120 days. Keep this in mind when choosing which variety to plant now. All hot pepper plants need heat to flourish. Use a heated propagation mat, the top of your fridge, or at least keep your seeds and seedlings as toasty as possible, in a warm, draft-free location, and covered with a plastic bag or dome. You’ll need to repot them when they have several sets of leaves; they should be transplanted outdoors once overnight lows stay at 50°F (10°C) or warmer.

Eggplant

Like many of the other seeds that are suitable for early planting, eggplant seeds require warmth to germinate. The seeds are quite tiny; mix them with sand, if needed, and then sprinkle the sand mixture on your potting soil. Once planted, keep the cells or containers on top of your fridge, on a heated propagation mat, or covered with a plastic bag or cloche. It should take about one week for seeds to germinate. They’ll be ready to transplant in about four to six weeks, and ready to go into the garden 10-12 weeks after planting.

Have you started any seeds already? Do you have any tips for producing strong healthy seedlings when you sow seeds early? If so, please share in the comments below.

12 New Guns That Turned Heads At The SHOT Show

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12 New Guns That Turned Heads At The SHOT ShowEvery year the National Shooting Sports Foundation hosts the annual SHOT Show event, which allows the gun industry to showcase its newest firearms and related gear. The following is just a fraction of what was new at this year’s contention in Las Vegas that could be of interest to defensive mined folks.

Glock’s G19X is essentially a G19 slide on a G17 frame. Some are advocates of this idea, others not so much. Reports are that the trigger has been much improved. Glock will most likely do well with this new offering.

Ruger’s PC (pistol caliber) Carbine in 9mm has been around for a number of years. The PC can now accept Glock pistol magazines, in addition to Ruger pistol magazines! What’s so appealing to me about this carbine is its takedown ability. It comes apart just like the Ruger 10/22 takedown.

Walther’s well known PPQ pistol now has a smaller version, the “SC” model. Short grip and short slide, in 9mm, it’s an 11-shooter. A bit small for some, but many will like it. PPQ’s trigger is hard to beat.

Another Ruger offering is the “Security 9” pistol, a low-cost version of the G19. It has a “backward-facing” manual safety lever, which I would recommend leaving in the “off” position anyway. Nice trigger at five pounds with a crisp reset. For a serious, carry pistol, it’s not bad, and pricing is very reasonable.

Springfield Armory’s hammer-fired XDE is another pistol that has its unique following as a hammer-fired system. It is very flat (single column) and easy to carry. Slide manipulation is reported to be very easy. There will be many women who will like it for that reason alone. This is a nice carry pistol.

Honor Defense is making a polymer-framed, single-column 9mm (8-shooter) with modular grip components, and comes apart exactly like a SIG 320.

Beretta’s APX pistol is a G17-sized, double-column carry pistol. Reports are that it surpasses all their other models. Many Beretta fans are recommending it with confidence.

Also from Beretta is the model 1301 shotgun and is at the top of the list of defensive purposes. Folks are saying it has much less recoil than the model 1201. The model 1301 will be a good option for those looking for a 12ga shotgun for serious applications.

SIG has a new model, the P365. This is a striker-fired, flat, 9mm concealment pistol, designed to compete with the S&W Shield, Kahr PM9, Walther PPS/M2 and G43. The 365 comes from the factory with night sights, a nice addition. The magazine is basically single stack that makes the 365 an 11 or 12-shooter depending on which magazine you use.

Kahr Arms now makes a nice AR selling in the $750 range. Khar pistols are now available in the “C,” “S” and “P” series, “P” being the nicest finished and expensive. All are reported to run well.

DSArms, well-known makers of FALs, is making the CTC, a folding stock with magazine-release near the front of the trigger-guard. If you are looking for a serious 308 rifle, take a look at what DSA has to offer.

POF (Patriot Ordinance Factory) is producing the “Revolution” gas-piston AR rifle in 308 caliber. For those who love 308 rifles, this is another great choice in a defensive rifle. It’s about the same weight and size as a typical AR in 5.56×45.

It would appear that the industry is putting much effort into compact and flat 9mm pistols with the concealed carry market in mind and with good cause. More and more folks are serious about providing for their everyday defense.

Which new gun would you want to try or own? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Growing Your Own Food. New Garden Beds.

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Growing your own food is a must for future survival, you can’t trust foods from overseas, & Australia & the UK are producing less & less of our own foods! If it all hits the fan, there will be no foods to purchase, it will be a matter of grow or forage or starve.

Recently we put in a new berry patch for growing Boysenberries & Young berries, & we added another pumpkin patch ready for next spring.

We have a lot of regrowth tree saplings to get rid of for fire safety, so we spent some time cutting & mulching for the new berry patch.

The newly plowed & composted pumpkin patch.

Want to live more naturally

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I am currently a college student, but have been wanting to go off-grid for the past year or so. I’m concerned student debt might get in the way, and don’t want it to be something that ties me to society for the next ten years plus. I love the outdoors, but need someone to teach me the necessary skills to live off grid. I’m a hard worker and very easy to get along with. It would be great to live a more simple and natural life, the way nature intended. I just hate seeing how people are hurting the earth and don’t want to be a part of it anymore. I’d love to share this new life with likeminded people. 

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Escaping the Judgment of the Babylonian System-Pt 2

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Author John Theo joins me today to talk about how God led him to leave academia for a more biblical lifestyle in a more conservative part of the country. Check out John’s fantastic short story Clarke for only $0.99!

 

The Days of Elijah, Book Four: The Seventh Vial  is now available!

The ultimate battle which will decide the fate of Heaven and Earth has finally come. The Bible has prophesied of the Seven Vials of God’s Wrath, the final judgments which will utterly destroy what’s left of a decimated planet. Everett and Courtney must leave their sanctuary of relative safety, but there is nowhere left to turn. And getting anywhere in these last days means traversing wastelands patrolled by Global Republic drones or crossing hostile deserts infested by the violent jihadi armies of Caliph Marwan Bakr. It won’t be the first time they’ve been trapped between a rock and a hard place, but it might be the last!

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The post Escaping the Judgment of the Babylonian System-Pt 2 appeared first on Prepper Recon.

Ruger – Whats old is new again

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As you may have noticed in some earlier posts, I am quite excited by Rugers introduction of a 9mm carbine that takes pistol magazines. The carbine comes with a magwell adapter to take Glock mags, but as-is the thing is made to take the mags from Rugers American series and their Security-9 gun.

Wait..Security what?

Waaaaay back in the day, Ruger made a k-frame-style pistol under a few different names – Police-six, Speed-Six, Security-Six. They were no-frills six-shot revolvers marketed towards police and security markets. A reasonable strategy in the day when only the most forward thinking groups equipped their guys with automatics.

As the revolver faded from duty holsters, Ruger tried to capture the market with their very good, very affordable, and very ignored P-series of automatic pistols. Their extremely low price would make them attractive to buyers who needed to equip agencies/departments on a budget. Sadly, the P-series never really caught on and it was quietly discontinued a few years ago. Personally, I’m a huge fan of the P95 series (Specifically the P95DC) and I can usually pick up a couple each year on Gunbroker for less than $200.

When Ruger came out with their PC9 carbine, the plan was that it would be a police carbine that would use the same mags as the pistol the officer carried. A couple problems with that concept was that a) cops that carried longarms usually went with M4s or 870’s, and b) virtually no department issued the P series as a standard sidearm. The Ruger 9mm carbine was discontinued about ten years or so ago and they command stupid prices on Gunbroker. But..that’ll change now because really the only market for the PC9 will be guys like me who have a mountain of P-series pistols. But….

Ruger has, it seems, decided to get into the budget wondernine market again with the Security-9 series. The most interesting thing is that dealer cost on these things is…$260~. Yeah, that’s not a typo. So you get, basically, Ruger’s version of the Glock 19 for only a hundred bucks more than a HiPoint. (Or, put another way, for the same money you get twice as much capacity, half as many guns,and  three times the respect of a HiPoint.)

The Security-9 is getting some reviews at the usual places, and I’m sorta curious about them simply because I still have the inexplicable attraction of a carbine and pistol taking the same mags. However, since the Ruger carbine will accept Glock mags there’s no need for me to get a couple (or five) of the Security-9’s to go with the carbine. But, considering their low dealer price, if they turn out to be a quality gun, at least on par with the P-series, then there might be some interest there. There are some differences…the P-series are hamer fired versus the concealed hammer, DA/SA, and have second-strike capability. The Security-9 offers…well..not much that I can see except perhaps slightly better ergos and a rail. I’d be very curious to see if theyre as durable as the tank-like P’s.

I’ll probably wind up getting one just to try out and if I like it, who knows…maybe I’ll retire the P-series to Gunbroker and restock with the Security-9’s.

Anyway, I find it interesting that Ruger has gone back to trying to get the ‘budget’ market for autopistols again. I suspect that these things will replace the P-series as the most common ‘big name’ autoloader in police evidence bins.

 

What’s the Illuminati Planning for the 2018 Super Bowl Half Time Show?

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There’s an incredibly scary trend that’s been developing over the past couple of years with regards to the illuminati.  The name of the game isn’t child’s play “gang…

Fantasy Books for Middle Grade Readers

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As a writer, it’s probably not surprising that my kids love to read. We spend at least two or three hours each day listening to audiobooks and then an hour or two on top of that reading. Yeah, we love books around here. That said, sometimes finding new, interesting fantasy novels for middle-grade readers can be tricky. Once you’ve finished the books you love as a kid, where do you go?

Recently, I asked some of my writer friends on Facebook for suggestions on great fantasy novels for middle-grade readers. I got some fantastic recommendations and have been having a lovely time enjoying these stories with my kids.

Are you looking for new books? Check out my list and let me know what you think!

1. The Shadows

This house is keeping secrets . . .

When eleven-year-old Olive and her parents move into the crumbling mansion on Linden Street and find it filled with mysterious paintings, Olive knows the place is creepy—but it isn’t until she encounters its three talking cats that she realizes there’s something darkly magical afoot. Then Olive finds a pair of antique spectacles in a dusty drawer and discovers the most peculiar thing yet: She can travel inside the house’s spooky paintings to a world that’s strangely quiet . . . and eerily sinister. But in entering Elsewhere, Olive has been ensnared in a mystery darker and more dangerous than she could have imagined, confronting a power that wants to be rid of her by any means necessary. With only the cats and an unusual boy she meets in Elsewhere on her side, it’s up to Olive to save the house from the shadows, before the lights go out for good.

The Shadows (The Books of Elsewhere, Vol. 1) is a story about an 11-year-old who moves into a new house, but nothing is as it seems. This story is really interesting and has a decent pace. We’ve been reading a few chapters each night before bed, but each chapter ends on a cliffhanger so sometimes falling asleep after reading can be tricky! If you like this story, there are four more books in the series, so this is a great one to start if you plan to do even more reading.


2. A Hat Full of Sky


Rats! They’re everywhere: in the breadbins, dancing across tabletops, stealing pies from under the cooks’ noses. So what does every town need? A good piper to lure them away.

That’s where Maurice comes in. But he’s only a cat (though one that talks), so although he has the ideas, he needs rats and someone to play the pipe. Who better than the kid to play the pipe? And Dangerous Beans. And Peaches. And Hamnpork (who doesn’t really like what’s been happening since The Change; all a rat leader really needs is to be big and stroppy, thinking is just not his thing). And Darktan. And Sardines. And all the others in the Clan.
Then they arrive in Bad Blintz, which is suffering from a plague of rats, and find there are NO rats anywhere (though the two resident rat catchers seem to have plenty of tails to show, at 50 pence per tail).
Someone else has had ideas, and Maurice is not pleased.

A Hat Full of Sky: Discworld Book 32, (Discworld Childrens Book 3) is a Terry Pratchett novel set in the Discworld series. This is a standalone book, so you don’t need to read the other stories in the series in order to read it. We read this one and then moved on to some of the other Discworld books, which both of my kids really enjoy. 
If you’ve never read Pratchett’s writing, you’re missing out. Terry writes books that both children and adults can enjoy, so while this is technically a book designed for youngsters, there’s fantastic character development, world building, and poignant thoughts you’ll be able to enjoy in this one.

“Why do you go away? So that you can come back. So that you can see the place you came from with new eyes and extra colors. And the people there see you differently, too. Coming back to where you started is not the same as never leaving.” ― Terry Pratchett, A Hat Full of Sky

3. Crenshaw

Crenshaw

In her first novel since The One and Only Ivan, winner of the Newbery Medal, Katherine Applegate delivers an unforgettable and magical story about family, friendship, and resilience.
Jackson and his family have fallen on hard times. There’s no more money for rent. And not much for food, either. His parents, his little sister, and their dog may have to live in their minivan. Again.
Crenshaw is a cat. He’s large, he’s outspoken, and he’s imaginary. He has come back into Jackson’s life to help him. But is an imaginary friend enough to save this family from losing everything?
Beloved author Katherine Applegate proves in unexpected ways that friends matter, whether real or imaginary. This title has Common Core connections.

Crenshaw was added to my to-read list when several of my author friends suggested it. Katherine Applegate is one of those writers who manages to suck you into her world in a seemingly effortless way.

“Imaginary friends are like books. We’re created, we’re enjoyed, we’re dog-eared and creased, and then we’re tucked away until we’re needed again.” -Katherine Applegate, Crenshaw




4. A Snicker of Magic


Midnight Gulch used to be a magical place, a town where people could sing up thunderstorms and dance up sunflowers. But that was long ago, before a curse drove the magic away. Twelve-year-old Felicity knows all about things like that; her nomadic mother is cursed with a wandering heart.

But when she arrives in Midnight Gulch, Felicity thinks her luck’s about to change. A “word collector,” Felicity sees words everywhere—shining above strangers, tucked into church eves, and tangled up her dog’s floppy ears—but Midnight Gulch is the first place she’s ever seen the word “home.” And then there’s Jonah, a mysterious, spiky-haired do-gooder who shimmers with words Felicity’s never seen before, words that make Felicity’s heart beat a little faster.

Felicity wants to stay in Midnight Gulch more than anything, but first, she’ll need to figure out how to bring back the magic, breaking the spell that’s been cast over the town . . . and her mother’s broken heart.


A Snicker of Magic not only has an incredible cover, but has an incredible premise, as well. What do you do when you move somewhere new and nothing is what you expect? What do you do when your entire life changes and you have to find a way to make sense of the world around you? As a family that recently moved from one side of the globe to the other, I like these types of books because my kids can really relate to the feeling of being thrust into a new world you aren’t quite expecting.

*

Have you read any of these books with your kids? Which one was your favorite?

Who will join your group?

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Who will join your group?
Host: David Jones “Prepping Up with the Jones “Audio player provided!

Dave answers questions from last week’s show on how to conduct a Prepper exercise. He reviews what “crawl, walk, run” means when exercising alone or in a group. Then Dave talks about a very important question that every Prepper needs to ask and that is how to pick people to join your group.

Continue reading Who will join your group? at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Essential Winter Survival Gear for Surviving Jack Frost

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Essential Winter Survival Gear for Surviving Jack Frost This winter is a big deal. At least in the southeast we are taking on a winter that is much different than the last. I am struggling to remember a winter in Virginia that has been such a consistently cold season. In many ways it has been …

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Gardening for Food Production

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Gardening for Food Production What better a goal than gardening for food production. I feel like this is something we should all be looking to achieve in 2017. Our ability to provide, at least some, food for ourselves is a key element of enjoying freedom. When you are beholden to the supermarket and restaurants for …

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Top 10 Prepper Fiction Books You Must Read

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Top 10 Prepper Fiction Books You Must Read How do you get your daily injections of prepper conspiracy, doomsday juice or end of times inspiration? There are many ways you can come to fountain. Revelations itself is always a great way to understand that we are not necessarily a permanent thing on this planet. Or …

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DIY Survival: Make a Crossbow from Scratch

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DIY Survival: Make a Crossbow from Scratch As a traditional archery aficionado I have a crossbow insecurity. I know, like everyone knows, that it is a much more efficient weapon. There is no denying that. Still, I like to think that my recurve has some mystical powers. Now if I were to choose my own …

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The Raised Row Garden Method. No Tilling, Less Weeding, More Fun!

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The Raised Row Garden Method is now front and center! Tired of endless weeding, and the painful, labor-intensive hours of rototilling, digging, raking and hoeing? Then the Raised Row Garden Method is the answer! Vegetable gardening has never been easier, more

The post The Raised Row Garden Method. No Tilling, Less Weeding, More Fun! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Treating Farmyard Wounds Without A Vet

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Without a doubt, having a vet tend to wounds or medical emergencies is the way to go when your animal is sick or injured. However, there may come a time when you can’t get a vet to come.

The weather could be bad, the vet may be held up at another call, or the injury may be so bad that it needs treated right then rather than in the hour or three hours that it would take the vet to get there.

Fortunately, there are many wounds and illness that you can treat yourself if need be. Today, we’re going to touch on a few of them.

Colic

Because a horse has no way to belch or vomit, colic can be a death sentence. There are several different types of colic, including spasmodic colic (gas), Impaction colic, sand colic, and twisted gut. Of all of these, twisted gut is the worst and can actually be a result of sand or impaction colic gone bad.

Once your horse has twisted gut, immediate surgery is about the only thing that’s going to save him.

For the other types, though, there are treatments that may take care of it at home. First, you need to have a first-aid kit for your animals just as much as you need one for the two-footed critters on your farm. Two of the items it should most certainly contain is Banamine and Phenylbutazone, aka bute.

Both are NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) for horses. Banamine is a bit more effective at relieving colic pain than bute, but both work.

There are a couple things to keep in mind when using either of these. First, if you don’t know how to use it, call the vet and get directions, or leave it alone. It can kill your horse or, at the very least make matters worse, if you give him too much.

Second, you’re not curing anything with these drugs; you’re only masking the symptoms. That means that you shouldn’t be surprised if the horse starts exhibiting symptoms again once the drug wears off.

Now, should you use it for colic? Personally, I do if it goes on for too long simply because sand colic is what we deal with most where I’m at and it tends to take a while to resolve. If I were in pain for several hours, I’d pop a few Advil, so why not give my horse the same relief?

Also, I’ve seen horses with colic hurt themselves badly thrashing around in the pasture or stall because of the pain. The case of colic resolves itself in a few hours, but the bruises, cuts, or even breaks don’t.

There are a ton of rumors about colic – the horse has to walk constantly, the horse can’t lie down, the horse will twist a gut if he rolls. The first two are false. How would you like it if you were sick to your stomach and somebody made you walk or kept you off the couch?

Also, most vets will tell you that they won’t twist a gut by rolling – after all, they roll all the time just because it feels good. It’s a point of controversy with some and it’s so ingrained in me that I try to prevent the roll.

How will you survive when there is no doctor around? 

So – what can you do? Banamine and vegetable oil. Listen for gut sounds in the lower area behind the rib cage. If you don’t hear anything at all, you need to call the vet and at least tell him what’s going on and let him decide a course of action. A couple of cups of vegetable oil (any kind) may help lube things up and get things moving through the digestive tract.

Daily psyllium (Metamusil) added to feed isn’t a bad idea if you live in a sandy area, and of course, plenty of roughage. Keep your feed room doors locked and make sure your horse has plenty of water at all times. Avoid lots of cold water immediately following a hard workout.

Avoiding colic is better than treating it.

Cuts and gashes

If your animal – any animal – is cut and bleeding, that’s not exactly something you can wait for the vet to treat. I’ve seen some ugly gashes that, if you didn’t know better, you would swear were life-threatening but were actually just ugly. On the other side, I’ve seen wounds that didn’t look like anything at all that ended up being serious or even fatal.

One of the biggest factors in determining how serious something is going to be in the long run is how it’s treated immediately.

Any wound needs cleaned and disinfected. Since we’re dealing with animals, that often means we’re dealing with wounds full of gunk, especially if you aren’t there to catch the injury immediately.

So, first things first – clean it. That’s critical! It may not be easy, though. It’ll likely take more than just you, but you need to scrub it out and disinfect it. If the wound is bleeding, puff on some Wonder Dust – a dressing powder and blood coagulant for cuts, abrasions, wounds and capillary bleeding.

It’ll stop the bleeding and promote healing. If the wound has stopped bleeding, Wound Kote is fabulous as a disinfectant and to keep flies and debris out of the wound and aids in scab formation, especially for wounds that aren’t going to be wrapped.

If you’re wrapping a wound (or even if you’re not), Furazone is wonderful. It’s an antibiotic ointment with an awesome yellow color, so you can see where you’ve put it. It’s good for treating infections, too.

Now, if you have something that’s particularly deep that needs stitches, you have a couple more options. Many farmers stitch wounds themselves, but most just let things heal on their own. However, there are times when that just won’t do. There are products out there that are sort of made for this.

If you have a wound this deep, I recommend keeping a can of Aluspray on hand because it acts as a liquid bandage. Say your cow or goat or horse has a wound on its side that needs a bandage. You can’t really put on there, but Aluspray seals the wound almost like a glue.

The great thing about it is that air can penetrate it but dirt and germs cant.

So, stockpile these, and also brush up on essential oils that treat different wounds. They often work as well on animals as they do on people.

Mastitis

This is a big deal in all animals that give milk, women included, especially when we’re taking steps to help them produce more milk. And it’s definitely one that’s better prevented than treated. It’s painful and the milk from that teat isn’t usable by the baby animal or by the human that milks it.

Mastitis is an infection of the mammary gland and is caused when a mammary gland is blocked. Often, this is because milk was left in the breast or teat and caused the clog.

This isn’t anything to kid around with; it can be lethal and is one of the costliest diseases in the dairy industry. Corporate considerations aside, what it means to you is that you won’t have milk, the cow’s calf may go hungry, and the cow is in pain and could even die from it.

A bad scenario all the way around. Plus, when you have to give the cow antibiotics, the milk isn’t drinkable.

Your cow or nanny or mare can develop mastitis in a number of ways – the milk isn’t stripped from her udder properly or completely, she’s exposed to a staph infection in the environment or by you when you don’t wash your hands between milking, or even if her calf suckles from another cow that has it – it happens.

A dirty environment doesn’t help either because infections such as E. coli can be found in manure. Bumps and bruises to a full udder … anytime the orifice is open, such as when the teat is leaking milk, it’s vulnerable to infection. Also, a chapped or frostbitten teat is more prone to mastitis.

A calf eats when it’s cold and windy out and the teat is left wet in those conditions. You can see what may happen.

So, if you read the paragraph above, you’ve likely realized that keeping sanitary conditions goes a long way toward preventing infection and judicious use of bag balm or udder butter or some other udder cream helps with the chapping. Wash the udder before you milk and dry and condition it after.

Sometimes mastitis will resolve on its own, but often it won’t. the quarter needs to be stripped at least daily and usually antibiotics would be used. But we don’t want to use antibiotics, or don’t have access to any. Now what?

Essential oils that are antibacterial to the rescue. Tea tree oil, peppermint oil, and oregano oil are all highly antibacterial. Use the oils in a base such as coconut oil, or there are commercial lotions such as Superior  Cow Cream that already has them.

Other than that, it’s a matter of keeping the teat clean and stripped of milk and boosting the cow’s immune system with aloe Vera, dried kelp meal, or pasteurized whey. The whey can be given orally or sub-q at the base of the tail.

Some organic dairy farmers also insert a garlic tincture into the vulva twice a day using a tube and a syringe.

Mastitis is bad, but it happens. Do what you can to prevent it, and what you have to to get rid of it.

There are many conditions that can be treated without a vet IF you have the knowledge and experience to do so, and the condition isn’t severe. However, there are times when your vet can’t get there and you can’t even get him on the phone. In those instances,

I hope some of this information helped. If you have any other tips, please share them with us in the comments section below.

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia.

How To Store Emergency Food And Water

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I think we all love to see new ways to store emergency food and water. If you listen or read the news it’s pretty obvious we must be prepared to store emergency food and water today, not tomorrow. I realize most of us have budgets that may keep us from purchasing all the food or water we need to store to be prepared. I get it. But, there is no excuse if you do not have enough food and water in your home this very minute to feed and hydrate your family for at least two weeks. I can hear some of you say, “I’m living paycheck to paycheck.” I think many feel that way but they are somehow doing it. Please don’t make excuses, you are responsible for your family, no one else should be expected to take care of your family.

The government can’t take care of everyone, so if you think they will come to your neighborhood within 24 hours of a disaster, think again. It’s not going to happen. Please don’t think your neighbor down the street will fulfill your needs. I get about 300-400 emails a day from people telling me how they are storing food and water with very little money. I may be on a soapbox today, yes I do this a few times a year because I want people to understand how important it is to be prepared.

I love it when a reader sends me pictures and tells me how she removed her beloved swing from her porch where she enjoyed sipping hot chocolate sitting in it when it was raining. Her name is Robbie, and she talked her sweet husband into adding a small section onto the porch to give her a larger pantry to stock food and water for emergencies. I love this! I asked her permission to share her photos, thank you, Robbie! I call this picture, Robbie’s Store. She fills it so she doesn’t run out of food and replenishes as needed.

Store Emergency Food Pantrystore emergency food

Here’s the deal, people will ask me how much food to store. That’s a very good question, but there are so many variables.

Store Emergency Food Boxes

I’ve seen boxes of emergency food storage at Costco where the pictures of the food on the box look fabulous. But if you look closer the box may say  “feeds a family of four for three days.” Really? I think not. Unless you eat only 300 calories three times a day. This would not feed Mark. Well, today he would have to eat tomorrow’s allotted food as well so he would feel full.

It’s still a very good way to store emergency food storage. It’s a compact box with packets ready to add water. I don’t buy those boxes because they don’t work for Mark and me. But the box will give you a few meals that you can make with very little work. Emergency food storage is critical to have on hand no matter what you decide works for you.

Now, I don’t calculate my emergency food storage by calories. I don’t count calories now. I probably should since I would be thinner, but that’s how I roll. Today, I want to show those readers who have not seen how I store my emergency food a glimpse of how you may want to do it.

Store Emergency Food Racks

These shelves I purchased online from Costco that are more heavy duty than the ones you can purchase from the store. They are 72 inches tall by 48 inches wide and 18 inches deep. They have heavy duty wheels with locks to keep them in place, or I can roll them when needed.

store emergency food

If you have questions about the amount of food you may want to store, I have it all spelled out in my book “Prepare Your Family For Survival” by Linda Loosli

Here’s a picture showing food storage in cases under bunk beds:

store emergency food

I have a wonderful friend, named Alex Tarsha who designed these shelves years ago with studs on the wall. He sold his blog called Survive Hive, but I couldn’t find the directions to make these. I shared his post about these back on February 27th, 2014. You may want to check out the website, I like the it.

store emergency food

Store Emergency Water

Now, let me show you how I store some of my water, it may or may not work for you. As you know, I highly recommend storing four-gallons of water per person per day. We need it for cooking, hydrating, washing dishes and some for personal hygiene. This picture below shows how I store 56-gallons of water underneath a queen size bed in my guest room. The containers are the 3.5-gallon size WaterBricks and I preserve the water in all of my containers with Water Preserver so I only have to rotate the water every five years compared to bleach which needs to be rotated every six months. Water Under A Queen Bed by Linda

store emergency food

If you have a dresser you can put on an angle you may be able to store water behind it like what is shown in the picture below. I purchased 12 cases of water that stores for 50 years up to temperatures of 145 degrees. Yes, they are very expensive, but it’s water I will drink and enjoy every drop of it. I saved for three years to buy these. Just giving you the heads up. Blue Cans Trust me on this one, it’s the best tasting water I have ever tasted.

store emergency food

You may want to consider purchasing water filters or purifiers. If you have contaminated water coming out of your local city water lines you may be instructed to halt all water use. I have seen this many times right here in the USA over the last few years. Government officials made mistakes hooking up lines in several cities right here in Utah. Officials also did not disclose the lead in the water lines in Flint, Michigan, as you may remember until a doctor started questioning the health of kids in the area.

I will not drink, cook or wash any fruits or vegetables with my tap water. I don’t trust those in charge of keeping our water safe. I use a system called reverse osmosis which removes up to 99.9% of bacteria and viruses out of my water.

Just a note here, I went to the city of Farmington, Utah back in 1983 when my family lived there. I took a white coffee cup filled with water that was yellow that I dispensed from my kitchen faucet. I asked the city what was wrong with our water, it was yellow? Keep in mind I had soft water so it was not mineral. They said I shouldn’t worry about it. Well, that’s the last day I have ever had a drop of water used in my kitchen.

It’s interesting because my neighbors and I started asking why is it that so many people were getting cancer in Farmington, Utah? Our neighborhood. We started walking around the streets and it seemed that in every third house someone had cancer, children, and adults. Why? It was actually questioned on a local TV news station. We never got an answer. I’m pushier now, I would have sent the water to be tested. I was too trusting back then, now I know better.

Please store emergency food and water, you will need it, I promise. May God bless our world.

Stay Hydrated by Linda

Small Home Storage by Linda

Copyright picture (featured image only): AdobeStock_109228559 by Aleksandar Kosev

The post How To Store Emergency Food And Water appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

How To Store Emergency Food And Water

Click here to view the original post.

I think we all love to see new ways to store emergency food and water. If you listen or read the news it’s pretty obvious we must be prepared to store emergency food and water today, not tomorrow. I realize most of us have budgets that may keep us from purchasing all the food or water we need to store to be prepared. I get it. But, there is no excuse if you do not have enough food and water in your home this very minute to feed and hydrate your family for at least two weeks. I can hear some of you say, “I’m living paycheck to paycheck.” I think many feel that way but they are somehow doing it. Please don’t make excuses, you are responsible for your family, no one else should be expected to take care of your family.

The government can’t take care of everyone, so if you think they will come to your neighborhood within 24 hours of a disaster, think again. It’s not going to happen. Please don’t think your neighbor down the street will fulfill your needs. I get about 300-400 emails a day from people telling me how they are storing food and water with very little money. I may be on a soapbox today, yes I do this a few times a year because I want people to understand how important it is to be prepared.

I love it when a reader sends me pictures and tells me how she removed her beloved swing from her porch where she enjoyed sipping hot chocolate sitting in it when it was raining. Her name is Robbie, and she talked her sweet husband into adding a small section onto the porch to give her a larger pantry to stock food and water for emergencies. I love this! I asked her permission to share her photos, thank you, Robbie! I call this picture, Robbie’s Store. She fills it so she doesn’t run out of food and replenishes as needed.

Store Emergency Food Pantrystore emergency food

Here’s the deal, people will ask me how much food to store. That’s a very good question, but there are so many variables.

Store Emergency Food Boxes

I’ve seen boxes of emergency food storage at Costco where the pictures of the food on the box look fabulous. But if you look closer the box may say  “feeds a family of four for three days.” Really? I think not. Unless you eat only 300 calories three times a day. This would not feed Mark. Well, today he would have to eat tomorrow’s allotted food as well so he would feel full.

It’s still a very good way to store emergency food storage. It’s a compact box with packets ready to add water. I don’t buy those boxes because they don’t work for Mark and me. But the box will give you a few meals that you can make with very little work. Emergency food storage is critical to have on hand no matter what you decide works for you.

Now, I don’t calculate my emergency food storage by calories. I don’t count calories now. I probably should since I would be thinner, but that’s how I roll. Today, I want to show those readers who have not seen how I store my emergency food a glimpse of how you may want to do it.

Store Emergency Food Racks

These shelves I purchased online from Costco that are more heavy duty than the ones you can purchase from the store. They are 72 inches tall by 48 inches wide and 18 inches deep. They have heavy duty wheels with locks to keep them in place, or I can roll them when needed.

store emergency food

If you have questions about the amount of food you may want to store, I have it all spelled out in my book “Prepare Your Family For Survival” by Linda Loosli

Here’s a picture showing food storage in cases under bunk beds:

store emergency food

I have a wonderful friend, named Alex Tarsha who designed these shelves years ago with studs on the wall. He sold his blog called Survive Hive, but I couldn’t find the directions to make these. I shared his post about these back on February 27th, 2014. You may want to check out the website, I like the it.

store emergency food

Store Emergency Water

Now, let me show you how I store some of my water, it may or may not work for you. As you know, I highly recommend storing four-gallons of water per person per day. We need it for cooking, hydrating, washing dishes and some for personal hygiene. This picture below shows how I store 56-gallons of water underneath a queen size bed in my guest room. The containers are the 3.5-gallon size WaterBricks and I preserve the water in all of my containers with Water Preserver so I only have to rotate the water every five years compared to bleach which needs to be rotated every six months. Water Under A Queen Bed by Linda

store emergency food

If you have a dresser you can put on an angle you may be able to store water behind it like what is shown in the picture below. I purchased 12 cases of water that stores for 50 years up to temperatures of 145 degrees. Yes, they are very expensive, but it’s water I will drink and enjoy every drop of it. I saved for three years to buy these. Just giving you the heads up. Blue Cans Trust me on this one, it’s the best tasting water I have ever tasted.

store emergency food

You may want to consider purchasing water filters or purifiers. If you have contaminated water coming out of your local city water lines you may be instructed to halt all water use. I have seen this many times right here in the USA over the last few years. Government officials made mistakes hooking up lines in several cities right here in Utah. Officials also did not disclose the lead in the water lines in Flint, Michigan, as you may remember until a doctor started questioning the health of kids in the area.

I will not drink, cook or wash any fruits or vegetables with my tap water. I don’t trust those in charge of keeping our water safe. I use a system called reverse osmosis which removes up to 99.9% of bacteria and viruses out of my water.

Just a note here, I went to the city of Farmington, Utah back in 1983 when my family lived there. I took a white coffee cup filled with water that was yellow that I dispensed from my kitchen faucet. I asked the city what was wrong with our water, it was yellow? Keep in mind I had soft water so it was not mineral. They said I shouldn’t worry about it. Well, that’s the last day I have ever had a drop of water used in my kitchen.

It’s interesting because my neighbors and I started asking why is it that so many people were getting cancer in Farmington, Utah? Our neighborhood. We started walking around the streets and it seemed that in every third house someone had cancer, children, and adults. Why? It was actually questioned on a local TV news station. We never got an answer. I’m pushier now, I would have sent the water to be tested. I was too trusting back then, now I know better.

Please store emergency food and water, you will need it, I promise. May God bless our world.

Stay Hydrated by Linda

Small Home Storage by Linda

Copyright picture (featured image only): AdobeStock_109228559 by Aleksandar Kosev

The post How To Store Emergency Food And Water appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

The Health Benefits of Omega-3 and Why You Should Make it Part of your Diet

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ReadyNutrition Readers, did you know that 2 out of the 3 Omega-3 fatty acids can be derived from seafood? This article presents a little information about Omega-3 fatty acids, a really important substance for your metabolism.  Human beings (and mammals in general) are not able to produce these fatty acids in our own bodies; however, we can obtain them in different forms in our diet.  Then our bodies transform them into the “forms” we need.

There are three types of Omega-3’s that are important for people, and they are as follows:

  1. ALA – also known as Alpha Linolenic Acid, and these can be found in certain oils in plants and nuts.  Here are some sources for these:  walnuts, flaxseed oil, hemp oil, and seeds, such as pumpkin and sunflower.
  2. EPAEicosapentaenoic Acid, found in fish and ocean-oils
  3. DHADocosahexaenoic Acid, also found in fish and ocean/marine oils.

Here are some sources for EPA and DHA:  fish oils, oils from krill, squid, and octopus, and egg oil…this latter being an oil found in eggs, such as chicken eggs (non-fish lovers, again, you’re probably happy!) Alternatively, you can purchase omega-3 oils in capsule form.

Omega-3 Health Benefits

Our vaunted medical establishment recognizes the importance of Omega-3 fatty acids; however, it will not commit to actually saying they benefit individuals in the prevention of disease.  They use the term “may,” a “fallback” to state is may or may not…and they’re not liable, etc., for anything they tell you.  Well, here are some of the areas Omega-3’s may help you:

  • Inflammations, cancer, cardiac disorders (cardiac death, sudden death, and MI, or Myocardial Infarction).
  • It may also help against different types of skin diseases, such as dermatitis, and also help with cognitive functions in the aging process.
  • Omega-3’s may also help in treating mental disorders, such as depression and psychosis.

One of the problems with true and good reviews on supplements is that very few medical doctors will go “out on a limb” and challenge the approved, authorized system regarding them.

The American Medical Establishment wants you to stay underfed, weak, out of shape, working (working ensures more taxes, and more grants for them, remember), sick, and constantly using a steady supply of prescription medication.

Do you want real advice?  Go talk to a bodybuilder, a professional athlete, or a weightlifter.  Look at one of them, and then look at the doctors who are claiming supplements do not work.  Use your own eyes and make a decision.

These doctors all invest in the pharmaceutical industry and demonize all holistic foods and supplementation.

The Omega-3’s work and they’re also needed by you for tissue repair from their anti-inflammatory effects.  Fish are high in protein, and if you shop it right, they aren’t as expensive as you might believe.  Some good sources are cod, mackerel, sardines, and salmon.  You can also pick up that rod and reel and go out for some bass, crappie, or trout to take in a steady supply of Omega 3’s.  For those who just can’t do the fish?  Well, there are supplements.

Your friendly neighborhood Wal-Mart has fish oil, salmon oil, and cod liver oil in happy, non-fish-tasting capsules.  They’re not too expensive and you can take one or two of them a day as a supplement.  I also must mention that phytoplankton and marine algae also contain all three types of the Omega-3’s, and you can pick these guys up either in dried form at your better health food stores, or in capsule form there, and in Wal-Mart.  For dosages consult with the package directions by the manufacturer/grower of these different foods.

If you haven’t already done so, consider making Omega-3 fatty acids part of your diet, either in the consumption of foods or as an adjunct with supplements.  You’ll be giving yourself a healthy edge…your number one piece of equipment for survival is your body.  Never forget that, and if you put in “garbage” you can’t expect to roll a Lamborghini off of the assembly line.  Start those fishing rods up soon!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition