Best EDC Knife For Self Defense, Survival and Preparedness

Click here to view the original post.

A Guide To Help You Find The Best EDC Knife For You

Best EDC Knife

When a specific tool’s been used for centuries and found across several continents, you know there’s something special going on.

Knives are the perfect example of such a special tool.

And it’s not like the basic knife design has evolved all that much over time either. No, the idea of a blade (stone and later metal) has been with us since the dawn of man.

Knives have maintained their basic applicability, retained their form, and sustained their usefulness since their creation.

Why? What is so great about knives? They’re just really good at cutting stuff, right?

Well, in a word, yes. Knives get their greatness from the versatility they offer in accomplishing simple functions like cutting, chopping, slicing, stabbing, whittling, carving, etc.

But these functions are essential for all sorts of everyday uses; such as:

  • Self-Defense
  • Cooking Prep
  • Skinning Game
  • General Utility (opening boxes)
  • Shelter Building
  • Entertainment (knife throwing)

And that’s why it’s so important to keep an Every Day Carry (EDC) blade with you at all times.

EDC Knife 1.1

Why Carry An EDC Knife


When you’ve got a pocket knife, neck knife, boot knife or belt knife, you’ve got one of the most ancient survival tools at your side.

But these days, EDC knives are more compact, lighter, and maintain their edges better than knives from the past.

Better than the fixed blade hunks of iron our ancestors had to lug around.

But when it comes to finding an EDC knife, things can get tricky fast.

There are many knife companies making EDC knives today. Trying to find the best one quickly becomes an overwhelming endeavor.

And buyers beware! Not all EDC knives are created equal. Some are designed and built to higher standards of quality than others.

Some EDC knives make incredible survival resources while others are barely a flimsy excuse for a letter opener.

You do not want to waste your money on a product that’s going to fail you when you need it most. That why today we’re going to cover the following EDC Knife topics:

  • Four Types Of EDC Knives
  • Most Important Qualities For Your EDC Knife
  • Best EDC Knife For Survival
  • Caring For Your EDC Knife
As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Ultimate List Of Survival Gear. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

Boot Knife

Types of EDC Knives


There are lots of EDC knives designed specifically for survival purposes while others are made for general application.

But no matter the specific design you prefer, they’re all extremely useful tools. It’s a necessary addition to any survivalist’s belt, pocket, get home bag or your packed bug out bag.

However, you decide to carry it, you must choose the type of EDC knife that will work best for you.

Folding EDC Knives

Nowadays, the most popular type of EDC knife is a folder. This kind of knife simply folds in half to reduce its overall length and size when tucked away.

I’m sure you can see the appeal here.

The only major downside to carrying a folding knife is they cannot take as much abuse as a full tang fixed blade survival knife.

If you try chopping or batoning with a folder, you’ll quickly destroy the knife at it’s weakest point – the folding joint. So for most everyday carry uses, a folder is hard to beat, but don’t mistake a folder for a true survival knife.

Fixed Blade EDC Knives 

Unlike a folder, where you retrieve the knife and flip it open, with a fixed blade knife, well, the blade is fixed. There’s no joints or hinges; no unfolding or flipping it open.

So a fixed blade full tang knife can handle a lot more abuse. Think of it as a mini survival knife.

Now there are different ways to carry a smaller fixed bladed EDC knife. So let’s cover each of those options next.

Neck Knife Carry

A neck knife is typically a shorter fixed blade knife that fits in a slim sheath with a cord and the cord goes around your neck.

The better ones have a thin profile when in its sheath. It also should be lightweight, so it doesn’t become annoying or uncomfortable to carry every day.

Unlike a folder, where you retrieve the knife from a pocket and flip it open, with a neck knife,  you grab the knife’s handle and pull it down to release it from its sheath.

Boot Knife Carry

A boot knife is a small fixed blade knife worn in a sheath that wraps around your ankle or calf. Hence, the term “boot knife.”

You don’t necessarily have to be wearing boots tho.

Long pants work to keep the knife concealed as well, even if your wearing shoes. However, you probably don’t want to carry a boot knife around town in a pair of shorts.

Belt Knife Carry

Next, we have the popular belt knife carry.

Again, this is typically a shorter fixed blade knife that rests in a sheath but in this case, it rides along on your belt.

The biggest downside to this type of EDC knife is that it’s more difficult to conceal.

Now, maybe you don’t want to conceal it? Or maybe you want everyone to know you have a knife at the ready. Or maybe you wear long loose shirts and can still conceal it.

For some, the belt knife is the most convenient and most comfortable way to carry a small fixed blade knife around town.

Also, there’s also a newer type of belt knife hitting the market.

One where the small fixed blade knife is concealed in the belt buckle. These have a quick release clip so you can just grab the buckle, pull and you’re knife is ready to go.

pocket knife on split tree branch 1

Most Important Qualities For Your EDC Knife


As with any tool, there are a few basic components and characteristics you’ll want to look for.

But, everyone’s exact needs and preferences are going to be different for every person. And personal preference plays a big part in picking out the best EDC knife that will work well for you.

You have many factors to think about, from:

  • the weight
  • the shape of the handle
  • the size of the blade
  • the carry location
  • the blade design
  • the handle material

One specific knife might feel great for you and awkward as heck to the next guy. That’s normal. With this in mind, here’s a list of essential features good reliable EDC knives have in common:

Compact

Folding knives are exceptional in this regard.

For millennia knives were made with fixed blades that required sheathes for safely. These had to be strapped to a belt or pack. But in the 1900’s, when folding knives hit the scene, it changed the game.

Suddenly, you could put your EDC knife in your pocket, discretely tucked away but at the ready.

Some of the best EDC knives are folders. Not all great EDC knives are folders, but many are. They’ve become popular for everyday carry for a reason.

But short fixed blade EDC knives are compact as well.

Ergonomic Handle

The handle is a critical part of the knife. It’s the part of the knife you’ll be most intimate with, so make sure it feels great in your hand.

It should sit comfortably, and it should be easy to grip. If it feels too small or too large, try another size or another knife.

Don’t compromise here.

A knife that fits perfectly in your hand will help build a bond between you and your survival tool. It should feel like it was made for you.

Locking mechanism (folders only)

On the handle, there should be a button or a sliding clip to lock your blade in place.

I’ve seen people maimed by stray blades accidentally opening in their pockets. It’s essential for your safety that you can lock the blade in place when its folded and extended.

Fixed blade knives don’t have or need locking mechanisms.

Low-Riding Pocket Clip (folders only)

I would argue that the clip of a knife, is every bit as important as the folding mechanism or the blade lock. The clip makes it insanely easy to fasten a knife to the outside of a pack, or into a pocket.

Clips are essential when it comes to EDC knives, but some of them can be a pain.

Some clips are large and bulky and mostly just get in the way. Finding a knife with a nice, low profile clip, is a huge step towards finding the perfect survival EDC knife.

Good Sheath (mainly fixed blade knives)

With neck, boot and belt knives carry options you need to spend as much time researching the sheath as you do the knife. The sheath in these carry locations will make all the difference.

You want a sheath that’s compact but not flimsy and it should have a small profile. It needs to have enough material and size to do its job but no more.

It also should feel snug when the blade is seated.

Lightweight and Durable

There are some incredibly cool looking folding blade knives.

For example, I’ve seen some are made out of hardwood and inlaid with turquoise. Or made out of mammoth bone, with their blades forged from Toledo steel.

While these tools look cool, they are also way more cumbersome than your EDC knife should be.

A knife made out of durable, lightweight materials will serve you far better. Plus, it’ll weigh on you less throughout your day-to-day activities.

There’s a reason they don’t make bejeweled screwdrivers and golden plated hammers. Tools are meant to be used and beat up and worn down; not bedazzled.

If they’re made from precious materials, it compromises the utility of the instrument.

Legal Blade Length

The laws on “how long a knife blade can be” change from state to state and place to place. Some areas only allow knives of specific lengths to be carried on your person legally. While in other places, they might not allow people to carry knives at all.

Researching your states knife laws is an important step in buying an EDC knife.

If you don’t pay attention and buy a knife that’s illegally for open carry, it might get confiscated. Or worse, you might get a ticket for carrying it.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Ultimate List Of Survival Gear. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

The Best EDC Knife For You


Here’s a list of the best and most acclaimed EDC knives.

The following weapons have all the qualities listed above. These are very well-made blades you can rely on.

Folding EDC Knives

The Benchmade Griptilian 551

Benchmade knives are some of the best in the world. They are so renowned for their quality that the US military uses them as the standard issue army EDC knife.

I carry this exact blade in my pocket at all times, and it’s the best knife I’ve ever owned.

The thick stainless steel blade folds nicely into a highly durable. Plus, it has an extremely lightweight handle molded in the “griptilian” pattern.

The weight is perfect, and the balance of these knives is impeccable. You cannot go wrong with Benchmade, and this is one of their most popular blades.

The best part about Benchmade EDC knives is the lifetime warranty that they come with.

If your Benchmade blade ever fails, or malfunctions, you can send the knife no problem. Benchmade will work with you to replace the item.



The Kershaw Composite Blackwash Leek

This sleek little EDC knife comes with a 3” blade, and a D2 steel edge, and a very low-profile, reversible pocket clip.

The blade features SpeedSafe open-assist. This flicks the blade open very quickly, with just the touch of a button.

The locking mechanism is located at the bottom of the handle and fixes the blade in place when engaged.

Perhaps the best part about this Kershaw blade is its slim design.

Even when it’s folded into the handle, the knife is extremely slender, hiding easily in a pocket or on a belt.



The Spyderco Civilian

There are few EDC blades out there as wicked-looking as this knife. Its curved blade is serrated and developed for elite undercover law-enforcement agents.

Much like a handgun, this knife is designed for one thing: self-defense.

A mid-positioned back-lock prevents accidental closures/opening. Spyderco is a Colorado company that’s been making top-of-the-line knives for years.

Their products are some of the best in the blade business, and their price-points reflect that. They are expensive.

But you’re paying for extremely high quality and a lifetime guarantee.



Gerber Gator Folding Knife

Gerber is one of the oldest and most reliable knife-making companies in America. Making the Gerber Gator a highly reliable survival tool.

It’s basic, it’s simple, it’s versatile, it’s durable, and it’s authentic.

The handle is covered in a ballistic nylon grip molded to look like gator skin. And the thick, stainless steel blade is edged to perfection.

If you’re looking for an affordable, reliable EDC knife, there are few better options.



Columbia River Knife and Tool

CRKT makes some of the most affordable knives for the best quality. They are the perfect balance between affordability and excellence.

This knife is the perfect example of that.

The handle is made from high-durability textured glass filled nylon scales. The stainless steel blade features a seatbelt cutter on the Carson Flipper. It also includes a tungsten window-smasher on the butt.

The flipper can be pressed for an automatic single-hand opening of the tanto-shaped blade.

This knife is made for function, not for fashion but that does not mean it doesn’t look good.

There are several different handle color options available to choose from.



Neck EDC Knives

If you’re going to trust your life with a knife, it has to be strong enough for the job.

That’s why full tang fixed blades like the Survival Neck Knife are great for survival…

Survival Neck Knife

Survival Frog Neck KnifeFirst off, the Survival Neck Knife’s blade is much thicker than most.

On average, it’s blade is 3-4x thicker than a standard pocket knife. Why? Because most pocket knives are made thin on purpose to make them lighter.

Guess what. Saving weight at the expense of strength isn’t going to do a lick of good in a crisis.

Fortunately, at 4mm thick, the Survival Neck Knife’s blade is thick enough for batoning wood, skinning large game, and even using it as a mini pry bar.

Second, deploying the Survival Neck Knife is easy and frustration free.

It hangs comfortably around your neck, all you do is grab the handle and pull down.

So your blade is ready to go in less than a second.

That sure beats spending 5-10 seconds searching for a pocket knife or fumbling for a blade in a bag. The Survival Neck Knife is superior in a crisis or self-defense situation.

Lastly, the Survival Neck Knife can be easily concealed, making it invisible to the naked eye.

This is a HUGE advantage over carrying the standard fixed blade in a sheath on the hip.

 Just slip the survival lanyard over your neck and slide the Survival Neck Knife underneath your shirt and it’s hidden from sight.

Doesn’t that mean it’ll be hard to grab fast?

Nope, just pull up on the lanyard and the Survival Neck Knife will slide out from behind your shirt.

Ready to do whatever you need.

Not to mention that it’s extremely comfortable to wear. At just 3.2 oz. in total weight, you’ll barely notice you’re carrying this featherweight knife.

It’s the SkilledSurvival team’s most recommended neck knife and it makes for a damn good EDC knife too; especially for survival.

Boot Knives

Here’s the thing about boot knives, they’ve sort of gone out of style.

It used to be one of the most popular ways to carry an EDC knife. However, with the gain in popularity of folders, boot knives are just not as appealing.

Now, many companies call their knives “boot knives” but then they don’t provide a sheath with an ankle wrap to go along with it. To me, that’s not a “boot knife”.

The sheath and the wrap are an essential component. They must be designed and sold together for them to work properly.

So with that said, here is one solid boot knife for those who are determined to carry this way.

Gerber Ghoststrike Fixed Blade Knife Deluxe Kit with Ankle Wrap 

The Gerber Ghoststrike boot knife is compact with a skeletal design. It’s made from 420 HC steel and includes a black ceramic coating.

This coating reduces reflection for better evasion and helps prevent corrosion in harsh conditions.

The handle is textured and rubber for superior grip.

The overall knife length is 6.9 inches while the blade comes in at 3.3 inches.

The ankle wrap is made out of neoprene which offers both a comfortable and secure knife carry position.

Or you can get this knife without the ankle wrap (but still with the sheath) and carry it as a neck knife.

Belt Knife

Now when you think of belt knife, I’m sure you think of a knife in a sheath that can attach to your belt. Because that’s what a belt knife is, right?

Yes, but first I also want to share with you another take on the belt knife I think you’ll like.

Renegade Gear Belt Knife

This is a new take on the traditional “belt knife”.

The knife is completely contained in the belt buckle! Just draw the knife from the buckle anytime, anywhere fast.

It’s an ultra sharp steel knife that includes a serrated blade for sawing action.

Talk about hidden and comfortable to carry – this knife can’t be beat in those categories.

The key here is the belt. If the knife is great but the belt sucks, then who cares right? Nobody wants to wear an uncomfortable belt every day – even if it has a knife.

But the good news is, this belt is great too.

It has super tough webbing and fits all standard pant loops. Plus, it has a locking mechanism to keep it snug all day long without loosening up.

Lastly, you remove the knife without loosening or removing the belt.

Here’s a short introduction video, that show’s you better how this belt knife works.

Knife Sharpening

Caring For Your EDC Knives


Just like any knife, EDC knives need a little TLC from time to time. Maintenance and upkeep are necessary if you want them to continue to perform at their best.

But it’s nothing difficult or complicated. All it takes is the occasional sharpening and regular cleaning. Doing so will make a quality EDC knife last several lifetimes (or longer).

Cleaning

Most EDC knives are made of stainless steel. This makes cleaning them extremely easy.

First, scrape off any crud or grime from the blade (use a surface cleaner, like Windex, to get out stubborn stains).

With a damp rag, you can wipe down the blade and handle. And with a q-tip, you can clean out all the nooks and crannies a typical folding EDC knife has.

It’s also a good idea to oil your knife once in a while. To keep the hinge swinging like it is brand new.

Gun oil works best for this, applied to a q-tip and gently rubbed on the hinge-point (but you can also use WD-40).

Don’t go overboard though! A little oil goes a long way. Be sure to wipe off any excess oil afterward.

Sharpening

Many knife makers will sharpen your knife for you.

If your Kershaw, Spyderco or Benchmade blade is getting dull, send it back to the manufacturer. Let them use their specialized equipment to sharpen it correctly.

This also ensures that the blade is sharpened correctly and evenly.

Of course, this means parting ways with your EDC knife for several weeks.

You can also sharpen an EDC knife yourself, using a multitude of knife sharpeners.

Sharpen your blade every once in a while. Make sure you stay on top of it, a dull knife is more dangerous than a sharp one!

The Final Word


Buying an EDC knife is an important step towards becoming a prepared survivalist.

It’s a tool that serves a vast multitude of purposes, and it fits comfortably inside of a pants pocket, under a shirt, in a boot or on a belt.

EDC knives are an essential tool for anyone who considers themselves a survivalist. But finding the right one can be difficult.

Do your research, shop around, and find the best EDC knife for you.

It makes all the difference in the world carrying an EDC knife. Find one that feels like the perfect fit for your body, your preferences, and your survival needs.

Will Brendza

P.s. Do you know where the closest nuclear bunker is from your home?

There are a lot of natural nuclear shelters in the US that are absolutely free. And one of them is near your home.

Click on the image above to find out where you need to take shelter.

The post Best EDC Knife For Self Defense, Survival and Preparedness appeared first on Skilled Survival.