Looking for friends

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hello have property as of Jan 31 2018. have cabin kit off grid solar wind parts,

just waiting to get there an get driveway in then it begins
lol
hope to find friends that we can bounce ideas off each other

Now waiting on weather to break thinking April first have job till then.

hope to hear from other in ont

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55 Things Your Grandparents Lived Without — Can You?

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55 Things Your Grandparents Lived Without -- Can You?

I once heard a story about a young woman proudly showing off her new kitchen to her grandmother.  The kitchen had the latest and greatest of everything—high-end range, refrigerator with water and ice through the door, gentle-glide drawers, and granite countertops.

As the older woman admired the kitchen, her granddaughter asked her, “Grandma, what is the thing you like most about it?”

“Running water,” the grandmother replied.

For me, that story has always reminded me to keep my blessings and challenges in perspective. Many of our grandparents grew up with what we would likely consider privation by today’s standards. Depending upon the ages of you and your grandparents, and on your family’s geography and lifestyle, it’s possible there is a wide gap between that which you take for granted and what your grandparents once lived without.

Assuming your grandparents were born somewhere between the end of the 19th century and the middle of the 20th, here are a few of the things many of us consider to be necessities today that our grandparents probably lived some or all of their lives without.

  1. Personal computers. Actually, most people old enough to be parents today have lived at least part of their lives without home computers.
  2. Laptops. There’s a good chance that anyone born before the year 2000 has not always had one.
  3. Smart phones. We all remember life without smart phones.
  4. Tablets and other modern devices. Most of us remember when the word “device” didn’t have anything to do with communication.
  5. Voice-activated devices. Hey Alexa, how long ago were you invented?
  6. Mobile phones of any kind. Lots of us grew up without one.
  7. The Internet. Our grandparents probably grew up using encyclopedias, if they were lucky.
  8. Google. Most of us remember the teacher telling us to look words up in the dictionary.
  9. Cloud storage. Some of our grandparents might have thought humanity had gone ‘round the bend if someone told them they were storing photos in a cloud.
  10. YouTube. Mindblowing, when you think about it.
  11. Credit cards. The rule of thumb was once that if you didn’t have the money today, you didn’t buy it today.
  12. Debit cards. Our grandparents probably grew up on just cash and checks.
  13. Big houses. Homes are much larger than they once were.
  14. Multiple bathrooms in one home. Your grandparents likely got by with just one bathroom for the whole family to share.
  15. Indoor plumbing. Your grandparents might have even had to use an outdoor privy and lug water for washing.
  16. Electricity. Although urban areas had electricity for most of the last century, it was not available to many rural residents until decades later.
  17. Central heating and air conditioning. Many of our grandparents might consider this a real luxury.
  18. Online shopping. Once upon a time, in a galaxy not all that far away, people had two choices:  they bought from the local store, or else they pored over a print catalog and filled out forms with pens and put money in an envelope and waited for weeks for the thing they ordered to arrive.  Now, we can lie on the couch in our pajamas and buy just about anything—the world of shopping is literally at the tip of our fingers.
  19. Cheap airfare. Buying an airplane ticket was once a really big deal, mostly reserved for very special occasions or for wealthy people.
  20. Uber rides. Call some stranger and ask them to come pick you up?  Sure, strangers helped people out in the good old days.  But it wasn’t Uber.
  21. Online financing and mortgages. For most of our grandparents, seeking a loan was a lot harder process than it is today.  It included a long paper application, at least one face-to-face interview, and a multiday wait.   The last time I took out a mortgage, I entered a few facts and figures on my home computer and got an answer within minutes.
  22. Medical test results available almost immediately. In the old days, people got blood drawn at the hospital and waited for two weeks for the results to arrive in the mail.  Nowadays, your doctor often gets the results later the same day.
  23. Huge closets full of clothing, shoes, and accessories. I don’t know how many purses or pairs of shoes my grandmother had, but I bet I have more.  Way more.
  24. Dishwashers. Many of us alive today have lived part or all of our lives hand-washing dishes.
  25. Kitchen electrics. Our grandparents might have had a toaster or a stand mixer, but probably didn’t have the wide range of small electrical appliances available to us today, from smoothie machines to stick blenders to juicers to expresso makers to spiralizers.
  26. Automatic icemakers. Filling ice cube trays and setting them in the freezer without spilling them and then busting the ice out of them is hard.  Especially if they’re those old-fashioned aluminum kind. Reaching into the freezer and grabbing a few ice cubes that your freezer made and dumped into a container for you is easy.
  27. Overnight mail delivery. Some of our grandparents lived in a time when a letter took several days just to cross a few state lines, and people spent extra on “air mail” when it was urgent.  But even air mail didn’t arrive the next day.
  28. Reliable weather forecasts. Meteorology wasn’t as precise as it is today.  They didn’t have access to radar and other modern tools, and it was often a guess at best.
  29. Warnings for natural disasters. Scientists and officials still don’t get it right all the time, but warnings for blizzards, tsunamis, and floods are far more efficient than they were in our grandparents’ day.
  30. Comfortable passenger cars. Some of our grandparents could never even have imagined the creature comforts in modern cars.  Power windows and mirrors, heated seats, air conditioning, state-of-the-art sound systems, cruise control, lumbar support, navigation systems—wow!
  31. Fast food. The ability to zip in, order, pick up, and zip out with a bag of food in your hand is a relatively modern concept.
  32. Drive-up windows. We can do a lot without getting out of our cars these days.  We can buy food, do our banking, pick up prescription meds, grab a few groceries, and in some regions even do convenience-store shopping.
  33. Live-saving vaccinations. A world where diseases like polio, diphtheria, pertussis, influenza, tuberculosis, and smallpox threatened lives and caused irreparable disability existed in many of our grandparents’ lifetimes.
  34. Life-changing medications. From antibiotics to statins to antipsychotic drugs to hormone replacements to synthetic insulin to pain relief to cancer chemotherapy, our grandparents had far fewer choices.
  35. Surgeries and other medical advancements. Our grandparents might not have had the option of knee- or hip-replacement, or prosthetic limbs, or cataract surgery, or even cutting-edge diagnostic procedures like MRIs and mammograms.
  36. Food imported from all over the globe. Our grandparents probably couldn’t walk into the produce section and choose from hundreds of different fresh vegetables and fruits 365 days a year.  Buying local is important, but it’s nice to be able to occasionally indulge in fresh produce on a cold winter day.
  37. Replacement formula for babies. Our grandparents had far fewer choices when it came to infant nutrition.  Mother’s milk is not always possible, and cow’s milk by itself is incomplete.
  38. Television. Many of our grandparents grew up without TV.  And even those who did have a television often had just one, in the living room, with just black-and-white pictures and limited selections.
  39. TV on demand. Today’s viewers can choose between cable, Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, and dozens of other channel choices.  Our grandparents?  Not so much.
  40. Remote controls. I have one for my TV, one for my Roku box, and one for my internet radio.   That’s not a lot of remote controls by today’s standards, but it’s three more than my grandparents had.
  41. Power tools. Anyone who has ever used a cordless impact driver or a table saw or a belt sander can testify to how much easier and faster and more efficient they are than their manual counterparts.  Our grandparents did it the hard way.
  42. Plastic. The amount of plastic most of us use in our everyday lives is staggering.  Very little of our lives is untouched by plastic, from sandwich bags to house siding to toothbrush handles to storage totes to snow sleds to rakes to water buckets to trash bags to lawn furniture to car dashboards to dishware to children’s toys to zippers.  Our grandparents had products made out of wood, pottery, glass, metal, and natural materials.  But they might not have grown up with much plastic.
  43. Disposable diapers. Many people alive today spent their early years in cloth diapers, or possibly even used them for their own children.  The convenient remove-and-toss method was not an option a few generations ago.
  44. Disposable tissues. Many of our grandparents used reusable handkerchiefs.
  45. Paper towels and napkins. People used reusable cloth for cleanup jobs far more often in our grandparents’ day.
  46. Disposable tableware. Plates, cups, and flatware were items which our grandparents bought once, used every day, and washed over and over.
  47. Microwave ovens. When I told my young children that I had not had a microwave in my childhood home, they asked me in hushed astonished tones, “How did you live?!” I got by, it turns out.  Just like most of our grandparents did.
  48. Synthetic fabrics. A lot of garment labels today list fibers I’ve never even heard of.  Our grandparents had far fewer choices of materials for clothing, outerwear, accessories, and home décor.
  49. Ready-made foods at the grocery store. In our grandparents’ day, the grocery store carried mostly whole foods.  Heat-and-eat options are a relatively recent phenomenon.
  50. Ready-made coffee. Our grandparents made their own coffee at home.  Without a Keurig machine, and possibly even without an electric drip coffeemaker.  Going out to the local coffee shop, or even the corner gas station, for a cup of coffee, hasn’t always been a thing people do.
  51. Automatic laundry machines. Many of our grandparents didn’t have dryers.  And if they had a washer, it was probably a lot less user-friendly than the ones we have today.
  52. If our grandparents did have refrigerators, they were not like the ones we have today.
  53. Riding lawn equipment. Our grandparents probably used a walk-behind mower, with or without a gas-powered engine, to mow their small lawn.
  54. Electric heating pads and chemical heating patches. Our grandparents probably used hot water bottles and poultices instead.
  55. Paid time off work. Paid vacations have not always been common, and maternity/paternity leave didn’t always exist.

This list could truly go on forever, and I have barely scratched the surface. Such a lot has changed in just a few generations that it must be difficult for some of our grandparents to even recognize the planet we inhabit today as the same one they grew up on. Some of the changes truly represent advancement, while others make us all wonder if modern-day goods and services might have gone too far. But most of us embrace the things we’ve grown accustomed to, and we may find it challenging to live without the things our grandparents didn’t have.

What would you add to our list? Share your thoughts in the section below: 

6 Secrets To Keeping Chickens Healthy During Winter

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6 Secrets To Keeping Chickens Healthy During Winter

Image source: Pixabay.com

Winter is a scary time for new chicken owners. We want our flock to be warm, healthy and happy — which can be challenging with freezing temperatures and snow coating the ground.

Fortunately, once you figure it out, raising chickens in the winter isn’t that hard. Most chickens are hardy and able to handle the cool temperatures. Here are some crucial tips that will make the winter experience better for you and the flock.

1. Don’t add a heater; add insulation

If you are considering a heater for your chicken coop, I caution you to back away. My husband is a firefighter and has responded to dozens of chicken coop fires over the years. It is not safe. All of the bedding is begging to start a fire.

Chickens don’ t need a heater. They huddle together for warmth. Insulation is a better choice, but you need to add that when you build your chicken coop. You also don’t want to seal off the coop entirely. Ventilation will prevent moisture from building up. All of the droppings and no ventilation will lead to ammonia in your coop, and that is a recipe for sickness.

There is a huge difference between ventilation and drafts. You don’t want drafts. Ventilation areas should be above where the chickens roost, ensuring they don’t get cold. Typically, it is the space between the roof and walls, covered with hardware cloth. You don’t want a predator entering!

2. Add entertainment

Winter can be boring for humans and chickens. They need something to do with their time as they hang out in the coop more often. A popular option is hanging a head of cabbage as a play toy. They will peck at the cabbage dangling from the ceiling.

You can even provide a dust bathing area. Put a tub of sand or wood ash mixed with food grade diatomaceous earth. Some people just put it on the ground in the coop and let them scratch it up. Either way, chickens love to bathe and dust themselves! Plus, it helps keep lice and mites away.

3. Provide covered outdoor space

Many chickens prefer not to step in snow. I found that out when only two of my chickens would dare venture outside after a snowstorm. Giving them a covered space outside allows them to venture out, whether they are fans of snow or not.

The solution can be as easy as adding a tarp over part of the run. They just need an area without snow, unless you want to go shovel. But, no one likes to shovel, so just save yourself a backache and create a makeshift roof.

Another solution is to scatter hay and straw on the ground outside to cover the snow. When the temperatures start to increase around the low 30s, chickens may venture out even without snow protection. Under those temperatures, it is hard to convince them.

4. Coat their combs and wattles

Unfortunately, I had no idea that breeds with large combs and wattles are more prone to frostbite. One of our roosters years ago, Sven, loved to stand outside, even in the negative temperatures. I noticed black tips on his comb, and the tips eventually fell off.

Chickens can get frostbite just as easily as we do. To protect their combs and wattles, gently smear some petroleum jelly on them each day when you go to check their food and water. Don’t worry; if your chickens get frostbite as mine did, it typically just affects their appearance.

5. Give appropriate roost space

You might have to adjust your coop design if you find that you don’t have enough roosting space for each chicken. Chickens fluff their feathers and roost together at night. It keeps them warm and snug. Warmer air rises, keeping them comfortable.

Venture outside once all the chickens are roosting to see if everyone has a spot. If someone is on the ground, you need to add more space. That poor chicken on the ground is going to be cold and more vulnerable.

6. Give them greens

In the summer, chickens have access to delicious and healthy greens, especially if they can free range. Winter limits those choices. It is hard for them to forage and find anything substantial. Try to make an effort to give them safe kitchen scraps as often as possible.

Another choice is to learn how to grow fodder yourself inside. Fodder is an excellent supplement for your chickens in the winter months. It will boost the quality of your eggs, as well.

If you live in an area that receives extremely low temperatures regularly, you will want to make sure that you pick cold-hardy chickens. Some breeds handle lower temperatures better. However, with these tips, you can guarantee all of your chickens will be healthy and happy come spring time.

What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

6 Secrets To Keeping Chickens Healthy During Winter

6 Secrets To Keeping Chickens Healthy During Winter

Image source: Pixabay.com

Winter is a scary time for new chicken owners. We want our flock to be warm, healthy and happy — which can be challenging with freezing temperatures and snow coating the ground.

Fortunately, once you figure it out, raising chickens in the winter isn’t that hard. Most chickens are hardy and able to handle the cool temperatures. Here are some crucial tips that will make the winter experience better for you and the flock.

1. Don’t add a heater; add insulation

If you are considering a heater for your chicken coop, I caution you to back away. My husband is a firefighter and has responded to dozens of chicken coop fires over the years. It is not safe. All of the bedding is begging to start a fire.

Chickens don’ t need a heater. They huddle together for warmth. Insulation is a better choice, but you need to add that when you build your chicken coop. You also don’t want to seal off the coop entirely. Ventilation will prevent moisture from building up. All of the droppings and no ventilation will lead to ammonia in your coop, and that is a recipe for sickness.

There is a huge difference between ventilation and drafts. You don’t want drafts. Ventilation areas should be above where the chickens roost, ensuring they don’t get cold. Typically, it is the space between the roof and walls, covered with hardware cloth. You don’t want a predator entering!

2. Add entertainment

Winter can be boring for humans and chickens. They need something to do with their time as they hang out in the coop more often. A popular option is hanging a head of cabbage as a play toy. They will peck at the cabbage dangling from the ceiling.

You can even provide a dust bathing area. Put a tub of sand or wood ash mixed with food grade diatomaceous earth. Some people just put it on the ground in the coop and let them scratch it up. Either way, chickens love to bathe and dust themselves! Plus, it helps keep lice and mites away.

3. Provide covered outdoor space

Many chickens prefer not to step in snow. I found that out when only two of my chickens would dare venture outside after a snowstorm. Giving them a covered space outside allows them to venture out, whether they are fans of snow or not.

The solution can be as easy as adding a tarp over part of the run. They just need an area without snow, unless you want to go shovel. But, no one likes to shovel, so just save yourself a backache and create a makeshift roof.

Another solution is to scatter hay and straw on the ground outside to cover the snow. When the temperatures start to increase around the low 30s, chickens may venture out even without snow protection. Under those temperatures, it is hard to convince them.

4. Coat their combs and wattles

Unfortunately, I had no idea that breeds with large combs and wattles are more prone to frostbite. One of our roosters years ago, Sven, loved to stand outside, even in the negative temperatures. I noticed black tips on his comb, and the tips eventually fell off.

Chickens can get frostbite just as easily as we do. To protect their combs and wattles, gently smear some petroleum jelly on them each day when you go to check their food and water. Don’t worry; if your chickens get frostbite as mine did, it typically just affects their appearance.

5. Give appropriate roost space

You might have to adjust your coop design if you find that you don’t have enough roosting space for each chicken. Chickens fluff their feathers and roost together at night. It keeps them warm and snug. Warmer air rises, keeping them comfortable.

Venture outside once all the chickens are roosting to see if everyone has a spot. If someone is on the ground, you need to add more space. That poor chicken on the ground is going to be cold and more vulnerable.

6. Give them greens

In the summer, chickens have access to delicious and healthy greens, especially if they can free range. Winter limits those choices. It is hard for them to forage and find anything substantial. Try to make an effort to give them safe kitchen scraps as often as possible.

Another choice is to learn how to grow fodder yourself inside. Fodder is an excellent supplement for your chickens in the winter months. It will boost the quality of your eggs, as well.

If you live in an area that receives extremely low temperatures regularly, you will want to make sure that you pick cold-hardy chickens. Some breeds handle lower temperatures better. However, with these tips, you can guarantee all of your chickens will be healthy and happy come spring time.

What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

Off-Grid Tricks That Will Make Your House Warmer (And Lower Your Heating Costs, Too)

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Off-Grid Tricks That Will Make Your House Warmer (And Lower Your Heating Costs, Too)

Image source: Pixabay.com

No matter where you live, staying warm in the winter takes much more work than being comfortable the rest of the year. But it can be done — no matter your heating source.

Be Creative When Insulating

Keeping the warm air in and the cold air out is priority No. 1 when it comes to home heating. If replacing old doors and windows or adding to existing insulation is an option, consider one of these other insulating methods:

  • Use heavy drapes or even blankets over older windows to protect from cold.
  • Seal around door jambs and window casing with expandable foam to prevent drafts.
  • Replace weather stripping around leaky doors and windows.
  • Add window film or bubble wrap over windows to increase their insulating values.
  • Keep unused rooms closed and use draft stoppers along the floor to keep cold air from leaking into occupied rooms.
  • Install outlet and switchplate gaskets to stop cold air in exterior walls from seeping into living spaces.

Heat the Person, Not the Room

Turn the thermostat down a notch and still stay warm by focusing on the person and not heating an entire home. Throw blankets, lap quilts, and afghans are all good ways to keep a person warm and lower your heating costs. Extra blankets or even heated blankets provide a comfortable place to sleep if the air in your bedroom is cold.

Take Advantage of the Sun

Some of the coldest days of the year are usually the sunniest! Take advantage of solar heating by opening drapes and curtains on windows that get the most direct sunlight during the day. You also can build or buy solar window boxes which harvest the heat of the sun and allow it to pass into your home via open windows.

Kill two birds with one stone and consider putting in a lean-to style greenhouse attached to your home where the excess heat can be let into the house by opening a window, or enclose a porch with polycarbonate panels for the same effect. Not only can you help heat the house, but you can grow or start your garden veggies, as well!

Become a Fan of Fans

It may seem counter-productive, but using fans to push air around in the winter can save you big bucks on your heating bills. Use ceiling fans to bring warm air down from the ceiling, small corner fans to push air down hallways or into small rooms, and box fans or woodstove fans to move air from one room to another.

Waste Not, Want Not

Using the oven? Leave the door open when you are done cooking to let the heat escape into the room. The same can be done with the clothes dryer. Just keep in mind that if you have lights in either of these appliances that can’t be turned off, you’ll want to be diligent about getting them closed when they aren’t providing heat to the room.

Think Outside the Box – Recycle and Upcycle

If you’ve got a wood stove, consider making your own firebricks and firelogs out of old junk mail and newspapers. You also can use catalogs, food packaging boxes, wood scraps (no pressure treated, plywoods or chipboards which contain glues, chemicals or resins) and even pinecones in place of firewood.

For radiators or wall-mounted propane heaters without fans, use a wall shelf mounted above to steer heat into the room instead of straight up towards the ceiling. Just be sure to check with the manufacturer to determine safe clearances.

You also can use leftover greenhouse building materials to build solar heating boxes as mentioned above.

Use More Than One Heating Source

Don’t be afraid to diversify and use more than one heating source for your home. If you have electric heat but live in a wooded area or have access to inexpensive firewood, consider adding a wood stove, or wood furnace as well to save money. If you already have propane for cooking, look into adding a propane fireplace or heater if propane in your area is cost effective. By using more than one heating source you have options if there is suddenly a spike in propane or oil costs, or if your usual firewood cutting area gets closed due to fire.

What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

How To Keep Your Compost Pile Churning … All Winter Long

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How To Keep Your Compost Pile Churning … All Winter Long

Image source; Wikipedia

It can be a struggle to maintain your compost bin or pile over the winter. Whether you’re dealing with severe cold and/or heavy snow in northerly regions, excessive moisture in the Pacific Northwest, or desert conditions in the American Southwest, your compost pile may need a little extra help during the winter months. It’s worth it, though. By the time spring rolls around, you’ll be rich in black gold.

There are two basic composting methods. With any waste material, microorganisms (aerobic bacteria) naturally work on decomposition, and you can speed that process along by doing things like maintaining the correct ratio of green to brown waste and turning the pile regularly. Vermicomposting relies on worms to eat organic matter and then cast (poop) rich soil as a byproduct. If you keep your organic waste on bare ground, your pile likely hosts both vermicomposting and composting processes.

Hot Composting

As bacteria break down waste material, they generate heat. That heat is crucial for the bacteria to keep growing, multiplying, and just generally doing their job. While most people refer to this process simply as “composting,” the more technical term is “thermophilic composting” or, more informally, “hot composting.” And “hot composting” it is: compost piles can reach internal temperatures of 150℉!

Even though compost naturally generates heat, cold weather, of course, brings the temperature of the compost pile down. That affects the ability of the bacteria to do their job, particularly on the outside edges of the pile. If the temperatures dip too far — and especially if the compost isn’t tended to — microbial activity will cease completely. If you’re willing to wait for warmer spring temps for the decomposition to resume, then that’s not a big deal. But if you would prefer to keep generating compost over the winter months, there are a few ways to help your compost’s microorganisms chug along.

If You Build It

Help your compost stay toasty by enclosing it with three walls and a roof. (Leave the south-facing side uncovered, so that it can absorb warmth from the sun.) This can be as easy or as complex as you make it. Stack cinder blocks or nail together scrap lumber for the walls. For the roof, you can just balance a loose piece of lumber on top or throw a tarp over the whole thing. Even easier: Buy a compost tumbler. Enclosing compost not only helps trap its heat, but also to moderate the effects of wind and excessive moisture.

If your region experiences extreme cold, adding insulation is a good idea. Again, this does not have to be done at great cost or effort. Surround your enclosure with straw bales, line the walls with several layers of cardboard, or pile snow, straw, or leaves around it. Don’t forget to insulate the roof, as well.

Go Bigger

The bigger your compost pile is, the more bacteria it will have, and the more heat it will generate. According to the University of Illinois Extension, compost piles that are at least one cubic yard in size will weather Midwestern American winters best.

Fuel Up

Adding new waste material regularly is crucial — but you need to be careful about what kind of material you add and its size.

Maintaining the ideal proportion of green to brown waste (a.k.a. the C:N ratio) is especially important in the winter, when we want our compost piles to work at maximum efficiency. Check this site for detailed information about the C:N ratio to shoot for depending on which brown waste you add.

If you bag leaves in the fall with the intent of adding those to your compost over the winter, bring a bag inside overnight before dumping it in, so that the cold leaves don’t bring down the temperature of the pile.

It’s also a good idea to shred waste before dumping it in. Waste that’s roughly two inches in size will break down more quickly, keeping heat levels consistently high.

Not too Wet, Not too Dry

Ideally, compost should be just lightly moist. If it’s too wet, the bacteria can’t get the oxygen they need to survive. But if it’s too dry, the bacteria can’t do their job, either.

If you live in an area that experiences heavy moisture in the winter, plan your compost enclosure accordingly: a South-facing opening so that the sun can warm and dry the waste; and a roof or other covering to keep moisture out. If your compost pile unexpectedly gets too wet, stirring it up with a pitchfork should help dry things out. Additionally, adding more brown waste will help soak up excess moisture.

If you live in a desert area, keep your compost uncovered. Make a crater (or craters) in the top, to catch all the moisture you can. If worst comes to worst, you can always break out the hose.

Vermicomposting

As might be expected, vermicomposting can be problematic during cold winter months. That said, a simple workaround is to keep your vermicompost bin indoors. If the thought of a bin full of worms under your kitchen sink grosses you out (and I’ll admit I’m in that camp), the bin can be kept in an insulated garage or outbuilding, or elsewhere in your house, such as the basement or laundry room.

Depending on your location, it may be possible to keep your vermicompost box outdoors during the winter. Keep in mind that the worms will die if they get either too cold or too hot. You’ll need to experiment to find a balance of insulating the bin enough to keep it warm, but not so much that the insulation along with the heat from the hot compost process plus any heat from the sun fries your worms.

Do you keep your compost pile active all winter long? If so, share your tips and trick in the comment section below.

TO LIVE HEALTHY FRUIT LIFE AND FREE MYSELF IN NATURE IN HAWAII

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there is an abundance of wild fruit in hawaii i assume considering the hot climate, that is why i think Hawaii, I have to get a flight from Melbourne to Hawaii, will be better if I have others, restore our health and connection with source energy, detoxing from the negative energies we have been surrounded by, my name is Harry and Im 20 , Im confident that even if no one comes I dont care Il go by myself , but others join, I have a tent i will sleep in, peace, fuck living in this city , i can live in citys later at life when im at peace and confident in what i am doing, right now this shit jjjust causase me 24/7 stress

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Rotate and replace – learn it, love it, live it

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As I’ve posted before, about a zillion years ago there was a sale on oatmeal at the local Albertson’s. I went long on it and wound up with a five-gallon Gamma-sealed bucket full of vacuum-sealed packets of instant oatmeal. And there they sat. Quietly waiting. Until one day about ten years later when I decided to pull ’em out and get ’em into the rotation.

Well, that means that what came out of long-term storage must be replaced, no? As I was flipping through Costco’s little sales flyer I see that they have 52-packs of oatmeal on sale for $5.99. That comes out to about twelve cents per package of oatmeal. Being the curious sort, I checked the scale and the packages do weight the same. However, and this surprised me, the apple flavor oatmeal packages contain almost 25% less product than the brown sugar or cinnamon flavor packets. Interesting.

But the point is that in the course of around 12 years, the sale price of the oatmeal products has remained virtually unchanged. Which I found rather interesting. It also nice to see that my food storage program has been going on long enough that even somewhat-long-term stuff hasstarted getting rotated and replaced on a regular basis. Go me!

Anyway, these things will get packed a dozen to a bag and sealed up for the Deep Sleep. Oatmeal isnt anyone’s favorite food, but it is very difficult to argue against it’s convenience. Some boiling water, freeze dried fruit to mix in, and you’ve pretty much got a decent breakfast. In the Venezuela-of-the-future you could have oatmeal, fruit, eggs, bacon, and orange drink all out of a can you put away twenty years ago. Kinda comforting, that. Speaking of Venezuela…this was too good to not share:

-666 Points: We Just Witnessed The 6th Largest Single Day Stock Market Decline In U.S. History

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-666 Points: We Just Witnessed The 6th Largest Single Day Stock Market Decline In U.S. History The stock market is a perilous situation. When you really start to think about how deep the claws of greed are dug it can get a little scary. Do you have any idea how many computer programs are handling …

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The post -666 Points: We Just Witnessed The 6th Largest Single Day Stock Market Decline In U.S. History appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Trump Tax Cuts Have Postponed Economic Collapse

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Trump Tax Cuts Have Postponed Economic Collapse The economic collapse is one of the most widely agreed upon scenarios for the collapse of society. Like an asteroid just grazing our atmosphere the 2008 crisis was not as bad as it could have been because society still believed in the banks and the government. I wonder …

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Trump Tax Cuts Have Postponed Economic Collapse

Trump Tax Cuts Have Postponed Economic Collapse The economic collapse is one of the most widely agreed upon scenarios for the collapse of society. Like an asteroid just grazing our atmosphere the 2008 crisis was not as bad as it could have been because society still believed in the banks and the government. I wonder …

Continue reading

The post Trump Tax Cuts Have Postponed Economic Collapse appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Post-Collapse Charity

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When it comes to charity in any SHTF/post-collapse world, there are two main schools of thought. In this article, I will examine both schools of thought, and then give my opinion of how to handle charity, pot-collapse.

Option 1)  No Charity – Take Care of Your Own

But if anyone does not provide for his own, that is his own household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.” — 1 Timothy 5:8 (HCSB)


Those of the “No Charity” school point out that it is a matter of security. You don’t want your home or retreat to be overrun by refugees or looters, which is exactly what would happen once word gets out that you plenty of food and other stuff. Better to act like you are just another one of the starving masses, with nothing worth taking. 

Many of the “No Charity” folks also point out that you really don’t have any excess to give out to hose in need. In truth, you don’t know how long the collapse will be, or what your future needs will be. Your first priority must be your family/group, and you may actually end up needing that “excess” that you gave away.

Option 2)  Be Charitable – Help Those in Need

Let them do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to give, willing to share” — 1 Timothy 6:18

But whoever has this world’s goods, and sees his brother in need, and shuts up his heart from him, how does the love of God abide in him?” — 1 John 3:17


Those of the “Be Charitable” school point to a multitude of passages where the Bible teaches us, commands us, to be charitable and generous towards others, especially those in need – the poor, the homeless, and so forth. Furthermore, they say that being charitable can be done safely without endangering your family, or taking an unreasonable risk of running out of food and supplies too soon. This is particularly true if you plan ahead to be charitable, and know exactly how much you can give, to whom you will give, and how you will do so. 

My Thoughts

Both schools of thought on post-collapse charity make valid points. The Bible does instruct us that we are first and foremost responsible for taking care of our own. The Bible also instructs us that we are to be charitable and generous to others in need – even strangers. It is, in my opinion, a matter of balance. We must strive to rise to God’s standards and do both to the best of our ability. But, how do we balance the needs of our family with the needs of strangers? This balance will be made especially difficult in the dire and unpredictable nature of a collapse.

Plan Ahead for Charity

The key is to plan ahead. You won’t be able to figure out the best balance after-the-fact, when fear and other emotions will run wild.

In my planning, I  am not expecting massive hordes from the cities (see my myth of the golden horde article). Most people will die in the cities, waiting (and looting & rioting) for the government to show up to help them (learned helplessness). Or they will die while trying to escape the city. Frankly, I don’t expect the vast majority to make it 20 miles out of the city before dying or being killed.* A few city folks will make it out, of course, but not the hordes of most preppers’ nightmares.For similar reasons, I don’t expect far flung relatives to show up at my door. My cousin and his family, who live in Chicago, will never make it to my home in North Carolina during a collapse, even if they wanted to come here. 

Instead, I expect we will be dealing with local folks (friends, neighbors, acquaintances) needing help, and maybe the occasional refugee. Those folks can be dangerous, since desperate people do desperate things, and we should be ready to deal with that danger. However, I think most will simply be pitiful. 

Ideas For Providing Charity

Church-based Charity – A church I attended many years ago had a small room where they stored old coats & jackets, blankets, canned and dried food, baby supplies, and other similar things. These were then given to the homeless or other people in need that would show up at the church from time-to-time asking for help. Your church could do something similar – storing supplies that could be distributed to needy folks in an emergency. Worried about break-ins or looters showing up at the church? Your church could come up with a plan to provide security at the church during a crisis. An added benefit of this is the church would then be able to act as a headquarters and communications hub for the entire congregation, or even as a temporary shelter for members.
 
Cache-based Charity – An idea I heard recently from Viking Preparedness (Pastor Joe Fox), is to set up a number of caches a couple of miles away from your home or retreat. When refuges show up, give them a map to the cache, along with a warning that you have no more supplies to share and will treat them as looters if they show up at your home a second time.With some supplies, your threat, and a couple of miles distance from your home, the refuges will likely continue onward rather than continuing to bother you. 

Supplies-for-Work – When a neighbor shows up at your place needing food or other supplies, offer them a job! “Split this wood, and I’ll give you a bag of food.” “Spend two hours weeding my garden, and I’ll give you a bottle of aspirin.” Or whatever. There will be lots of projects on your homestead needing to be done. Trading supplies for work will be of benefit to both parties. You might even be able to hire the right refuge or two to work on your homestead and help with security in exchange for room and board. Of course, be careful who you hire on, but not all refugees are bad guys. 

Give-a-Bag / Don’t Come Back – Fill up a number of tote bags with some food, a couple of bottles of water, some matches, and a small first aid kit (the kind you can get at Wal-mart for a buck in the travel-size rack), and maybe even a Gospel of John. When refuges show up, give them a bag with a warning that you don’t have much, and will not give them any more under any circumstances. Let them know you’re armed and vigilant, and if they come back, you’ll be forced to treat them as looters. 

A Final Note

Remember, we’re talking about helping needy neighbors and true refugees, not gangs of armed thugs trying to take your stuff. You need to have a security plan in place to deal with looters and bandits with extreme prejudice. But neighbors and refugees you can deal with generously but firmly.  


* Do you really expect those folks who can’t get around Wal-mart without an electric shopping cart to be able to hike out to your homestead? Most people are fat, unhealthy, out-of-shape, and totally unprepared to bug-out. Besides, by the time they realize that they need to get out, gas will be completely gone and the roads and Interstates will be undrivable parking lots.

Sprouting new garden plants from seeds: tips from an old pro

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Do a bit of research to find seeds of plants you’ll love. I go with heritage seeds but if you want to use hybrid and just stock their heritage seeds, that works too. Each year I mix up a few new varieties. I love the Black Krim Tomato it has an awesome sweet flavor. It’s […]

Food Storage Recipe – Cheesy Ham & Potato Foil Pack

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This is perfect for camping or at home just wrapped up and stuck in the oven. Great way to warm up the kitchen on a cold morning.

NEED

 ● 1 ¾ cups cubed cooked ham steak

● 3 peeled and cubed potatoes

 ● 1 1/ 3 cups Alfredo sauce

. ● 1 cup shredded Swiss cheese

 ● 2 tbsp. chopped fresh chives

 Cut one large piece of foil around 20” x 18” and spray with cooking spray.

 Spoon your ham into the middle of your piece of foil and add your potatoes on top.

 Pour your Alfredo sauce on top of the potatoes and then sprinkle with cheese.

 Fold your foil into a packet, creasing all of the edges to firmly close it while leaving a small tent over the ingredients.

Put your closed packet on the hot coals of your campfire or on top of your heated grill.

Cook for 20 minutes, flipping the packet half way through cooking.

 Make sure your potatoes are tender after 20 minutes of cooking, if not, continue cooking a bit more time til they are done.

Food Storage Recipe – Cheesy Ham & Potato Foil Pack

This is perfect for camping or at home just wrapped up and stuck in the oven. Great way to warm up the kitchen on a cold morning.

NEED

 ● 1 ¾ cups cubed cooked ham steak

● 3 peeled and cubed potatoes

 ● 1 1/ 3 cups Alfredo sauce

. ● 1 cup shredded Swiss cheese

 ● 2 tbsp. chopped fresh chives

 Cut one large piece of foil around 20” x 18” and spray with cooking spray.

 Spoon your ham into the middle of your piece of foil and add your potatoes on top.

 Pour your Alfredo sauce on top of the potatoes and then sprinkle with cheese.

 Fold your foil into a packet, creasing all of the edges to firmly close it while leaving a small tent over the ingredients.

Put your closed packet on the hot coals of your campfire or on top of your heated grill.

Cook for 20 minutes, flipping the packet half way through cooking.

 Make sure your potatoes are tender after 20 minutes of cooking, if not, continue cooking a bit more time til they are done.

Food Storage Recipe – Cheesy Ham & Potato Foil Pack

This is perfect for camping or at home just wrapped up and stuck in the oven. Great way to warm up the kitchen on a cold morning.

NEED

 ● 1 ¾ cups cubed cooked ham steak

● 3 peeled and cubed potatoes

 ● 1 1/ 3 cups Alfredo sauce

. ● 1 cup shredded Swiss cheese

 ● 2 tbsp. chopped fresh chives

 Cut one large piece of foil around 20” x 18” and spray with cooking spray.

 Spoon your ham into the middle of your piece of foil and add your potatoes on top.

 Pour your Alfredo sauce on top of the potatoes and then sprinkle with cheese.

 Fold your foil into a packet, creasing all of the edges to firmly close it while leaving a small tent over the ingredients.

Put your closed packet on the hot coals of your campfire or on top of your heated grill.

Cook for 20 minutes, flipping the packet half way through cooking.

 Make sure your potatoes are tender after 20 minutes of cooking, if not, continue cooking a bit more time til they are done.

Prepping Up and Rick Austin and Biolite!

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Prepping Up and Rick Austin and Biolite!
Host: David Jones “Prepping Up with the Jones “Audio player provided!

On this show Dave has former Television Producer turned Prepper, Rick Austin on the show. Rick is also the brains behind Prepper Camp one of, if not the largest, outdoor Prepper and Self Reliance Expos in the country. Rick will talk about Prepper Camp and how he went form TV Producer to becoming an off the grid Prepper living the dream.

Continue reading Prepping Up and Rick Austin and Biolite! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Prepping Up and Rick Austin and Biolite!

Prepping Up and Rick Austin and Biolite!
Host: David Jones “Prepping Up with the Jones “Audio player provided!

On this show Dave has former Television Producer turned Prepper, Rick Austin on the show. Rick is also the brains behind Prepper Camp one of, if not the largest, outdoor Prepper and Self Reliance Expos in the country. Rick will talk about Prepper Camp and how he went form TV Producer to becoming an off the grid Prepper living the dream.

Continue reading Prepping Up and Rick Austin and Biolite! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

7 Quick Tips to Help You Survive an Earthquake

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7 Quick Tips to Help You Survive an Earthquake This year is going to be a rocker. Its a serious issue that you are going to see happening even early in the year. The slowing of the earths rotation has been noticed by scientists. In 2017 we talked about hurricanes and our world was rocked …

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The post 7 Quick Tips to Help You Survive an Earthquake appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Soda Can Survival Stove

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Soda Can Survival Stove There are very few places in the world that do not harbor some type of refuse from the human race. What you can do with trash in a survival situation is very important. One thing that you will see everywhere is a soda can. that is what brought me to this …

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Off-Grid Living Simplicity – A 608 Sq. Foot Cabin That Rocks!

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All too often, off-grid living is thought of as living without. Living without comfort. Living without style. And perhaps most of all, living without many of the modern conveniences that can make life a bit easier. But that simply doesn’t

The post Off-Grid Living Simplicity – A 608 Sq. Foot Cabin That Rocks! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

How To Cook Breakfast With These Recipes

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Do you love to cook breakfast for your family as much as I do? There is something really awesome about cooking a meal together as a family. Now that’s it’s down to just Mark and me at home, breakfast is a whole lot different than when we had a house full of family or friends when we would cook breakfast for a large group. I learned from my daughter and son-in-law to bake bacon in a 9″ by 13′” pan instead of the cookie sheet idea. It’s a lot easier and less splatter from the grease. I do buy thick center cut bacon from Costco, it’s my favorite.

If you stock your pantry with the basics like flour, baking soda, baking powder, honey, salt, vanilla, maple syrup, oil, etc. you can make so many recipes. Here is my post showing you the basics of what you need in your pantry. Linda’s Pantry Ideas

If you look at my pantry idea article you will see the items I like to store so I can make pancakes, biscuits, bread, waffles, crackers, pasta, cookies, crepes, tortillas, muffins, and so much more.  Here’s the deal, if you have those few items you can make so many meals that will fill the belly. You can add meat, beans, fruits, and vegetables and you are set for feeding your family after a disaster, a job loss, or loss of income for some reason. You will not need to depend on anyone but yourself. What a sense of peace that will give you.

If you know how to make some of these recipes, please teach others so they can learn to be self-reliant too. If we have a disaster, food will become scarce. No, I’m not trying to scare you, I just want to teach the world to be prepared for the unexpected.

Cook Breakfast Together

I love setting the table with family, pouring the water or juice in the glasses, folding napkins, you name it, I love it! We all work as a team right down to the youngest grandchild. I truly love it!

1. Puffy Popeye Pancakes

Ingredients:

6 eggs

1 cup milk

1 cup flour

1/4 cup butter, melted

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees and grease a 9-inch by 13-inch pan, or a 12 cupcake or muffin tin pan. Combine the ingredients in a blender and quickly pour into pans desired and bake for 15-20 minutes until lightly browned and puffy.

2. Waffles by Linda

Ingredients:

3 eggs

2 cups buttermilk

1 cup flour or 1 cup whole wheat flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 cup oil

1/2 teaspoon salt

Instructions:

I dump everything into a bowl and use a whisk to combine the ingredients. Preheat your waffle iron and grease it so the waffles will not stick. I use a 1/2 cup scoop and pour the batter into the waffle iron and cook until lightly brown. This recipe makes about 8 waffles. I store my hot waffles in a tortilla maker to keep them warm until the family gobbles them up. Tortilla Warmer

3. Linda’s Whole Wheat Ebelskivers

cook breakfast

Ingredients:

1-1/2 cups freshly ground whole wheat flour (white bread flour works well too)

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon dough enhancer (optional)

Dash of salt

Freshly ground nutmeg using a Microplane or out of a jar to taste

Whisk the following:

1 cup buttermilk (I used the dry food storage type and reconstituted with water as directed)

2 eggs

1 cup sour cream

Instructions:

After whisking, add the dry ingredients. Heat the Ebelskiver Pan. I use vegetable spray instead of putting 1 teaspoon of oil in each Ebelskiver hole. Heat the pan until very hot. I use a toothpick to flip mine. I will cook both sides and then cook them on their side. Here’s my post showing how to cook them. Ebelskivers by Linda

4. Crepes by Linda

cook breakfast

Ingredients:

2 eggs

2 tablespoons of oil

3 tablespoons of sugar

1 cup flour

1-1/2 cups milk

Combine the ingredients in a blender or large bowl and use a whisk. Preheat and grease a griddle or crepe maker and put about 1/4 cup of batter, depending on what size pan you are using, onto the hot pan. Spread the batter with a crepe tool and use a silicone spatula to flip the crepes, once you can see the edges are starting to brown. Cook the other side until slightly brown. I use a tortilla warmer to keep these warm.

The awesome thing about crepes, you can make them with scrambled eggs, Nutella spread, and fruit with lots of whipping cream.

Chunky Monkey Pancakes:

cook breakfast

Ingredients:

2 cups freshly ground hard white wheat flour or white enriched bread flour

2 tablespoons baking powder

1 teaspoon sea salt

4 teaspoons honey

4 eggs

2-1/2 cups milk

1/2 cup oil

Sliced bananas

Mini chocolate chips, use amount as desired (I sprinkle just a few on each pancake)

Instructions:

I place all the ingredients in a bowl and whisk it until blended. It will be a medium thick batter or add more milk until you reach your preferred thickness. I use approximately 1/4 cup of batter for each pancake and cook each side until golden brown. Serve with maple syrup or caramel sauce.

PRINTABLE recipe: Recipes by Food Storage Moms

I hope my recipes help you cook breakfast with your family or friends, life is good when you sit around a table and enjoy one another. May God bless you to stay healthy and safe this year. Thanks again for being prepared for the unexpected, we need to be diligent in our food and water storage.

My Favorite Things:

Baking Pan

Crepe Maker

Griddle

Ebelskiver Pan

Copyright pictures:

Crepes:  AdobeStock_90723113 by little hand stocks

Ebelskivers:  AdobeStock_60622989 by Brent Hofacker

Crepes with Nutella: AdobeStock_65037409 by themalni

The post How To Cook Breakfast With These Recipes appeared first on Food Storage Moms.