Feb 22, Mora Knife

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The Mora Knife, such as the Companion or Bushcraft models, is an excellent tool for survival and bushcraft. Learn about the qualities to consider in choosing good outdoor knives.

Japan uses NWO Tool To Force South Korea to Consume It’s Radioactive Food

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The World Trade Organization is a tool of the Globalists.   The basic idea is to allow the super rich to
sell their crappy and dangerous products any where, any time.

This comes on the heels of the largest coverup in history. 

http://radiation.news/2018-02-09-industrial-disaster-public-may-never-know-full-extent-of-the-damage-from-fukushima.html
——————————————————————————————–

UPDATE 1-Japan wins WTO dispute over Fukushima-related food

https://www.reuters.com/article/japan-southkorea-wto/update-1-japan-wins-wto-dispute-over-fukushima-related-food-idUSL8N1QC6U4

By Yuka Obayashi

TOKYO, Feb 22 (Reuters) – The World Trade Organization on Thursday largely upheld a Japanese complaint against South Korea’s import bans and additional testing requirements imposed on Japanese seafood because of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster.

In a ruling that can be appealed by either side, a WTO dispute panel said that South Korea’s measures were initially justified but that keeping them in place violated the WTO’s sanitary and phyto-sanitary (SPS) agreement.

Japan launched its trade complaint at the WTO in 2015, arguing that radioactive levels were safe and that a number of other nations, including the United States and Australia, had lifted or eased Fukushima-related restrictions.

Homesteading as a Business?

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If you’re considering starting a homestead or backyard/urban farm, you may be wondering—is homesteading more like a job, a hobby, or a lifestyle?

In truth, it can be all three. Although it takes a lot of work and dedication to make homesteading a full time job. Even more when you want to be able to support your entire family with it. It’s not impossible; producing the right types of vegetables and creating a good, local market for them has allowed some farmers to make a living off of less than an acre.

But like anything, a venture such as this takes some planning. If you have limited growing space, you’ll need to determine whether or not you are ready to use some of that limited space for market sales, instead of your own food.

Although some will say that farming of any kind is not truly a lifestyle. Farming, no matter the size of the farm, is a lifestyle by definition. Webster’s defines lifestyle as “a particular way of living; the way in which a person or group lives.” But is all growing, farming? And is everyone who grows something, a farmer?

Growing is defined as something which “undergoes natural development by increasing in size and changing physically.” In other words, when you plant a garden of any kind, or raise livestock from infancy to maturity, you are “growing” something. But does just planting a garden or keeping a few chickens make your property a farm?

Using the example of tending a garden or keeping a couple of chickens, you could think of yourself as a farmer. But farming and being a farmer takes a little more than that.

In the strictest sense of the word, a farmer is a person growing food, on large tracts of land. But today, those growing food on a smaller scale in their backyard, on rooftops or on a few acres, also consider themselves to be farmers.

More and more households have gotten away from the cute little tomato vine on the patio and the cucumber plant by the deck. Opting instead for a wide variety of food plants (including edible flowers). Not only in traditional gardens but in raised beds, vertical gardens and huge containers filled with vegetables and fruits.

Some have even branched out further (no pun intended) and have included fruit trees and bushes in their backyard farm. Many choose not to sell their excess produce, growing just enough for their own family. Either storing and preserving the extra, or else sharing with family and friends. So, for many homesteaders, the farm is a lifestyle.

For those people who embrace the small homestead lifestyle in this way, do look at themselves as farmers. They’re just a different type of farmer. They may even consider themselves to be a slightly more modern version of traditional farmers. They have the same respect for food as their traditional counterparts.

Homesteading as a Job

More and more farmers are beginning to venture into the market place. Either with their excess produce or with crops planted in a “market garden,” specifically earmarked for sale at a farmer’s market.

Some farmers intend to make their farms and gardens profitable from the start. Others split their focus, growing for both their own table and for sale.

Depending on the space available for cultivation, farmers may be selling not only things from the garden. But also honey, eggs and even cheeses and milk (provided your state allows the sale of raw milk).

So, what happens when you decide to turn your little farm into a money making venture? Like any other business, there are things that you need to pay attention to.

Let’s take a look at a few of the more important items that everyone needs to consider before monetizing their backyard farm.

Zoning

Depending on your area, zoning regulations can strictly dictate whether or not you can have livestock. Or even where your vegetable garden can be placed, and where your new barn can sit.

These regulations even determine whether or not you can sell from your home. Regulations change from town to town and city to city, so be sure that you are allowed to do what you want and need to do, before you actually do it. (And if there is something you don’t like, petition to change it!)

Prepared Food Sales

Are you considering selling things from your kitchen? Such as pickles, canned vegetables, breads and pies? Many locations have strict regulations on what and where you can sell, even going so far as to require commercial kitchen use.

However, some areas are now allowing some home-prepared foods to be sold without government oversight. An example of this is the Cottage Food law in Florida. Though restrictive in terms of what you can sell. Such as breads, dry rubs, herb blends, honey products, pasta, etc., and it requires direct sales to consumers.

It can make it easier and less expensive for you to get your product out. For the small-scale producer, laws such as this are important in the development of one’s business.

Keeping Chickens in Homestead

Chickens

The first and often most popular animal that the new homesteader will obtain is a chicken. Relatively independent and easy to care for.

Chickens provide the farmer with an additional source (or multiple sources) of produce and income. But while many urban areas are beginning to allow chicken keeping, others have sadly not yet seen the light.

Those who do allow chickens to be kept in an urban yard may also put restrictions on the number of birds you can have. Usually 2–4 birds, a low number if your goal is to keep your family in eggs, as well as selling fresh eggs.

Many urban locations also do not allow roosters. Due to the disruptive nature of their crowing. While roosters are not strictly necessary for egg production itself. When you want to raise a few replacement birds (or a couple for the freezer), not having roosters makes that impossible, as the eggs will not be fertile.

Check the regulations for your town or city, as more and more are allowing chickens in the backyard.

Homesteading Market

Selling Produce

It usually isn’t an issue when someone wants to sell their excess fresh fruits and vegetables out of their home. In urban areas, for example, if you are only going to put out a few things every now and then, chances are you won’t run into any problems.

But, if you plan on putting up an actual fruit or vegetable stand, it may be looked at a bit differently. So make sure to check local zoning laws.

Rural regulations likely won’t be as strict, especially in cases of on-farm sales in agricultural areas, but it doesn’t hurt to check anyway.

If you plan to sell at your local farmer’s market, then you’ll need to check those requirements as well. For example, most markets require vendors carry their own insurances.

Homesteading Workshops and Other Programs

Are you planning to have classes or workshops on your farm? If so, it might be considered a home business in an urban area. Which carries with it the need for certain licenses and/or permits, as well as extra insurance coverage.

In some areas, a home business may not be allowed at all. Again, it is important to check everything out beforehand (we’ll discuss more on teaching your skills in Chapter 7).

Expectations about Homesteading

After all is said and done, the biggest thing that you need to think about when considering to get into homesteading is: are you ready for it?

Raising and preparing your own food is one thing. But once you take that extra step of turning your backyard farm or homestead into a business, the game entirely changes. Now, the food’s presentation needs to meet customer standards, not just family standards.

While a few blemished apples don’t bother your family, your more finicky customers will pass it by as substandard. Though there may be absolutely nothing wrong with the fruit.

An imperfect seal during the canning process means you can immediately refrigerate the jar as soon as it cools, and still use it. But you cannot sell that unsealed jar at a farmer’s market.

Your display at the farmer’s market will need to be a bit more refined than when you just throw a few extra vegetables on a table by the driveway. At a farmer’s market, sight sells: a good display that showcases your offerings can make all the difference.

It doesn’t have to be expensive, fancy or prize-winning. But it should be attractive and eye-catching. It’s also more important than ever to know what you sell.

e prepared to teach customers how to use a product if it is an unusual fruit, vegetable or herb. Have a couple recipes available for it, as well; customers are more likely to try something new if they know what to do with it.

Finally, whether you choose to view your homesteading as a lifestyle or as a job. Think about whether a small homestead, backyard farm, or urban farm is right for you.

Do you have the time and dedication necessary to make your farm a success? If you’re only doing container gardening in the backyard or on a balcony, you will most likely only be growing enough for your own use, and containers are not as difficult to maintain.

However, the soil and its nutrients may need to be replaced each year in a container; larger plants, such as fruit trees, will need occasional transplanting into larger containers, and containers, especially plastic ones, will need to be replaced from time to time.

But though this sounds like a lot, those with little time or space to spend on a garden will find that container gardening can be the way to go. It may limit you somewhat in the types of plants you can raise, but you will still have a wide range of fruits and vegetables to choose from (with some now being developed specifically for use in containers).

In other words, container gardening provides an attractive, low-impact option for people just looking to see whether they have a green thumb or not.

If a container garden isn’t right for you, a raised bed garden provides another low-stress option. There are now so many types of raised beds to choose from.

You can create an attractive garden which is easy to combine with traditional gardening methods and even container gardens. If you have a medical or physical problem which makes it difficult for you to use a traditional gardening style, raised beds can be built specifically to meet your comfort needs and accommodate almost any physical limitations that you may have.

And then there’s the question of livestock. If you are considering livestock of any kind, will you have the time and money to keep them?

Pens need cleaning, animals need grooming, daily and twice-daily feedings, and all of it rain or shine (or snowstorm). If you are keeping a goat or cow for dairy use, add twice-daily milking to your routine. Even when you’re ill, they still need care.

In short, both you and your family need to determine for yourselves whether you’re ready for the commitment. If the extent of your urban farm will be half a dozen containers on your balcony, the time commitment will be relatively low.

However, the larger you decide to go with your homestead, the more time you will need each day. Whether your homestead is a job or a lifestyle, it will be a part of your life, albeit a fulfilling and personally rewarding one. Whatever you decide, make sure you’ve done your homework first!

The post Homesteading as a Business? appeared first on Survival Preps.

We can change the world

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No, nothing will change so long as we support corrupt governments by doing NOTHING! Australia & the US support the genocide in West Papua, the Papuans were our allies in WW2 & saved many of our servicemen. Nothing will change unless the corrupt governments are sacked & a better non corrupt governing system is put in place. This will never happen in Australia, but it may happen in other countries.

Keith.

Book Review: The Modern Day Gunslinger

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While my Understanding the Use of Handguns is a great beginner book, the Modern Day Gunslinger is a great advanced text. This book is designed for those that have mastered the basics and want more training to increase their skills. Don Mann, the author of this book, is a former Navy SEAL, the foreword was by LT. COL. Grossman, and so I had high hopes for this book when I ordered it. Quite simply, it delivered. The Modern Day Gunslinger is a large book, and it is filled with training drills, techniques, and explanations. It is copiously illustrated with photographs,

The post Book Review: The Modern Day Gunslinger appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Free PDF: Averting Death from the Skies

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Averting Death from the Skies is an interesting article on building bomb and fallout shelters – those being two totally different animals. It is interesting to me how mass media had no problem discussing preparedness in the 1950’s Today is such information is covered it is to degrade the prepared minded or during advertisement for the newest zombie movie. If you have the resources to build such a shelter, it would be prudent to do so, remember anything strong enough to be used as a bomb shelter will work perfectly as a tornado shelter, a safe room, or secure storage. 

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My Current EDC

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So this is what I’ve been carrying lately. Truth be told the principle has been the same for me for many years, updating and upgrading as needed or when something worth it comes along.

LG G6

Waterproof, dustproof, nice 2:1 screen, great camera and well placed fingerprint. Does everything an iphone does and then a lot more, for half the price.

Leatherman Charge tti

Mi number one tool, the one I’d never want to be left without. To be honest it can double as a pocket knife, but its just so convenient and so handy when SHTF, you gotta have one.

ZT0630

Well made, tough, excellent steel Emerson design with a self-deploy wave feature.

Klarus Mi7 titanium

New to me but liking it a lot. Bright AA that can run 14500 li-ions and go up to 700 lumens. It has moonlight mode too which is the one I use the most. Strobe, SOS, battery indicator, and one little trick, at least in mine AAA works as well. I went with titanium because it just looks better and I do use and carry my EDC daily. Titanium holds on and looks much better over the years.

Klarus Mini One titanium

Fancy keychain light. 120 lumens and can be recharged via micro USB.

Casio Protrek PRG250T

Solar, titanium, barometer, compass, altimeter, best watch I ever had and I’ll take it over smart watches that need daily or weekly charging any day of the week.

Wiley Valor

I’ve been using Wiley for many years and recently started using these. If you can, get the polarized version. They are worth the small price difference.

Zippo Crusade Victory

“Deus Vult!”

My Current EDC

So this is what I’ve been carrying lately. Truth be told the principle has been the same for me for many years, updating and upgrading as needed or when something worth it comes along.

LG G6

Waterproof, dustproof, nice 2:1 screen, great camera and well placed fingerprint. Does everything an iphone does and then a lot more, for half the price.

Leatherman Charge tti

Mi number one tool, the one I’d never want to be left without. To be honest it can double as a pocket knife, but its just so convenient and so handy when SHTF, you gotta have one.

ZT0630

Well made, tough, excellent steel Emerson design with a self-deploy wave feature.

Klarus Mi7 titanium

New to me but liking it a lot. Bright AA that can run 14500 li-ions and go up to 700 lumens. It has moonlight mode too which is the one I use the most. Strobe, SOS, battery indicator, and one little trick, at least in mine AAA works as well. I went with titanium because it just looks better and I do use and carry my EDC daily. Titanium holds on and looks much better over the years.

Klarus Mini One titanium

Fancy keychain light. 120 lumens and can be recharged via micro USB.

Casio Protrek PRG250T

Solar, titanium, barometer, compass, altimeter, best watch I ever had and I’ll take it over smart watches that need daily or weekly charging any day of the week.

Wiley Valor

I’ve been using Wiley for many years and recently started using these. If you can, get the polarized version. They are worth the small price difference.

Zippo Crusade Victory

“Deus Vult!”

Getting Started With Backyard Chickens (Interview With Lisa Steele)

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Backyard chickens are no longer the sole domain of seasoned farmers homesteaders. Nowadays, even city folks are buying chickens to eat healthier eggs.

But if you’ve never owned chickens, where should you start? That’s the subject of today’s edition of Off The Grid Radio. Our guest is Lisa Steele, a TV host and poultry expert who has written three books about backyard chickens. She also is the founder of Fresh Eggs Daily.

Lisa gives us advice for novices and then shares her best tips for veterans, too.

She also tells us:

  • How to feed chickens naturally – without breaking the bank.
  • Why she doesn’t trick chickens to lay more eggs during winter.
  • How to use herbs to keep chickens healthy.
  • Why she doesn’t refrigerate her eggs.
  • How many chickens one family should own.

We learned a lot from Lisa. You will, too.

 

Getting Started With Backyard Chickens (Interview With Lisa Steele)

Backyard chickens are no longer the sole domain of seasoned farmers homesteaders. Nowadays, even city folks are buying chickens to eat healthier eggs.

But if you’ve never owned chickens, where should you start? That’s the subject of today’s edition of Off The Grid Radio. Our guest is Lisa Steele, a TV host and poultry expert who has written three books about backyard chickens. She also is the founder of Fresh Eggs Daily.

Lisa gives us advice for novices and then shares her best tips for veterans, too.

She also tells us:

  • How to feed chickens naturally – without breaking the bank.
  • Why she doesn’t trick chickens to lay more eggs during winter.
  • How to use herbs to keep chickens healthy.
  • Why she doesn’t refrigerate her eggs.
  • How many chickens one family should own.

We learned a lot from Lisa. You will, too.

 

Food Dehydrator

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A food dehydrator is essentially an oven. However unlike a conventional oven it’s a low temperature oven. Why do they call it a food dehydrator? Because it’s designed to draw out the moisture from food. To dry it out. Why would you want to dry out your food? Because certain foods that have been sufficiently dried out will be able to preserve without freezing or refrigeration. Foods that have been properly dried with a dehydrator will retain most of their nutrients. How does a food dehydrator work? It’s an enclosed space that typically contains food trays, a heater, a circulating

The post Food Dehydrator appeared first on Modern Survival Blog.

Venezuelan COPS Kidnapped Pro Athlete’s Elderly Mom and Held Her For Ransom…and This ISN’T Unusual

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by J.G. Martinize D.

Our state has failed in many ways. There is no security, there is no a food production system, and the economy collapsed a long time ago. … Read the rest

The post Venezuelan COPS Kidnapped Pro Athlete’s Elderly Mom and Held Her For Ransom…and This ISN’T Unusual appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

Son Gets Ill And Misses School. Mom Lands In Court.

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Son Gets Ill And Misses School. Mom Lands In Court.

A school district tried to prosecute a Pennsylvania mom because her son’s health problems kept him from attending school – and the school didn’t back down until an attorney got involved.

The controversy began when Leslie Sacks’ son entered high school and began having anxiety attacks. The mom kept him home “numerous days” while she “searched for a doctor who could help,” according to the Home School Legal Defense Association’s Darren Jones, who represented Sacks.

Get Free Electricity — And Never Be Without Power!

She finally found an “out-of-state specialist who put her son on a long-term medical protocol” and who noted that the boy’s health problems were exacerbated by being in large groups. The high school’s special education department was unwilling to help. So, she decided to homeschool him.

“Unfortunately, by this time, her son had missed several days that the school claimed were ‘unexcused,’ and the school charged him with ‘Violation of Compulsory School Attendance,’” Jones wrote. “For three weeks, the school also began robo-calling every day at 10:02 a.m. to inform Leslie that her son was illegally out of school.”

The case ended up in court, where Sacks fortunately found a sympathetic judge.

“So between the judge, the school, Leslie, and me, we worked out a deal that we thought was best for everyone,” Jones wrote. “Leslie would continue homeschooling her son, who was already making very good academic and physical progress at home. Once she finished out the year, she would let the school district know she was done, and they would pass that information on to the judge, who would dismiss the case. The judge didn’t put any other requirements on Leslie at all.”

What is your reaction? Share your thoughts in the section below:

Preparing for Gun Control as Responsible Gun Owners!

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Preparing for Gun Control as Responsible Gun Owners
Host: James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio player below!

While we have seen quite a bit of blame laid across the board I have noticed that the AR15 is taking a lot of heat. I have heard some of the solutions proposed and of course, for the average responsible gun owner its all very nerve racking.

No gun owner wants to see children shot and they don’t want to exist in a world where maniacs have access to guns.

Continue reading Preparing for Gun Control as Responsible Gun Owners! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

10 Fundamentals for Your Natural Medicine Kit

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There may be a day when you cannot run to a grocery store or pharmacy for medical supplies. A visit to a doctor may be impossible however there are a number of time-tested remedies that may prove useful. Having certain items on hand can help prepare you for situations where medical attention is necessary. Here’s […]

10 Fundamentals for Your Natural Medicine Kit

There may be a day when you cannot run to a grocery store or pharmacy for medical supplies. A visit to a doctor may be impossible however there are a number of time-tested remedies that may prove useful. Having certain items on hand can help prepare you for situations where medical attention is necessary. Here’s […]

10 Fundamentals for Your Homeopathic Medicine Kit

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There may be a day when you cannot run to a grocery store or pharmacy for medical supplies. A visit to a doctor may be impossible however there are a number of time-tested remedies that may prove useful. Having certain items on hand can help prepare you for situations where medical attention is necessary. Here’s […]

13 Ways to be Prepared for a Nuclear Fallout

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The threat of nuclear war has been lingering for several years. From the US to Russia to others around the world, we continually hear how nuclear war can be a reality as tensions seem to rise. While it is unsure if these threats are something to be taken seriously or something just the media is […]

The post 13 Ways to be Prepared for a Nuclear Fallout appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Wild Wanderings 11 – Strangers In A Strange Land

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Wild Wanderings 11 – Strangers In A Strange Land For survival and prepping there are some very real answers to the issues. We know that we must store water and food; first aid and ammo to be prepared. We take a lot of steps to assure we are prepared for what might come. Now add …

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A Suburban Guide to Buying Lumber

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A Suburban Guide to Buying Lumber There is a very real bit of anxiety when it comes to picking out lumber. If you don’t know what you are doing its extremely overwhelming. There is lumber for building outside and lumber for building inside. There are boards that sell cheap and you shouldn’t use for certain …

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Seven Survival Keys That Every Hunter Should Know

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Seven Survival Keys That Every Hunter Should Know Hunting is exploding. There is no doubt. Some people think its a great thing while others think it will lead to lots of wounded animals. I don’t know the answer but I will tell you that when you take suburbanites and thrust them into the woods there …

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Seven Survival Keys That Every Hunter Should Know

Seven Survival Keys That Every Hunter Should Know Hunting is exploding. There is no doubt. Some people think its a great thing while others think it will lead to lots of wounded animals. I don’t know the answer but I will tell you that when you take suburbanites and thrust them into the woods there …

Continue reading

The post Seven Survival Keys That Every Hunter Should Know appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

Timo Marshall: How To Make Alcohol

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Timo Marshall: How To Make Alcohol Unfortunately, vices do not collapse when the rest of the world does. No, we will still be beholden to addictions and things of that nature long after the world falls apart. The desire for such things will be just as strong and there will be no guarantee that you …

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Cultures Around the World Show Us How Life Purpose Fuels Longevity

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Cultures Around the World Show Us How Life Purpose Fuels Longevity There is purpose in prepping. While you may be hard at work to some sort of preparedness goal, you might not realize what a complex thing you are undertaking. You might also not understand why you enjoy is so much. Prepping brings purpose and …

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GAS MASKS: 3 Best Military-Grade CBRN Masks To Ensure Your Safety

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GAS MASKS: 3 Best Military-Grade CBRN Masks To Ensure Your Safety The symbol of prepping. Many preppers  hate the fact that this is the symbol synonymous with preppers but it is the fact. The gas mask is one of those preps that you laugh at until you need it. Its one of those things that …

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Jumpstart Your Emergency Fund With This Trick

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Jumpstart Your Emergency Fund With This Trick The emergency fund is one of the toughest things to get started. Its even more difficult to see it through. Still, having that extra money on hand in case of a disaster can make all the difference. What we find is that its very easy to dip into …

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Homemade Baking Mix Recipe – A Substitute for ‘Bisquick’

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I have to admit, growing up, I had no idea that you could make your own baking mix. I never saw the need to because we always had a box of Bisquick in our kitchen pantry. Mom would pull it

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How an Inflatable Kayak Can be Your Best Friend in Emergencies

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: Another guest contribution from Derek to The Prepper Journal. As you know I am a BIG fan of kayaks.  As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and possibly receive a $25 cash award as well as be entered into the Prepper Writing Contest with a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, enter today.

Floods can be one of the most devastating things to happen to homeowners. It happens far too often and can lead you and your family to being exposed if you are not prepared. One of the most important items you can have in these types of scenarios (besides the obvious food, water, first aid) is an inflatable kayak. Now before your mind wanders to the picture of a cheap kids dingy, or a blow-up alligator, you should know some things.

Why Inflatable Kayaks?

Inflatable kayaks have taken leaps and bounds over the years and are starting to outperform the ever traditional hard shell kayaks in sales. This is because…

-Inflatable Kayaks Are Made to Be More Durable

-They take up far less room as many of them fold to be the size of a hockey bag

-These kayaks are far easier to transport

-Inflatable kayaks average cost is less

-They can usually be set up within ten minutes

-Inflatable kayaks are lighter

More and more people are getting into these kayaks because they don’t take up nine feet, they are made from strong materials such as PVC and are easier to transport over land. You can get a very solid quality inflatable kayak for about $300. This is not just an investment for preventative measures, it can also be used for recreational purposes. After all there are a ton of physical and mental benefits from kayaking. (https://floatingauthority.com/20-health-benefits-kayak-exercise/)

So what does this mean in terms of emergencies?

Inflatable Kayaks in Emergency Situations

Inflatable kayaks open up many possibilities not the least of which is YOU can be a life saver (literally). Many of them can take up to 500 pounds of cargo. This means that you can fit family members, food, pets and gear all on one inflatable kayak. I want you to think about floods for a second. Often times people who are not prepared are forced to perch on the roofs of their houses and wait for help for hours, sometimes even days. Why would you want to put you and your family in a vulnerable position like that?

Instead, with an inflatable kayak, you can paddle with your most important belongings, cover more ground, and paddle to a safe and secure area. Best of all you can fold it up when you are done and put it in its carrying case as opposed to having to cast it adrift like so many had to during Hurricane Harvey.

Survival Gear You Should Bring in the Event of a Flood

-Water (at least a 3 day supply)

-Food (at least a 3 day supply)

-Flashlight

-Hand Crank Radio

-First Aid Kit

-Extra Cash

-Extra Batteries

-Cell Phone with Charger

-Copies of Personal Documents (like medical information, insurance policies, Birth Certificate )

-Pet/Baby Supplies (If Applicable)

-Extra Clothing

-Sanitary Items

-Rain Gear

-PFD’s (Life Vests Preferably)

-Kayak Bilge Pump

-Whistle

-Paddle Leash

While this may seem like a lot, much of it can be stored in a backpack or extra storage bags. Only bring what is necessary for your situation.

Inflatable Kayaks for Off the Grid

If you are living off the grid, particularly near a body of water such as a lake, chances are you have started to get the hang of fishing. There’s only one problem though. You can only fish around the perimeter of the lake which can be a very small area compared to the rest of the lake. Think of all the fish that you could be missing out on! Sure you can get a canoe but, you have to haul it around with you and find a way to transport it which can be a real pain, especially if there are no roads and you are in a relatively isolated area.

In comes the inflatable kayak and the problem is solved. Inflatable Kayaks are ideal fishing vessels and not just because they are portable. They also are great for sneaking up on fish. In many types of canoes and hard shell kayaks water often thumps against the side of the boat making noise and essentially announcing to all fish within that radius that you are there. Definitely not ideal. In an inflatable kayak you can go to all the areas in the water that you could not go on land and also be rather stealth about it as well by creeping up on unsuspecting fish. This could increases your catch rate by a significant margin. Kayaks like the Sevylor Coleman Colorado are ideal for this type of activity. When you are finished you can simply deflate it , fold it and pack it back up into its carrying bag. No back breaking heavy lifting and awkward maneuvering required.

What Should I look for in an Inflatable Kayak?

There are a ton of models that are out there and it can be very confusing, not to mention time consuming for the average user to mull over all the options. To clear all the clutter you should ask yourself one question..

What are you using it for?

Is this going to be used for emergency just in case scenarios or are you planning on getting more use out of it?  Chances are if you are an adventurous family you will be using it more often than not for recreational purposes. Could you really buy something like this and not play with it? So things to consider in either case is how important is on water performance? How far do you plan on paddling? Where are you going to paddle?  If you are looking for more performance based inflatable kayaks like the Advanced Elements AE1017 they will end up costing you more money because of the quality materials used. If you plan on having a more recreational kayak or one for strictly emergencies the Sea Eagle SE330 is a good cheap model made with quality materials.

Either way you want an inflatable kayak that can be durable, hold a good amount of equipment (look at the maximum Capacity rating of the manufacturer) and one that is stable and sturdy in the water.

Inflatable Kayaks can become one of your best friends in survivalist conditions because they give you additional safety and access when conditions get tough. They are built to be durable, light, transportable and space friendly and ready when you need them.

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Three Sisters Gardens: Grow More Food With Less Work

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Imagine a small garden that produces an above-average harvest, yet needs minimal water, fertilizer, and weeding—and, as a bonus, leaves your soil more fertile at the end of the growing season. Some might call that a dream come true, but what it’s really called is a Three Sisters Garden.

Yet this remarkably savvy strategy for growing corn, beans, and squash wasn’t developed by a Ph.D. in a modern research garden. Instead, it began centuries—perhaps millennia—ago as a Native American agricultural tradition.

Three Sisters Garden 3

What is a Three Sisters Garden?

Unlike today’s gardens where plant varieties are separated by straight rows, a Three Sisters Garden allows corn, bean, and squash plants to grow together and benefit from each other.

The beauty of a Three Sisters Garden comes from the symbiotic relationship between these three crops.

  1. As corn stalks grow, they create poles for beans to climb on to gain support and find sunlight without getting outcompeted by the sprawling squash.
  2. The bean roots also help stabilize the corn in heavy winds and fertilize it by “fixing” nitrogen from the air into a form that corn and squash roots can absorb.
  3. The squash’s large leaves are prickly enough to deter pests from coming close, and they shade out weeds while keeping the soil moist.1)The Old Farmers’ Almanac: The Three Sisters: Corn, Beans, and Squash 

History of the Three Sisters Garden

When agriculture began in the Americas 7,000 years ago, it quickly changed the landscape and local cultures beyond recognition.

Maize, beans, and squash were domesticated in Central and South America and gradually made their way to the American Midwest.2)University of Nebraska: The “How” of the Three Sisters: The Origins of

Different Native American tribes began to integrate these crops into their horticultural traditions, though the Iroquois (also called the Haudenosaunee) first used the phrase “Three Sisters” to describe the practice of growing them together in highly productive garden plots.

Over the centuries, the Three Sisters gained physical and spiritual importance for the Iroquois. Their planting method involved sowing all three seeds in fertilized mounds that prevented the young plants from getting waterlogged.

Women then weeded and hoed these mounds throughout the summer and harvested the crops in the early fall before drying and storing them for winter. Celebrated as a gift from the Great Spirit, corn, beans, and squash were eaten together for most meals.

American colonists first learned of Three Sisters Gardens over 300 years ago.

Since they were used to straight, orderly farm fields, most settlers first dismissed these densely planted gardens as wild.

However, they soon learned that this biointensive combination-planting method was perfectly suited for the region, as cleared land was difficult to maintain and small Iroquois garden plots needed to produce higher yields than European ones.

Today, a Three Sisters Garden is a great example of an ecological guild in America because each plant directly benefits the others.

Grown together, Three Sisters crops produce more food with less water and fertilizer.

In fact, Three Sisters Garden plots tend to produce 20 percent more calories than when the same crops are grown apart.3)Estimating Productivity of Traditional Iroquoian Cropping Systems from Field Experiments and Historical Literature

A Nutritional Cornucopia

Not only are the Three Sisters naturally suited to grow well together, they also pack a powerful nutritional punch. In fact, a diet of corn, beans, and squash is nutritionally balanced without the need for other protein sources.

Corn kernels are rich in carbohydrates and become a complete protein source when eaten with beans.

Full of vitamins and minerals, squash rounds out the diet nutritionally.

Making them even more valuable, corn, beans, and squash all could be dried and eaten throughout the winter.4)Native Seeds: How to Grow a Three Sisters Garden When combined with other vegetables native to America like peppers and tomatoes, the Three Sisters fueled culinary creativity and promoted health all year long.

Three Sister Variations

Not all Three Sister gardens are the same.

While squash, beans, and corn were important food crops throughout America, many native cultures made variations on the growing method to better fit their local conditions.

For example, throughout the dry Southwest, the Three Sisters were often planted in separate fields with wide plant spacing to maximize the use of a limited water supply.5)Native Seeds: How to Grow a Three Sisters Garden

In some places, a fourth sister joined the trio. Sunflowers attracted insect pollinators to the garden while distracting birds from the corn and providing support for bean vines.

Throughout the Southwest, tobacco was interplanted with the Three Sisters as a ceremonial plant.

Likewise, watermelons and gourds were easily substituted for squash.6)Native Seeds: How to Grow a Three Sisters Garden

Three Sisters Garden 4

Tips for Getting Started

When you follow the Three Sisters method today, you equip your garden with the building blocks it needs to grow flavorful plants that are well suited to your natural conditions.

You can also help preserve a Native American heritage and benefit from centuries of horticultural innovation and experimentation by growing your own Three Sisters Garden at home.

Layout

There are plenty of variations for laying out a Three Sisters Garden, but it’s always best to plant your corn in clusters instead of rows. This makes it easier to attract pollinating insects for your squash plants and for wind-pollinated corn tassels to fertilize each other.7)Native Seeds: How to Grow a Three Sisters Garden

Make sure you choose a spot with plenty of direct sunlight and a neutral pH level (6.0–7.0 is best).

Minimal space is needed for a Three Sisters Garden. A 10-foot-by-10-foot plot tends to be ideal. That’s a small enough space to be fairly simple to prepare and maintain while ensuring that you sow enough corn (about 10–20 plants) for it to cross-pollinate.

To set up a traditional Three Sisters Garden in a 10-foot-by-10-foot plot, mark off three rows spaced five feet apart. Each row will have five 18-inch mounds, alternating corn/bean mounds with squash mounds.8)Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: Growing a Three Sisters Garden

Planting

Sowing a Three Sisters Garden takes a little longer from start to finish, but the steps are simple—and the results are oh so worth it!

  1. Start by fertilizing the garden bed with your favorite amendments.
  2. Form the soil into flat mounds that are a foot high and 18 inches in diameter.
  3. Alternate the corn/bean mounds with the squash mounds.
  4. Stagger the planting by species to create a “stacked” garden that gives the corn and/or sunflowers a few weeks’ head start. This also prevents the plants from outcompeting each other in their beginning growth stages.
    1. Once the danger of frost has passed, plant four kernels of corn an inch deep and six inches apart, with each kernel forming one of the four points of a diamond shape.
    2. Once the corn reaches five inches tall, plant four bean seeds in a pattern that adds corners to your diamond shape, effectively making it a square.
    3. Squash seeds should be planted one week later in the remaining mounds. In each mound, plant three squash seeds four inches apart in a triangle shape.9)The Old Farmers’ Almanac: The Three Sisters: Corn, Beans, and Squash
  5. Make sure to hill up the soil as it starts to level out so that there is plenty of material for the root systems to work with.

Maintenance

As the Three Sisters grow together, you will notice the bean sprouts starting to climb the corn stems, and heavy squash leaves starting to fan out along the ground.

While squash leaves help shade out weeds as they grow, it’s best to regularly weed your plot when the plants are young to prevent them from getting outcompeted. Laying down a layer of organic mulch is also a good way to help the soil retain moisture on hot summer days.

Insect pests are likely to find your garden as exciting as you do, so make sure to watch for squash bugs, squash vine borers, and corn earworms.

A drop of vegetable oil on the tips of corn ears can help fend off an invasion, and you can keep your beans healthy by working them only when the plants are dry.10)The National Gardening Association: Growing the Three Sisters

To preserve the purity of heirloom varieties, you can hand-pollinate your corn plants. Simply place waxed paper bags over the corn silk to prevent pollen from getting in. When the tassels are two inches out, remove the bags and shake your preferred pollen on the silks before replacing the bags to prevent contamination.

Harvest

By mid-to-late summer, your Three Sisters Garden will be brimming with produce.

Summer squash is often the first to mature. You can harvest the squashes once they are two inches in diameter, as they taste best when small and tender.

Winter squash needs to be harvested when the outside skin is hardened and the squash has lost its natural sheen. Make sure to cleanly slice the stem with a knife, and leave the stem on the squash to help it stay fresh for several months.

Green beans are best harvested when the pods are slim and tender. So long as you prevent your beans from over-maturing and going to seed, they should produce vigorously for a month or two. Take care not to damage the vines as you pick them, and you should enjoy fresh beans for much of the summer.

Ears of corn are ready to pick about 20 days after the first silk stacks appear. You’ll know the ears are mature when the silks are dry and brown and the kernels are smooth and plump, and emit a milk-like juice when you puncture them with your thumbnail. Simply twist off each ear when ripe, and eat immediately for the best flavor.

Three Sisters Garden 2

Best Three Sister Varieties to Grow

Not every variety of corn, beans, and squash grows well in a Three Sisters Garden.

Oftentimes, traditional heirloom varieties are better suited to the specific growing conditions that companion planting calls for.

Below are varieties of corn, beans, and squash that are well suited for Three Sisters Gardens.

Corn

Sweet corn was a staple food in Native American diets,11)Mother Earth News: Native American Gardening: The Three Sisters and More and most varieties grow well using the Three Sisters method. Native corns tend to be heartier and more drought resistant than industrial varieties, so make sure you look to corn varieties that are naturally suited for your growing conditions.

It’s best to choose a tall variety so that your bean plants have plenty of room to grow.

Pencil Cob corn is a prolific, six-foot variety, and Flor del Rio is an excellent heirloom popcorn.

If water is an issue, Southwestern varieties like Tohono O’odham and Hopi mature fast and use less water, but their short stature makes it harder for them to support beans.

Beans

When choosing your beans, it’s essential that you select pole beans instead of bush beans to ensure they trellis themselves on the corn stalks. Common pole bean varieties include pinto, kidney, black, lima, and navy.

Ideally, you should grow “corn beans,” as they have adapted to growing in shady conditions and won’t suffer from overcrowding.12)Mother Earth News: Native American Gardening: The Three Sisters and More

Few Native American bean species have been preserved, but the Ohio pole bean and Amish Nuttle are two options.13)Mother Earth News: Native American Gardening: The Three Sisters and More Other versatile pole beans include Blue Lake, Kentucky Wonder, O’odham Vayos, and Four Corners Gold. If you do end up with a short corn variety like Tutelo Strawberry, you might pair it with a bean variety like Wild Pigeon, since it isn’t aggressive enough to overpower the shorter corn.

Squash

Unfortunately, few squash varieties that were common in traditional Native American gardens are still in use. While Yellow Summer Crookneck and Early White Scallop date back at least to the 1700s, the varieties available today are significantly different from the originals.

The best squash variety depends on the amount of space you have to work with.

If your garden provides ample room for plants to sprawl, go for a winter squash variety like Tarahumara Pumpkin or Magdalena Big Cheese.

Tighter arrangements better suit Yellow Crookneck squash, Ponca butternut, and Dark Star zucchini.

A Harvest of Heritage

A delightful combination of science and history, the Three Sisters Garden nurtures both body and soul.

Yes, it provides larger harvests with less work and water. But it also connects gardeners with centuries of heritage—and lets them play a vital role in ensuring that this wondrous planting method survives to nourish yet another generation.

For more information on Three Sisters Gardens, check out THE definitive book on the subject—Native American Gardening: Buffalobird-Woman’s Guide to Traditional Methods.

 


 

 

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References   [ + ]

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Caring for your Feet in a Collapse

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Written by Ben Ayad Often the unsung hero of the bugout or survival situation, our feet do the walking, carrying and running from threats. We buy nice coats to keep us warm, gloves to protect our hands and even glasses to protect our eyes. Our feet rarely get the same consideration. If you find yourself on your feet with a pack on your back for any duration you will wish you took these precautions. We are going to discuss six […]

The post Caring for your Feet in a Collapse appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

Caring for your Feet in a Collapse

Written by Ben Ayad Often the unsung hero of the bugout or survival situation, our feet do the walking, carrying and running from threats. We buy nice coats to keep us warm, gloves to protect our hands and even glasses to protect our eyes. Our feet rarely get the same consideration. If you find yourself on your feet with a pack on your back for any duration you will wish you took these precautions. We are going to discuss six […]

The post Caring for your Feet in a Collapse appeared first on Apartment Prepper.

Simple & Effective Worm Composting (VIDEO)

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While traveling in the Pacific Northwest, I met Peter Paul, who showed me the most amazing—and amazingly simple—idea for an outdoor worm composting bin. Using the help of worms to break down food matter (even meats!), Peter shows you a couple of simple methods for making great homemade compost.

Not only that, this method creates a vibrant compost tea that gave Peter 7-foot-tall tomato plants! He also sometimes trades his “worm juice” for different items … even once for iPhone (LOL).

This is a sample of the kinds of things you’ll learn when you take The Grow Network’s “Instant Master Gardener” certification class. Chock full of useful, doable information for taking your garden to the next level, “Instant Master Gardener” is available to our Honors Lab members as part of their monthly subscription. Click here to learn more!

(This article was originally published on May 19, 2015.)

 

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Conflicted: Shoot First or Hold Your Fire – What Would You Do?

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Conflicted Survival Game:

BEFORE the SHTF!

 

Conflicted is a Survival Game.  Each card in the deck has a scenario that will stretch how you would respond in an SHTF situation.  What would you do?  Leave your thoughts in the comment section below!

 

SCENARIO – You see a wave of men in orange inmate suits walking down the street towards your home.  They have pipes and makeshift clubs in their hands but they do not seem to be breaking into any homes or bothering anyone.

At this distance, you could take most of them out with your AR-10, but once they get close you will be overwhelmed if they try to jump you. Do you take the chance and let them pass or do you start shooting people who have done nothing to you? Why?

 

Tools to Help You Maintain Situational Awareness in Your Local Community!

 

Don’t forget to leave your thoughts in the comments below.

If you are interested in purchasing your own Conflicted Survival Game Cards  – CLICK HERE.

 

Peace,
Todd

How to Make Your Own Soda

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by Isabella

Delicious, bubbly soda is one of the greatest delights of modern life. But did you know you won’t have to give it up when SHTF? That’s right!

You can make your own refreshing soda drinks right at home, before or after a crisis! There are several different options for making your own soda, and all involve at-home culturing. Just like sourdough or sauerkraut, you can ferment sugars and fruits in water for an extended period of time and then carbonate in an airtight container to produce a delicious, bubbly drink.

Here are some of the most popular:

Water Kefir

Water kefir is made from water kefir grains which can be purchased commercially and fermented in water to create the water kefir drink. Note that these “grains” are different from milk kefir grains, which are a slightly different strain of bacteria. This is by far the easiest way to  make soda at home, all it takes is a jar, water kefir grains, some sugar, and maybe fruit or fruit juice of choice to flavor!

It only takes a day or two to ferment, and then another day to carbonate, and you can keep it going on your counter continuously or store the grains for future use. Read on for some instructions!

Kombucha

Kombucha is all the rage lately, and for good reason! It is delicious, very cheap and easy to make at home, full of incredible health benefits and–best of all–can be carbonated to a delightful fizz!

It is made using black tea, sugar, and a SCOBY, which is essentially a mushroom that grows in the concoction you brew with the other ingredients. No, really!

You can buy a SCOBY commercially, grab one from a friend (if they’re brewing their own kombucha, they’re no doubt up to their ears in it already!), or grow one by pouring ⅓ of a bottle of store bought kombucha into a jar, covering with cloth and a rubber band, and leaving for a week. When a filmy substance has formed at the top of the jar, there’s your SCOBY!

Ginger Bug

A ginger bug is a culture that you grow yourself, using ginger and sugar. It is how old-fashioned ginger ale and root beer were made, so it’s ideal for survivalists to know about! Using grated ginger, sugar, and water, you let ferment until they get bubbly, and then use as the culture for many types of sodas.

Whey Soda

Whey is very easy to use to ferment juice and quickly and easily make your own at-home sodas. Whey is the white, liquid byproduct of making cheese or yogurt or separating curds from, well, whey.

Most people don’t realize this, but you can actually use it to make soda! First, some whey is added to fruit juice and water, and then that is let to sit for a few days. Next, you can carbonate to make it bubbly!

These types of homemade sodas are all really handy to know about but it’s not just for their refreshing taste. They all happen to be rich in probiotics, which can help support a healthy gut. This is particularly important in a survival situation, as the elements and the distress of a disaster will be wreaking havoc on your immune system, and you might even have sick or injured people with you.

A healthy gut means a healthy immune system–so these delicious sodas are great medicine too!

Water Kefir Directions

OK, so that’s a rundown of some basic ways of making soda. Let’s get down to the nitty gritty now and make some ourselves!

Here’s how to make water kefir, the first type of homemade soda we mentioned.

First, you will need to find yourself some kefir grains. You can easily purchase these online, or find a local fermenting group online and see if anyone has some to spare. This is what they look like:

kefir grains

Once you have your kefir grains, you might need to activate them, by leaving them in a little bit of water with sugar for a few days.

When they are ready to use, proceed with brewing:

1) First, fill a ½ gallon jar until nearly full with filtered water. Additives like chlorine might inhibit the fermentation process, so filtered is the best.

2) Next, add ¼ cup white sugar and stir to dissolve.

3) Then, add your kefir grains.

adding kefir grains

4) Cover the jar with a paper towel, piece of cloth, or coffee filter, and a rubber band. Let sit for at least 24 hours.

5) After 24 hours, check to see if the solution is bubbly at the top. It won’t be carbonated, but you’ll see “activity”, meaning some light foaming at the top, bubbles on the inside, or any sign of life:

bubbles forming in homemade soda

6) Once the solution is “active”, you can strain out the grains and drink as it is–or move on to carbonation!

Carbonation:

1) Take your active water kefir, add some molasses, fresh fruit, or fruit juice. This will provide the sugar for fermentation.

2) Put in another ½ gallon jar with an intact lid and rim, or a flip-top bottle.

3) Pour the water kefir into your container:

water kefir in containers

4) Seal tightly:

homemade soda ready for refrigeration

5) Now, let sit for 12-24 hours. WARNING: There is a chance if left too long this could blow up. Check regularly for bubbles (if you remove the top it will “hiss” when it is properly carbonated)  and keep somewhere will no one will be harmed if the container explodes!

Once carbonated, refrigerate and enjoy!

A quick note: fermenting is an inexact science. You might find that you need to tweak the fermentation time, amount of ingredients, containers, etc. to get the desired results.

Perfect your process while you still have the internet, which is full of handy resources for making water kefir and other delicious fermented sodas!

diy soda pinterest

Overlooked or Forgotten Preparedness Supplies & Techniques

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As we go through our daily lives and form habits and routines, it’s easy to lose track of the big picture. As we do things over a long period of time, we tend to take shortcuts and the small details tend to be overlooked. It’s especially important to keep this in mind with preparedness because […]

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