The classic survivalist’s dilema

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I had the weirdest dream last night (brought to me by some spicy chicken and rice, no doubt). I dreamed (or dreamt, I guess) that I was visiting a fellow survivalists place and he said i could stay in the guest house out back. Problem was, the place was lousy with grizzly bears and I thought ‘No problem, I have this handy PTR-91 in .308. I’ll just do a mag dump into the first one that gets in my way.’ And then I discovered that the magazine was empty. Awkward. After that it was hide-n-seek with three amazingly large grizzly bears.

This is the first dream I’ve ever had involving the usual gun problem (gun not working, bullets not having an effect, etc.) and the threat being an animal, instead of zombies or people.
==================

There are several problems for those of us who want to live the preparedness/survivalist lifestyle. One of the biggest is the often-at-odds-with-each-other desire to live someplace remote and quiet but still have a job/career to pay for it. Succinctly, the classic survivalist dilema is how do you live far enough out to have the security and privacy you want while still living close enough in to have a job?

Virtually all the survivalists I know who live in the ‘perfect’ locations are all either a) retired, b) made enough money to live off investments, or c) live a life of desperate poverty.

I’m far from being able to retire, my investments don’t provide enough to live on, and I’ve gotten rather used to hot water on demand and not crapping in a compost toilet. As a result, for the time being, I live in an environment that is not 100% conducive to The Lifestyle..the big deficiency being that I live in a fairly large population center. Oh, compared to San Francisco or Chicago it’s darn near a podunk small town, but it’s still too many rats in one cage for my taste.

Telecommuting? Well, thats wonderfully attractive but those sorts of gigs are few and far between. And, its something of a risk since if you lose your job you are now sitting in the middle of nowhere with no job and a greatly reduced prospect of finding another one given your remote location.

Alternatives? Well, I suppose the first thing is to lower your expectations. Don’t think that youre going to live at the end of a five mile gated road in the middle of nowhere and make $50,000 a year doing engineering consulting over the internet. After that, it seems the best compromise is to live in an area where you’re close enough to the smallest population center that will still provide you a living, but still small-townish enough to give you the isolation you’re after.

Let me give you an example of what I mean… in the town I live in, someone doing, say, a welding or diesel repair gig for a large company in this town can knock back around $40k. But…you have to live fairly close by to keep your commute realistic…as a result, you live in a populous place and your cost of living is commensurately higher. SO, you pack up the kids and move to some ‘Northern Exposure‘ type of small town. Your earning potential takes a heavy hit of 35-50%, but your cost of living offsets a bit of that since the expenses are a little cheaper. But an AR15 is still about $750 no matter if you live in the big city or the small town, so you’re going to have to lower your expectations of your purchasing power, or you’re going to have to work twice as hard to earn the same as if you’d remained in Big City.

There is another alternative I’ve seen where you have someone from someplace like California, New York, Chicago, Denver, etc, sell their home(s) and move out here. They usually wind up getting the same size home or bigger for about half the money and then use the other half to either set themselves up in a business, or invest it and live off the dividends. That has usually worked out fairly well in the instances I’ve come across it.

And, finally, I’ve met at least two people who did it the old-fashioned way – they worked like mules in The Big City for as much as possible, sucked it up for a few years, and then hit the EJECT button and relocated here.

I suspect at some point in the future I’ll be in the group of ‘moved to smaller town and earns less but improves quality of life’. In a perfect world I’d stick a million bucks in the bank, live off the dividends and interest, and have my quiet little place out in the sticks. But if you’re going to try for that sort of thing, you need to have started much, much more earlier than I have.

Ava’s Crucible: American Civil War 2.0 – Plus Another Giveaway!

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The American Civil War 2.0 Has begun!

The deck is stacked against twenty-nine-year-old Ava. She’s a fighter, but she’s got trust issues and doesn’t always make the best decisions. Her personal complications aren’t without merit, but America is on the verge of a second civil war. Ava must pull it together if she wants to survive.

CLICK HERE to buy your copy!

 

 As always, I’m hosting a giveaway to celebrate the release. I’m giving away 10 Ounces of Silver! I’m also giving away some high-end essential survival gear and autographed proof copies of Ava’s Crucible.

Giveaway Details:

 

One First Prize Winner will win 10 Ounces of Silver Bullion Bars! The First Prize Winner will also receive an autographed PROOF copy of Ava’s Crucible!

 Only 15 Proof Copies of Ava’s Crucible were ever printed, so you’ll be one of the elite few who own one.

 

One Second Prize Winner will win an Individual First Aid Kit stocked with an Israeli Battle Dressing, 2 packs of QuickClot, a TK4 Tourniquet, a Combat Application Tourniquet, Pre-threaded Sutures, Betadine Swabs, Steri-Strips, as well as gauze and bandages. The Second Prize Winner will also receive an autographed PROOF copy of Ava’s Crucible!

One Third Prize Winner will win a Sawyer Mini Water Filter and a Gerber Multitool. The Second Prize Winner will also receive an autographed PROOF copy of Ava’s Crucible!

How to Win:

 

  1. Leave a review for Ava’s Crucible on Amazon.com.

 

  1. Send an email including your Amazon screen name that you used for the review to: PrepperRecon@gmail.com. Use Ava Giveaway in the subject line.

 

The drawing will be held Saturday, May 5th. The winners’ Amazon screen name will be posted on PrepperRecon.com to announce that they’ve won. The winners will also be notified via email. Sorry, contest is open to US residents only.

 

Godspeed in the drawing!

 

Mark

The post Ava’s Crucible: American Civil War 2.0 – Plus Another Giveaway! appeared first on Prepper Recon.

Best Pruning Shears: Different Snips For Your Pruning Needs

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The post Best Pruning Shears: Different Snips For Your Pruning Needs is by Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Getting the best pruning shears is a necessity. Your pruning shears are one of your best tools as a gardener. How else do you get rid of excess growth or keep your plants trimmed to an appropriate size? But choosing the best pruning shears for your task can be a matter of personal preference, or … Read more

The post Best Pruning Shears: Different Snips For Your Pruning Needs is by Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

South Korea Nuclear Reactors — 24 Reactors in a Smallish Country

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Wow I thought they maybe had 4 or 6!

And they had a bunch more planned, but those are no longer in process, they will be scuttled.

Nuclear is too expensive.   They are trying to justify their continued existence and operation on “fighting CO2” which we pretty much know is a false meme meant to transfer wealth (ask yourself how did Al Gore get $500M from Fighting Carbon)

Have no doubt, in burning fuels, true pollutants are released, in rough proportion to CO2.   And we should minimize these burns and we should implement pollutant scrubbing mechanisms where feasible.   But we should not target CO2 specifically, because it is not a pollutant, it is plant food.    Targetting CO2 specifically is stupid and play right into the hands of the nuclear cartel.

Even if we believed the table on the right, which is very sketchy in my opinion, with amazingly CO2
being 10 times more costly than all other pollutants combined!   Seriously?   Politicized science needs to be taken to task.     

This from “Greentech Media”.   Me smells a rat.

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/the-cost-of-losing-firstenergys-nuclear-fleet

I wrote about the “War on Solar”, in a starter article here, and will add to it as nuggets present themselves.

http://www.nukepro.net/2018/04/war-on-solar-nuclear-and-coal-hate-solar.html

—————————————————————-

SEOUL, April 16 (Reuters) - South Korea's nuclear operator
said on Monday it shut down the Shin Wolsong No.1 nuclear
reactor for planned maintenance from Monday for 72 days.
The shutdown of the 1,000-megawatt reactor would take the
number of reactors offline to 10, according to Korea Hydro &
Nuclear Power Co Ltd (KHNP) website (www.khnp.co.kr).
Currently, South Korea operates 24 nuclear reactors. Nuclear
power supplies about a third of the country's electricity.

Details are as follows:
Reactors marked * are currently offline.

NAME CAPACITY OFFLINE STATUS
(megawatts)
Kori No.1* 587 Permanent closure
Kori No.2 650
Kori No.3* 950 Maintenance
Kori No.4 950
Shin Kori No.1 1,000
Shin Kori No.2* 1,000 Maintenance
Shin Kori No.3* 1,400 Maintenance

Note: The above reactors are all located near the city of
Busan, over 300 kms (190 miles) southeast of Seoul.

NAME CAPACITY OFFLINE STATUS
(megawatts)
Hanbit No.1 950
Hanbit No.2 950
Hanbit No.3 1,000
Hanbit No.4* 1,000 Maintenance
Hanbit No.5 1,000
Hanbit No.6 1,000

Note: These reactors are located in the county of
Yeonggwang, over 250 km (155 miles) southwest of Seoul.

NAME CAPACITY OFFLINE STATUS
(megawatts)
Wolsong No.1* 679 Maintenance
Wolsong No.2* 700 Maintenance
Wolsong No.3 700
Wolsong No.4 700
Shin Wolsong No.1* 1,000 Maintenance
Shin Wolsong No.2 1,000

Note: These reactors are located in the city of Gyeongju,
over 300 km (186 miles) southeast of Seoul.

NAME CAPACITY OFFLINE STATUS
(megawatts)
Hanul No.1 950
Hanul No.2* 950 Maintenance
Hanul No.3* 1,000 Maintenance
Hanul No.4 1,000
Hanul No.5* 1,000 Maintenance
Hanul No.6 1,000

Note: These reactors are located in the county of Uljin,
over 200 km (124 miles) southeast of Seoul.

Details of five reactors under construction (in megawatts):
NAME CAPACITY DUE DATE

Shin Kori No.4 1,400 September 2018
Shin Kori No.5 1,400 October 2021
Shin Kori No.6 1,400 October 2022
Shin Hanul No.1 1,400 April, 2018
Shin Hanul No.2 1,400 February, 2019

Details of the six new nuclear reactors to be cancelled (in
megawatts):
NAME CAPACITY DUE DATE
Shin Hanul No.3 1,400 December 2022
Shin Hanul No.4 1,400 December 2023
Cheonji No.1*** 1,500 December 2026
Cheonji No.2*** 1,500 December 2027
Undecided No.1*** 1,500 Undecided
Undecided No.2*** 1,500 Undecided

*** Cheonji No.1 and Cheonji No.2 reactors were planned but
did not gain government approval, and the two power plants with
no name were planned but the location and construction schedule
had not been decided.


Free PDF: Granddad’s Wonderful Book of Chemistry

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Basically the Granddad’s Wonderful Book of Chemistry is a collection of old out of copyright books that Kurt Saxon combined into a single work.  Saxon is known for his explosive instructions and his Poor Man’s James Bond books.  His lack of fingers testify to his explosive knowledge. Much of this is useful, but it is presented at your own risk and for academic study only.  The standards of safety when this was written were much more lax.  And the author of this PDF did not bother to test anything in it, setting on reprinting older work. Granddad’s Wonderful Book of

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Book Review: Generators and Inverters

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGu2YKChBWg I really like Stephen Chastain’s books, he builds the things he writes about, and they really work. In this particular book he talks about how to turn a car engine into a generator. In his book, Generators and Inverters, He talks about how to create a carburetor to make your engine run on multi-fuels like propane and biodiesel, how to silence your engine and reduce vibrations, and MUCH more. This is a very valuable book for homesteaders, diyers, or anyone looking at alternative energy sources. From his website: “Steve, a mechanical and materials engineer, lives in Jacksonville, Florida. He

The post Book Review: Generators and Inverters appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Book Review: Generators and Inverters

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGu2YKChBWg I really like Stephen Chastain’s books, he builds the things he writes about, and they really work. In this particular book he talks about how to turn a car engine into a generator. In his book, Generators and Inverters, He talks about how to create a carburetor to make your engine run on multi-fuels like propane and biodiesel, how to silence your engine and reduce vibrations, and MUCH more. This is a very valuable book for homesteaders, diyers, or anyone looking at alternative energy sources. From his website: “Steve, a mechanical and materials engineer, lives in Jacksonville, Florida. He

The post Book Review: Generators and Inverters appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Five “Life Extension” Garden Vegetables To Plant In 2018

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There’s no doubt about it: the health benefits of nutrient-dense, fresh, organic produce is a keyreason to break out the gardening tools each season.

Purchased produce simply doesn’t have as many nutrients as the veggies that come from our gardens. Commercial growers typically choose varieties that mature quickly, produce heavily, and give a uniform, visually-appealing fruit–all factors that come at the cost of nutrient density. As well, commercial growers often engage in practices that strip nutrients from the soil, which means the vegetables they grow have nowhere to absorb nutrients from. Finally, harvested vegetables

“Getting high-quality nutrients from key garden vegetables is the single best way to maximize genetic expression for longer and healthier life.”

lose moisture and nutrients over time, as part of a process called respiration. The longer veggies sit between harvest and table, the more nutrients they lose.

For these reasons, freshly-picked home-grown vegetables are inherently healthier than purchased vegetables. That said, you can maximize the health benefits of your garden by planting those veggies that are chock full of nutrients. There are five vegetables, in particular, that pack a powerful nutrient punch: sweet potatoes, broccoli, brussels sprouts, dark leafy greens, and garlic.

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are the most nutritious root veggies out there. They’re terrific for our digestive system since they’re high in fiber and they have a high phytosterol content, which may help prevent duodenal and gastric ulcers. These root veggies are also high in beta-carotene (Vitamin A), which helps maintain the health of our skin, mucous membranes, immune system, and eyes. High amounts of antioxidants prevent cell damage by free radicals, which in turn protects the body against cancer. Sweet potatoes also contain Vitamin B, Vitamin C, and several minerals, including iron, calcium, and selenium.

Sweet potatoes are tropical plants that love sun, heat, and humidity. Best in zones 8 and above, but you can successfully grow sweet potatoes as far north as Zone 3 if you keep the soil toasty under plastic sheetingduring early summer. As long as they stay warm, and have plenty of room to run their vines, sweet potatoes are easy to grow.

Broccoli

Broccoli is a powerhouse, providing us with protein and fiber as well as an array of vitamins (A, C, E, K, and some B vitamins including folate) and minerals (iron, potassium, calcium, selenium, and magnesium). The nutrients in broccoli contribute to:

  • Heart health, reducing cholesterol and heart disease.
  • Healthy, dense bones.
  • A healthy immune system.
  • Healthy eyes and the prevention of age-related macular degeneration.
  • The reduction of free radicals, which can assist in keeping our bodies cancer-free.

Broccoli also contains non-nutritive antioxidants and phytochemicals that have been shown to block cancer in its early stages.

Broccoli isn’t difficult to grow, but it does require a little bit of planning and care. It’s a cool weather crop that will bolt in the summer heat. For that reason, startbroccoliearly: seeded or even transplanted out about two weeks before the last frost date. During the summer months, keep broccoli shaded and mulched so that it stays as cool as possible. Water regularly and keep an eye on any potential pests.

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts (like broccoli, kale, mustard and collard greens, also discussed here) are members of the brassica family of vegetables. Brassicas contain phytochemicals (specificallyglucosinolates) and carotenoids-antioxidants, both of which have been shown to reduce the risk of cancer. Additionally, Brussels sprouts are rich in Vitamin K, which helps our blood clot and our bodies maintain healthy bones. These veggies are also high in Vitamin C and fiber and have a host of other vitamins and minerals, including Vitamin B6, thiamine, potassium, folate, iron, and manganese.

Like other brassicas, Brussels sprouts are a cool weather crop that doesn’t perform well in hot, dry weather. In fact, sprouts that mature when it’s hot outside may be flimsy and bitter. It’s best to start Brussels sprout seeds indoors in May or early June. Care for the seedlings indoors until August, or roughly 45-60 days beforethe first frost date. Once planted out, use mulch to protect the plants during summer’s last hot days. Brussels sprouts are slow to grow but well worth it.

Dark Leafy Greens (Kale, Mustard and Collard Greens, Spinach, Chard)

Kale, mustard greens, and collard greens are all members of the brassica family, and as such, have the same cancer-fighting phytochemicals and carotenoids-antioxidants as Brussels sprouts and broccoli. Further, dark leafy greens of all types are rich in calcium and iron, and also contain Vitamins A, C, E, and K, as well as fiber, folate, and magnesium.

Most dark, leafy greens are fast-growing cool weather crops. If planted in early spring, before the risk of frost has passed, they’ll be ready to harvest before the heat of summer causes them to bolt. The exception is Swiss chard, which–although also quick and easy to grow–tolerates heat well enough to last into the fall.

Garlic

The health benefits of garlic are well known. It can boost the immune system, reduce blood pressure, lower cholesterol levels, and detoxify heavy metals in our bodies. As well, garlic contains antioxidants that may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Garlic is relatively easy to grow as long as you plant itat the right time. Garlic cloves are best overwintered in the ground, to sprout in the spring or you may try planting as soon as the ground is workable in late winter. Other than standard watering and weeding, keep an eye on your garlic plants for flowers. Should blossoms start to form, cut them off so that the plant directs its energy to its bulb.

Do you have any tried and true tricks for growing these five nutrient-dense veggies? If so, let us know in the comments below.

 

Five “Life Extension” Garden Vegetables To Plant In 2018

There’s no doubt about it: the health benefits of nutrient-dense, fresh, organic produce is a keyreason to break out the gardening tools each season.

Purchased produce simply doesn’t have as many nutrients as the veggies that come from our gardens. Commercial growers typically choose varieties that mature quickly, produce heavily, and give a uniform, visually-appealing fruit–all factors that come at the cost of nutrient density. As well, commercial growers often engage in practices that strip nutrients from the soil, which means the vegetables they grow have nowhere to absorb nutrients from. Finally, harvested vegetables

“Getting high-quality nutrients from key garden vegetables is the single best way to maximize genetic expression for longer and healthier life.”

lose moisture and nutrients over time, as part of a process called respiration. The longer veggies sit between harvest and table, the more nutrients they lose.

For these reasons, freshly-picked home-grown vegetables are inherently healthier than purchased vegetables. That said, you can maximize the health benefits of your garden by planting those veggies that are chock full of nutrients. There are five vegetables, in particular, that pack a powerful nutrient punch: sweet potatoes, broccoli, brussels sprouts, dark leafy greens, and garlic.

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are the most nutritious root veggies out there. They’re terrific for our digestive system since they’re high in fiber and they have a high phytosterol content, which may help prevent duodenal and gastric ulcers. These root veggies are also high in beta-carotene (Vitamin A), which helps maintain the health of our skin, mucous membranes, immune system, and eyes. High amounts of antioxidants prevent cell damage by free radicals, which in turn protects the body against cancer. Sweet potatoes also contain Vitamin B, Vitamin C, and several minerals, including iron, calcium, and selenium.

Sweet potatoes are tropical plants that love sun, heat, and humidity. Best in zones 8 and above, but you can successfully grow sweet potatoes as far north as Zone 3 if you keep the soil toasty under plastic sheetingduring early summer. As long as they stay warm, and have plenty of room to run their vines, sweet potatoes are easy to grow.

Broccoli

Broccoli is a powerhouse, providing us with protein and fiber as well as an array of vitamins (A, C, E, K, and some B vitamins including folate) and minerals (iron, potassium, calcium, selenium, and magnesium). The nutrients in broccoli contribute to:

  • Heart health, reducing cholesterol and heart disease.
  • Healthy, dense bones.
  • A healthy immune system.
  • Healthy eyes and the prevention of age-related macular degeneration.
  • The reduction of free radicals, which can assist in keeping our bodies cancer-free.

Broccoli also contains non-nutritive antioxidants and phytochemicals that have been shown to block cancer in its early stages.

Broccoli isn’t difficult to grow, but it does require a little bit of planning and care. It’s a cool weather crop that will bolt in the summer heat. For that reason, startbroccoliearly: seeded or even transplanted out about two weeks before the last frost date. During the summer months, keep broccoli shaded and mulched so that it stays as cool as possible. Water regularly and keep an eye on any potential pests.

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts (like broccoli, kale, mustard and collard greens, also discussed here) are members of the brassica family of vegetables. Brassicas contain phytochemicals (specificallyglucosinolates) and carotenoids-antioxidants, both of which have been shown to reduce the risk of cancer. Additionally, Brussels sprouts are rich in Vitamin K, which helps our blood clot and our bodies maintain healthy bones. These veggies are also high in Vitamin C and fiber and have a host of other vitamins and minerals, including Vitamin B6, thiamine, potassium, folate, iron, and manganese.

Like other brassicas, Brussels sprouts are a cool weather crop that doesn’t perform well in hot, dry weather. In fact, sprouts that mature when it’s hot outside may be flimsy and bitter. It’s best to start Brussels sprout seeds indoors in May or early June. Care for the seedlings indoors until August, or roughly 45-60 days beforethe first frost date. Once planted out, use mulch to protect the plants during summer’s last hot days. Brussels sprouts are slow to grow but well worth it.

Dark Leafy Greens (Kale, Mustard and Collard Greens, Spinach, Chard)

Kale, mustard greens, and collard greens are all members of the brassica family, and as such, have the same cancer-fighting phytochemicals and carotenoids-antioxidants as Brussels sprouts and broccoli. Further, dark leafy greens of all types are rich in calcium and iron, and also contain Vitamins A, C, E, and K, as well as fiber, folate, and magnesium.

Most dark, leafy greens are fast-growing cool weather crops. If planted in early spring, before the risk of frost has passed, they’ll be ready to harvest before the heat of summer causes them to bolt. The exception is Swiss chard, which–although also quick and easy to grow–tolerates heat well enough to last into the fall.

Garlic

The health benefits of garlic are well known. It can boost the immune system, reduce blood pressure, lower cholesterol levels, and detoxify heavy metals in our bodies. As well, garlic contains antioxidants that may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Garlic is relatively easy to grow as long as you plant itat the right time. Garlic cloves are best overwintered in the ground, to sprout in the spring or you may try planting as soon as the ground is workable in late winter. Other than standard watering and weeding, keep an eye on your garlic plants for flowers. Should blossoms start to form, cut them off so that the plant directs its energy to its bulb.

Do you have any tried and true tricks for growing these five nutrient-dense veggies? If so, let us know in the comments below.

 

Why You Should Include a Cotton Pillowcase In Your Bug-Out Bag

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Here’s a piece of gear for your bug-out bag that I rarely hear recommended: a cotton pillowcase. Why a cotton pillowcase? Lightweight and not taking up much space, a cotton pillowcase has a myriad of potential uses in a survival situation.

1- Makes an instant bag for collecting wild edibles, kindling for your fire, or anything else you for which you need a good size bag.

2- Can be used to pre-filter water to remove bugs, leaves, stems, algae, and other rubbish before boiling or otherwise treating it.

3- Can be cut into large (or small) bandages, or fashioned into a sling, for first aid.

4- Can be cut into patches to repair clothing (a small sewing kit is a good idea for a bug-out bag).

5- Can be cut into pieces to use as reusable toilet paper (just boil to clean/disinfect before reusing). 

6- Can be fashioned into a reusable diaper (just boil to clean/disinfect before reusing). 

7- Cotton burns, so it can be used in fire making (it also makes for excellent char cloth).   

8- Can be pressed into use as a dust- or smoke-mask.
—————

Follow me on GAB at  https://gab.ai/TimGamble

Follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/TimGamble
 

How to Find Essential Resources in Your Area (Before You Ever Need to Scavenge)

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Information Collection for the Prepper – Part 4
By Anonymous 411

What if things really went crazy and you were in a situation in which you needed to scavenge? Would Read the rest

The post How to Find Essential Resources in Your Area (Before You Ever Need to Scavenge) appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

The Coming Bitcoin Blackouts?

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Bitcoin mining “rigs” like this one are growing rapidly in the U.S.

The vast popularity of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin will lead to blackouts and higher electric bills unless something changes fast. Digital currencies are not controlled by the big banks yet, but rather by a network of users who an incredible amount of electrical power while processing tracking, verifying transactions and building complex blockchains.

Cryptocurrency mining; the process by which digital currencies are created, does in fact use vast amounts of electricity. And it’s growing. The amount of electricity used in Bitcoin mining increased by 610% between April 2017 and April 2018, data from Digicomist indicates. Bitcoin miners worldwide now use enough electricity to power 5.5 million American homes.

Disturbingly, Bitcoin (BTC) is just one cryptocurrency; experts think there are now more than 1,000 cryptocurrencies on the market. Those digital coins are attracting a lot of money; over $600 billion was invested in the cryptocurrency market at the end of 2017, Coindesk’s State of Blockchain report estimated. That means the cryptocurrency market is now worth more than the national economy of Argentina – a country of 43.85 million people.

Cryptocurrency Mining is Big Business

Digital currencies have become one of the most lucrative investments around. Coindesk estimated that all significant cryptocurrencies increased in value by more than 1,000% in 2017. 

Bitcoin’s price increased from around $900 a Coin at the end of 2016 to a high of approximately $20,000 at the end of 2017, Coindesk estimated. Bitcoin’s price fell to $7,967 on April 16, 2018, but Bitcoin trading volume hit a record high on April 12, MarketWatch reported.

Such gains are attracting big money to cryptocurrency. George Soros and the Rockefeller family have announced plans to invest in altcoins in April 2017. Much of the investment will go into cryptocurrency mining which is very lucrative.

Observers think the biggest cryptocurrency miner; China’s Bitmain, made more money than the computer chipmaker NVIDIA, one of the most lucrative tech stocks, CNBC reported. NVIDIA’s income increased by 54.61% to $2.911 billion during 2017, Bitmain might have made a profit of $3 billion to $4 billion in 2017.

How Cryptocurrency Mining Threatens Electricity Supplies 

Bitmain is one of the companies identified as a threat to the electricity supply in the nation of Iceland. Bitmain operates mining farms; datacenters that harvest cryptocurrency and sells computers designed for mining or mining rigs to investors.

Iceland’s residents are worried that cryptocurrency miners will use up most of their island’s very cheap electricity, The Washington Post reported. The fear is that miners might use so much electrical power that they might monopolize the island’s limited electricity supply.

Cryptocurrency Mining popular in the US

Cryptocurrency mining is not widespread in the United States yet, but it’s coming. 

The Eastman Kodak Company unveiled plans to sell a cryptocurrency mining rig called the KashMiner to the public in January. Kodak plans to install mining rigs at its headquarters in Rochester, New York, to augment the company’s income.

News stories did not say how much electricity the KashMiner uses, but if it becomes popular, it can cause shortages or blackouts. If Kodak is successful, other companies might follow its lead. 

Cryptocurrency mining by individuals is already extremely popular in the United States. There is a severe shortage of computer-graphics cards; that are used in mining, at retailers like Best Buy, Ars Technica reported in January. The shortage developed because of all the people trying cryptocurrency mining. 

Individual mining is hard to stop because almost anybody with a computer, an internet connection, and a graphics card can do it. Even though it is easy, miners can make several hundred dollars a month.  

Another threat is that largescale commercial cryptocurrency mining might start in areas of the US with cheap electricity such; as Washington State, or Louisiana. Major miners have ignored North America so far, but CNBC reported Bitmain has plans to mine in Canada.

Watch out for Cryptocurrency Mining

Cryptocurrency mining has not caused significant power grid blackouts yet, but it could happen. In fact, it can happen in any country where inflation destroys the buying power of the currency while increasing the value of cryptocurrencies. This currency issue has already happened in Venezuela.

Households and individuals should prepare for such shortages by installing their own backup power systems. People that mine cryptocurrency should definitely invest part of their profits in a backup power system so they can keep mining during blackouts. 

How Many Gallons of Propane in a 20 lb Tank

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How many gallons of propane to expect in a standard 20 lb tank (typical barbecue grill size) when it’s “full” – is a bit confusing. However I’m going to make it simple for you (as simple as I can). When you bring your empty 20 lb propane tank to get it refilled, you are most likely going to get 4 gallons of propane. The tank technically won’t be filled to capacity, but for safety reasons a 20 lb propane tank should only fill to 80% of it’s maximum. If you were somehow able to fill the tank completely (extremely unsafe)

Original source: How Many Gallons of Propane in a 20 lb Tank

Appendicitis Off The Grid

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Appendicitis Off The Grid

Blocked appendix

Blocked appendix

After a disaster or at a remote homestead, the medic may not have ready access to modern medical technology. As such, many conditions that are commonly identified with ultrasounds or CAT scans may be more challenging to diagnose. One of these challenges is abdominal pain. There are various medical issues that cause it, with the classic example of an abdominal emergency being appendicitis. Over 300,000 Americans have their appendix removed every year.

The Appendix

The “vermiform appendix”, as it is formally known, is a hollow tubular organ a few centimeters long and a centimeter wide. It looks like a worm (vermiform means worm-like).  Attached at the entrance to the large intestine (the “cecum”), it resides in the lower right portion of the abdomen in almost all people. Inflammation of the appendix can become a medical emergency quickly; if ignored, it may represent a life-threatening situation.

ASIDE: When the appendix (or any other organ, for that matter) is inflamed, the suffix “-itis” is added; thus, inflammation of the appendix is called “appendicitis”.

What purpose does the appendix serve? Charles Darwin believed it was a left-over from an earlier time, as horses and some other animals have larger ones that help them digest vegetation. Today, it is thought by many that it serves an immune function for fetuses and children. It is also thought to be a reservoir for good gut bacteria. After a bout of, say, dysentery or cholera, it may help repopulate the gastro-intestinal tract with beneficial micro-organisms.

Having said that, there seems to be no major ill effects from having an appendix removed, although some studies suggest a small increase in diseases, such as Crohn’s Disease.

What Happens in Appendicitis

A grossly inflamed appendix

A grossly inflamed appendix

Appendicitis is related to an obstruction of the organ by, usually, calcified feces; it some cases, blockage can be caused by foreign objects, trauma, or even intestinal worms.  How does this lead to a possibly life-threatening situation?

Once blocked, the mucus produced by the appendix is unable to drain into the cecum. The organ swells as a result. Once swollen enough, the ensuing pressure on the appendix walls prevents the circulation necessary to keep tissue alive. The dying tissue causes the appendix to fill with pus and, without treatment, will be either walled-off by the body’s defenses or will burst (a “ruptured appendix”).

Once ruptured, an inflammation of the lining of the entire abdomen called peritonitis occurs. From there, it can progress to an infection throughout the body (sepsis) if untreated. Death may be the final outcome.

How to Identify Appendicitis

Many illnesses will be difficult for the medic to diagnose in austere settings. Although ultrasounds and CAT scans help confirm suspicions, appendicitis can be identified with some reliability based on physical signs and medical history.

Classic signs and symptoms that suggest appendicitis as the cause of abdominal pain include:

  • Pain starting at or around the belly button, usually dull and aching
  • Loss of appetite, followed by nausea and vomiting
  • Abdominal swelling
  • Fever
  • Inability to pass gas
  • Pain evolving to become sharper and migrates to the lower right abdomen

The pain tends to localize to a specific spot one-third of the way from the hip bone to the belly button, an area known as “McBurney’s Point”.

McBurney's Point

McBurney’s Point

Once an appendix has ruptured, the pain becomes general throughout the abdomen in many cases. The belly may appear stiff and swollen, with tenderness on exam, both on pressing down (“guarding”) and when letting go (“rebound tenderness”, often worse).

It should be noted that other symptoms may present in a significant minority of patients. Cramping may occur, with some complaining of painful or otherwise difficult urination. As with any condition, signs and symptoms may vary from person to person.

Mimics of Appendicitis

Causes of abdominal pain by area

Causes of abdominal pain by area

Other conditions may lead you to erroneously suspect appendicitis when, in actuality, something entirely different is going on. Urinary infections, right-sided tubal pregnancies or ovarian cysts, diverticulitis, Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, and pelvic inflammatory disease may mimic an inflamed appendix to one extent or another and must be ruled out. These topics will be discussed in future articles.

Treatment of Appendicitis

Appendicitis is the most common cause of abdominal pain treated by surgery today, and the procedure is usually curative. The earlier the surgery is performed, the faster the recovery and the less likely scarring will occur. Below is a video of a (bloodier than usual) open removal of a swollen appendix:

Appendectomy can be performed, using a very small incision, under sedation and local anesthesia off the grid. This procedure is not without difficulty for the inexperienced surgeon, as there is intervening small intestine and other structures that must be moved out of the way to visualize the inflamed area. Of course, patient discomfort is a major obstacle.

Recent studies have explored the possibility of using antibiotics to nip early appendicitis in the bud. The patient should be placed on bedrest and restricted to small amounts of clear liquids as soon as you make the diagnosis.

Intravenous treatment is the preferred way to deliver antibiotics to treat appendicitis, but may not be an option off the grid. In that case, a combination of Ampicillin (veterinary equivalent Fish-Cillin) and either Clindamycin (veterinary equivalent Fish-Cin) or Metronidazole (veterinary equivalent Fish-Zole) might be useful. In cases of Penicillin allergy, Ciprofloxacin (veterinary equivalent Fish-Flox) may be a suitable alternative to Ampicillin.

Look for other common causes of abdominal pain to be examined in future articles.

Joe Alton MD

Dr. Alton

Dr. Alton

Find out more about appendicitis and conditions that mimic it in the Third Edition of the award-winning Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide for When Medical Help is Not on the way, available at Amazon or along with an entire line of medical supplies at store.doomandbloom.net.

The Third Edition

The entity known as news!

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The entity known as news!
Allen Getz ” Behind The Headlines ” Audio player below!

For the inaugural broadcast of Behind the Lines, we will examine the entity known as news. The investigation will center upon what is news, why is it news, and why is control (or lack of control) of it so important to society.

Listen to this broadcast or download “The entity known as news” in this player!

Continue reading The entity known as news! at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Homemade Dry Brownie Mix Recipe – Store Until Ready To Use

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This past week we were both craving brownies so I went to the pantry and was disappointed to find that we were out of brownie mix. You are probably thinking of the brownie mix that you find in the grocery

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7 Spring Gardening Tricks That Will Stop Summer Weeds

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A little extra work in the spring can prevent a lot of weeding later in the year.

 

It’s a story most gardeners know all too well. We start off the growing season with a blank palette of natural soil in an atmosphere of spring optimism, always confident that this will be the best garden season ever. But if the arrival of summer brings with it an onslaught of weeds, even the most positive of spirits can get crushed under the weight of battling them.

The good news is that there are ways to combat weeds in spring, without using synthetic or even organic herbicides, which can make life a little more comfortable later on. Here are seven tricks to try.

Kill weeds first with clear plastic. Laying reusable clear plastic over the garden before planting any seeds is often an effective way to kill a lot of weeds at once. Sometimes, the greenhouse effect that is created by this method can generate so much heat that it destroys not only sprouted weeds but their seeds, as well, and possibly even other soil pathogens. As a nice side bonus, using clear plastic can preheat the soil in preparation for seeds or seedlings that will appreciate the residual warmth when the plastic is removed. One downside to this method is that it can be less effective in colder climates or during a cold, wet spring, and can end up creating favorable conditions for weed growth if the sun’s rays lack the intensity for searing heat. Make sure this one is right for your situation before using it.

Use fabric mulch before or during planting. I buy high-quality landscape fabric by the roll—the heavy-duty kind sold by greenhouse supply outfits—as often as I can afford it. It costs me a lot more money up front than the cheap stuff, but it works out to be cost-effective because I use it over and over. I use it between the rows in my in-ground garden every year, laying it out before or during planting in a way that defines walk spaces and prevents weeds in all but the smallest slivers of soil. I also use fabric in long-term applications as a weed barrier between and around raised beds, and around berries and fruit trees.

Less expensive fabric or recycled materials can also make a real difference in weeds. Some of my favorite repurposed items for mulching are bags from livestock grain and other animal feed. Used carpet—especially around the other edges of a garden where any possible chemical seepage is less of an issue—works well, too.

Use grass clippings, cardboard and newspaper. These are an excellent mulching option for smaller garden spaces and tight budgets. As with synthetic materials, it is essential to use this method before the weeds take hold—better still before they even sprout. I’ve used this mulching process with good results, and have found that the most important secrets to success are to do it on a day with little to no wind. Don’t skimp on materials, use heavy, wet grass clippings, and pack it down well.

Use weed-free compost. Whether purchased from a commercial compost facility or retailer, obtained directly from a farm, or made right on the homestead, the key is to ensure it’s been heated sufficiently to kill weed seeds. We get all the weeds we need from nature, and do not need to import more!

Maintain the highest possible soil quality. Weeds flourish in poor soil, but most vegetables are not as adaptable as weeds. The more favorable conditions we can give our plants, the better armed they are to grow bigger and stronger and be better equipped to hold their own in the constant fight with weeds for space. Minimal rocks, the right ratio of sand and loam, ample organic material, and proper drainage all contribute to soil health—and in turn, make a big difference in plant health.

Provide plenty of water to newly planted seeds and seedlings. As with soil quality, water helps provide intentional plants with what they need to compete against weeds.

Provide the specific nutrients for the plants that you are growing. This point goes along with general soil quality and water but adds soil composition into the mix. It’s crucial to test garden soil—most cooperative extension services or state universities can help with this—and to amend the soil as recommended. Depending upon geography and the variety of crops being grown, soil test reports might advise raising or lowering soil pH, adjusting the ratio of organic matter, or adding specific nutrients like phosphorus, magnesium or sulfur.

The fundamental way to stop summer weeds in spring is twofold: First, make life as difficult as possible for weeds by overheating them in the sun under clear plastic or suffocating them under mulch. Second, make life as easy as possible for the plants you do want to grow by giving them the best possible soil and water conditions.

What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

 

Are Tire Gardens Toxic? The Case For And Against

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Are tire gardens toxic?

In a newsletter last year, I shared some thoughts on tire gardens, along with this video:

In response, one of my readers wrote:

“Hello David,
Tires do leach toxic, carcinogenic chemicals into the soil and plants grown in them. No time to research this? Then do not show pictures of plants grown in tires. That is irresponsible and bad karma as you pass on injury to others. Look into it. Fact: tire gardening and straw bale gardening are bad if you do not want toxin-suffused vegetables.”

And Sheila writes:

“One year, my father and I planted potatoes in tires. Just put on another tire and add dirt. We had lots of potatoes with seven high. PVC pipe with holes in it to water the plants. Problem was that they tasted like tires. Since then, I am not a fan of tires for living or gardening.”

Vegetables tasting like tires? And bad karma! Oh me oh my, I just want to give up.

Actually, I don’t care about tire gardens, though I do like the idea of recycling a waste product into a gardening bed.

But growing vegetables in tires isn’t a method I have any personal stake in. I’m happy to drop the method if it’s got its downsides, like straw bale gardening seems to have.

So—are tire gardens toxic? Let’s do a little digging.

Are Tire Gardens Toxic? The Case For Tires

Tires are, of course, cheap and widely available even in the third world. ECHO uses them in their urban garden demonstration area. You can set up tire gardens on driveways, on roof tops, in rocky lots, and in tight spaces.

They’re convenient, too. But are they toxic?

When Patrice at Rural Revolution blogged about their tractor tire gardens, she got a similar response to that which I got … but even harsher.

Someone wrote:

You could have created a floral landscape, a Dutch Masterpiece, an English Rose Garden, a French Formal Garden, and you chose Fords-Ville, Michelin Man, and polluted Mother Earth. Scrap timber is everywhere, so are bricks, tiles, even rockery stones, but tires no. Are you sure the food grown will be free of carbon rubber tire oil moisture? A carcinogen?

You can read Patrice’s response and entire defense of tire gardening here, but most of it boils down to what she wrote here:

“Tires have a lot of nasty things bonded into them, things that arguably ARE carcinogenic. But it’s the term BONDED that must be considered. Intact tires are distressingly inert (that’s why they’re everywhere rather than quietly decomposing into Mother Earth).”

She then quotes extensively from research done by Mr. Farber of www.tirecrafting.com (which now redirects to an Etsy site so the original essay appears to be missing):

Used tires already exist, and in their solid state, they are as safe or safer than any other construction material. The process and the result of this global discard nightmare being recycled by industry, whether grinding them up for road base, burning them as fuel, or recouping the oil, releases more hydrocarbons while costing the global economy billions of dollars for tire cleanup and commercial recycling. Modifying tires to create green space and home gardening available to everyone would not only absorb hydrocarbons, it could well be the key to salvation for practically every family on the planet that is otherwise excluded from adequate sustenance. Personal tire recycling potential benefits far outweigh all perceived hazards.

Still, I am not convinced. After all, if vegetables are tasting like tires, well, that doesn’t inspire confidence. Yet I do love what Patrice has done at Rural Revolution. In her case, it made sense.

Are Tire Gardens Toxic? The Case Against Tires

According to Brighton Permaculture Trust:

“Due to commercial secrecy, it’s difficult to find out the exact ingredients of a tire, and there are lots of different types. The list below is from a ‘typical tire’:

  • Natural rubber
  • Synthetic rubber compounds, including Butadiene—known carcinogen
  • Solvents: Benzene—known carcinogen, Styrene—anticipated to be carcinogenic, Toluene—has negative health effects, Xylene—irritant, & Petroleum naphtha
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Phenols—some are endocrine-disruptive, Benzo(a)pyrene—linked to cancer
  • Heavy metals: Zinc, chromium, nickel, lead, copper & cadmium
  • Carbon black—possibly carcinogenic
  • Vulcanising agents: Sulphur & zinc oxide
  • Polychlorinated biphenyls—known carcinogen
  • Other synthetic chemicals”

Again, though, these terrible things might have off-gassed during the tire’s usable life or been stabilized and made inert during manufacturing.

Yet as Mischa argues in that article:

“When it comes to growing food in tires, why take the risk?

Whilst the quantity of toxic chemicals may be small, we don’t know the exact amount used in tyres because of commercial secrecy.

People generally grow food organically for themselves to avoid exposure to synthetic chemicals. It seems ironic that a ‘Permaculture way’ of reusing tires could be unintentionally reintroducing potentially harmful chemicals back into the equation.”

And over at Science Daily, it gets scarier:

“Draper’s method has been to make up clean samples of water like those inhabited by several kinds of aquatic organisms—algae, duckweed, daphnia (water fleas), fathead minnows, and snails—and under controlled laboratory conditions, put finely ground tire particles into the samples. By letting the particles remain in the water for 10 days and then filtering them out, she created a “leachate” that included substances in the tire rubber. All the organisms exposed to the leachate died, and the algae died fairly quickly.”

This is not complete tires, of course, but tires will break down slowly over time in the garden—and if it kills ground life, well, that’s obviously a bad thing.

The science isn’t settled, but it is unsettling.

Conclusion

After multiple hours of research, I am now leaning against tire gardening. On my new property, I have not built any tire gardens and I don’t plan to add any.

If you’re in an urban setting, have terrible soil or no soil, and no options, etc., there might be a place for tire gardens. I built mine for fun in a few minutes and have enjoyed them, but I now have no desire to expand and add more. Yet digging beds is free—so why use tires at all?

Especially if it’s going to ruin the karma I don’t even believe in.

If you want simple, tried-and-true and even off-grid methods for growing lots of food without much money in tough times, stick around The Grow Network and keep learning!

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Featured Photo Credit: Mark Buckawicki / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain

 

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Running Pain: When to Stop and When to Make Your Way Through

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: A guest contribution to The Prepper Journal. Good advice herein as keeping ones self in good condition and knowing how to listen to your own body are a recurring theme here for people who may suddenly be tasked with difficult circumstances. As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and be entered into the Prepper Writing Contest with a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, then enter today!

Running is a vigorous activity which brings many benefits and some problems. Each runner has experienced pain and muscle soreness. Sometimes, the runner encounters these problems out of season and the person should know how to cope with them.

The only question that should be solved is when it is the right time to pull yourself together and to push through and when to stop running.

Let’s see how to identify the pain by type and how to cope with running pain.

Good And Bad Running Pain: What’s The Difference?

All runners experience different types of pain. The difference is that one type may subside quickly while another type of pain needs careful treatment.

Muscle soreness is very common, especially if you are a new runner. If you push your body to its limits, then muscles burn. For instance, if you used to run 4 kilometers and ran 7 kilometers, you’ll experience this pain. It’s caused by a buildup of lactic acid. This pain gives the signal to the brain to let know how hard your muscles work. When you suffer from this pain, then push through and the pain will decrease. Also, you’ll build enough endurance.

Besides, side cramps are also a problem. Running causes you to strain a ligament connecting your diaphragm to the abdominal muscles and side cramps can occur. However, the pain will subside if you walk with your hands on top of your head (you have all seen marathon and distance runners assume this position after an event.)

But if you experience awful pain during running and it doesn’t weaken, that’s a sign of an injury and it means that you should stop for some time.

The most common injuries are caused by applying repeated force over a prolonged period of time and these injuries include the following:

 

  • Runner’s Knee

This condition is characterized by a tender pain around or behind the kneecap. Downhill running, weak hips, and muscle imbalance cause runner’s knee.

Treatment: take anti-inflammatory medications, use a knee brace, and don’t run for a long distance.

  • Achilles Tendinitis

This condition is characterized by swelling of the Achilles tendon. This swelling is caused by tight calf muscles, inappropriate footwear, flat feet, and a mileage increase.

Treatment: take anti-inflammatory medications, stretch your calf muscles, wear supportive shoes, and avoid activities that put extra stress on the tendons.

  • Plantar Fasciitis

This condition is characterized by inflammation, irritation, and tearing of the plantar fascia. This leads to extreme pain and stiffness in the arch. Wearing inappropriate footwear and excess pounding on the road trigger this condition.

Treatment: stretch the heels, wear cushioning shoes. If the condition worsens, wear orthopedics and a night splint.

  • Shin Splints

Shin splints occur when the muscles and tendons covering the shinbone become inflamed. Typically, this condition is caused by prolonged running on hard surfaces.

Treatment: wear shock-absorbing insoles, ice the shins for 15 minutes, try to run on softer surfaces.

  • Patellar Tendinitis

This injury is typical for distance runners and it is characterized by tiny tears in the patellar tendon. It connects the kneecap to the shinbone. Overpronation and over-training are the major reasons for this injury.

Treatment: strengthen the hamstrings and ice the knee.

  • Ankle Sprain

An ankle sprain occurs when the ankle rolls in or outward, stretching the ligament. Unfortunate landing, curbs, and potholes can cause this injury (as well as severe heels and platform shoes.)

Treatment: have a solid rest when this injury occurs, strengthen the muscles around the ankle, wear an ankle brace.

Ways To Avoid Running Pain

Of course, there is no a universal remedy that helps to get rid of pain and soreness but there are some handy tips that will help you to eliminate pain.

  • Train Smart

Go towards your goal slowly but surely. You should listen to your body, sleep well, and stick to healthy eating habits (don’t consume sugar and processed foods; eat less sodium and more lean protein, fruit, and veggies). If there is a lack of sleep, then a healing process is prolonged and inflammation and joint pain aren’t reduced.

The training program should be right for you. If you have a minor injury, it’s better to avoid long runs and don’t do speed training because it puts stress on your tissues and ligaments and your condition may worsen.

Also, if your condition is very poor, then miss or reschedule a few runs, it won’t have a big impact on your training but it will affect your recovery positively.

  • Take Care of Injured Muscles

If you are going through a lactic acid build-up period and muscle soreness is a common situation for you, then heat sore muscles before the run but never heat them after running because it can only increase inflammation. Always cool down the muscles with ice after the run.

  • See a Specialist

Only a specialist can tell you whether you will be able to run with pain or not, so a visit to a doctor is a must. The specialist will make a diagnosis. Remember that such conditions as Runner’s Knee, iliotibial band syndrome, Piriformis syndrome, patella tendinitis, and Achilles tendinitis should be treated only with a professional’s help. Besides, a professional will make adjustments to your training schedule, and he will give an appropriate treatment plan.

  • Use Techniques to Release Pain

There are several techniques that help in reducing pain. You can try an active release technique (ART). It can help to eliminate muscle pain which occurs due to injury.

Active release technique is a type of soft tissue therapy that helps relieve tight muscles and nerve trigger points, greatly reducing joint stress or muscle pain. This technique helps to relieve different problems, which include lower back pain, shin splints, Plantar fasciitis.

The major benefit of this technique is preventing and breaking up dense scar tissue, also called adhesions. Adhesions limit the normal range of motion of joints and muscles.

If you choose ART, you’ll get the following benefits:

  • Your flexibility will be increased because ART helps restore normal muscle and connective tissue function. As a result, your performance is improved and running injuries are prevented;
  • A range of motion and mobility will be improved;
  • Back pain will be relieved because compressed nerves are released.

Another technique you can try is called The Graston Technique. This is a patented form of manual therapy that uses stainless steel tools to perform muscle mobilizations. These tools treat scar tissue and fascial adhesions, which decrease the range of motion.

The Graston Technique helps to treat such conditions as ankle sprains, Plantar Fasciitis, runner’s knee, pulled muscles.

The treatment brings the following benefits:

    • A fast and full recovery is facilitated;
    • It can work as a post-surgery therapy and as a means to ease chronic inflammation;
    • It reduces chronic injuries and corrects dysfunctional movement patterns within the tissue. Eventually, the more efficient movement is allowed;
    • This technique provides an immediate reduction of pain.

 

  • Never Run with Major Pain

If you suffer from unbearable pain, then stop and rest because running with major pain may delay recovery. If there is an injury, then stick to a golden rule – RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). If it doesn’t help, then visit a sports injury specialist because if you don’t treat the injury, then the pain can become chronic.

  • Don’t Run if the Injury Causes You to Limp or Change Your Stride

If you can’t run normally, it’s better not to run at all because it may worsen the injury. However, if it is just soreness and if it doesn’t worsen during the run, then you can run. Usually, minor soreness disappears when muscles warm up.

  • Don’t Use Painkillers and Anti-inflammatory Drugs Before a Run

These drugs don’t heal the injury, they only hide pain, and your condition may only worsen. If you feel extremely bad, it’s better not to run, but if the pain is bearable, then it’s better to take medications afterward.

How To Keep Running If You Want To Stop

Each runner has experienced running pain during the race and everyone faced a choice – to stop or continue to run. The ability to push through the bouts of discomfort is a necessary ability for the athlete.

If you don’t experience severe pain, then quitting isn’t the solution. Here are some tips concerning your physical and mental health that will help you to keep running when you want to stop.

Tips For Overcoming Physical Pain

  • Take Walk Breaks

If your goal is to run a marathon, then you should take walk breaks to win. A study in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport found that including regular walking breaks in your race can bring you to the finish line at the same pace as if you ran the entire way — while doing a lot less damage to your body.

Walking breaks help runners experience less muscle pain and fatigue. Also, they help runners ran farther and for longer periods of time. Besides, each run is not only a physical but also a mental challenge. It’s easier to run if you cut the distance into small parts and a walking break helps to achieve it.

  • Loosen Your Grip

If there’s tension in your upper body, then it makes a regular run feel twice as hard. In order to run longer and be less tired, you should loosen your grip. To check whether your upper body is tensed or not, you can perform an easy test: roll up a sheet of paper and run with it in your hand for a few minutes. If the paper is crunched, then you try too hard and you should relax. This works when trying to fall asleep as well spread your fingers wide and keep them that way to relieve tensions that may be keeping you awake.

  • Breathe Deeply

If you change your pace often and get tired quickly, try to take deep breaths. Slow down, breathe deeply, it will lower your heart rate and you will breathe better. If you try to bring in much oxygen too quickly, you don’t get rid of CO2 in your lungs.

Find your breath and you can try a two-breath sequence: two steps on one inhale, two steps on one exhale.

Tips For Improving Mental Health

  • Get Distracted

Research has found that listening to music can improve your running performance by up to 15%.

Thus, if you feel tired, just get distracted, listen to your favorite music, don’t look at the watch or an app to see how many miles are left and go towards your goal.

Also, another way to forget about pain is to let your mind wander. You can count the trees when you pass them, think about the colors of the cars and houses you see, it will definitely help you to forget about the pain.

However, there’s another point of view. Some studies show that the most skilled athletes have the least activity in the brain. In other words, they are able to perform on autopilot.

  • Repeat Positive Affirmations

If you suffer from mental pain, abstract from it, think about something pleasant. Focus on achieving success and repeat the affirmations – I feel fine, I am a fierce competitor, my endurance is high, winning is the best feeling in the world, I am a winner, and you will not notice how the pain will go away.

  • Remember Your Motivation

When you are ready to quit, remember where you have started. Your initial goal will help you to complete the race. Remember how hard you worked, how strong you are and that you are capable to withstand the normal pains of physical stress.

Conclusion

Please, remember that none of this information should substitute professional medical advice. When to stop or when to make your way through if you suffer from running pain is a decision, which is made by each person individually. And in this case, a physical and emotional condition should be taken into account. Before making this important choice, think carefully, see a specialist, and listen to your body, because sometimes in order to take a step forward, you need to take two steps back.

About the Author: Helen Rogers is an editor of http://thecrossfitshoes.com/ She helps people get stronger. She shares running and sports questions, beauty tips. All her stories are result-oriented and make her readers become healthy, wealthy and wise.

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