The Liquidation of the Krakow Ghetto – Max Richter “Last Days” / scene f…

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These Germans were ordinary people, people with more dark side than good side. People like this exist today within our own government, anyone who can sanction the genocide in West Papua & in fact train the Indonesian military & pay them to commit genocide is not someone to be trusted with our welfare. Anyone who cuts funding to women’s help centers when domestic violence is rife in Australia is NOT a nice person. Gun control is population control. Could never happen here in Australia? It could happen anywhere & already has!

This totally abhorrent behavour by our government is all for money & power, they will do ANYTHING for more money & more power. The Port Arthur massacre proves this, the end (gun confiscation) justifies the means (an orchestrated massacre by unknown shooters with the knowledge of the government!).

DON’T let them take any more of our guns, we are already under-gunned compared to the police, military & criminals.

Had to take a day off from heavy lifting

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I have been running all week and none of the jobs done were light weight endeavors. I built 2 of the new raised beds with Mom’s assistance, tilled the other garden beds with Tucker the pekes’s help with digging. Stacked about 2 cords of wood, though Mom stopped by and helped finish off the 1/3 of a cord stacked in the carport. Mom and I loaded up several of her planters so she can start her container garden at her new place.  Mom grabbed some of the older chicken wire so she can protect some new trees she wants to grow at the new house.

This week I bought two new thorn-less blackberry plants, some seed potatoes, more soil and manure for the raised beds along with wood mulch for around the beds and replacement much for the yard walkways.  I’m trying out some new step-in fence posts that should keep Tucker the peke from digging in the planted garden beds.  I’m going to use temp. plastic fencing but these post are designed for electric fence strands so I have the option to change it if it becomes needed.  What I like is these little fence posts have a metal spike to drive into the dirt and plenty of hooks to hold the fence taut.  Once I gift Mom a couple of my smaller raised beds (2 ft. x 4 ft.) and move a couple of the kiddie pool beds it should be simple to block Tucker off from digging in the garden beds.  Tucker the peke will have plenty of digging area under the walnut trees where most plants don’t grow very well and that area is sort of the bird and squirrel area.

Mom and got a few more of her things moved out to her place and I got some of the “inheritance” furniture items back as she is having floor space issues. Gosh, we both have prepped a lot a stuff  (for family) and now those prep items are excess so Mom will have a big yard sale this summer!  After that stuff is sold Mom can put the cash back into her place and make some stuff happen for her place!  It would be great if she could make enough on the yard sale to run a power line out to her shop area and fence off her wide open drive way area.

Update on the dog food test:

It seems the dogs like for carbs Brown rice, pearled barley and white rice in that order. For vegetables: peas and carrots were the big winner, chopped broccoli was okay and green beans were the least favorite.  As far as meats go,  chunk/stew type beef seems to be the preferred meat, chicken okay and hamburger is okay.  The dogs are eating all of the new home made dog food and are no longer getting sick even when I add in a new dog food recipe.  I’ll be adding in some raw beef bones so the dogs have a teeth cleaner and can gnaw on the bones for extra minerals.  I tried a new recipe for bone broth and was very disappointed with the results.  The new broth turned out very greasy and the bones did not crumble after 48 hours in the crock pot.  so I’ll go back to the original recipe I used. While I added garlic and onion for flavor the dog’s took no harm I could see when I added the first bone broth to cook the brown rice.  I wonder if it is ingesting the onion/garlic vegetable matter that is so bad for dogs?  Perhaps when you strain the veggies out and all you are left is flavor and vitamins, onion and garlic is not so bad for dogs?  I don’t know, but I’m keeping the dogs exposure to onion and garlic at a minimum.

Removing wood sap: I was literally covered in sap and lots of scratches after stacking the Douglass Fir.  I took a hot bath because I need one, wash with soap and then put Avon’s skin so soft on my arms covered in sap and it washed off with no scrubbing.  My Mom used to sell Avon products but not any more so we make no money by this endorsement.  If you need to remove sap, goo, tar or anything like that get a big bottle or two of  Avon’s Skin so Soft for safely getting that gooey stuff off your skin.  I also like Avon’s Skin so Soft insect repellent/sunscreen.  It works great against all the bugs in SW Idaho, Death Valley California (NTC) and Central Washington (YTC) that I have personally tested while in the US Army.

P.S.  Two things I learned with stacking wood.  A good sticky tape is great for pulling out sprinters from your hands and much easier and less painful/ damaging than digging them out with a needle or knife.  If your glove fill with splinters, dirt or what ever collects in the fingers of the glove that you can’t shake out.  Place the glove over a vacuum/shop vac hose and suck those little bits of gunk out of your gloves. I don’t know about you but the ends of my leather glove always get filled with gunk while I’m working on projects.  Then the gloves end up with a finger full of little gunk you can’t remove and that makes the gloves hard to use.  Perhaps other people already do that, but I found out just how great it works for clear the gunk from the interior of my gloves this week.  Fabric type gloves this not such a big problem as they can be easily turned inside out and washed.  Leather gloves can’t be machine washed or turned inside out easily especially the the thick work gloves.

A great thing is after all this physical labor now all I have to do is finish up the projects as all the heavy work is done.  Cut a few PVC pipes for garden hoops to support frost cover drape. Drill a few brackets, test out some fence posts and plant some early seed plants and get some plants started growing indoors for trans planting.  I’m still catching up but each year I get started a little earlier on plants.

Pros & Cons Of Various Survival Foods

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Food is a very important necessity, we all know that and it’s safe to assume that most of us also know that food is not always easily available when you need it. It is entirely possible that there will come a time when you will have to face a shortage of food and for that …

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Patriots Networking: Social Media and Communications Platform MeWe

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As quickly as the world of social media changed the world, the world of social media is changing. Unfortunately, its changing for the worst. Instead of these technologies being vast opportunities for free speech and expression, certain people are being silenced. We are all figuring out that we want and what we don’t want out …

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How To Build DIY Survival Shelters To Survive Through The Night

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While knowing how to build shelter from the woods around you is important and impressive, we have easy to pack materials that are more effective. The ability to build shelters with tools is incredibly important. A great tarp can be used to make many types of shelters. They will not rely on pine boughs to …

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Survival Gear Review: Fenix HM50R Headlamp

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I’ve been on a quest for the perfect headlamp pretty much forever. And I’m as close as I’ve ever been to headlamp happiness. The Fenix HM50R Headlamp has almost all the features I want in a useful and highly productive form factor. Where the Fenix HM50R Headlamp really shines in the small details that refine its design and use. But to appreciate the nuances of the Fenix HM50R Headlamp, one would need to have developed frustrations with previous designs. So here are some obvious improvements with the Fenix HM50R Headlamp. First and foremost is the light throw. With a turbo mode of 500 lumens, this light screams in the dark. And the steps down in brightness of 130, 30, and 4 lumens are exceptionally good choices give all types of darkness the proper amount of light.

By Doc Montana, a Contributing Author to SHTFBlog and SurvivalCache.com 

For comparison, my first headlamp was four D-cell monster with a dim incandescent bulb that probably threw two dozen lumens on a good day going downhill and with the wind. The pound of batteries were worn on the belt in a big red plastic case. A wire ran from the case to a bulbous unit mounted on a two-inch wide rubber strap. At the time it was like the light from a Maglite but with the advantage of a headlamp. Overall, it was awful, but since it was the only affordable option in town, we didn’t know any better. Today, however, our standards are much higher, our expectations much greater, and our tolerance for poor design much lower.

Operating Operationally

In order to control headlamp lighting, a simple interface must power the light on and off and through the settings in an intuitive way that is watertight and works easily in the dark by feel as well as when wearing gloves.

Also Read: Bug Out Flashlights

Another consideration is beam control. Headlamps by design are to be worn on the head. This means a significant amount of control is possible just by moving one’s head. This works with gross movements, but what about when precision is needed such as with close-up work (think medical or mechanical interventions) or when moving through terrain with hands full and limited head movement? Generally a headlamp points forward or rotates down placing the center of light closer to the eyes. Lateral adjustments are from simply revolving head strap around the head. The Fenix HM50R Headlamp is essentially a cylinder in a cuff meaning it can spin 360 degrees around the vertical. The cuff is a rubberized plastic material that connects light to the headband. My Surefire Minimus headlamp uses the same attachment concept, but in a heavier, beefier design that requires a tool to adjust the tension. Normally I would prefer a Surefire light over almost any other brand, but the number of design flaws in with the Surefire kept me looking for a better light even after I dropped more than a Benjamin Franklin on it.

Batter(y) Up!

The Fenix HM50R Headlamp runs on a single CR123 battery which is my preference with headlamps, powers this light for two hours on full power and 128 hours on low with 14 hours and 48 hours respectively for the middle two settings. However, the Fenix HM50R Headlamp ships with a rechargeable 700mAh 16340 battery that extends the top end light by half an hour but lowers the runtime somewhat. The included battery recharges in the light through a micro-USB port, or outside the light in a charger. A similar Fenix light, the HL50 caught my attention with it’s ability to run either CR123 or AA batteries but required a extra tube extension if running AA batteries. That means one must carry the extra piece when running a CR123 battery in the light and nobody wants to do that. Well at least me anyway. Plus the HL50 headlamp had a metal attachment ring that was captured in between the battery tube and the end switch in order to keep the light attached to the metal clasp on the headband. That meant that you had to disassemble the light in order to remove it from the headband. With the newer Fenix HM50R Headlamp, all you need to do to set it free from the headband is to pull it out from the rubberized collar. For reference, the Surefire Minimus also requires a tool to remove it from the headband because the entire attachment system must be dismantled.

Related: Compact Flashlight Comparison

So why would you want to remove the headband from the light? Many reasons, notably that the Fenix HM50R Headlamp is a great flashlight on its own. The 90 degree angle-head design is like a mini military “moonbeam” D-cell flashlight. By the way, the first flashlight appeared around 1899 and was powered by D-batteries. So for almost 100 years, the D-cell ruled the flashlight world. Today I have no D-cell electronics except for a pair of 1950’s era Civil Defense Geiger Counters.

What’s Your Angle?

As an angle-head flashlight, the Fenix HM50R Headlamp can stand upright, upside down, and sideways. Often tail standing a flashlight requires a reflective ceiling to capture the photons from escaping out into space. The Fenix HM50R Headlamp on the other hand can sit still on a table firing the light forward or upward if you like. On the Surefire side, even if you remove the light from the headband, only one end of the cylinder shape has a flat-enough face to tail stand.

The Fenix HM50R Headlamp has a battery charge indicator in the form of a glowing or blinking green or blue light in the switch. When clicked quickly, the switch lights up indicating the rough amount of charge in the battery. This is a tremendously welcome feature for several reasons. First, it’s always good to know your battery’s condition. Second, as a rechargeable flashlight, the Fenix HM50R Headlamp can be topped off before adventuring so a quick charge indication will tell you both if you need to charge, and with charging experience, about how long that will take.

And third, the subtle green or blue light does not interfere with the operation of the light whereas the Surefire Minimus begins an irritating blink sequence when its battery runs low. My lone complaint here is that the blue glow indicates a lower charge. Blue? Why not red? Red would make so much more sense, and Red is universal indicator of too much (redline) or too little (in the red). The meaning of blue must be memorized. And worse, if you use a Fenix rechargeable 16340 battery with built-in micro-USB port, the light on the battery glows red when low and charging, and blue when charged. So even within the Fenix family, a blue light means both fully charged and almost dead. May I suggest that the Fenix Flashlight engineers spend a few more minutes a week talking with the Fenix Battery engineers. It is those little things that are maddening.

Splitting Hairs

Regardless of the indicator light oversights, I highly recommend getting the ARB-L16-700mAh rechargeable batteries. The chief complaint about using CR123 batteries is their initial cost, and slightly less available presence in low-volume battery sellers like back road gas stations and small town grocery stores. So those same recharging superpowers that the Fenix HM50R Headlamp has are equally available in the ARB-L16-700mAh battery. Yes, the battery has its own port and can be charged just like a non-Apple cell phone.

Related: 5 Cheap Things That Can Get You Killed

Something to think about with headlamp batteries is that you just might have to swap them out in the dark…with cold hands…in a hurry…while on the run. With the Fenix HM50R Headlamp all you have to do is spin off the only cap, swap batteries, spin the cap back on, and fire it up. This is so very different from one of my 3-AA headlamps where the entire light must be unsnapped from its headband bracket, then cracked open like an oyster, then replace each AA battery in the proper configuration, then reseal the housing in the right direction, reconnect it to the bracket in the right orientation. In other words, you need time, patience, and an understanding of the battery replacement sequence prior to the lights going out.

Bounce Check

Another great feature of the Fenix HM50R Headlamp is the minimal weight. My other Fenix AA headlamps had some heft to them causing the light to bounce up and down on my forehead when running or biking, and being a noticeable weight on my head. So much so that a hard bump can knock the headlamp around if not wearing the strap that runs over the top of the head. With the Fenix HM50R Headlamp, no third strap is needed which makes donning it much easier especially when helmets and hats are involved.

You Might Like: 30-30 Lever Gun For Survival

The durability of the Fenix HM50R Headlamp seems above and beyond. The aluminium chassis of the light conveys solidity to everyone. The fine threaded aluminium cap with O-ring seal is part of the IP68 rating of this light. IP68 decoded means IP for International Protection standard. 6 means complete protection from dust, dirt and sand for eight hours. And the 8 rating means water resistance at 1.5m for at least 30 minutes.

Head of the Class

Fenix seems to have upgraded its headband material. Compared to my other Fenix lights seems less snaggy (if that’s a word) with a tighter textile weave and with a grippy strip across the forehead. A few features missing from the Fenix HM50R Headlamp include that there is no strobe, no red light (to preserve night vision) and no SOS mode. You know, if it comes down to when I need to telegraph an SOS signal with my headlamp till the battery runs dry, well then I’ll regret the missing feature. But I will also likely forget that feature even exists if I ever have to use it.

So as noted, I am thrilled with this particular Fenix HM50R Headlamp. While there is some obvious room for improvement, the room is small and probably only apparent to those who have used many other headlamps and developed specific preferences. Either way, I have no reservations about this headlamp for general use, emergency use, and survival use.

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Survival Gear Review: Fenix HM50R Headlamp

I’ve been on a quest for the perfect headlamp pretty much forever. And I’m as close as I’ve ever been to headlamp happiness. The Fenix HM50R Headlamp has almost all the features I want in a useful and highly productive form factor. Where the Fenix HM50R Headlamp really shines in the small details that refine its design and use. But to appreciate the nuances of the Fenix HM50R Headlamp, one would need to have developed frustrations with previous designs. So here are some obvious improvements with the Fenix HM50R Headlamp. First and foremost is the light throw. With a turbo mode of 500 lumens, this light screams in the dark. And the steps down in brightness of 130, 30, and 4 lumens are exceptionally good choices give all types of darkness the proper amount of light.

By Doc Montana, a Contributing Author to SHTFBlog and SurvivalCache.com 

For comparison, my first headlamp was four D-cell monster with a dim incandescent bulb that probably threw two dozen lumens on a good day going downhill and with the wind. The pound of batteries were worn on the belt in a big red plastic case. A wire ran from the case to a bulbous unit mounted on a two-inch wide rubber strap. At the time it was like the light from a Maglite but with the advantage of a headlamp. Overall, it was awful, but since it was the only affordable option in town, we didn’t know any better. Today, however, our standards are much higher, our expectations much greater, and our tolerance for poor design much lower.

Operating Operationally

In order to control headlamp lighting, a simple interface must power the light on and off and through the settings in an intuitive way that is watertight and works easily in the dark by feel as well as when wearing gloves.

Also Read: Bug Out Flashlights

Another consideration is beam control. Headlamps by design are to be worn on the head. This means a significant amount of control is possible just by moving one’s head. This works with gross movements, but what about when precision is needed such as with close-up work (think medical or mechanical interventions) or when moving through terrain with hands full and limited head movement? Generally a headlamp points forward or rotates down placing the center of light closer to the eyes. Lateral adjustments are from simply revolving head strap around the head. The Fenix HM50R Headlamp is essentially a cylinder in a cuff meaning it can spin 360 degrees around the vertical. The cuff is a rubberized plastic material that connects light to the headband. My Surefire Minimus headlamp uses the same attachment concept, but in a heavier, beefier design that requires a tool to adjust the tension. Normally I would prefer a Surefire light over almost any other brand, but the number of design flaws in with the Surefire kept me looking for a better light even after I dropped more than a Benjamin Franklin on it.

Batter(y) Up!

The Fenix HM50R Headlamp runs on a single CR123 battery which is my preference with headlamps, powers this light for two hours on full power and 128 hours on low with 14 hours and 48 hours respectively for the middle two settings. However, the Fenix HM50R Headlamp ships with a rechargeable 700mAh 16340 battery that extends the top end light by half an hour but lowers the runtime somewhat. The included battery recharges in the light through a micro-USB port, or outside the light in a charger. A similar Fenix light, the HL50 caught my attention with it’s ability to run either CR123 or AA batteries but required a extra tube extension if running AA batteries. That means one must carry the extra piece when running a CR123 battery in the light and nobody wants to do that. Well at least me anyway. Plus the HL50 headlamp had a metal attachment ring that was captured in between the battery tube and the end switch in order to keep the light attached to the metal clasp on the headband. That meant that you had to disassemble the light in order to remove it from the headband. With the newer Fenix HM50R Headlamp, all you need to do to set it free from the headband is to pull it out from the rubberized collar. For reference, the Surefire Minimus also requires a tool to remove it from the headband because the entire attachment system must be dismantled.

Related: Compact Flashlight Comparison

So why would you want to remove the headband from the light? Many reasons, notably that the Fenix HM50R Headlamp is a great flashlight on its own. The 90 degree angle-head design is like a mini military “moonbeam” D-cell flashlight. By the way, the first flashlight appeared around 1899 and was powered by D-batteries. So for almost 100 years, the D-cell ruled the flashlight world. Today I have no D-cell electronics except for a pair of 1950’s era Civil Defense Geiger Counters.

What’s Your Angle?

As an angle-head flashlight, the Fenix HM50R Headlamp can stand upright, upside down, and sideways. Often tail standing a flashlight requires a reflective ceiling to capture the photons from escaping out into space. The Fenix HM50R Headlamp on the other hand can sit still on a table firing the light forward or upward if you like. On the Surefire side, even if you remove the light from the headband, only one end of the cylinder shape has a flat-enough face to tail stand.

The Fenix HM50R Headlamp has a battery charge indicator in the form of a glowing or blinking green or blue light in the switch. When clicked quickly, the switch lights up indicating the rough amount of charge in the battery. This is a tremendously welcome feature for several reasons. First, it’s always good to know your battery’s condition. Second, as a rechargeable flashlight, the Fenix HM50R Headlamp can be topped off before adventuring so a quick charge indication will tell you both if you need to charge, and with charging experience, about how long that will take.

And third, the subtle green or blue light does not interfere with the operation of the light whereas the Surefire Minimus begins an irritating blink sequence when its battery runs low. My lone complaint here is that the blue glow indicates a lower charge. Blue? Why not red? Red would make so much more sense, and Red is universal indicator of too much (redline) or too little (in the red). The meaning of blue must be memorized. And worse, if you use a Fenix rechargeable 16340 battery with built-in micro-USB port, the light on the battery glows red when low and charging, and blue when charged. So even within the Fenix family, a blue light means both fully charged and almost dead. May I suggest that the Fenix Flashlight engineers spend a few more minutes a week talking with the Fenix Battery engineers. It is those little things that are maddening.

Splitting Hairs

Regardless of the indicator light oversights, I highly recommend getting the ARB-L16-700mAh rechargeable batteries. The chief complaint about using CR123 batteries is their initial cost, and slightly less available presence in low-volume battery sellers like back road gas stations and small town grocery stores. So those same recharging superpowers that the Fenix HM50R Headlamp has are equally available in the ARB-L16-700mAh battery. Yes, the battery has its own port and can be charged just like a non-Apple cell phone.

Related: 5 Cheap Things That Can Get You Killed

Something to think about with headlamp batteries is that you just might have to swap them out in the dark…with cold hands…in a hurry…while on the run. With the Fenix HM50R Headlamp all you have to do is spin off the only cap, swap batteries, spin the cap back on, and fire it up. This is so very different from one of my 3-AA headlamps where the entire light must be unsnapped from its headband bracket, then cracked open like an oyster, then replace each AA battery in the proper configuration, then reseal the housing in the right direction, reconnect it to the bracket in the right orientation. In other words, you need time, patience, and an understanding of the battery replacement sequence prior to the lights going out.

Bounce Check

Another great feature of the Fenix HM50R Headlamp is the minimal weight. My other Fenix AA headlamps had some heft to them causing the light to bounce up and down on my forehead when running or biking, and being a noticeable weight on my head. So much so that a hard bump can knock the headlamp around if not wearing the strap that runs over the top of the head. With the Fenix HM50R Headlamp, no third strap is needed which makes donning it much easier especially when helmets and hats are involved.

You Might Like: 30-30 Lever Gun For Survival

The durability of the Fenix HM50R Headlamp seems above and beyond. The aluminium chassis of the light conveys solidity to everyone. The fine threaded aluminium cap with O-ring seal is part of the IP68 rating of this light. IP68 decoded means IP for International Protection standard. 6 means complete protection from dust, dirt and sand for eight hours. And the 8 rating means water resistance at 1.5m for at least 30 minutes.

Head of the Class

Fenix seems to have upgraded its headband material. Compared to my other Fenix lights seems less snaggy (if that’s a word) with a tighter textile weave and with a grippy strip across the forehead. A few features missing from the Fenix HM50R Headlamp include that there is no strobe, no red light (to preserve night vision) and no SOS mode. You know, if it comes down to when I need to telegraph an SOS signal with my headlamp till the battery runs dry, well then I’ll regret the missing feature. But I will also likely forget that feature even exists if I ever have to use it.

So as noted, I am thrilled with this particular Fenix HM50R Headlamp. While there is some obvious room for improvement, the room is small and probably only apparent to those who have used many other headlamps and developed specific preferences. Either way, I have no reservations about this headlamp for general use, emergency use, and survival use.

Visit Sponsors of SurvivalCache.com

How to Filter Water in the Wild in 4 Steps

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There are multitudes of bacteria that exist in even the most clean water. Even at the tops of mountains you can still find disease causing bacteria. You have to understand this and the importance of filtering and sanitizing water. You see, filtering is important but it is not the final step in truly sanitizing water. …

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The Perfect First Aid Kit Starter

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When it comes to preparedness, medical preparedness is no joke!  Every family should have medical and first aid supplies.  The key to your medical supplies is to make sure it meets the needs of your family.  But many preppers find it hard to start.  That’s why the 105 Piece First Aid Kit from Survival Hax is the Perfect First Aid Kit Starter!

The Survival Hax First Aid Kit is compact and comes with its own zipped case.  It is easily identified as a first aid kit.  It is a great place to start and is very affordable.

This is what you get:

  • (1) Triangular Bandage
  • (1) PBT Bandage (Small)
  • (1) PBT Bandage (Large)
  • (1) Roll of Nonwoven Tape
  • (2) Sterile Nonwoven Swab
  • (10) Alcohol Wipe
  • (20) Band-Aid (Regular)
  • (10) Band-Aid (Small)
  • (4) Butterfly Band-Aid
  • (4) H Style Band-Aid
  • (4) Cleaning Wipes
  • (25) Cotton (Q-Tips)
  • (3) Cotton Balls
  • (1) First Aid Blanket
  • (1) Scissors
  • (10) Safety Pins
  • (1) CPR Mask
  • (1) PVC Gloves – Large
  • (1) Tweezers
  • (1) Fire Starter Flint
  • (1) Burn Dressing
  • (1) Credit Card Tool
  • (1) First Aid Bag

The Survival Hax First Aid Kit normally sells for $24.99. Survival Hax has extended a special offer to Prepper Website readers.  You can currently get the Survival Hax First Aid Kit for $11.99.  That is a great price for a First Aid Starter Kit!  The discount is automatically taken at checkout.  And, you will experience FREE SHIPPING and it’s good to know that your order will be fulfilled by Amazon.

This is a great deal and you can easily purchase several for:

  • Your Vehicle
  • The Office
  • Your Kid’s Backpack
  • Your EDC
  • For a Gift

Check out these PICS…

Lots of stuff in this kit…

This is a nice start to your First Aid Kit…

All kinds of bandages too…

AND a small ferro rod and credit card tool, which you might want to keep in your wallet or EDC kit.

Open kit…

Here’s your First Aid Kit Starter…

Front of Package…

Back of Package…

Peace,
Todd

 

Two Person Armed Defense: A Different Approach To Firearms Training

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Disciplined training is especially important in a two-person defense strategy.

Many folks that take self-defense seriously and carry a pistol on a daily basis train extensively on an individual level. Consider combining your live firearm training with another person that you may spend a great deal of time with, perhaps a co-worker, a good friend or your spouse? Are you both armed on a regular basis?

This past year I was able to attend a course that focused on an armed situation where you and another may be forced to work as a cohesive unit. The session entitled “2 Person Armed Defense” (2PAD) provided some excellent insight into working with another armed person in a self-defense situation. This training, along with related topics, consists of firearms courses offered by Personal Defense Network (PDN) and its Executive Director, Rob Pincus.

In the course I attended, Pincus was the on-site instructor for the 2PAD class held at the Gun Club Range in Gypsum, Colorado during the month of June 2017. An overview of critical firearms safety rules started off the day as it always should. Pincus then discussed what he calls the “3 C’s Foundation” of communication, coordination, and cooperation when it comes to teamwork. He reinforced these concepts throughout the day.

An additional key point made early on in the day is that an “individual response” is almost always the first typical reaction in any high-stress event. Therefore, the day’s training focused on moving to or with your partner after your immediate response as an individual. Once these basics were well ingrained, we moved on to a series of live firearm drills, based on two people having to work together.

The following are critical drills utilized during 2PAD training:

1.Extend Your Handgun/Touch And Press Trigger

 One of the few individual drills throughout the day started out at the five-yard line. This distance is typical to defensive actions in the average armed confrontation. First, the student maintained a proper stance (squarely facing the target with feet placed shoulder width apart) and firing grip on the handgun (the students utilized Sul position most often). The student would then extend the pistol straightforward while beginning trigger touch, and immediately they would press the trigger as they aimed the muzzle at the threat/target. All the while the student would focus on the high center mass of the target as they looked into the desired strike zone (not as seen in normal-sighted shooting).

This technique provides excellent defensive accuracy and is fast at the five- to ten-yard line. The drill was repeated several times, all while increasing rounds fired from two up to six. This combat focus drill is a trademark drill of PDN and Pincus and is worth adding to your training regime.

If you have not used the Sul or indoor ready position as it is sometimes called, take a look at the following link: https://www.personaldefensenetwork.com/article/firearm-ready-positions/

2.Move With Your Teammate And Shoot

 This segment began to ingrain the skill of movement into defensive shooting. Each two-person team would move a few steps laterally when the shoot command was given. The movement was not always side by side but could be towards each other. The intent was to get a degree of comfort in working with another armed person with the added stress of movement and combat-accurate fire on the threat. Action was also encouraged after firing, which began the lead up to the next training drill: moving to your partner and then shooting.

3.Move To Teammate And Engage The Threat

 In a situation where you and another armed citizen do not know where the attacker is, moving towards each other could very well provide an advantage. Of course, by doing so, the argument exists that it would become somewhat easier for the attacker to take both of you out. This drill has valid training points but ideally should often be practiced with your armed partner. This drill begins as one of the pairs observes a threat, moves and starts firing. The second of the team would then draw their handgun and move to assist their partner (utilizing the Sul position). The goal for the second partner would be to cover the 360 degrees for additional threats and look for an escape route. Ideally, you and your teammate would be pressed up against each other back to back with the “rear guard” so to speak, grabbing onto the beltline of their partner to help lead them to a more secure zone at the first opportunity. In the event the partner shooting would run out of ammo or had a malfunction, they would call for the “rear guard” to cover and rotate towards the threat to engage.

This drill may sound a bit nerve-wracking (any real shooting would be), but I found it to have real-world application, and it was a way to shape the thinking of an effective response should the need ever arise.

4.The Figure 8

 Over the day, all drills were continued to reinforce the key concepts. Also, working through doorways and around vehicles were added in and always with a partner. Pincus likes to key in on the immediate and individual startled response, which is very probable in the real world. A good drill that teams performed to help instill this surprised response was the Figure 8 drill.

A pair of students would walk in figure 8 (crossing each others paths) parallel to the targets. Pincus would then call out numbers (numbers were drawn on targets with a marker) the student pair would turn towards threats (targets), which were scattered at varying distances, and engage the appropriate numeral(s) with multiple shots. Each student would fire only at the threats on their proper side. The Figure 8 is a dynamic drill, and as close to realism when having to find and identify the danger while engaging as any I’ve done, and all the while working with another armed citizen.

During the entire course and for all drills Pincus reinforced the importance of a valid 360-degree scan. What are you scanning for? In order of priority: additional threats such as other armed citizens or law enforcement that you don’t want to get shot by or other folks that may be willing to help you or others in some way.  Then scan for a position of advantages, such as cover, a more precise shooting position, or other position of tactical advantage.

Ammunition requirements for 2PAD are in the 400 to 500 rounds range over a full day of training. This training course was a different approach than many others I have attended, especially from a civilian perspective. It provides insight into the reality of working with another armed person, and I would not hesitate to participate again.

For many long years I have trained in law enforcement both as a student and as an instructor, and now in the civilian world. If there is one good piece of advice I could give to any student of defensive living and mindset, it would be to keep pushing yourself with valid training and a proper attitude. Rob Pincus and Personal Defense Network provide such training.

More Reasons To Plant Your Own Lettuce

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Big agriculture seems to keep producing “bad bugs” for consumers.

Federal health officials expanded their warning to all types of romaine lettuce as they explore the national E-Coli outbreak affecting an increasing number of people.

Formerly the warning was for chopped romaine only. It’s now expanded to almost “everything romaine” such as hearts of romaine, salads and salad combinations.

If you can’t confirm the lettuce the lettuce is safe, don’t purchase or order it. And if the lettuce is coming out of Arizona, it might be smart to throw it away, even if a portion has been consumed and nobody has gotten ill, the bureau stated.

“Create tags for lettuce packaging frequently so can identify problem areas,” the CDC said in a Friday update. “Therefore, throw out any romaine lettuce in case you are unsure about where it had been grown.”

The epidemic, which began March 13, has led to 53 cases in 16 nations. The Alaska instances haven’t yet been added to the CDC’s cases. Of the cases, 31 individuals were hospitalized including five individuals who developed kidney failure. There haven’t been any deaths so far.

Pennsylvania is the hardest-hit country with 12 instances, followed by Idaho with 10. Approximately 70 percent of these illnesses are women or women.

No grower, supplier, supplier or manufacturer was recognized as the origin, although researchers have made it obvious the outbreak is arriving out of Arizona.

Restaurants and retailers should use extreme caution when buying any romaine for resale in the pinpointed areas, the CDC said. They also need to ask providers for the origin of the lettuce.
The E. coli virus seen spreading in many countries is toxic, especially the chemical poison called Shiga. People get ill from within 2 to 8 days of consuming the bug, which then causes painful digestive track cramps and nausea. Although most recuperate in one week, some may end up with severe kidney damage or even renal failure.

A word to garden lettuce lovers. You in fact grow your own lettuce, just keep in mind that you can get E-coli from your own lettuce patch if you’re not careful, so make you have clean hands by washing thoroughly and regularly when preparing food. While food safety is in the news and has our attention, make sure you all wash all vegetables and fruits thoroughly, and never prepare food when you are sick. And, if you do end up getting sick, immediately write down everything you have eaten in the last 3 days before and be sure to provide the information to your doctor. Remember: As soon as you start to feel sick, write as much meal history down as you can before your condition worsens. It’s often hard to remember food intake details when you are extremely nauseous.

Separating Onions: Getting The Most Out Of Your Nursery Pack

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The post Separating Onions: Getting The Most Out Of Your Nursery Pack is by Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Today I’ll show you how to go about separating onions and maximizing the value of your store-bought seedlings! When you go to purchase onions, leeks, or other alliums at a nursery or garden center, they often come in a six-pack container that’s just crowded. Even if you started your seed at home, this can become … Read more

The post Separating Onions: Getting The Most Out Of Your Nursery Pack is by Lorin Nielsen and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Rise of the Machines: How you WILL become a pawn to the likes of Google, Amazon and Facebook

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This is a glimpse into the not so distant future. In this video we not only show you what your future will look like, we show you how the likes of Google, Amazon, Facebook, and future unknown actors will control you, whether you like it or not. Your every interaction with society will be recorded …

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Handguns: You Will NOT Rise To The Occasion…

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Allow me to paraphrase a few choice things I’ve heard over the years from folks with respect to handgun usage / training / personal defense.

  • I’ve been around guns my whole life
  • I’ll take a CCW course, I wouldn’t need to shoot though
  • I carry a gun but keep it locked in my glove box
  • I do have a gun, if something happens I’m sure I’ll know what to do when that time arises

I once spoke to a very nice lady who takes her dogs on a walk while carrying a pistol….that she has never fired.  As a matter of fact she has never once fired a gun at all!  Now imagine something were to happen, be it wild animal encounter or bad guy, I suspect she would have a better chance of throwing the gun at the threat than actually employing it in the manner prescribed.  It is mind boggling to me how many folks almost NEVER train but do carry a gun for self defense, citing some of the reasons I listed above.  When the chips are down, stress levels are high and there are mere seconds to react, one can only hope that all the time spent purposefully training will pay off.  If there is no training to fall back upon, failure will be the likely outcome and as the quote goes: you will not rise to the occasion but default to the level of your training.

I’m fortunate that I live in an area where I can shoot just about any time I want, the main constraint is ammunition because to date I have yet to find someone to give it to me for free.  Yes I know there is an option to reload, which I do for precision rounds (.308) but plowing through 4,000 rounds a year of 9mm I have no desire to stand over my turret press plugging away at an average of 100 rounds per hour.  I shoot a variety of drills and scenarios both on paper and steel, strong and weak hand and also with a shot timer.  I’m no pro out there with my Glock 19 but I do what I can to keep my level of proficiency up, including dry fire techniques while at home.  It’s a skill set that must be constantly honed otherwise the rust starts to set in, I know this from personal experience as well.

I train with the mindset that while I want to be proficient I truly hope to never have to use my pistol in a personal defense situation.  Yet should that day come,  even with all the training, there are still no guarantees.  Imagine how far less prepared the average person who shoots 50-100 rounds of year at a giant paper target at the indoor range would be.  Someone who carries concealed but never practices draw from the holster, someone has never fired a single round under stress or experienced a malfunction.  This is what perplexes me, why is there no emphasis on training?  These folks carry a gun to protect themselves or their family but actually do not possess the skills to employ the gun in a proficient manner.

Through no fault of their own I truly believe that good people are just ignorant with respect to what needs to go into becoming remotely proficient with a firearm.  Unless their target is a static full sized “person” at 7 yards under full lighting in a climate controlled range with an NRA instructor standing over their shoulder they wouldn’t have a clue.  Some folks wouldn’t even have that experience in their kit, owning guns they have never even fired.  Ridiculous!

These aren’t issues I can solve, all I can do is emphasize to everyone reading this how important the training is.  On a local (read: what I can actually control) level I do take folks out and teach them how to shoot, help them refine their skills while always keeping the fundamentals at the forefront.  Currently there is around 6 inches of snow on the ground and the temps are hovering in the 20’s, I’l be out today ringing steel and running drills.  It’s always a good day to train, get out there yourself and stay safe.

 

 

10 Great Cold-Hardy Vegetables

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The coldest winter in 150 years for many gardeners has keep the focus on cold-hardy vegetable varieties until warmer weather arrives.

There are many ways to extend the growing season through the winter in cold temperate climates, including using cold frames, greenhouses, row covers, and raised beds, as well as mulching heavily and starting plants indoors. Perhaps one of the easiest ways to extend the season, however, is to grow a diversity of cold-hardy plants. Cold-hardy plants can allow you to begin harvests earlier in the spring while continuing to yield later into the fall and even through winter.  Below is a sampling of some favorites, as well as some lesser-known cold-hardy vegetables.

Kale And Collards (Brassica Oleracea Acephala)

Certain varieties of kale, such as Red Russian, and Sea Kale may produce well into the winter, especially if protected by cold frames or other covers.  Some may even survive the winter in areas as cold as zone 5, such as the perennial Sea Kale (Crambe maritima). This type of Kale is actually outside of the Brassica oleracea species of plants which includes other vegetables like kale, collards, cabbage, broccoli, and brussels sprouts. Mulch heavily and kale will stick around longer into the cold season, as with most plants.

Swiss Chard (Beta Vulgaris Cicla)

Although a heavy frost will kill chard, they will still produce well into the late fall in colder climates, and if covered, they may even last into the winter.  On very rare occasions, swiss chard can make it all the way through, even in zone 5 or warmer.

Beets (Beta Vulgaris Conditiva)

Even after the beet greens die off above ground, you will still be able to harvest the beet itself, often well into the winter. Beets are related to chard and their greens are equally as delicious.

Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea Capitata)

Cabbage comes in many different varieties and is another excellent green that will last into the depths of the fall at least. There are even perennial varieties such as Walking Stick Cabbage, although they don’t have the large cabbage head that is characteristic of more popular types of annual cabbage.

Good King Henry (Chenopodium Bonus-Henricus)

This spinach relative is another perennial green that lasts into the fall in even the coldest climates, and it will also emerge early in the spring. Mulch heavily and it should survive in as cold as zone 4 climates. The cooked young leaves are best and must be eaten soon after harvest since they wilt. The seeds can also be eaten once soaked in water overnight and rinsed, though they are a little small and time-consuming to harvest.

Perennial Onions (Allium Species)

There are a few varieties of perennial onions that last well into the fall in the coldest of climates, including Egyptian Walking Onion and Perennial Bunching Onion. These plants are commonly grown for their onion greens, but the bulbs can also be eaten, of course, although they are smaller than their annual cousins. The bulbs may be harvested throughout the year, even when the aboveground greens die back.

Musk Mallow (Malva Moschata)

Musk Mallow is another perennial green that produces late into the year and comes up relatively early in the spring. The young leaves have a mild flavor and are best as one component of a multi-green salad. There are other varieties of mallow that are perennial as well, but this one is known to be one of the best flavored. The flowers and seeds are also edible, and the plant is hardy to at least zone 3.

Sunroot (Helianthus Tuberosus).

A vigorous perennial root crop growing to 10 feet tall, the flavor of the tuber improves after frost. Some say they are best eaten in their first year, though they will continue to produce and spread as a perennial for many years. Care should be taken to cook them well, and they shouldn’t be eaten in large quantity at first since they may cause gas. They are similar to beans in this way until your body grows accustomed to them.

Radicchio / Italian Chicory (Cichorium Intybus)

These perennials have edible leaves and roots. The leaves are a little bitter and are often blanched by excluding light while they are growing, making a sweeter, milder flavored green. Cook the roots like you would parsnips.  The roots also make an excellent (caffeine-free) coffee substitute when roasted and powdered.

Perennial Yam (Dioscorea Batatas)

Grown commonly in Japan and other parts of Asia as food, this vine root crop cultivates well in cold, temperate regions and can be harvested well into the winter, or early in the spring (until the ground freezes or when it thaws). It is hardy to at least zone 5 if mulched heavily and can grow up to 8 feet long or more. It is best grown in deep, sandy soil, where it will produce a much larger root than in more dense soils (up to 3 feet long!). Cook the yam before eating, either by baking or boiling, similar to a regular yam. It is not very flavorful but is an excellent addition to soups and will readily absorb added flavors. The vine also produces small “aerial tubers” which are little yam berries. These tubers can also be cooked and eaten or used to propagate more plants.

These are but a small sampling of the many cold-hardy vegetables that you can grow in colder climates. Many perennials are great crops to try for cold-hardiness since cold-hardy perennials, by their very nature, will often produce longer into the year and come up earlier in the spring. Consider constructing cold frames or a passive solar greenhouse to extend your season even further, potentially making it last through the entire winter. If you have any of your favorite cold-hardy vegetables that you like to grow or have anything you’d like to comment on, please feel free to share in the comments below!

Thermoregulation – Regulating Your Core Body Temperature In A Survival Situation

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What comes to mind when you think of dying in a survival situation. Lets talk about the wilderness. Most people have thoughts of getting lost in the woods and wildlife is involved in their demise. Maybe you think about starving to death or dying without water. The fact of the matter is, a cold sweat …

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Tale of the Tang: The Untold Story of Knife Tangs.

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Knives are the weapon of choice for many, but what most people forget is the fact that they need to understand the parts of the knife. You might love to carry a knife to your outdoor adventures, but have you given thought about the parts of a knife? After all, it is the sum of the parts that makes the knife strong, the parts dictate the purpose of the knife. Whether it is a full tang hunting knife or a push tang knife, you need to pay attention to these little details. The tang is that part of the knife,

The post Tale of the Tang: The Untold Story of Knife Tangs. appeared first on Dave’s Homestead.

Your Responsibility in Restraining the Power of the State

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We have never seen a government that has so overstepped its bounds in the history of America. Even in the darkest days of the despotic British rule we were still allowed our guns. All across the nation local and state governments are putting together laws that will affect your right to bear arms. Its a …

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Tactical TV Remotes for SHTF

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Tactical TV Remotes for SHTF
Micheal Kline “Reality Check” Audio player below!

This week we are having a little fun with surveillance cameras. Cameras are ubiquitous and most everyone carries one in their pocket. We see the traffic cameras, CCTV, and webcams and to many people, this is good news as the technology can be used to protect us or by giving us the ability to see what goes bump in the night.

Continue reading Tactical TV Remotes for SHTF at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

How to Start a Food Stockpile on the Cheap

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As a homesteader, one of your strong points is, by far, the food you produce and stockpile. Should something major happen, you’ll be one of the “lucky” ones who will have food on your family’s table. But what if you’ll be unable to grow that food? Maybe a volcanic eruption will hinder your gardening endeavors. […]

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How to Understand Minute of Angle (MOA) – Long Range Shooting

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You generally do not have to visit a shooting range at all in order to hear the word MOA. Marketing’s campaigns have pasted that term to almost everything related to the firearms world such as the best rifle scopes, red dot sights, and the accuracy of a particular gun.  In the most basic sense, MOA is an expression of accuracy and became the common unit-of-measurement for windage and elevation on most weapons and aiming opto-electronic devices on the North American arms bazaar. If you are in doubt how to understand Minute of Angle (MOA) and its application in Long Range

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4 Home DIY Projects Worth Taking the Time For

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Home DIY projects of all kinds can be incredibly thrilling and fulfilling. If you’re looking for DIY project ideas that can do wonders for your residence, there are many out there simply waiting for you. It’s critical to focus your energy on home improvement projects that can lead to exceptional results. Try Your Hand at Cabinet Painting Cabinets are undeniable focal points in kitchens. If you want to revamp your food preparation zone, then you should seriously consider painting its cabinets a fresh new color. Cabinet painting doesn’t take a lot of time or skill. You just need to give

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No Fuss Seeds: 10 Seeds That Love To Be Directly Sowed

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Is everyone as busy as I am in the garden? I did a lot of prep work in Fall and I still find myself hoping I have enough time to get all of my seeds in. But the soil is starting to warm up and there are seeds that love to be directly sowed.

What I like about directly sowing seeds is it’s a no fuss method to getting your garden started. As long as the soil is warm and moist, seeds can be sown and it will germinate quickly. Mid-spring to early summer (April-June) is the best time for to get your seeds in the ground. The secret to success is to prepare a good seedbed, free of weeds and with a loose soil.

These are 10 of the best seeds that love to be directly sowed.

Golden Bantam Corn
Danvers Carrots
Hales Best Cantaloupe
Green Lincoln Peas
Pickling Cucumbers
Green Beans
Rainbow Swiss Chard
Bunching Onion
Bloomsdale Spinach
Zucchini Summer Squash

You can bet I’m getting these in the ground over the weekend.

 

See you in the garden,

Tess

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

This Survival “Super Plant” Belongs In Every 2018 Self-Reliance Garden

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Crested, plume, or spike varieties of celosia flowers can be a stunning addition to your garden.

Whether they’re of the crested, plume, or spike types, celosia flowers are quite striking. All are vividly colored, but crested celosia, with its unique shape, has given the flowers their common name: cockscomb. Crested celosia flowers are wavy and fan-like and, when they form into a globe shape, they resemble a brain. When they develop flatter and narrower, the flowers look like a rooster’s (or cock’s) comb.

Although no one is sure where celosia originated, it’s a tropical plant that grows widely throughout Africa, Indonesia, and Asia. It was introduced into England in 1570 and by the early 1700s, it was noted growing in Carolina.

Both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew cockscomb at their estates. By the middle of the 19th century, it was “almost universally grown” in America’s flower gardens. In the 1920s and ‘30s, cockscomb was often included in agricultural exhibitions at county and state fairs, with gardeners competing to see who could grow the biggest crest on the smallest plant.

As a member of the amaranth family, common cockscomb is edible. While most American gardeners grow cockscomb as an ornamental plant only, it is collected from the wild as a food source in Asia, South America, Africa, and the West Indies. Like other leafy greens, cockscomb is a good source of protein and also provides vitamin A, vitamin C, iron, calcium, and phosphorus.

All parts of the plant are edible, including the stem, leaves, and flower. That said, the stem and leaves are more tender before the plant starts to bloom. Young leaves are similar to basil in texture, comparable to spinach in flavor and can be used in place of spinach in cooked recipes. In cultures where cockscomb is eaten, its leaves are usually added to soups and stews. However, in Mexico, the leaves are served as a side dish after being cooked with hot peppers, red palm, garlic, and lime. Cockscomb stems can be chopped up and added to stir-fries, and the flowers work beautifully as a garnish.

Cockscomb is also highly regarded for its medicinal properties. Anecdotally, it’s used to treat a wide variety of issues including diarrhea, gastroenteritis, and dysentery. It’s used in Asia, in particular, as a parasiticide for tapeworms and other parasites. Additionally, the leaves are pounded and applied as a poultice for various types of skin sores and wounds. Notwithstanding, please consult a medical professional if you’re considering using cockscomb to treat a medical issue.

Celosia is a worthwhile addition to any garden, and it’s readily available as a bedding plant at most garden centers in the spring. It can also be grown from seed, though it’s best started indoors about 6-8 weeks before the last frost. Since it doesn’t like its roots disturbed, it’s best to start seeds in peat pots or other compostable pots that can be directly planted into the garden after the last risk of frost. Celosia is incredibly easy to grow, as long it’s planted in full sun with well-drained soil. It’s prone to root rot if its roots stay wet too long but otherwise requires little care, being drought-tolerant and immune to most pests and diseases. Best of all, celosia does well as an annual almost everywhere, beginning in hardiness Zone 2. In Zones 10 and above, it should overwinter nicely.

Well, what are you waiting for? With so many stunning varieties and colors, not to mention “off-the-grid” uses, why not start planting your own celosia varieties for 2018?

 

Ongoing Draught Affecting World Food Prices

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If spring rains don’t come, many farmers can expect another dry year.

The prices for cereals, which contain the world’s most important food crops, rose by 12.1% over the past year.

The cost of cereals, which include grains, corn, rice, and soybeans, has been increasing because of dryness in the United States, the United Food Agriculture Organization reported. The United Nations tracks cereal prices with an index that rose by 165.3 points or 2.3%, in March 2018.

Dry conditions in the United States, wet weather in Europe, and deteriorating crop prospects in Argentina all lowered crop yields and drove prices up. The UN Index indicates that the ongoing drought in the USA is affecting food prices.

Severe Drought In America’s Breadbasket

A significant cause of the rise in cereal prices is apparent; parts of America’s breadbasket are experiencing severe and extreme drought.

Most of Kansas is suffering from extreme and severe drought, as The University of Nebraska’s Drought Monitor Map for April 12, 2018, indicates. A small portion of Kansas is suffering from the worst kind of dryness on the map, which is listed under the category of “exceptional drought.”

Almost all of Kansas is suffering from some drought. The dryness also extends into neighboring states. An area of moderate drought spreads into Missouri, Nebraska, and even parts of Iowa. Northwestern Missouri and Southern Nebraska are also abnormally dry for this time of year.

Other parts of the breadbasket suffering from severe and extreme drought include the plains of Eastern Colorado, Oklahoma, the Texas Panhandle, and West Texas. About a third of Oklahoma is suffering from severe or extreme drought, making it the driest state. According to the monitor, the drought in Oklahoma is worse than in Arizona.

The drought is also afflicting some of the northern grain-growing areas. Most of North and South Dakota are experiencing either moderate drought or abnormal dryness. A significant portion of South Dakota is also experiencing severe drought. That drought extends into the plains of Eastern Montana.

Another state feeling the heat is America’s Dairyland: Wisconsin. A broad swath of Wisconsin is suffering from abnormal dryness.

The Drought Will Affect Food Prices

America’s breadbasket is facing a drought that is affecting food prices. Long-term effects are hard to determine, but the results of the drought are likely to be felt at supermarkets within the next year.

It will take some time for increased cereal prices to affect retail costs because of the time it takes grains to reach shelves in the form of processed foods. A likely scenario will be slowly increasing food prices over the next year.

Meat prices are directly affected by cereal costs because corn and grain are used to feed livestock. Meat prices might fall in the short run as farmers slaughter animals in an attempt to control costs. While this action will initially increase the meat supply, it will assuredly fall later on. That will lead to higher prices eventually because there will be less meat on the market.

At this time, stocking up on cereals and flour, as well as on products made from them such as pasta, might be a good strategy for those trying to control food costs. Another smart approach might be to change your diet and eat more vegetables, meats, and other foods that are easier to grow yourself.

Expanding our vegetable gardens and raising more livestock will be a wise move for all of us.

 

Survival Watch – It’s Time To Get A Badass Watch

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How To Find The Best Survival Watch For You

I don’t know about you, but for me, a survival watch is the one thing I wear every single day. Where I go, it goes.

You can’t say that same thing for most other accessories you own, especially other survival gear. You can’t take your survival knife on a plane, or that fancy survival lighter you just bought.

Yes, you can (but shouldn’t) wear your survival multitool to a nice restaurant.

However, a badass survival watch – that thing can go anywhere.

That’s why you should take the time to invest in a good one.

You want a survival watch that can go through hell with you and still got your back. A watch you trust through thick and thin.

So today we’re going to help you find the right survival watch by covering the following topics:

  • What A Survival Watch Is (and what is not)
  • How A Survival Watch Will Save Your Life
  • Most Useful Features Of A Survival Watch
  • Best Survival Watches
  • Should You Rely On Technology

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Ultimate List Of Survival Gear. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

What A Survival Watch Is (and what is not)


Survival watches fall into one of two categories :

1 – Paracord Survival Watch

A paracord survival watch acts as a mini survival tin on your wrist. All these survival watches have similar features.

They tell time and often include a fire starter, whistle, and compass. Then the wristband is made out of paracord.

2 – Technical Survival Watch

These types of survival watch act as a mini survival computer on your wrist.

These watches include key features such as a compass, GPS, barometer, thermometer, altimeter, and sunrise/sunset times.

In this article, I’m going focus on the survival watches that act as a computer on your wrist. So whenever I refer to “survival watch” I mean ones that are a mini computer unless stated otherwise.

The reason I’m not going to cover paracord survival watches is that I’ve never come across a good one. 

At least never one I’d be willing to wear. Instead, I keep my survival watch and my paracord bracelet separate.

Without naming names, I’ve tested a few and they’re just not good enough.

It’s sort of like buying one of those pre-made survival tins for $10. They’re a great concept, but they regularly lack quality.

The fire starters on these “survival watches” are minuscule, which makes them easy to break and hard to use. They also tend to have cheap, unreliable 2 cent compasses.

I can’t put my life in the hands of a product like that.

And as far as paracord goes, I carry it with me in other ways.

So instead, I suggest you make or buy a survival paracord bracelet and add it to one wrist. Then invest in a high-quality survival watch and put it on the other wrist – like I do.

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How A Survival Watch Will Save Your Life


Perhaps you’re out hunting, wound a deer, and begin the process of tracking its blood trail. Tracking further and further into the remote wilderness until you realize it’s almost dark out.

Or maybe you’re out picking berries and hear other humans approaching. You can tell they’re not friendly (maybe the mob) and you also can’t tell how many of them there are. Or if they’re armed.

So you panic and high-tail it out of there in an unfamiliar direction.

Or what if you’re just enjoying the great outdoors via an off-trail hike but the weather is changing for the worst fast. You’re forced to take cover before the storm hits.

What do each these situations have in common?

You’re stranded and lost in the wilderness. This is when your survival watch can become a real lifesaver.

This is when you need the critical information on your wrist only a quality survival watch can provide.

As A Way To Introduce You To Skilled Survival, We’re Giving Away Our Ultimate List Of Survival Gear. Click Here To Get Your FREE Copy Of It.

Most Useful Features Of A Survival Watch


Of course, a survival watch must first and foremost accurately tell the time and date.

It also must have excellent battery life (or even better be solar powered). It should also be waterproof and be tough as hell.

But once you go beyond these basic watch features, that’s the real survival features start to kick in.

Barometer

A barometer sense atmospheric pressure. Often times changes in atmospheric pressure predict significant weather changes.

Two of the most dangerous threats in survival situations are extreme exposure and lack of clean water. But, if you have a barometer on your survival watch, you’ll be more aware of bad weather approaching.

You’ll know way ahead of time if the weather is making a surprising change. Allowing you to either turn back sooner and avoid getting stuck out there or hunker down well before it arrives.

In most cases, by the time you see rain coming, it’s too late. And if you get wet in cold weather, you’re in danger of hypothermia, and in a world of hurt.

Instead, you can utilize the barometer on your survival watch to better predict oncoming rain. This helping you prepare yourself for a risky situation.

Another way a barometer can help you survive is to prompt you to set up catchments collect oncoming rainwater.

If you happen to get stuck out in the wilderness and you know rain is on its way, get some of that fresh rainwater to quench your thirst.

Altimeter

If you live in a mountainous region and don’t know your exact location an altimeter can help.

An altimeter on your survival watch, tells you your exact altitude. So if you have a topographical map it helps to narrow down where you’re at on the map.

And when you know where you’re at, you can find your way back to camp or civilization.

This is a must-have feature if you live or enjoy traveling to regions with significant elevations changes.

Compass

The compass is one of the most valuable survival tools around.

Sure, there are several bushcraft methods to find your direction without a compass. But for accuracy and speed, nothing beats having a high-quality compass.

Natural navigation includes an understanding that thicker branches on trees often face towards the sun, which indicates a southern direction.

Doable but not easy. Even the experts can struggle to get natural navigation right every time.

But for survival, it’s best to learn how to navigate without a compass but then always HAVE a compass and a map! Why not put that compass on your wrist where you’ll never forget it.

Sunrise & Sunset Times

If you’re far away from your vehicle or campsite you’ll want to ensure you get back to safety before sunset. It’s never a good idea to navigate in the dark because it’s dangerous and difficult.

So it’s a big advantage to know exactly when sunset is. That way, you don’t have to use your extended arm and 4 fingers to estimate how many hours until sunset.

Instead, if you have a survival watch with sunset/sunrise times, you’ll know exaxtly how many MINUTES you have til darkness sets in.

Thermometer

I like to know what the temperature is at all times, so I admit it, and I’m a temperature geek.

It probably stems from the fact that I grew up in a rural farming area. But it’s essential to keep track of temperatures when you’re:

But it’s easy to lose track of your own body temperature.

When you’re working hard and sweating, you won’t realize just how cold it is out. You feel hot and so it’s easy to think to yourself “it’s not that cold, I’ll be fine.”

The problem comes when you stop working, and you’re still sweating.

Maybe it’s cooler than you realized. Perhaps you were going to make your fire after your activities but run into issues getting one started. When conditions are wrong, hypothermia can happen fast.

So if you can keep an eye on the temperature, you’ll know if you’re sweating too much. And if it’s too cold and can’t dry off, you’ll have issues. Instead, avoid working up a sweat and take plenty of breaks.

In the words of Les Stroud, “if you sweat, you die.”

The same principle applies if it’s hot. If it’s hot and you’re sweating but think to yourself, “I just need to get this task done” you risk a heat stroke.

It’s easy to do, to focus so intensely on your activity that you don’t listen to your body.

Instead, use your survival watch to check the temperature often. And if it’s really hot, take lots of breaks and drink lots of fluids to prevent a serious heat stroke.

Best Survival Watches


There are so many great survival watches on the market today.

They are all tough, many are powered by solar, they include important sensors and data you need to help you survive.

So the best way to help you narrow down your search for the best survival watch for you, we’re going first highlight our favorite series of watches for survival.

From there you’ll be able to find the exact watch within a series that best meets your needs (color, price point, etc.)

G-Shock Master Of G Series

Master of G Series Of Survival Watches

The Casio Master of G-Series Watches is one of the toughest most durable survival watch series you can find. These watches are engineered to survive the most grueling situations you can think of.

They’re adapted and evolved to respond successfully to conditions in the sky, on the land and out at sea.

There are three main watch categories within this series:

GRAVITYMASTER WATCHES

The GRAVITYMASTER is a watch series with pilots and air travel in mind.



MUDMASTER WATCHES

The MUDMASTER is built to withstand the cross trek adventures or in trenches.



GULFMASTER WATCHES

The GULFMASTER is the ideal watch for those who spend time on or in the water.



These watches all include Shock Resistant Technology and most have Triple Sensors, which includes the following sensors:

  • Altitude
  • Barometric Pressure
  • Temperature

Plus, they include a compass as well.

And lastly, you might want to make sure you find one that uses tough solar to keep your timepiece’s battery topped off with the free power of the sun.

Check Out The Master Of G Prices


Casio Pro Trek Watch Series

Casio’s PRO TREK watches are perfect for all serious outdoor enthusiasts.

These watches are powered by Android Wear 2.0 and feature important technology such as GPS, Location Memory, Moment Setter, and more.

These survival watches also come with Casio’s Triple Sensor technology (altimeter, barometer, temperature). In addition, they have a dual-layer LCD and are water resistant.

Casio’s PRO TREK line of watches are rugged, stylish and versatile.

Check Out Today’s Prices



Military Watch Exchange

Ok, this option is not a specific watch or even a category of survival watches, this is a site where you can find great deals on military watches.

But what’s the difference between a military watch, a survival watch, and an outdoor watch or even a tactical watch?

To me, nothing. I think all these watch terms just mean a badass watch that’s rugged enough to survive harsh conditions and with all the essential components you need to survive.

Click Here To Find A Military Watch Deal

Technology Dependent Society

Should You Rely On Technology?


A survival watch worth investing in will be high-tech. They do so much more than just tell time.

So before we discuss these features, I wanted to be clear about my thoughts on technology.

I strongly believe you should never completely rely on technology in a survival situation. Technology can and does fail, pure and simple.

I have nothing against technology, but I do have a love/hate relationship with it.

Technology is there because it makes our lives easier. But easier is not a survival skill. It’s a survival curse.

If you want to be self-reliant you need the right survival skills, knowledge, and tools. Ones that don’t rely on technology.

At the same time, would you rather cut down a tree with a chainsaw or an axe? Obviously, the answer is a chainsaw, but I also own a sharp survival axe on hand, just in case.

I even enjoy using an axe. It’s fun; it’s good exercise, but when you want to get the job done fast, you use a chainsaw.

It’s the same idea with my survival watch. I use it all the time, but I always carry a map and compass with me as well.

I know how to get my bearing using nature.

It’s important to practice navigational skills, but when you want to get things done as easy as possible; use technology. And that’s why I choose to wear a high tech survival watch.

The Conclusion


I love redundancy. I’ve got an engineering background, so redundancy is everything to me. That’s why I believe owning a survival watch is imperative.

It’s still important to learn navigation skills. And nothing beats basic survival skills, using a compass and a map, but a survival watch is easy to use, and technology can make life easier. That’s the whole point of technology.

If it makes survival easier, it leads to fewer mistakes.

You can find out about some recommended survival watches at http://www.topsurvivalweapons.com/survival-watches- guide/

P.s. Do you know where the closest nuclear bunker is from your home?

There are a lot of natural nuclear shelters in the US that are absolutely free. And one of them is near your home.

Click on the image above to find out where you need to take shelter.

The post Survival Watch – It’s Time To Get A Badass Watch appeared first on Skilled Survival.

North Korea and Syria: A Chemical Weapons and Missiles Dynamic Duo?

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After World War II the whole of humanity has been paying attention to various alliances. There is a degree of fear in regard to multiple powers pulling resources and working on the side of evil. This was communism for a while. American spent many lives in far away lands just crushing what looked like it …

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Peanut Butter as a Survival Food: Protein Packed in the Pantry

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One of the best survival foods is widely available and probably already in your pantry! Peanut butter is an excellent and nutritious way to stay fed during an emergency, disaster, or SHTF. It has plenty of nutrients and protein to carry you over for short periods, or it can supplement a long-term food storage supply. …

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Planting Corn in Stations

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Before I moved to Central America a couple of years ago, I always planted corn in rows, one plant every 6-12 inches, 1.5-3 feet apart.

Like this:

Planting Corn in Stands

Then a farmer taught me the local method of planting corn in stations, and I’ve found it really saves prep time.

Read More: “Hand Pollinating Corn for Seed Saving”

Instead of tilling an area, you just take a string trimmer (or scythe or whatever may be your weed-clearing weapon of choice) and scalp the ground right down to the dirt.

Then knock loose holes in the ground about 2.5 feet apart, plant 4 kernels in each hole, and feed with manure or whatever high-nitrogen material you have.

In a few weeks, the corn will grow taller, but the weeds you knocked down will also return. Come back with your string trimmer and knock all the space between the corn back to bare earth.

In a few more weeks, the corn will be tall enough to take care of itself and shade out the weeds. Eventually, you harvest the ears, then turn the ground over to grow something else.

It’s really an easy system. You can see a patch I planted this way in this video.

This method of planting corn can also be used in a pigeon pea/corn intercrop system like I wrote about here.

As I remark in the video, I’d really love to try this in a typical lawn. Imagine doing this in the midst of an expanse of St. Augustine or bahia! What great fun.

Here’s a large patch of corn growing this way:

Planting Corn in Stations on Hillside

See how it was done? It’s the same method of hacking holes into the soil and planting kernels. 3-4 seeds are planted in each hole and the corn grows nicely that way in a small clump. Between clumps is about 2.5 feet in all directions.

This method seems to work very well on slopes, as the roots of the weeds and grass hold the soil together, whereas tilling it all and row planting corn could lead to serious erosion issues.

The harvests are decent as well — I haven’t noticed a drop off in productivity at all. The wider spacing also means you can often grow corn without any irrigation, depending on your climate.

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How to Choose the Best AR 15 Optics for Hunting

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Written by Guest Contributor on The Prepper Journal.

Editors Note: A guest contribution from Brandon to The Prepper Journal. With the unending assault on the 200 million privately owned firearms in the United States and the revisionists view of our 2A rights being crucified in the media, I thought this timely as well as informative. The information below assumes a properly sighted in weapon as the base platform. As always, if you have information for Preppers that you would like to share and be entered into the Prepper Writing Contest with a chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards  with the top prize being a $300 card to purchase your own prepping supplies, then enter today!

Choosing the best optic for hunting with an AR 15 can be difficult depending on the ranges, terrain, and game you’re hunting. Here’s how to choose the right optic.

As more hunters choose to use AR 15 pattern rifles when it comes time for opening day, they are struck with important decision. Because the AR 15 was designed to use just about any optic that would fit on his top rail, hunters must decide which one is best.

Choosing the best hunting optic for AR-15 is largely a function of your hunting environment and personal preference. For most people, is going to pull down between using a magnified optic or red dot. Here are a few tips and tricks to guide you along the way between choosing a magnified optic or a red dot.

How to Choose Hunting Optics for AR-15 ?

Magnified Scopes

Magnified optics, also called scopes, simplify the aiming process by replacing the front and rear sight of a rifle with a set of crosshairs. They almost always add magnification to the equation as well. That magnification is normally the attraction that many people buy them for.

Having a telescopic, magnified optic in the field allows you to dial in the amount of power you need to view targets at extended ranges. It allows you to stretch out your rifle to the very edge of your cartridges ballistic potential, or your marksmanship ability.

It’s important to remember however, scopes do not help you shoot better and they are far from point and shoot affairs. Magnified optics allow you to see the target better, they don’t fix poor marksmanship habits. Magnified optics will not fix a bad trigger squeeze or even poor sight alignment.

All scopes suffer from parallax error. This is when you view the scope add an improper distance or improper angle. If you’ve ever looked through a scope and seen a black donut shape instead of cross-hairs, you know exactly what this is.

Many hunters are starting to realize that they don’t need as much magnification as they think and are flocking towards light and trim scopes that are easy to carry in the field. Depending on how much magnification you need, you may benefit from using a zero-magnification red dot.

Red Dots

Red dot optics have only a few advantages over magnified optics. Chiefly, their simplicity and ruggedness. Red dot optics are simple to choose, simple to operate, and very easy to shoot with. Very often, children learn to shoot with red dot optics because they are the easiest sighting system for people to learn to shoot firearms with.

When you mount a red dot on a rifle you are grossly simplifying the aiming process. Wherever the red dot is pointing when the trigger breaks, the bullet is going to hit. This is why they are so popular among competition shooters and militaries. They absolutely dominate shooting at moving targets and shooting in low light.

Under stressful situations, red dot optics are the king of marksmanship. Their main downside, however, is their lack of magnification. Once you add magnification to red dot optic you lose its point and shoot capability. Scopes must be properly aligned with your eye to work, just like iron sights.

That loss in magnification can lead to a loss in field precision because of nerves, weather conditions, or just poor marksmanship. If you have a new hunter or looking for an optic that is conducive for fast shooting at moderate distances nothing beats a red dot.

Ranges & Terrain

AR 15’s are particularly well-suited to situations where you will be hunting in heavy brush, or shooting at multiple targets. Hog hunting is a perfect example. Hog hunting typically takes place in swampy, thick brush areas where large rifles with large magnified optics can be as severe hindrance.

A slim and trim an AR 15 with a red dot is perfectly suited to taking out multiple hogs that are tearing up a food plot or decimating a garden. Same goes for groundhogs, multiple targets in a confined area. However, if you are going to be hunting groundhogs you’ll most likely be further away than if you are hunting hogs, most varmint hunters using AR 15s want a magnified optic.

Deer hunting with AR 15 is a touchy subject at best, and many hunters will find themselves in a wide variety of scenarios while hunting. While 99% of deer are taken within 300 yards, a range where red dot would be fine, many hunters would prefer a magnified optic if they were hunting a tree stand over been field. Most often it comes down to the terrain and ranges you will be hunting.

Game Animals

Along with the ranges and terrain that you are going to be hunting in, the game animal that you are hunting for is going to affect the type of optic you use on your AR 15 for hunting. Hog hunting, which typically takes place at ranges well within 100 yards, is not somewhere where you would need high magnification. Both because of the ranges, and the game you’re hunting.

However, hunting groundhogs typically happens within 200 yards, well within the distance you could use a red dot, but the game that you are hunting is much smaller. AR 15’s are particularly well-suited for hunting groundhogs and ground squirrels but need a magnified optic to really take advantage of their strengths because the game animal is tiny.

Take into account not only the ranges and drainage will be hunting in but also the size of the game and the precision needed. The further out you plan to hunt, the more precision you need for an ethical kill and the greater chance you’ll need magnification.

The Verdict

At the end of the day, the best optic for an AR 15 is the one that you choose to hunt with. The AR 15 makes a fine sporting rifle provided you chosen the correct caliber for the game that you are hunting. Having an optic on your upper receiver makes shooting easier and your rifle more effective regardless of the type you choose.

Whichever one you choose to hunt with, red dots or magnified scopes, remember to know it like the back of your hand well in advance of opening day. You don’t want to be known as the guy who missed his deer because he had to change his scope the night before the big hunt.

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Keeping Survival Strategies Simple

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Keeping your emergency plans simple could be the single most important thing you do.

I’ve been a survivalist for a long time. Things were different when I started, back in the 1970s. More than anything, there wasn’t the survival industry that we have today. Those of us who thought in those terms had to figure out how to do things ourselves or how to adapt existing tools and equipment (mostly camping equipment) for survival.

There have been many changes since then. Much of that has been due to people coming up with new equipment and new ideas. It is much easier to find the gear to build a survival kit or bug out bag today than it was 40 years ago. There’s also a much more comprehensive range of equipment to choose from, much of it excellent and some of it noticeably superficial.

But one thing has happened in all this which works against our survival. In the desire to keep coming up with new gear and techniques, not everyone has thought through the practicality of their ideas in an actual survival setting. More than anything, this has been manifested in the complexity of some of these survival gadgets. While I have nothing against a sophisticated piece of equipment, I have a lot against it being complicated to use.

As a former engineer, I am fully aware that the more complex a piece of equipment is, the more chance there is of something going wrong with it, especially when you really need it.. Take a look at cars for example.. There are thousands of parts that have to work correctly for a vehicle to run. Then there are several hundred more that have to run for all the accessories and conveniences to run as well.This fact makes the chances of that car running flawlessly for 100 miles considerably slim.

Keeping Fire Starting Simple

For that matter, I have some major issues in using techniques that are difficult to employ. These concerns are especially valid when there are easier things that will do the job. Take fire starting as a case in point. Survival instructors seem to collect fire starting techniques, each trying to outdo the next in the variety and complexity of the methods they know. I suppose that some of the more esoteric and difficult practices of fire starting might be useful in a real emergency where one doesn’t have a survival kit. Nevertheless, I think it makes much more sense to ensure that you have a survival kit with a simple, reliable fire starter in it.

Today, the fire starter that seems to be the most widely promoted is the Ferro Rod. You can find many giveaways where someone is trying to send you one of these. You’ll also see them included as an “extra” with survival knives, survival shovels and just about any other piece of survival gear you can think of.

As far as I’m concerned,the only thing worse than a Ferro Rod for starting a fire is using friction (bow drills, fire plow, pump fire drill, etc.). The Ferro Rod is nothing more than a commercialized version of a flint and steel. While you can start a fire with it, you’d better have some extremely dry, really flammable tinder and you’d better not be suffering from hypothermia, or in a real crisis you could lose your life.

If you need a fire in a survival situation, you usually need one instantly and not in half an hour. That’s why I believe in fire starters that are fast, easy and reliable. Forget about “secondary fire starters” unless they truly fit that description. Make sure you have enough adequate primary fire starters to take care of your needs.

What do I mean by that? I mean fire starters that will work no matter what. Storm proof matches are one of the best fire starters on the market, for that very reason. It doesn’t matter if you’re in the midst of a hurricane and the storm has soaked the matches in water. They work.

Another fire starter as good as Storm proof matches is a Storm proof lighter. This product combines a butane lighter with a piezoelectric igniter. As long as the gas valve is depressed, the piezoelectric igniter is operating. So, even if the wind blows it out, it will reignite immediately. If you’ve ever tried starting a fire in the wind with a disposable butane lighter, you’ll quickly see the value of this lighter.
Keeping Emergency Shelter Simple

Setting up camp consists typically of building a shelter and starting a fire. However, I hear more people talking about building a debris shelter than I hear talking about how to make sure you have a shelter that you can set up in ten minutes or less. The last time I built a debris shelter, it took me a whole lot longer than 10 minutes.

On the other hand, if you have alight weight tarp and some paracord, you can set up roughly the same size and shape shelter in less than 10 minutes, especially if you have some tent stakes to use with it. But even if you don’t, cutting tent stakes from sticks is easy. If you need insulation, you can still pile leaves on the sides of the tarp, just like you would on the framework you make for the debris hut.

If you want to go even more accessible than this, then make a backpacking tent part of your bug out bag. Good backpacking tents weigh less than a lot of other things that we include in our kits, but for some reason,we don’t carry them along. If we want to keep things simple, this only makes sense.
Bottom Line:

Keeping your emergency plans simple could very well be the single most important thing you do.

I could keep going on with example after example. The point is that we should take a look at everything we’re doing for survival with the idea of ensuring that it is the most effortless possible way of doing things. When an actual survival situation presents itself, you’re going to have enough to do without making things harder. The time you save on these routine tasks could be the time you need to accomplish some other critical survival task.

Even more important than the time you save is the ease of accomplishing the task. I wasn’t being facetious before when I was talking about someone with hypothermia dying while trying to start a fire. If you ever get to that point, you won’t be able to accomplish complex tasks; you’ll have to keep things as simple as you possibly can. Your mind won’t be clear, and your agility could very well be out the window.

That’s why I believe in making the “KISS” principle a central part of my own survival strategy. If you’ve never heard that acronym before, it stands for “Keep It Simple Stupid.” No, I’m not insulting you. When you’re cold, and you need to survive, I can guarantee that you’ll feel stupid. So, you’ll need to keep things as simple as possible.

What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2018-04-19)

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  This weekly post is an open-forum, though preferably focusing on what we all did this week for our prepping & preparedness. Comment and voice your thoughts, opinions, accomplishments, concerns, or questions for others on any general topic of preparedness. This weekly open-forum is for any off-topic conversation during the week. Keep up to date with recent comments from ALL articles.   (Support Modern Survival Blog) Important: To help assure that we stay on-the-air: 1. If you’re running an ad blocker, add ModernSurvivalBlog.com to your whitelist. Revenue from our ads help bring you this free premium content. 2. Visit our

Original source: What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2018-04-19)

What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2018-04-19)

  This weekly post is an open-forum, though preferably focusing on what we all did this week for our prepping & preparedness. Comment and voice your thoughts, opinions, accomplishments, concerns, or questions for others on any general topic of preparedness. This weekly open-forum is for any off-topic conversation during the week. Keep up to date with recent comments from ALL articles.   (Support Modern Survival Blog) Important: To help assure that we stay on-the-air: 1. If you’re running an ad blocker, add ModernSurvivalBlog.com to your whitelist. Revenue from our ads help bring you this free premium content. 2. Visit our

Original source: What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2018-04-19)

How to Read a Map and Contour Lines

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Countless times, I’ve recommended buying detailed paper maps of your local area and all the areas along the path to your bug out location. During a major disaster, satellites might be down and GPS might not be working. If that happens, you need to know how to find your way with paper maps. They will […]

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