Home depot run and another truck load of Mom’s stuff moved.

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Home depot is having a good sale on a lot of yard and garden stuff in the ad for this week.  The 100 foot water hose for $20.00 looks and feels like a solid mid-range quality hose. I think calling it heavy duty is a bit of a stretch but the brass hardware looks and feels solid.  I will replace the light weight green hose on the wind up reel I use for watering my front yard with the the new hose.  That will give me 2 light weight hoses for watering the plants in the backyard containers.  It also means that Mom can keep the 50 foot garden hose that I loaned her since  I can reach everything that might need water on my property.

We got 4 bags of the “garden soil” that was on sale. Mom got one of the 3 cubic foot bags and I kept three of the bags for the raised garden bed project and any containers that need a topped off with soil.  The blackberry plants in containers got topped off with this soil and seem to be very happy in their spot off the end of the patio! Mom added some more potting soil for her indoor plants and I bought three of the 2 x 6 x 10 foot boards to finish up the last garden bed that will hold the peppers, tomatoes and those plants that love the heat and take longer to grow.  After building a couple of the raised beds I think I have worked out any kinks of construction. I should be able to get the last bed installed and put up the anti-Tucker fence this weekend.  I’m very excited to see how these new raised beds work out this growing season.

I think we got a lot of needed items out loaded in the dually and out to Mom’s place today.  Mom found a box full of glassware that she has been sort of searching for among the boxes in the shop and we even found a box of summer clothes to add to her collection of items she needs to find space to put away.  We loaded up three pallets for her wood storage area. not as good as wood racks but this will get the wood off the ground and provide some air circulation to season the wood.  Mom also grabbed a few of the smaller pots so she can start adding some flowers for a splash of color around her mini-homestead.

Mom got all of the battery powered yard/garden tools loaded up. For $40.00 she got a small cultivator that works in large containers or small garden beds, a battery powered chainsaw, weed wacker and leaf blower/sweeper plus a lot of  18 volt batteries and  chargers.  I gave Mom a refill on chainsaw oil as her electric saw has a massive leak of  bar oil if it set down to rest on the bar.  I wonder if the saw has a loose or missing screw as that bar oil leak seems very odd. I have a small corded chainsaw and never had all the bar oil leak out if I set the saw down with the bar at a slight downward 10-30 degree angle.

I need some advice for those of you that have flood irrigation. What is a good way to divert water to protect landscaping work that still looks good and does not cost a lot of money?  I gave mom some landscaping timbers that we could add as a barrier/water diverted around the flower beds or should we look at some sort of low decorative brick wall?  All of the wood mulch (for retaining moisture) Mom has placed in the flower garden beds is floating off when she irrigates. All the barrier has to do is divert most the flood irrigation waters, some water seepage would be a good thing for the flower beds.

Last but not least, I gave Mom some of my homemade pet food as she was saying today Jackson the terrier did not seem very interested in his food.  If you are a little reluctant to make home made dog food you might try “Fresh Pet” dog food that is carried refrigerator section of the pet food aisle.  I think the food is still a bit high in preservatives, that is  how I tested the concept of “fresh dog food” to my dogs.  The biggest thing I have noticed since going with a homemade dog food is there is very little waste compared to canned dog food.  When I was feeding canned dog food the dogs would not eat it  during the day and it got all dried out and crusty and that food got tossed in the trash.  The home made dog food tends to be eaten quickly and the dogs are staying at a healthy weight and not getting fat.  I have older dogs in the 10 years plus age range and they seem to be doing better on a fresh/homemade dog food diet.  The dogs seem to be eating less wet food and are not eating much more dry food/ kibble to make up from a lack quality food.  In fact, my little peke Tucker will beg a bit when he wants the homemade food in his dish.  Tucker never did that when I was feeding him canned dog food.

Home depot run and another truck load of Mom’s stuff moved.

Home depot is having a good sale on a lot of yard and garden stuff in the ad for this week.  The 100 foot water hose for $20.00 looks and feels like a solid mid-range quality hose. I think calling it heavy duty is a bit of a stretch but the brass hardware looks and feels solid.  I will replace the light weight green hose on the wind up reel I use for watering my front yard with the the new hose.  That will give me 2 light weight hoses for watering the plants in the backyard containers.  It also means that Mom can keep the 50 foot garden hose that I loaned her since  I can reach everything that might need water on my property.

We got 4 bags of the “garden soil” that was on sale. Mom got one of the 3 cubic foot bags and I kept three of the bags for the raised garden bed project and any containers that need a topped off with soil.  The blackberry plants in containers got topped off with this soil and seem to be very happy in their spot off the end of the patio! Mom added some more potting soil for her indoor plants and I bought three of the 2 x 6 x 10 foot boards to finish up the last garden bed that will hold the peppers, tomatoes and those plants that love the heat and take longer to grow.  After building a couple of the raised beds I think I have worked out any kinks of construction. I should be able to get the last bed installed and put up the anti-Tucker fence this weekend.  I’m very excited to see how these new raised beds work out this growing season.

I think we got a lot of needed items out loaded in the dually and out to Mom’s place today.  Mom found a box full of glassware that she has been sort of searching for among the boxes in the shop and we even found a box of summer clothes to add to her collection of items she needs to find space to put away.  We loaded up three pallets for her wood storage area. not as good as wood racks but this will get the wood off the ground and provide some air circulation to season the wood.  Mom also grabbed a few of the smaller pots so she can start adding some flowers for a splash of color around her mini-homestead.

Mom got all of the battery powered yard/garden tools loaded up. For $40.00 she got a small cultivator that works in large containers or small garden beds, a battery powered chainsaw, weed wacker and leaf blower/sweeper plus a lot of  18 volt batteries and  chargers.  I gave Mom a refill on chainsaw oil as her electric saw has a massive leak of  bar oil if it set down to rest on the bar.  I wonder if the saw has a loose or missing screw as that bar oil leak seems very odd. I have a small corded chainsaw and never had all the bar oil leak out if I set the saw down with the bar at a slight downward 10-30 degree angle.

I need some advice for those of you that have flood irrigation. What is a good way to divert water to protect landscaping work that still looks good and does not cost a lot of money?  I gave mom some landscaping timbers that we could add as a barrier/water diverted around the flower beds or should we look at some sort of low decorative brick wall?  All of the wood mulch (for retaining moisture) Mom has placed in the flower garden beds is floating off when she irrigates. All the barrier has to do is divert most the flood irrigation waters, some water seepage would be a good thing for the flower beds.

Last but not least, I gave Mom some of my homemade pet food as she was saying today Jackson the terrier did not seem very interested in his food.  If you are a little reluctant to make home made dog food you might try “Fresh Pet” dog food that is carried refrigerator section of the pet food aisle.  I think the food is still a bit high in preservatives, that is  how I tested the concept of “fresh dog food” to my dogs.  The biggest thing I have noticed since going with a homemade dog food is there is very little waste compared to canned dog food.  When I was feeding canned dog food the dogs would not eat it  during the day and it got all dried out and crusty and that food got tossed in the trash.  The home made dog food tends to be eaten quickly and the dogs are staying at a healthy weight and not getting fat.  I have older dogs in the 10 years plus age range and they seem to be doing better on a fresh/homemade dog food diet.  The dogs seem to be eating less wet food and are not eating much more dry food/ kibble to make up from a lack quality food.  In fact, my little peke Tucker will beg a bit when he wants the homemade food in his dish.  Tucker never did that when I was feeding him canned dog food.

Choosing A Bug Out Location – Small Town Versus Isolated Retreats

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At some point in our lives we have or might have to face certain harmful or dangerous situations that we might feel the need to escape from. If not that, sometimes life can just get so tiring and exhausting that you need to bug out for a while and spend some time on your own, …

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Choosing A Bug Out Location – Small Town Versus Isolated Retreats

At some point in our lives we have or might have to face certain harmful or dangerous situations that we might feel the need to escape from. If not that, sometimes life can just get so tiring and exhausting that you need to bug out for a while and spend some time on your own, …

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The post Choosing A Bug Out Location – Small Town Versus Isolated Retreats appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

The Seven Minute Pain Solution

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Off-The-Grid Pain Solution

Many Americans continue to look for the perfect alternative pain solution.

You can’t survive without pain.  That might sound surprising, but the truth is, pain alerts you when you are overstressing a specific part of your body.  It also indicates a potentially chronic condition that will keep reoccurring over time. Pain could definitely represent an acute condition as well which still needs to be dealt with. Both situations require a pain solution.

Fortunately, we’re left with some great alternatives including one fascinating pain solution. These off-the-grid options do not require prescription drugs which often have some terrible side effects. One favorite fix for pain is power that is electrostatic in nature. And, believe it or not, static electricity, the very same kind you experience with a shock when you touch an object in a cold, dry environment, can be used to relieve a lot of suffering and pain. Allow me to explain.

Maintaining Cellular Balance To Maximize Your Pain Solution

Every single living cell within your body has both a positive and negative charge. It is the balance of these charges that lead to a state of wellness. An imbalance, on the other hand, leads to degradation, malfunction and varying levels of disease. You may have heard that the cells are more alkaline if an area of your body has a negative charge. Usually, less blood flowing to the area of concern also means a lower temperature in that area.

Conversely, when an area of the body has a positive charge, the cause is usually cellular hyperactivity. Excess tissue acids, along with inflammation, swelling, warmth, and pain accompany this over-activity. To help reverse these problems, you will need to present additional negatively charged particles (electrons) to the area.

Creating Your Own Electrostatic Treatment Hack

One of the easiest ways to create a significant amount of usable negative “healing” electrons is using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plumbing pipe and a small piece of fuzzy material. You can purchase PVC pipe from a building supply firm, any home improvement store, or online I suppose.  All you need is one to two feet of 1 1/2-inch pipe. By the way, at this length, its usually considered to be scrap. One of the best choices for the fuzzy material is the somewhat wild-looking polyester fake fur that can be found in fabric and craft stores.

To make a pain relief charge, take the PVC pipe in one hand and rub the piece of fuzzy material back and forth across it. For best results, move the charged PVC pipe slowly back and forth over the area, keeping it from the surface of your skin.

Important: By rubbing the PVC against the material, you recharge the pipe. If you happen to touch the pipe against your skin, you won’t get fried. However, you will have to “reload” the PVC from time to time.

Repeat the procedure until you feel relief.

The results can be quite dramatic. In fact, many folks begin to feel better within seven minutes. (Some even sooner.) That said, there is no set time period for treating a problem area. Sometimes it’s 15-20 minutes.

Bottom line: stubborn areas may take longer.  It took me almost an hour to get rid of a migraine one time.

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Terror by Shipping Container

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Terror by Shipping Container When you consider the size of this nation and the vast expanse of its borders, it is pretty impressive that we have had the limited terrorist activity in the nation. Its an ode to those who make a living keeping the bad guys out. One thing to remember is, for every …

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15 Home Remedies for Seasonal Allergies and Hay Fever Symptoms

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Allergy sufferers are hating the world. The spring pollen is here and it has come without remorse. Even dogs are feeling the effects. Of course, there are plenty of answers that come in pill form and nasal sprays. Are you comfortable with shoving something up your nose every morning or swallowing a pill just to …

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Book Review: Atlas Shrugged

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Atlas Shrugged is a book that people either love or hate depending on their point of view and how many times they have read it. I read this book once a year, and have for the past several years, and each time it becomes clearer and much more useful.  This year I read it prior to going to the Atlas Shrugged Part II premier, and was particularly aware of the connections between Rand’s fictional world, and the world I live in. While I don’t agree with everything she stood for, especially the cult that formed around her, I have enough

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Free PDF: The First Steps After a Flood

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The Red Cross Brochure – The First Steps After a Flood starts by assuming that your home has been flooded.   It says that although floodwaters may be down in some areas, many dangers still exist . The PDF gives you things to remember in the days ahead. This is a pretty small document, it outlines the very basics of flood remediation and tells what resources the Red Cross offers to flood victims. Basically they can help you by providing you with a voucher to purchase new clothing, groceries, essential medications, bedding, essential furnishings, and other items to meet emergency needs.

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A Map Of The Coming War: Who Is Who (And Where) In Syria

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Like it or not our president is ushering us into a war in Syria and possibly a war with Russia. Well, if we are honest about it, we have been in a proxy war with Russia since the beginning of this battle in Syria. It will be a new conflict for the US and we …

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Biologist Predicts how Civilization Collapses Soon

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Finally we are hearing from someone outside of finance about the collapse. It seems like every time I see a doomsday article it is coming from someone who is managing a massive portfolio. This article is very unique because it comes from a place of science. When I see biologists stepping into the fray. Its …

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Survival Medicine Hour: Causes of Abdominal Pain Off The Grid

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SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR PODCAST

After a disaster or at a remote homestead, we all know that the medic for the family may not have ready access to modern medical technology. That means many conditions that are commonly identified with ultrasounds or CAT scans may be more challenging to diagnose. One of these challenges is abdominal pain. There are various medical issues that cause it, and Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP discuss several common diseases that must be identified and treated, such as appendicitis, gall bladder stones, stomach viruses, and more. These issues have some telltale signs that clue you in on what’s going on.

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2018/05/03/survival-medicine-hour-appendicitis-stomach-flus-gall-bladder-disease-more

Don’t forget to follow Dr.Bones and Nurse Amy on Twitter @preppershow, Facebook at Doom and Bloom, and YouTube at DrBones NurseAmy Channel!

Inflamed Appendix

Inflamed Appendix

Here’s wishing you the best of health in good times and bad…

Joe and Amy Alton

Joe and Amy

Joe and Amy

Find out more about abdominal pain and 150 more medical issues in survival settings with the award-winning Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide For When Medical Help is Not on the Way! And fill those holes in your medical supplies with kits and individual items from Nurse Amy’s store at store.doomandbloom.net

Survival Medicine Hour: Causes of Abdominal Pain Off The Grid

SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR PODCAST

After a disaster or at a remote homestead, we all know that the medic for the family may not have ready access to modern medical technology. That means many conditions that are commonly identified with ultrasounds or CAT scans may be more challenging to diagnose. One of these challenges is abdominal pain. There are various medical issues that cause it, and Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP discuss several common diseases that must be identified and treated, such as appendicitis, gall bladder stones, stomach viruses, and more. These issues have some telltale signs that clue you in on what’s going on.

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2018/05/03/survival-medicine-hour-appendicitis-stomach-flus-gall-bladder-disease-more

Don’t forget to follow Dr.Bones and Nurse Amy on Twitter @preppershow, Facebook at Doom and Bloom, and YouTube at DrBones NurseAmy Channel!

Inflamed Appendix

Inflamed Appendix

Here’s wishing you the best of health in good times and bad…

Joe and Amy Alton

Joe and Amy

Joe and Amy

Find out more about abdominal pain and 150 more medical issues in survival settings with the award-winning Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook: The Essential Guide For When Medical Help is Not on the Way! And fill those holes in your medical supplies with kits and individual items from Nurse Amy’s store at store.doomandbloom.net

Water Filter – the DIY (Straw-Style) Water Filter! – Survival/SHTF Water Filter – Easy DIY

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Do you have one of those handy dandy straw style water filters in your life? Maybe you have one stowed away in your bugout bag for that time when things go down the chute. Or, maybe you have one in your hiking bag so you can drink water on the go in your next hiking …

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Making The Switch To Warm Weather Survival Gear

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summer survival gear

Making the switch to summer survival gear should be a top priority.

In case you hadn’t noticed … summer is almost here. It seems like the new year started just last week, and now we’re easing up on the halfway point for this year. Ski parkas and snow boots are gone and it’s time to dig out the camping gear and dust it off. It’s time to switch to warm weather survival gear.

With the seasons changing and the temperature along with them, it’s also time to take a fresh look at your survival kit. It’s all too easy to take that gear for granted, once you’ve got it put together; kind of like checking off the box and then forgetting it. But just because you’ve got a survival kit, EDC bag or bug out bag put together, doesn’t mean that you can set it aside and just forget about it.

If you’re anything like me, you probably have multiple survival kits. I keep one in each of my vehicles, one with my fishing gear, my EDC bag that’s always with me and my bug out bag in the hall closet. While these aren’t all the same, each is intended to help me survive, should the need arise.
But I might go a bit farther than most people, especially with my EDC bag.

That kit gets used quite a bit, as it doesn’t just contain survival gear, but things that I might use to take care of life’s little problems. So whether I’m grabbing a safety pin to take care of a split seam in my clothing, using the lighter to light up someone’s birthday cake, or taking the rain poncho out in a storm, things seem to migrate out of my kits, unless I make a conscious effort to put them back.

Reviewing your kit (or kits) once in a while gives you the opportunity to check on the condition of your gear, remind you of what you have in the bag and make an honest appraisal about what might need to be replaced. At the same time, you might find that you’re missing something important, which you didn’t realize when you first put it together. So periodic checks are an essential part of staying prepared.

Seasonal Changes
Most people’s kits need to be looked at twice a year for seasonal appropriateness; once in the spring and once in the fall. The first thing you want to look for in your survival kit are things that need to change with the seasons. Updating to warm weather survival gear a pretty important consideration.

Warm hats and gloves that you need for the winter are not appropriate for the warm summer months. That warm hat should be replaced by something that will protect you from the sun, not something that will keep your ears from getting frostbite. Warm winter gloves need to be replaced with lightweight work gloves and winter coats should be replaced with a windbreaker or rain gear.

Seasonal weather changes affect other things as well. Summertime can be a time of drought in some parts of the country. Whereas you might be able to melt snow for drinking water in the wintertime, you may have to depend more on the water you can carry in summer.

Some Things Just Don’t Last
If you leave a survival kit in your car, boat or anyplace else that can get hot, you might be surprised at the things that go bad in it. Many types of fire starting tinder will go dry from the heat, rendering them useless. My favorite tinder or cotton balls soaked in petroleum jelly will only stay good for about six months, before they dry out and I need to replace them.

Food is another thing that you need to check carefully. Heat can affect many types of food negatively, such as dried fruits. Most dried fruits aren’t totally dry when you add them to your kit, but sitting in a hot car trunk will dry them out the rest of the way, making them too hard if not impossible to chew. Other foods, like jerky, can become moldy with time, rendering them useless. I’ve even had canned goods which were part of my survival supplies go bad. Periodic replacement of these items is vital so that when you need them, they are available.

Watch out for any stored water, as well. Water expands when it is hot, obeying the laws of physics. Likewise, it expands when it is cold. This can cause water containers to burst or just from leaks. You might find yourself grabbing a bottle of water, merely to find it empty.

Lighters can also leak or even explode from the heat. While this isn’t all that dangerous, it could put you in a dangerous situation if you depend on that lighter and it doesn’t work. Pens can dry out from the heat. Check anything that can be affected by heat or cold, to make sure it is okay.

Batteries are another thing that you can’t count on lasting, without checking them regularly. I don’t know how many flashlights I’ve lost through the years, because of batteries that leaked inside them. It’s easy to think that your flashlight is okay because it has long-life alkaline batteries in it and it hasn’t been used for a while. But unless you check it, you can’t be sure.

Stuff In Your Bag Gets Used Up
As I mentioned with my EDC bag, supplies in your kit might get used up. It’s great to be able to grab a butane lighter or rain poncho when I need it. But I have to remember that those things are still part of my survival kit. Each time they are used, they need to be returned to the bag, or if the items are used up, they need to be replaced.

We should be especially careful about this with things which can be used up, like butane lighters. While it is easy to think that a disposable lighter is good for 1,000 fires, it is also easy to forget to reduce that number each time we use it. Getting caught in a survival situation, with most of the butane used up wouldn’t be great.

What Should be Updated?
Finally, we should always be on the lookout for what we should replace because we’ve found something better. New gear is coming out all the time, prompting me to buy it and check it out. While not every new survival gadget is worth changing my survival kits over, every once in a while there is something that comes out, which is. Checking my bug out bags gives me the opportunity to ensure that I have added that new piece of gear to all my kits.

One example of this, which happened to me not too long ago, involved a flashlight. I have a small survival kit which I keep in my fishing vest so that I’ll always have it with me when I go fishing. The compact flashlight I put in it was chosen for its size, more than its power. But I recently found a more powerful flashlight that was the same size. I had bought it to check it out, not thinking of this kit until I was making my bi-annual check of the kit. Then I realized that the new light was much better than what I had previously been carrying.

As you continue to gain experience in the art of preparation, you will probably encounter many new items that can perform better than what you are already using. When that happens, it only makes sense to update your kit. You may not realize it at the time when you buy it, but periodically checking your kit can give you an ideal opportunity to put that new gadget to use. Just the process of switching to warm weather survival gear provides lots of opportunities to update your kist and bugout bags.

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Watergun: parts arrival

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As best I can tell, the missing parts to get the gun ‘shootable’ were a sear, sear pin, and firing pin retaining plate. In other words, these:

I am not a gunsmith by any stretch of the imagination…thats one of the reasons I shoot Glocks – you don’t ‘smith them, you just swap parts. At this point it looks like nothing needs fitting, which is good. But..the proof is in the function. We’ll get to that later. Alright…lets grab a punch, YouTube some disassembly/assembly videos, and get crackin’.

And once thats done…lets hand-cycle it, check the safety and trigger, and just generally play with it. It may look like the slide is a bit stiff but whats actually happening is that I’m trying to rack the slide without moving the gun or my hands out of the frame. Think its easy? Try it sometime.

3 Sources of Hidden Survival and Prepping Knowledge

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While there is a ton of great information right here on SHTFPreparedness.com there are also little nuggets of info that are out there hiding. This is an important thing to consider. While you might think that prepping and survival are like technology and the old ways are irrelevant you will soon find that there are …

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Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits For Your Health

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Apple Cider Vinegar. Perfect taken 3 times daily… upon rising, mid-morning, and mid-afternoon. “1 to 2 teaspoons (Bragg) Organic Vinegar in 8 oz Glass Purified Water and sweetening (optional) to taste, 1 to 2 teaspoons Organic Honey, 100% Maple Syrup, Blackstrap Molasses or 4 drops herb Stevia.” The recommendation above is from the label of a bottle of… Bragg – Organic Raw Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar with Mother ( I don’t add sweetener. I just take it diluted with water. )   What’s the difference between Apple Cider and Apple Cider Vinegar? It’s the process of fermentation creating probiotics, enzymes,

Original source: Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits For Your Health

Getting to Know the LOQUAT

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LOQUAT (Eriobotrya japonica)

[Nyerges is the author of “Nuts and Berries of California,” “Foraging California,” and other books. He also leads regular field trips to learn about the uses of wild plants. He can be reached at www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com.]

The loquat, also sometimes known as the Japanese medlar,  is one of those fruits that seems to be everywhere, and most of it just gets eaten by birds or falls to the ground and rots.  This smallish tree – perhaps up to 15 feet tall —  produces some of the earliest fruit each spring.  The plant is somewhat common in California, and fortunately, more and more people are getting to know it, and more importantly, more and more people are beginning to value this sweet fruit.

Loquat’s native home is China, Japan, and North India, this evergreen’s leaves are broad, and pointed at the end, averaging about 8 inches in length.  Each leaf  is darker green on the upper surface, and the under surface is lighter green, with a characteristic wooly surface.

The tree produces white flowers in the late autumn, and its golden-yellow fruits are often abundant on the trees.  The small oblong fruits can be about two inches long, give or take. The flesh is sweet and free of fibre, and each fruit contains a few large brown seeds.  The flavor is sweet, but with a slight sour tang. They’re a bit addicting once you get used to them.  The fruit is high in Vitamin A, dietary fibre, manganese, and potassium.

If the tree is cultivated in your yard, you can produce some bigger fruits by simply irrigating and fertilizing. If the trees are just allowed to go wild, the fruits tend to get smaller each year, though still delicious.  Sometimes in our local wild areas, you can see where someone stopped to have lunch and then spit out the brown seeds, which readily sprout. 

I think loquats are great simply chilled and eaten fresh.  You can remove the seeds, and serve a bunch of the fruit with some ice cream.

If you’re on the trail and you happen upon some loquat trees in fruit at the time, just stop and enjoy a few!  They make a great refreshing trail snack.

Once the large seeds are removed, the flesh is sweet and tender and can be readily made into jams or pie fillings.  Just use a recipe that you already know and life for some other fruit, like peaches, and substitute loquats for the peaches.  You’ll find that these make an excellent jam or jelly.

Sometimes you’ll see loquat jam or jelly at local stores or farmers’ markets.  Mary Sue Eller, who is a professional cook who sells loquat jelly at the Highland Park and other farmers markets, shared with me her recipes, which is printed in my “Nuts and Berries of California” book.  She starts with four cups of fresh loquats, which she washes and deseeds.  She puts them into a pot with a little water, 1 to 2 cups of sugar (depending on the desired sweetness), and the juice of one lemon. She cooks it all until it gets thick, and then puts them into sterilized jars.  Eller suggests that first-time canners research all the details of such canning (in a book or website) before doing this.

It’s pretty easy to grow new loquat trees, and they will produce fruit in a few years.  Though they’re drought tolerant, they will still produce better fruit if they are watered somewhat regularly and fertilized with some regularity.

  

The leaves of the loquat are used in Chinese medicine to make cough syrup. The demulcent effect of the leaves soothes the respiratory and digestive systems.

Skill Work and Survival Packs

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Skill Work and Survival Packs
James Walton “I Am Liberty ” Audio player below!

After a deep wilderness excursion, I have a lot to reflect on and a lot to consider. There are skills that deserve more of my attention and others that I feel like I have gotten sewn into my being. Trips into the wilderness are crucial to getting a real read about what you think you are capable of.

Continue reading Skill Work and Survival Packs at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Fungus Gnat Larvae: How To Kill Them Off Quickly (2018 Update)

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The post Fungus Gnat Larvae: How To Kill Them Off Quickly (2018 Update) is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

One of the most frustrating pests in many indoor gardens is the dreaded fungus gnat and its young, the fungus gnat larvae. These little buggers can absolutely destroy your plants if you’re not vigilant — and they can do it quickly. The primary way that fungus gnats affect your plants is through their larvae. They … Read more

The post Fungus Gnat Larvae: How To Kill Them Off Quickly (2018 Update) is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Fungus Gnat Larvae: How To Kill Them Off Quickly (2018 Update)

The post Fungus Gnat Larvae: How To Kill Them Off Quickly (2018 Update) is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

One of the most frustrating pests in many indoor gardens is the dreaded fungus gnat and its young, the fungus gnat larvae. These little buggers can absolutely destroy your plants if you’re not vigilant — and they can do it quickly. The primary way that fungus gnats affect your plants is through their larvae. They … Read more

The post Fungus Gnat Larvae: How To Kill Them Off Quickly (2018 Update) is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Boy Scouts Self-Castration Leaves Girl Scouts Wondering

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Boy Scouts

Is the age of honor and integrity for Boy Scouts over?

For over 100 years, the Boy Scouts of America have used the name Boy Scouts. Seems to make sense, right? With girls set to become Boy Scouts soon, all that has to change.

The Boy Scouts organization announced a new name for the “Boy Scouts” yesterday: Scouts BSA.

Head scout, Mike Surbaugh, said it was “incredibly fun” coming up with the new name.

“We wanted to land on something that evokes the past but also conveys the inclusive nature of the program going forward,” he said. “We’re trying to find the right way to say we’re here for both young men and young women.”

According to “Glass Door”, Surbaugh is the 5th highest paid charity officer in the country making over $1.5 million per year.

But the Boy Scouts program is currently for 11 to 17-year-olds. This raises some issues:

  • On what basis would you keep a 35-year-old out of the Boy Scouts?
  • On what basis would you exclude Hillary Clinton from joining the Boy Scouts?
  • On what basis would you exclude Bubbles the Chimp from the Boy Scouts?
  • How about a 6-year-old Brownie that wants to join Boy Scouts?
  • On what basis would you keep a convicted terrorist out of the Boy Scouts?
  • On what basis would you keep out an evangelizing Satanist from the Boy Scouts?

The organization already has started admitting girls into the Cub Scouts, and Scouts BSA begins accepting girls next year.

Surbaugh said he thinks both boys and girls would prefer to call themselves simply “scouts” instead of creating distinctions such as “boy” or “girl”. (Or chimp.)

 

Inconsistent Equality

While politically correct, “equality” seems to be driving the name change. It’s not clear at this time if boys and girls will earn merit badges the same way, though.

So far, over 3,000 girls have joined Cub Scout packs nationwide.

A new, multimillion dollar marketing plan to push the new catch phrase “Scout Me In” is set to ramp up this summer. Seriously, try saying “Scout Me In” to someone when you’re in line at the supermarket.

As expected, social media is buzzing with anticipated, polarizing responses.

Kevin Aldrich, a council member from Indiana said, “Get over it, there is every reason to be co-ed. The Future Farmers of America is co-ed. 4-H is co-ed. Band in school is co-ed.”

Aldrich didn’t seem to notice or make the distinction that the name, Future Farmers of America is not Future Boy Farmers of America.

Since membership in the Boy Scouts has been declining for years, adding girls seems like a natural way to get money flowing again.

 

Girl Scouts Fight Back Against Boy Scouts

But the Girl Scouts of America intend to strike back with their own program designed to keep girls in the Girl Scouts.

Girl Scouts’ CEO, Sylvia Acevedo said, “Girl Scouts is the premier leadership development organization for girls.” “We are, and will remain, the first choice for girls and parents who want to provide their girls opportunities to build new skills … and grow into happy, successful, civically engaged adults.”

The Girl Scouts claim roughly 1.76 million young women and more than 780,000 adult members, down from just over 2 million youth members and about 800,000 adult members in 2014.

Boy Scout executives say they have roughly 2.3 million youth involved, down from 2.6 million in 2013 and more than 4 million from its halcyon days.

All this would be funny if it wasn’t being driven by a worldview that has the potential to destroy civilization as we know it.

God’s word teaches us to discriminate. Is good the same as evil? If you say yes, then murder is no different from buying a cup of coffee for a friend. If you say no, then you’ve discriminated. Good for you by the way.

OK, so back to the basics I guess. Men are different from women. (Surprise!) To argue total equality is to discriminate against God totally. If you read the Bible, there are all kinds of distinctions and discriminations that need to be made.

 

Political Correctness Is The Sand Castle Of Our Age

Here’s the thing: The single most important distinction among humans is not about sex or race… it’s about grace. The absurdity of politically correct humanism reminds all of us just how far we’ve come. That’s the bad news.

Boy Scout correctness waves sand castles

Political correctness will never withstand the test of time

The good news? The politically correct crowd, in their desperation, continue to build sand castles at the beach. The truth is, they’re losing and they’re scared. So, speak the truth in love, then simply sit back and watch God send in a few waves.

If you feel strongly about this topic one way or the other and would like to be on tomorrow’s Off The Grid Radio Podcast, email us at info@OffTheGridNews.com with your name and phone number and we’ll set up a time to talk between 9-10am CDT, Friday, May 4th.

The post Boy Scouts Self-Castration Leaves Girl Scouts Wondering appeared first on Off The Grid News.

How To Build Homemade Potato Crates – Potato Growing Made Easy!

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When it comes to growing potatoes with ease, nothing works like homemade potato crates! In fact, it is the only method we use to grow our entire crop, And that includes sweet potatoes, in addition to our regular potatoes. It’s

The post How To Build Homemade Potato Crates – Potato Growing Made Easy! appeared first on Old World Garden Farms.

Congratulations, March and April Certification Graduates!

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Congratulations to the following Community members on completing one or more of our Certifications in March and April!

As many of you know, one of the perks of membership in our Honors Lab is FREE access to several amazing certifications in our Honors Lab area—and lots more are in the works.

These Certifications dive deep. They’re essentially multi-lesson master classes, full of practical know-how so you can immediately start reaping benefits for yourself, your family, and your garden.

(And if you’re not an Honors Lab member yet, you can gain access to these Certifications + lots more perks of membership by joining today. Click here to learn more!)

 

Backyard Chickens for Egg Production Certification

NEW! Backyard Chickens for Egg Production 

In this awesome new certification, TGN blogger (and homesteader extraordinaire!) Tasha Greer covers everything from breed selection and coop design to flock health and egg storage — plus lots more….

Congratulations to the following Honors Lab members on completing this Certification:

  • Cherlynn
  • Connie
  • daviddulock
  • Debbie Kennedy
  • Diane Massey
  • Donna Detweiler
  • Downing
  • griesjoe
  • Heather Duro
  • Jennifer Walton
  • Joanna Newcomer
  • Luetta
  • Mark Davis
  • MikeF
  • Nata Porter
  • Rebecca Potrafka
  • Scott Sexton
  • suzan.mckillop

 

Bio-Intensive Gardening Certification 

Bio-Intensive Gardening Certification

This 8-week course teaches the principles of bio-intensive gardening—one of the easiest, most sustainable ways to produce big, delicious fruits and vegetables!

It covers everything from starting and transplanting seedlings to the basics of garden beds and soil, and from making compost to garden maintenance. There’s even a section on harvesting and processing grains!

Congratulations to the following Honors Lab members for completing the Bio-Intensive Gardening Certification in March and April!

  • bonhil777
  • Cherlynn
  • elizsiracusa
  • griesjoe
  • Heather Duro
  • Joanna Newcomer
  • Kathryn Magoon
  • Lauren Premo
  • Linda Clardy
  • Mary Ellen Rowe
  • MikeF
  • Richelle John
  • Sharon Companion
  • Shelli Haun
  • susanna.schuch
  • suzan.mckillop

 

Home Medicine 101 Certification

Home Medicine 101 Certification

The Home Medicine 101 Certification is a perennial favorite in the Honors Lab!

This eight-week class teaches you how to remedy:

  • Burns, stings, and rashes,
  • Wounds and lacerations,
  • Coughs and colds,
  • Fevers,
  • Indigestion,
  • Anxiety and insomnia,
  • Muscle pain, and
  • Topical infections …

… with readily available plants you may already have growing in your backyard!

Congratulations to the following Community members for completing Home Medicine 101:

  • alyssabpanico
  • AmyMatter
  • andreasexton
  • Anna-Marie
  • barb.stinson
  • bayetdelatour
  • bonhil777
  • Brenda Nicholson
  • cathyneumans
  • CeceliaStubbs
  • Cherlynn
  • ChristieWeixel
  • Chuck Belshe
  • CindaDunham
  • crowe.martin
  • DavidColley
  • Denise Poundstone
  • Diane Massey
  • Dianne
  • Donna Raygoza
  • elizsiracusa
  • equussue
  • ewbroach
  • fostermom30
  • Gee
  • Greg
  • griesjoe
  • handhinternatl
  • Jamie Carels
  • jasabelle6
  • Joanna Newcomer
  • KarinHolzscheiter
  • Katrina Rhoades
  • Kevin White
  • KrisLaubach
  • Lann
  • Lisa Petrillo
  • M
  • Marilyn Nepper
  • Mary Anne Chase
  • Mary Linda Bittle
  • michaelbuzel
  • nancybekaert
  • nicolette_b_2000
  • NINITAKELLER
  • NoeleneChadwick
  • ntcherneva
  • philipcabrams
  • rikkamojica
  • rleneraigoza
  • Shane Kraus
  • Sieglinde
  • smith4536
  • suzan.mckillop
  • tjm5
  • Tracy

 

Instant Master Gardener Certification

 

Instant Master Gardener Certification

In just 8 lessons, The Grow Network’s Instant Master Gardener Certification reveals gardening secrets, tips, and tricks that most people spend years discovering.

Lessons include:

  1. “The Secret to a Green Thumb”
  2. “How Much Land Do You Need?”
  3. “The Power of Herbs”
  4. “The Easiest Way to Prepare a Garden Bed”
  5. “Three Facts About Seeds Every Master Gardener Knows”
  6. “Transplanting Baby Plants”
  7. “The Four HUGE Advantages of Backyard Food Production”
  8. “A Homemade Fertilizer So Powerful, You Could Create a Business Out of It”

Congrats to the following Honors Lab members for completing this powerful certification in March and April:

  • 4cheers4u
  • Angel Nance
  • Barbara Maneja
  • Bill Burger
  • bonhil777
  • Bonnie Guffey
  • cathyneumans
  • CeceliaStubbs
  • Cherlynn
  • Constantine Spialek
  • Dale M Sieting
  • Denise Poundstone
  • dianamlott
  • Donna
  • Downing
  • Edge
  • EllenHomeister
  • griesjoe
  • Heather Duro
  • HeidiRockwell
  • Janet MacLennan
  • janicepizzonia
  • Joanna Newcomer
  • Kali Mason
  • Kathryn Magoon
  • Lauren Doyle Kerins
  • MarieCrum
  • Marilyn Nepper
  • Mary Ellen Rowe
  • MikeF
  • Nadia Cassar
  • preacher
  • Rebecca Potrafka
  • Selene Staehle
  • Sharon Companion
  • Shelli Haun
  • susanna.schuch
  • suzan.mckillop

 

Saving Quality Seeds Certification

Saving Quality Seeds

Learn how to save seeds that will ensure an abundant harvest in years to come with the in-depth information in TGN’s Saving Quality Seeds Certification.

This 7-lesson Certification teaches which plants are easiest to save seeds from, how to plan your garden with seed-saving in mind, how to do a garden soil inventory, the basics of dry and wet harvesting, the best way to store seed, how to determine seed quality—and more!

Congratulations to the following Honors Lab members on completing this Certification:

  • Carol Williams
  • Cherlynn
  • griesjoe
  • Heather Duro
  • Joanna Newcomer
  • Mark Davis
  • MikeF
  • Sharon Companion
  • Shelli Haun

 

 

We’ve also got several more certifications in the works, including “Making Home Medicine,” “Backyard Meat Rabbits,” “Bird-watching,” and “Beekeeping.” We’re working with some fantastic experts on these, so you’ll definitely want to check them out in the Honors Lab once they’re ready. Exciting stuff! 🙂

 

The post Congratulations, March and April Certification Graduates! appeared first on The Grow Network.

Start An Indoor Garden in Your Apartment

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Written by Craig Living in a small apartment doesn’t mean that you can’t bring the beauty of nature into your small home. There are design opportunities for even the tiniest of dwellings. Indoor gardens are gaining more popularity as people look for ways to improve their homes with live plants, whether they are edible or for decoration. By making a design plan for your space, you can grow a luxurious garden that will make you happy to come home. Plan […]

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10 Helpful Podcast Episodes for New Preppers

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When anyone first begins to think about preparedness I believe it’s not only important to get off on the right foot, but get your information from credible sources. That’s why I decided to write this post and list 10 helpful podcast episodes for new preppers. We also have a list of 40 great YouTube and […]

The post 10 Helpful Podcast Episodes for New Preppers appeared first on Survivalist Prepper.

How to Supplement Your Potable Water Supplies by Cheaply Harvesting Rainwater

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Rainwater:  It’s free, falls from the sky nearly everywhere, and is relatively pure. Without rainwater, lakes and streams and aquifers would dry up and humans and animals would die or

The post How to Supplement Your Potable Water Supplies by Cheaply Harvesting Rainwater appeared first on Ask a Prepper.

Small Pantry-Its Really Easy To Organize One-Just Add Shelves

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Here is one more idea how to organize a small pantry, it’s really easy. When Fall arrives my inner clock reminds me to stock up on food storage because that is usually when the canned goods go on sale. I am asked quite often “How can I store my food storage when my pantry is so small”?

Well, I showed you a few weeks ago how to add a few shelves to your regular kitchen cupboards.

More Shelves For Your Small Pantry

By just adding a few extra shelves to your small pantry, you gain almost 50% more cupboard space depending on how your cabinets are built. I have the pantry shown below that used to have only 5 shelves. I added two more shelves to give me more space that was not as easily usable because of the height. I only have a few tall items to store in the pantry. Plus you can only safely stack cans two cans high. I have ten-foot ceilings so therefore, the pantry is taller than a house with 8-foot walls. The door alone is 8 feet tall. I want you to know those dimensions so you realize how I was able to add more shelving.

Plan Out The Shelves Of Your Small Pantry

Make a list of the various items you eat every day or every week. Then start measuring approximately how many shelves you can add. I measured and measured so many times then I went to a local cabinet place and had them cut the shelves. I picked up the exact size brackets that were already installed in the side walls. The holes were there so all I had to do was consider the depth of the shelves when measuring for the shelving.

There is something about having a pantry full of canned goods, honey, cocoa, canned soups. I have large and small buckets with flour and sugar for everyday baking and I refill them when needed.

My favorites I have to have in my small pantry:

1. baking stuff-flour, sugar, brown sugar, powdered sugar, cocoa, oils, honey, salt

2. peanut butter, jelly, and jam

3. canned soups

4. canned beans

5. canned enchilada sauce

6, ketchup, mayonnaise, Miracle Whip, mustard

7. canned meat-tuna, chicken, and roast beef

8. canned fruits

9. canned vegetables

Here’s the deal, I can’t afford to make a move so I need to make the best of my situation for my food storage. I love things organized.

Gamma lids

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100 Low Budget Meals Anyone Will Love Every Day

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Grocery prices keep going up every time I go to the store. I recently wrote an article about some of the Great Depression Era Meals. Wow, thanks so much to all my readers for giving me, even more, ideas to add to the list. Here’s the deal, I don’t see the grocery prices coming down anytime soon, so today I decided to put together 100 low budget meals anyone will love. If you are like me I can’t wait until my garden is ready to harvest! I save so much money having a garden! Yep, salads every night, sliced tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, etc. I make my own ranch salad dressing, or just use balsamic vinegar with olive oil. Yummy!

I watch for the meat in the clearance area or I don’t buy meat at all. I admire people who have access to real grass fed meat without the antibiotics and hormones added.

100 Low-Budget Meals Anyone Will Love Every Day

My favorite skillet for breakfast: Lodge L8SK3 Pre-Seasoned Cast-Iron Skillet, 10.25-inch

Breakfast Low Budget Meals:

1. French toast and scrambled eggs

2. Cheese toast with fruit cocktail

3. Scrambled eggs and bacon

4. Popeye or Puffy Pancakes

5. Smoothie with fruits and veggies

6. Pancakes and scrambled eggs

7. Waffles with fresh fruit

8. Eggs in a blanket (cut a whole out of the middle of a piece of bread and replace it with an egg then cook both in a fry pan)

9. Hard boiled eggs and fruit

10. Oatmeal with raisins (super budget meals if you buy oatmeal in bulk)

11. Cream of wheat with hard boiled eggs

12. Breakfast quiches

13. Breakfast burritos

14. Eggs benedict

15. Over easy eggs with sausage links

16. Toast and fried eggs

17. Link sausage wrapped up in a pancake

18. Egg baked muffins (baked omelets in muffin tins)

19. Leftover cold pizza

20. Homemade cinnamon rolls with scrambled eggs

21. Cold cereal with fruit

22. Homemade granola

23. Granola Bars

24. Homemade muffins with grated carrots

25. Homemade muffins with grated apples

26. Fried potatoes and eggs

27. Homemade whole wheat toasted bread with canned peaches

28. Hash with eggs

29. Doughnuts with scrambled eggs

30. Bagels and cream cheese

31. Peanut Butter and jelly sandwich

32. Fried Egg and bacon sandwich

33. Biscuits and sausage gravy

Luncheon Low Budget Meals:

34. Bagel with sliced turkey and carrot sticks/apple slices

35. Peanut butter and honey sandwich/carrot & peaches

36. Turkey, avocado, spinach wrap with plums

37. Chicken burrito with salsa

38. Almond butter on celery sticks and apple slices

39. Tacos with beans, lettuce, tomatoes, and cheese

40. Sandwich with mashed beans and celery sticks

41. Tomato sandwiches with lettuce

42. Grilled cheese sandwiches with carrots and apples

43. Bean soup with corn bread (soups are super budget meals)

44. Homemade hummus with crackers and apple slices

45. Tomato soup with crackers, cheese, and grapes

46. Smoothies with fruits, vegetables, and chia

47. Egg salad sandwich with sliced pickles

48. Turkey, cheese panini sandwich with tomatoes

49. Whole wheat bread with chopped can of chicken, mayonnaise and carrot sticks

50. Salad with tomatoes with sliced hard boiled eggs and chopped bacon bits with apples on the side

51. Salad with peas, bacon, cheese, chopped eggs and bell peppers with dressing and fruit cocktail on the side

52. Bacon, lettuce, tomato sandwiches with carrot sticks

53. Crackers with chicken salad and fresh grapes

54. Chicken salad with bacon, hard boiled eggs, and cashews over lettuce

55. Cooked rice and beans with salsa

56. Grilled tuna sandwich with carrots and apple slices

57. Hot dogs with relish, celery sticks and apples

58. Chili hot dogs with grated cheese, apples and carrots sticks

59. Ham salad sandwiches with sliced pickles and grapes

60. Ground leftover roast beef and mayo with carrot sticks and peaches

61. Sliced roast beef sandwiches with celery and grapes

62. Baked potatoes with broccoli and cheese (super low budget meals)

63. Corn dogs with carrot/celery sticks and apple slices

64. Chef salad, lettuce, cheese, ham cubes, sliced eggs, sliced celery, and beets

65. Chipped beef on toast with peas and apple slices (my favorite super budget meals)

66. Macaroni and cheese with green beans and applesauce

Dinner Low Budget Meals:

67. Homemade flour tortillas with beans, cheese, lettuce and fruit cocktail-My favorite tortilla maker: CucinaPro 1443 Flatbread and Tortilla Maker

68. Homemade corn tortillas with meat of choice, cheese, lettuce and sliced apples ***My favorite corn/whole wheat & spinach tortilla recipes:

Corn-Whole Wheat & Spinach Tortillas.

69. Chicken enchiladas with small salad and fruit of choice

70. Spaghetti with meat sauce over cooked pasta with small tossed salad and fruit of choice

71. Chicken chili with homemade corn bread

72. Vegetarian chili with homemade bread sticks and fruit of choice

73. Lasagna with meat and a tossed salad with rolls

74. Vegetarian lasagna with salad

75. Bowtie-spinach salad with craisins and mandarin oranges and bread sticks

76. Pork loin cooked in slow cooker, serve with vegetables of choice and fruit

77. Pork chops grilled, served with tossed salad and fruit

78. Barbecued ribs with tossed salad and fruit

79. Barbecued chicken with a tossed salad and fruit

80. Baked chicken with pasta salad and fruit on the side

81. Roasted vegetables and fruit on the side.

82. Homemade pizza with tomato sauce and grated cheese. Add a salad and fruit

83. Homemade calzones with tomato sauce and filling of choice. Add a tossed salad

84. Noodles and tomato sauce with green beans and canned fruit

85. Stew with vegetables and fruit of choice

86. Corned beef, cabbage, and potatoes

87. Chicken and broccoli casserole with fruit on the side

88. Chicken and rice casserole with green beans and fruit on the side

89. Tacos with fried hamburger, beans, cheese, lettuce, and tomatoes. Fruit on the side

90. Chicken enchiladas with tossed salad and fruit on the side

91. Taco salad, cooked hamburger, cheese, kidney beans, lettuce, broken tortillas chips and Catalina type salad dressing

92. Flank steak sliced very thin (barbecued in foil) serve with grilled veggies and fruit on the side

93. Foil dinners with meat of choice, carrots, celery, and onions, cook in oven or on barbecue

94. Tostadas with beans, grated cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and lots of salsa (one of my favorite budget meals)

95. Spinach wraps with chicken salad and a fruit salad

96. Salad bar, lettuce, tomatoes, grated cheese, chopped ham, olives, grated hard boiled eggs with dressing of choice

97. Potato bar with chili, broccoli, grated cheese, sour cream, chopped green onions and sliced olives

98. Tuna casserole with green beans and choice of fruit

99. Hamburger Casserole with snack ramen and frozen peas with fruit of choice

100. Turkey breast with homemade dressing, mashed potatoes, gravy, peas and cranberry sauce

If you have any more low budget meals please share them with me. Let’s pass the information on to everyone you think would enjoy these meals. I thank you for your comments. Blessings, Linda

 

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The Overlooked Nutritional Powerhouse You Can Stockpile For Years

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The Overlooked Nutritional Powerhouse You Can Stockpile For Years

Image source: Pixabay.com

If you are looking to add some powerhouse nutrition, be sure to consider lentils.

Lentils are legumes, and when compared with other dried beans, they are easy and quick to prepare since they do not require presoaking. However, they offer high nutritional content, and they readily absorb other flavors in your soups, stews and side dishes. Even better: They will store for years and years.

Lentils originated in central Asia and are one of the world’s first cultivated foods. In fact, lentil seeds dating back to Old Testament times have been discovered at archeological sites in the Middle East. Sometime before the first century, lentils made their way to India, where they became the basis of the popular Indian dish, dal.

There are dozens of varieties of lentils, and they are classified by size and by color. Although green and brown lentils are the most common types in the U.S., lentils also come in orange, red, yellow and black varieties. Flavors differ slightly among the different types, but each one offers a rich, dense, slightly nutty taste.

The ‘Miracle Oil Maker’ Lets You Make Fresh Nut Oils Within Minutes!

Here are some of the many health benefits lentils can provide.

Manganese. Stored in the bones and in the liver, pancreas and kidneys, this mineral helps the body maintain a normal level of blood sugar. It also offers protection against free radicals. A 100-gram serving of red lentils provides 100 percent of your daily manganese requirements.

Protein. If you are a vegetarian or are just looking to increase your protein intake, lentils are a great choice. A half cup serving of dry lentils provides 26 grams of energy-packed protein. They also are naturally gluten-free. Lentils are one of the best sources of alkaline protein, which means they can help balance the body’s pH level, promoting a healthy gut.

Fiber. If you consume 100 grams of dry green lentils, you will get 80 percent of your day’s fiber recommendation. A high daily intake of dietary fiber can help lower your “bad” cholesterol levels and offer protection against developing Type 2 diabetes and colon cancer. High fiber also regulates the digestive system, helping to prevent constipation, diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and diverticulitis.

Potassium. Potassium is helpful in regulating blood pressure, and it can help fight the damaging effects of too much sodium in the diet. A 100-gram serving of red lentils offers more potassium content than a large banana.

Folate. Folate plays an important part in heart health, nerve function and the formation of red blood cells. It helps prevent anemia and is very important in helping increase the blood volume of pregnant women and women of childbearing age in general.

The Overlooked Nutritional Powerhouse You Can Stockpile For Years

Image source: Pixabay.com

Iron. You can take a natural iron supplement by eating 100 grams of lentils, which provides almost half of your daily iron requirement. Iron helps in the formation of hemoglobin in the blood and myoglobin in the muscles, both of which help fight against fatigue and tiredness.

Low starch content. Compared with refined grains and packaged carbohydrates, lentils have a low impact on blood sugar levels. Lentils contain about 35 percent digestible starch, and about 65 percent resistant starch, which is the type that escapes absorption in the small intestines. Eating lentils can help curb your appetite, since they are low in calories yet are satisfying.

How to Purchase Lentils

Lentils are available in prepackaged containers and in bulk bins. Look for lentils that are whole and without cracks and without any evidence of damage from insects or moisture.

Unlike many canned vegetables, canned lentils retain most of their nutrition. Check the label, however, to avoid added salt or other ingredients.

Storage

When dry lentils are stored in an airtight container in a cool, dry and dark place, they will store for years. Cooked lentils will stay fresh in the refrigerator for about three days in a covered container.

Cooking With Lentils

Spread lentils out on a light plate or surface to check for and to remove any small rocks or other debris. Then rinse lentils in a strainer under cool running water.

To boil lentils, use one cup of lentils per three cups of liquid. For lentils that are easier to digest, place them in water that is already boiling. When the water returns to a full boil, turn down heat to a simmer and cover the pot. Red lentils take about 20 minutes to cook, while green lentils take about 30 minutes.

You can lengthen or shorten this time depending on the consistency you desire. For example, you might want to cook them for less time if you want a firmer texture for a salad or soup. If you are making a curry or a dal, however, you may want to increase the cooking time so your lentils have a softer consistency.

Have you ever eaten or stored lentils? What advice would you add? Share your tips in the section below:

Here are some recipes for lentils you may want to consider:

http://allrecipes.com/recipes/16982/fruits-and-vegetables/beans-and-peas/lentils/

http://www.thekitchn.com/20-lentil-recipes-for-easy-weeknight-meals-227286

https://minimalistbaker.com/1-pot-lentil-dal/

https://minimalistbaker.com/1-pot-lentil-dal/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/24/lentil-recipes_n_1070678.html

http://www.cookinglight.com/food/recipe-finder/lentil-recipes

The post The Overlooked Nutritional Powerhouse You Can Stockpile For Years appeared first on Off The Grid News.