House cleaning and furniture arranging

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I finally got a full day to concentrate on cleaning up my house.  Ugh, the house interior really needed some extra attention and TLC.  I took apart Mom’s dining table and moved all the parts and chairs to a small nook in my computer room.  I moved the ‘bar-type’ table back into the kitchen.   While the new table needs bars tools around it it is rectangular and only 22 inches wide and about 36 inches long.  This size fits great in my small kitchen.  Mom’s round dining table did not fit very well in my small kitchen and I suspect she may have a floor space problem with in her home with this table.  I have to say this table will give Mom much more working space in her small kitchen as her counter top space is limited.

I opened several of the new windows for the first time today.  Dang, those window block out a lot of traffic/city noise. Still under 80 degrees F.  fans circulating air is adequate for cooling. The longer I don’t have to use power for an A/C system the happier I am about the power bills.  So far the windows and new siding have had a significant impact on how my house holds heat or holds cool air and it is only May.  The new ceiling fans are also making a big difference on air circulation making the house feel cooler.

Huzzah! I have some work area in my shop after clearing out Mom’s pallets.  After moving the pallets there was some nice dry straw leftover so I picked out the chunks of trash then put the straw in a garbage bag for Mom’s chickens.  I set up my sawhorses and will add plywood for another work table.  Not really a work table as such, but a place to put tools and stuff as I start organizing the work spaces in the shop.  Getting my tools organized properly will be a job this summer.

I have own this home (held the mortgage) yet I never felt like the shop was mine.  The shop has always been more of “family” storage unit rather than my shop.  At least Mom  paid some rent for storage.  I’m not sure how I can do it this year,  but I want to make a ‘proper’ working shop. That will change this year.

I don’t believe in the collective. What I pay for is my private property.  Gosh Jamie you have so much why won’t you share?  Because I have worked physically and financially for everything I got.  Yep,  I’m on veterans disability and get enough cash to hover around poverty levels.  Who pays? all the people in the system.

My home is now worth about $150 grand and my taxes are going up with that new evaluation. My SSD and VA COLA adjustment will be about 2% inflation on about $1200.00. Oh goody I get another $6.00 per month for 2019, and it will not keep pace with inflation.   That does not cover the new taxes or the new water supply that Nampa city water work wants.  Honestly you folks back east that pay several hundred dollar per month above your house payment amazes me.

One thing I have noticed when states or communities want to ‘share the cost’ it is generally a bad thing for the middle class.  I don’t hate housing developers as long as the pay to develop roads, pipe and water systems.  Housing is cheap in Idaho compared to Cali, and coastal Oregon and Washington state.

Why is growth always considered a good thing?  There is both good and bad to growth.  Does Boise want to be the next San Fran and people shooting up in the local subway/train station.  Boise already has a homeless problem and it gets fricken cold here in winter.  Affordable housing is not going to work.  Getting people off the social welfare system would work.  I’d love to work but most companies wont’t hire me as I’m disabled and need a few exemptions.  Such is life!

 

 

 

Throwback: Reviewing the Whalen Industrial Rack Shelf

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As a prepper you might think that your worst enemy are those who are unprepared. That is not the case. You might think your worst enemy is the disaster itself. Also not the case. In reality, you are going to face some serious enemies that will be much stronger impediments to your preparedness goals. One …

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This Is The Turning Point

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The news is so ominous lately. There are so many open ended stories that show no real room for resolve. This is particularly true of our stock market and financial system on a whole. What is most unnerving about the American economic date, is not the things happening on wall street but whats  happening in …

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Russian Military Spending Less Than Previously Thought

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Russian military spending

Russia faces tough budget choices as geopolitical ambitions increase.

Russian military spending has taken a huge financial hit according to a new study. The report suggests that Russia’s economic troubles have put a dent in Moscow’s aspirations to continue with high defense spending, but the 20 percent figure does require some context to be fully understood. Russian military modernization will proceed forward in the next year, but the Kremlin will increasingly have to make some tough choices.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia has attempted to emerge with an invigorated military under President Vladimir Putin. Putin’s strategy was to increase the defense budget gradually over time. A growing economy and rising oil prices, the pace of Russian military modernization further sped up after the 2008 Russo-Georgian War, which revealed the continued structural flaws in Russia’s military capabilities.

Five decades later, significant investments into the Russian army paid off when the country utilized its increasingly sophisticated and competent military during conflicts with Ukraine as well as Syria.

At the same time Putin was flexing Russian muscle in Ukraine and Syria; however, the country was hit with the “double whammy” of lowered energy prices and some tough sanctions from the USA.

The Russian recession from 2014 To 2017 also forced the Kremlin to make some hard financial decisions. As the recent study indicates, this included a substantial decrease in Russia’s military spending.

What do you think? Is this real or fake news?

The post Russian Military Spending Less Than Previously Thought appeared first on Off The Grid News.

Corruption Has Juiced Failings in Capitalism, Democracy — But Does That Mean We Go Bat Shit Unworkable Liberal NWO Instead?

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stock here, in response to a thread at ENE (see link  and screen cap here) I wish to go on record with the following.    

And that is your NWO Rothschilds and buddies.   The same people who have co-opted a liberal meme, and using it to create chaos and division in order for them, they think, to extract ultimate control, exp. over the USA which used to have a strong working class with high moral principals and the financial wherewithal to choose the high road even in the face of adversity.   Said moral principals were often based in Christian religions (which some people hate due to their “evolved” but misguided sense that atheism is “better”).   Said morals also decimate the argument that the “rule of law” is bad, we need some rules, especially with the presence of insane hairless monkeys that need some reigning in occasionally.   However, that said, the strong moral values would be the steering force for those with the wherewithal, even going against the laws created by men, or even just laws being applies unjustly.

It should be quite obvious to anyone paying attention that a decades long agenda of destroying the strength and power base of those with fortitude and wherewithal has been undertaken and fairly successful.   

Seeing those battle lines drawn, which “side” do you stand on.   I am afraid that even if you don’t want to pick a side, your non-participation is in fact a vote for the evil NWO / continued rape by the bankers/<sic> elite.   That group is anything but “elite”, as opposed to being lecherous sociopaths. 

Red pill or blue pill?   Blue pill is a continued belief in what seems like a self declared virtuous path of “co-opted liberal” beliefs, even though those methods are shown in reality not to work well, and by simple thought experiments can be shown to have nearly no chance of working well.

A failure of the system, under extreme corruption and manipulation force fed by the concentration of power and wealth and then amplified by more effective propaganda enabled by the internet and social media and immediate feedback systems (Google analytics for one, Twitter, etc) the help fine tune the effectiveness of the propaganda…..a failure of the system is then grabbed by some and twisted into a belief that every element of “the system” is at fault and needs to be torn down and replaced with SOMETHING.     And that “Something” is never clearly defined, or at least can fairly easily be shown to be innefective and just not workable in the reality of a society formed by human beings.

A fucking plan that doesn’t work, and has no chance of working.    Like socialism, no matter how you twist the definition.

The fucking plan that doesn’t work, is the “virtuous” knee jerk reaction to replacing the maligned:

1) Capitalism
2) Rule of Law
3) Democratic voting system
4) Free Enterprise.

And the irony of it all in seen in the hypocrisy of the co-opted liberal ideals that play directly into the hands of the NWO Globalists.    Behind much of this hypocrisy is the rage and hatred of the tolerant people who viciously and ceaselessly attack the pussy grabbing Trump.    The continual blatant and extreme attacks, even involving physical violence and threats of death to the president, do so drown out many with opposing views, even to the point that many who see things clearly, feel that they have to pander to the snow flakes by qualifying nearly every statement with stuff like “not that I am defending Trump”.  

—————————————————————————————-

razzz

‘The Changing Wind in Politics by Generation’
“…When we combine both the Senate and the House and then plot the number of seats each party held as a percent of the whole combination, we see that the Democrats peaked with FDR. They have won at times ever since, but the percentage of seats held has been gradually declining.
Now an online survey of more than 16,000 registered voters ages 18 to 34 has revealed that support for Democrats over Republicans in Congress has continued to decline among the youth. It has fallen another 9% since the 2016 election to just 46%. The responses say that the Republican Party is a better steward of the economy. This should come as no surprise. The entire Marxist agenda resonated with the Great Depression generation as the Marxists blamed corporations and never mentioned the Global Sovereign Debt Crisis of 1931. Th[e] younger generations are simply viewing the world differently as to what they can do themselves rather than what government can do for them.”
https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/politics/the-changing-wind-in-politics-by-generation/

CodeShutdownCodeShutdown

but why does Armstrong keep saying this about Marxism? Marx was about giving the people the control and benefit of the means of production, NOT the government, thus ‘what they can do for themselves rather than what the government (and/or corporation) can do for them’ See? He has it nearly backwards. Dictators in Russia and China werent Marxists. For sure Armstrong is not Marxist. He computes natural cycles for the greatest wealth extraction from the public, while producing nothing.
America’s Electoral Choices: Liberal Fascism versus Conservative Fascism
http://washingtonsblog.com/2017/12/americas-electoral-choices-liberal-fascism-versus-conservative-fascism.html

CodeShutdownCodeShutdown

They’re Not Even Close: The Democratic vs. Republican Economic Records, 1910-2010
The Democratic and Republican Parties are virtual opposites of each other in their economic records, going back to the earliest period for which economic data were available, around 1910. More than a dozen studies have been done comparing economic growth, unemployment, average length of unemployment, stock market performance, inflation, federal debt, and other economic indicators, during Democratic and Republican presidencies and congresses, and they all show stunningly better performance when Democrats are in power, than when Republicans are. These studies are all available online, and they are all summarized and discussed in this path-breaking book, which settles, once and for all, the question of whether there’s any significant economic difference between the two Parties. Not only is there a difference, but – shockingly – it always runs in favor of Democrats in power. There might be other types of reasons for voting Republican, but all of the economic reasons favor voting for Democrats. Regarding economic performance, the two Parties aren’t even close.
https://www.amazon.com/Theyre-Not-Even-Close-Democratic/dp/1880026090/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1339027537&sr=8-9

razzzrazzz

CodeShutdown: One can see why you are fucked up in the head and fundamentally flawed in your foundational thinking which leads to your whole structure failing.
Marxism pits have and have nots in class warfare trying to attain common ownership. From there, many other forms of societies are envisioned. The ultimate decision maker is usually some figurehead trying to control the outcome of a suppressed society.
Example at hand. Constitution suspended, government takes control of all major businesses, while investment capital flees the country. Promises of pie in the sky during runaway inflation.
‘In Venezuela, inflation quadruples to 18,000 percent in two months, with no end in sight’
“Venezuela’s inflation rate, already by far the world’s highest, spiked from 4,966 percent to nearly 18,000 percent in just March and April — a trend that, if it continues, could push the country’s annual rate to more than 100,000 percent by year’s end, economists say…”
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/venezuela/article210282264.html
This was a typical capitalist society that Marx would want to level the playing field for all citizens. Not ever possible as people are not equal in their output or potential output. The resulting suppression in equalization causes productive and creative minds to flee.
Democratic policy only attracts the something for nothing crowd which is not sustainable hence the republican agenda wins out in the long run.

How to Mitigate the 6 Deadly Sins of Ax Work

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There is a little secret that people are finding out about. There is an activity that is as much fitness as it is function. Its as much resource as it is mental recess. If you have an axe and access to wood that needs splitting, you have probably already found out the secret of axe …

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Pistol caliber carbines

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Pistol caliber carbines – Where do you stand?
  • 20% – ( 1 vote )

  • 60% – ( 3 votes )

  • 20% – ( 1 vote )

  • 0% – ( 0 votes )

  • 0% – ( 0 votes )

    15 Reasons Why I Store Epsom Salts

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    What are Epsom Salts? It is not actually salt but a naturally occurring pure mineral compound of sulfate and magnesium.  It started out from a bitter saline spring at Epsom in Surrey, England. Do you remember your family always having Epsom Salts? I remember seeing this blue bag in the hall closet with the rest of the medicinal products my mother had stored. We only had a few items for any ailment we had. The ones that I remember were Epsom Salts, Merthiolate, Mercurochrome, and aspirin.

    Yes, that was it. We did not go to the doctor much, and if we did, we must have been close to death. I do remember having my throat painted with a purple violet ointment (Gentian Violet), something for strep throat. I would love any comments to help refresh my memory on that stuff. Natural Remedy

    We also had a yellow mustard paste you’d smear on your chest for bad coughs. Today it is all about Epsom Salts. Thank you to several readers that reminded me of the purple/violet ointment name! Another reader just emailed me and said she always puts a couple of tablespoons in the hole before she plants her tomatoes. It helps them grow stronger and prevents blossom end rot. Thanks so much for these awesome tips!

    Epsom Salts

    Why I Store Epsom Salts:

    1. Throw a cupful into a warm bath along with some lavender essential oils…….relax and read a book. No need to buy expensive bath salts, plus you choose the essential oils you prefer.

    2. Make a paste with water and Epsom Salts to soothe a sunburn. Take a small container and mix water and enough of the Epsom Salts to make a paste similar to thin toothpaste. Gently rub the mixture onto the sunburned skin.

    3. You can do your own pedicure by soaking your feet in a bucket of warm water with a 1/2 cup Epsom Salts added. Relax and let the dry skin fall off. Use a pumice stone to remove the remaining dead skin, and then rub coconut oil into your feet to soften them. I wear socks so I won’t fall from the slippery oil on my bare feet. It really helps with those cracked heels in the summertime.

    4. It is great for splinters….soak and then remove the splinter ever so carefully with clean tweezers.

    5. Gout can be treated by soaking your foot in as hot as the water can be and still be comfortable, along with 1/4 cup Epsom Salts. Soak the foot for about thirty minutes. This will help ease the discomfort of a sore foot.

    6. Sprains can be treated by following the instructions for gout. The water with the Epsom Salts seems to ease the discomfort of the sprained ankle or foot.

    7. Athlete’s Foot is treated by soaking the feet in warm water with 1/4 cup Epsom Salts for about 30 minutes. Drain the water, clean the container and repeat if necessary.

    8. Gardens are benefited by preventing slugs when you sprinkle some Epsom Salts around where you do not want the slugs to enter near your garden plants.

    9. Epsom Salts is a natural insecticide….sprinkle lightly around your plants to keep those plant pests away.

    10. Keep your lawns green with 2 tablespoons to one-gallon water and spray onto your lawn. Cheap way to keep your lawn healthy and green.

    11. Fertilize your houseplants. Sprinkle a little each week to keep them healthy and keep the pests away. (high in nitrogen, phosphorus & potassium)

    12. Make your own hand wash with baby oil and Epsom Salts. Soothes dry chapped fingers and knuckles.

    13. Clean your bathroom tile with equal amounts of Epsom Salts and your favorite liquid detergent, use a rag to just wipe away the grime.

    14. Add a tiny amount (about 1/4 teaspoon give or take) to your regular face cleansing cream and wash your face as usual. It feels fabulous!

    15. Fungus toenail or fingernail can be treated by soaking the infected nail(s) in hot water mixed with Epsom Salts at least three times a day.

    If you have other ideas please comment. I would love to add them to my list. We all learn from each other. The really nice thing about Epsom Salts is the fact that they are fairly inexpensive to purchase and store in your food storage stash or pantry.

    Epsom Salts:

    You can buy them everywhere even on Amazon:

    Copyright Pictures:

    Epsom Salts Picture: AdobeStock_184642748 by Kvladimirv

    First Aid Kit by Linda

    Survival Food Storage by Linda

    The post 15 Reasons Why I Store Epsom Salts appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

    15 Reasons Why I Store Epsom Salts

    What are Epsom Salts? It is not actually salt but a naturally occurring pure mineral compound of sulfate and magnesium.  It started out from a bitter saline spring at Epsom in Surrey, England. Do you remember your family always having Epsom Salts? I remember seeing this blue bag in the hall closet with the rest of the medicinal products my mother had stored. We only had a few items for any ailment we had. The ones that I remember were Epsom Salts, Merthiolate, Mercurochrome, and aspirin.

    Yes, that was it. We did not go to the doctor much, and if we did, we must have been close to death. I do remember having my throat painted with a purple violet ointment (Gentian Violet), something for strep throat. I would love any comments to help refresh my memory on that stuff. Natural Remedy

    We also had a yellow mustard paste you’d smear on your chest for bad coughs. Today it is all about Epsom Salts. Thank you to several readers that reminded me of the purple/violet ointment name! Another reader just emailed me and said she always puts a couple of tablespoons in the hole before she plants her tomatoes. It helps them grow stronger and prevents blossom end rot. Thanks so much for these awesome tips!

    Epsom Salts

    Why I Store Epsom Salts:

    1. Throw a cupful into a warm bath along with some lavender essential oils…….relax and read a book. No need to buy expensive bath salts, plus you choose the essential oils you prefer.

    2. Make a paste with water and Epsom Salts to soothe a sunburn. Take a small container and mix water and enough of the Epsom Salts to make a paste similar to thin toothpaste. Gently rub the mixture onto the sunburned skin.

    3. You can do your own pedicure by soaking your feet in a bucket of warm water with a 1/2 cup Epsom Salts added. Relax and let the dry skin fall off. Use a pumice stone to remove the remaining dead skin, and then rub coconut oil into your feet to soften them. I wear socks so I won’t fall from the slippery oil on my bare feet. It really helps with those cracked heels in the summertime.

    4. It is great for splinters….soak and then remove the splinter ever so carefully with clean tweezers.

    5. Gout can be treated by soaking your foot in as hot as the water can be and still be comfortable, along with 1/4 cup Epsom Salts. Soak the foot for about thirty minutes. This will help ease the discomfort of a sore foot.

    6. Sprains can be treated by following the instructions for gout. The water with the Epsom Salts seems to ease the discomfort of the sprained ankle or foot.

    7. Athlete’s Foot is treated by soaking the feet in warm water with 1/4 cup Epsom Salts for about 30 minutes. Drain the water, clean the container and repeat if necessary.

    8. Gardens are benefited by preventing slugs when you sprinkle some Epsom Salts around where you do not want the slugs to enter near your garden plants.

    9. Epsom Salts is a natural insecticide….sprinkle lightly around your plants to keep those plant pests away.

    10. Keep your lawns green with 2 tablespoons to one-gallon water and spray onto your lawn. Cheap way to keep your lawn healthy and green.

    11. Fertilize your houseplants. Sprinkle a little each week to keep them healthy and keep the pests away. (high in nitrogen, phosphorus & potassium)

    12. Make your own hand wash with baby oil and Epsom Salts. Soothes dry chapped fingers and knuckles.

    13. Clean your bathroom tile with equal amounts of Epsom Salts and your favorite liquid detergent, use a rag to just wipe away the grime.

    14. Add a tiny amount (about 1/4 teaspoon give or take) to your regular face cleansing cream and wash your face as usual. It feels fabulous!

    15. Fungus toenail or fingernail can be treated by soaking the infected nail(s) in hot water mixed with Epsom Salts at least three times a day.

    If you have other ideas please comment. I would love to add them to my list. We all learn from each other. The really nice thing about Epsom Salts is the fact that they are fairly inexpensive to purchase and store in your food storage stash or pantry.

    Epsom Salts:

    You can buy them everywhere even on Amazon:

    Copyright Pictures:

    Epsom Salts Picture: AdobeStock_184642748 by Kvladimirv

    First Aid Kit by Linda

    Survival Food Storage by Linda

    The post 15 Reasons Why I Store Epsom Salts appeared first on Food Storage Moms.

    Survival Debate: 9mm or .45

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    Lets open this intro up in saying that both rounds will kill and both rounds will protect. There is no better way to get a community arguing than when you start talking about which gun is better, which knife is better, which caliber or which bag is better. These are serious topics that bring the …

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    How to Not Die While Wildcrafting: 15 Rules for Foraging Safely

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    Walking out into the forests or fields and coming back with an armload of food and medicine is a rewarding experience. With every new plant you learn to identify and use, you become more empowered to care for yourself and your family. You also become less dependent on—and less vulnerable to—big, corporate entities. But this expanding freedom also comes with the responsibility of ensuring your own safety.

    Poisonous plants exist. Some of them look like the good plants. Some plants are good or bad, depending on the quantity. And even the safest plants can harm if harvested from a contaminated environment.

    I want to help you maximize your rewards while minimizing your risks. That’s why I am presenting you with 15 rules for safe wildcrafting. The more experienced you become, the more you’ll see exceptions to the rules and know when to ignore them. But I advise the novice to follow them all, because nobody wants to become a cautionary tale.

     

    1) Go Slowly

    The No. 1 rule with any new plant is to go slowly. You can have allergies and intolerances to wild plants, just like you can to conventional foods. The first couple of times you sample a plant, use a small portion. Also, you should only try one new plant at a time. This way, if you have a reaction, you’ll know which plant caused it.

    2) Talk to a Local Expert

    Local experts will often know little tips and tricks that the books and websites won’t mention, and they will have specific knowledge about how the plants look and behave in your area.

    If you can’t find an expert in your area, books and websites are an acceptable way to learn wildcrafting. However, they can’t warn you if you’re about to make a mistake. Use caution and consult multiple sources to minimize your risks.

    3) Don’t Eat a Plant Just Because Someone Said It Was Okay

    I really hope this one goes without saying. If you watch someone harvest it, prepare it, and eat it—and if they’re still alive the next day—then maybe you could try a little.

    4) Know Your Environment

    Physical hazards include thorns, holes, ledges, wild animals, moving vehicles, quicksand, and volcanoes. Just keep your eyes open and don’t stick your hands and feet anywhere you won’t be able to see them.

    Chemical hazards can be a bit trickier to detect. Don’t wildcraft from locations that get sprayed with herbicides or pesticides. (If you don’t know, ask. You don’t want to eat that stuff.)

    Avoid foraging beside busy roads. When it rains, the ditches are irrigated by vehicle-waste runoff. Many municipalities will also spray herbicides along the sides of rural roads. Apparently, this saves money compared to running the mowing trucks. But it also ruins many lightly trafficked areas that I would otherwise love to forage from. Areas around trash storage, treated wood, and industrial waste should also be avoided.

    Only harvest plants from pure waterways. Streams and rivers can carry dangerous waste for miles.

    Respect private property. Don’t go foraging around someone’s house after dark. Getting mistaken for a burglar and shot would just ruin your evening. And why were you foraging in the dark, anyway?

    Lastly … you know what poison ivy and poison oak look like, right?

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Poison Ivy

    5) Use All of Your Senses    

    How does the plant look? What patterns do you see? What colors? What’s the overall shape? How does it feel? (Rough? Smooth? Fuzzy?) What does it smell and taste like? (Ideally, you would be reasonably sure it wasn’t poisonous before tasting it, or even touching it.) Does it have a peculiar sound? Yes, plants can have telltale sounds.

    6) If a Plant Doesn’t Match, Don’t Use It

    Sometimes you’ll come across a plant that looks ALMOST right, but something doesn’t quite fit. You may have found a subspecies or variation. Then again, it might be a dangerous look-alike. It’s best just to leave that one alone until you can get a firmer identification.

    7) Avoid Plants With White Sap

    This one has a number of exceptions. Some plants, like dandelions, are perfectly safe. Others might be safe once they’ve been correctly prepared. But as a general rule, if a plant has white sap, leave it alone.

    8) Avoid Plants With White Berries

    This rule has almost no exceptions. Plants with white berries are plants that do not mess around. Don’t even touch them.

    9) Be Humble With Umbels

    If you see a plant with umbels,1)Umbel: A flat, disk-shaped, or umbrella-shaped cluster of flowers. you’d better be 110% sure of what it is before you harvest and use it. Elderberry, yarrow, and carrots all form umbels, and they’re great. Poison hemlock has umbels, too, and it will render you in the permanent past tense.

    Unfortunately, a lot of these plants will look very similar. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t ever wildcraft them, but you should probably build up your skills on safer plants first. When you’re ready for the umbels, double-check their characteristics every single time.

    No matter how smart you are or how much experience you have, anyone can poison themselves if they get cocky or careless. Do yourself a favor and be humble with the umbles. 

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Umbels

    10) Be 115% Sure About Mushrooms

    Mushrooms take the term “poisonous” as a personal challenge. Some of them, like the death cap mushroom, reportedly taste good. To make things worse, mushroom look-alikes can be very tricky to tell apart.

    On the flipside, mushrooms are delicious and a lot of fun. They can be wildcrafted safely, if you choose the right type. Some mushrooms, like morels and puffballs, are reasonably safe for beginners to gather. Just exercise due caution, research their appearance and look-alikes, and go out with an experienced guide until you get the feel for it.

    11) If It Looks Like an Onion AND Smells Like an Onion, It’s an Onion

    This rule works for garlic too, but the plant you find has to both look and smell oniony or garlicy. There are some dangerous look-alikes, but none of them are also “smell-alikes.”

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Wild Onion

    12) All Mustards Are Edible

    You can find mustards (Brassicaceae family) all over the world, and they’re all edible. Great. So what does a mustard look like? The surest way to identify them is by the bloom. All mustard family plants have 4 petals and 6 stamens2)Stamen: The pollen-producing reproductive organ of a flower. (4 tall and 2 short). The flowers are often small, so you may need a magnifying lens. Some members of this family may be too spicy to eat in any quantity.

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Mustard Family Bloom

    Read More: “Mustard Greens: What You Need to Know Before You Grow (With Recipe)”

    13) If It Looks Like a Mint AND Smells Like a Mint, It’s an Edible Mint

    Mints (Lamiaceae family) usually have square stems and opposite3)Opposite: A leaf pattern in which leaves appear in pairs, on opposite sides, of a stem. leaves. These leaf pairs will rotate back and forth 90 degrees as they move up the stem. If a plant looks like a mint, but doesn’t smell minty, avoid it. It might be fine. It might not.

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Lemon Balm

    14) Seeing an Animal Eat It Does Not Make It Safe

    Animals can eat a lot of things that would make us sick or dead. They usually know what’s good for them. They don’t know what’s good for us. Don’t copy the animals.

    15) Experience Trumps Theory

    It may be very helpful to watch a video or read a book about wildcrafting. But until you’ve actually gone out to harvest and use a plant yourself, you can’t rely on that skill. Issues will often come up that books and videos can’t prepare you for. Theory is great for laying a foundation of knowledge, but experience is the ultimate teacher.

    Whether the grid goes down or you just have a kid with a tummy ache, do you want to know that you’ve read about it in a book or that you’ve successfully harvested and used these plants before?

    Conclusion

    Hopefully, this guide has encouraged you, rather than scaring you off. Wildcrafting is a wonderful way to empower yourself, and it’s just a really fun way to spend an afternoon. If you follow the rules, and use a bit of common sense, you’ll come back in one piece.

    What are your favorite plants to wildcraft? Do you have any tips that I missed? Let me know in the comments, and we can get a good plant talk going.

     

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    _______________________________________________________

    Psst! Our Lawyer Wants You to Read This Big, Bad Medical Disclaimer –> The contents of this article, made available via The Grow Network (TGN), are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice; the Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should seek immediate medical attention. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information provided by TGN. Reliance on any information provided by this article is solely at your own risk. And, of course, never eat a wild plant without first checking with a local expert.

    _______________________________________________________

     

    References   [ + ]

    1. Umbel: A flat, disk-shaped, or umbrella-shaped cluster of flowers.
    2. Stamen: The pollen-producing reproductive organ of a flower.
    3. Opposite: A leaf pattern in which leaves appear in pairs, on opposite sides, of a stem.

    The post How to Not Die While Wildcrafting: 15 Rules for Foraging Safely appeared first on The Grow Network.

    How to Not Die While Wildcrafting: 15 Rules for Foraging Safely

    Walking out into the forests or fields and coming back with an armload of food and medicine is a rewarding experience. With every new plant you learn to identify and use, you become more empowered to care for yourself and your family. You also become less dependent on—and less vulnerable to—big, corporate entities. But this expanding freedom also comes with the responsibility of ensuring your own safety.

    Poisonous plants exist. Some of them look like the good plants. Some plants are good or bad, depending on the quantity. And even the safest plants can harm if harvested from a contaminated environment.

    I want to help you maximize your rewards while minimizing your risks. That’s why I am presenting you with 15 rules for safe wildcrafting. The more experienced you become, the more you’ll see exceptions to the rules and know when to ignore them. But I advise the novice to follow them all, because nobody wants to become a cautionary tale.

     

    1) Go Slowly

    The No. 1 rule with any new plant is to go slowly. You can have allergies and intolerances to wild plants, just like you can to conventional foods. The first couple of times you sample a plant, use a small portion. Also, you should only try one new plant at a time. This way, if you have a reaction, you’ll know which plant caused it.

    2) Talk to a Local Expert

    Local experts will often know little tips and tricks that the books and websites won’t mention, and they will have specific knowledge about how the plants look and behave in your area.

    If you can’t find an expert in your area, books and websites are an acceptable way to learn wildcrafting. However, they can’t warn you if you’re about to make a mistake. Use caution and consult multiple sources to minimize your risks.

    3) Don’t Eat a Plant Just Because Someone Said It Was Okay

    I really hope this one goes without saying. If you watch someone harvest it, prepare it, and eat it—and if they’re still alive the next day—then maybe you could try a little.

    4) Know Your Environment

    Physical hazards include thorns, holes, ledges, wild animals, moving vehicles, quicksand, and volcanoes. Just keep your eyes open and don’t stick your hands and feet anywhere you won’t be able to see them.

    Chemical hazards can be a bit trickier to detect. Don’t wildcraft from locations that get sprayed with herbicides or pesticides. (If you don’t know, ask. You don’t want to eat that stuff.)

    Avoid foraging beside busy roads. When it rains, the ditches are irrigated by vehicle-waste runoff. Many municipalities will also spray herbicides along the sides of rural roads. Apparently, this saves money compared to running the mowing trucks. But it also ruins many lightly trafficked areas that I would otherwise love to forage from. Areas around trash storage, treated wood, and industrial waste should also be avoided.

    Only harvest plants from pure waterways. Streams and rivers can carry dangerous waste for miles.

    Respect private property. Don’t go foraging around someone’s house after dark. Getting mistaken for a burglar and shot would just ruin your evening. And why were you foraging in the dark, anyway?

    Lastly … you know what poison ivy and poison oak look like, right?

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Poison Ivy

    5) Use All of Your Senses    

    How does the plant look? What patterns do you see? What colors? What’s the overall shape? How does it feel? (Rough? Smooth? Fuzzy?) What does it smell and taste like? (Ideally, you would be reasonably sure it wasn’t poisonous before tasting it, or even touching it.) Does it have a peculiar sound? Yes, plants can have telltale sounds.

    6) If a Plant Doesn’t Match, Don’t Use It

    Sometimes you’ll come across a plant that looks ALMOST right, but something doesn’t quite fit. You may have found a subspecies or variation. Then again, it might be a dangerous look-alike. It’s best just to leave that one alone until you can get a firmer identification.

    7) Avoid Plants With White Sap

    This one has a number of exceptions. Some plants, like dandelions, are perfectly safe. Others might be safe once they’ve been correctly prepared. But as a general rule, if a plant has white sap, leave it alone.

    8) Avoid Plants With White Berries

    This rule has almost no exceptions. Plants with white berries are plants that do not mess around. Don’t even touch them.

    9) Be Humble With Umbels

    If you see a plant with umbels,1)Umbel: A flat, disk-shaped, or umbrella-shaped cluster of flowers. you’d better be 110% sure of what it is before you harvest and use it. Elderberry, yarrow, and carrots all form umbels, and they’re great. Poison hemlock has umbels, too, and it will render you in the permanent past tense.

    Unfortunately, a lot of these plants will look very similar. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t ever wildcraft them, but you should probably build up your skills on safer plants first. When you’re ready for the umbels, double-check their characteristics every single time.

    No matter how smart you are or how much experience you have, anyone can poison themselves if they get cocky or careless. Do yourself a favor and be humble with the umbles. 

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Umbels

    10) Be 115% Sure About Mushrooms

    Mushrooms take the term “poisonous” as a personal challenge. Some of them, like the death cap mushroom, reportedly taste good. To make things worse, mushroom look-alikes can be very tricky to tell apart.

    On the flipside, mushrooms are delicious and a lot of fun. They can be wildcrafted safely, if you choose the right type. Some mushrooms, like morels and puffballs, are reasonably safe for beginners to gather. Just exercise due caution, research their appearance and look-alikes, and go out with an experienced guide until you get the feel for it.

    11) If It Looks Like an Onion AND Smells Like an Onion, It’s an Onion

    This rule works for garlic too, but the plant you find has to both look and smell oniony or garlicy. There are some dangerous look-alikes, but none of them are also “smell-alikes.”

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Wild Onion

    12) All Mustards Are Edible

    You can find mustards (Brassicaceae family) all over the world, and they’re all edible. Great. So what does a mustard look like? The surest way to identify them is by the bloom. All mustard family plants have 4 petals and 6 stamens2)Stamen: The pollen-producing reproductive organ of a flower. (4 tall and 2 short). The flowers are often small, so you may need a magnifying lens. Some members of this family may be too spicy to eat in any quantity.

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Mustard Family Bloom

    Read More: “Mustard Greens: What You Need to Know Before You Grow (With Recipe)”

    13) If It Looks Like a Mint AND Smells Like a Mint, It’s an Edible Mint

    Mints (Lamiaceae family) usually have square stems and opposite3)Opposite: A leaf pattern in which leaves appear in pairs, on opposite sides, of a stem. leaves. These leaf pairs will rotate back and forth 90 degrees as they move up the stem. If a plant looks like a mint, but doesn’t smell minty, avoid it. It might be fine. It might not.

    Wildcrafting Foraging Safely - Lemon Balm

    14) Seeing an Animal Eat It Does Not Make It Safe

    Animals can eat a lot of things that would make us sick or dead. They usually know what’s good for them. They don’t know what’s good for us. Don’t copy the animals.

    15) Experience Trumps Theory

    It may be very helpful to watch a video or read a book about wildcrafting. But until you’ve actually gone out to harvest and use a plant yourself, you can’t rely on that skill. Issues will often come up that books and videos can’t prepare you for. Theory is great for laying a foundation of knowledge, but experience is the ultimate teacher.

    Whether the grid goes down or you just have a kid with a tummy ache, do you want to know that you’ve read about it in a book or that you’ve successfully harvested and used these plants before?

    Conclusion

    Hopefully, this guide has encouraged you, rather than scaring you off. Wildcrafting is a wonderful way to empower yourself, and it’s just a really fun way to spend an afternoon. If you follow the rules, and use a bit of common sense, you’ll come back in one piece.

    What are your favorite plants to wildcraft? Do you have any tips that I missed? Let me know in the comments, and we can get a good plant talk going.

     

    Subscribe to TGN's bi-weekly newsletter

    _______________________________________________________

    Psst! Our Lawyer Wants You to Read This Big, Bad Medical Disclaimer –> The contents of this article, made available via The Grow Network (TGN), are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice; the Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should seek immediate medical attention. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information provided by TGN. Reliance on any information provided by this article is solely at your own risk. And, of course, never eat a wild plant without first checking with a local expert.

    _______________________________________________________

     

    References   [ + ]

    1. Umbel: A flat, disk-shaped, or umbrella-shaped cluster of flowers.
    2. Stamen: The pollen-producing reproductive organ of a flower.
    3. Opposite: A leaf pattern in which leaves appear in pairs, on opposite sides, of a stem.

    The post How to Not Die While Wildcrafting: 15 Rules for Foraging Safely appeared first on The Grow Network.

    Everything You Need to Know To Grow a Big Crop of Cucumbers

    Click here to view the original post.

    Nothing beats the summer heat like a fresh cucumber from the garden. These sun-loving vegetables are great for first-time gardeners and easy to grow.

    Pickling cucumbers, like Boston Picklers are prolific when they get going and are perfect for canning, but slicing cucumbers are best for salads. Did you know that cucumbers have electrolytes and are high in potassium? So they’re a wonderfully refreshing snack to help you beat the Summer heat!

    Here are some cucumber growing facts:

    • For one person, plant two to three plants in the garden.
    • On average, one cucumber plant produces two to three pounds of fresh cucumbers.
    • For square foot gardeners, all you need are two plants per square foot.
    • Did you know you can grow cucumbers inside for year-round cucumbers? Planting in a greenhouse or area of the home where cross-pollination cannot take place is best.

    Growing Tips for Lots of Cucumbers

    There are two methods you can use to grow cucumbers:

    Starting cucumbers indoors

    Cucumbers can be started indoors in peat pots or small flats and transplanted in a few weeks to the garden. The best time to start seeds is three to four weeks before the last frost. Plant 1 seed per pot in moist soil and place in a sunny window. Seeds should emerge within a few days. Give cucumbers plenty of sun and lots moisture until 3-4 true leaves grow. Begin hardening off cucumber plants by setting them outside for a few hours each day until they are used to extended hours of sunlight.

    When young plants are ready to be moved to the garden, wait to plant in the ground until soil temperatures reach 70 degrees F and take extra care to protect young cucumbers from frost.

    Directly sow seeds in the garden

    Cucumbers prefer well-drained, warm, fertile soil. Two weeks after the last frost in your area, plant your cucumber seeds about 1 inch apart, and about 1/2″ deep. You can either make a hole in the dirt and drop the seeds into it, or you place the seeds on top of the soil and gently press them in. If the soil is moist and warm, the seedlings will pop out of the ground in a matter of days. Ensure that young plants are protected from any unexpected weather. Row covers or hot caps (or plastic milk cartons with the caps removed) will help keep cucumbers safe if there is an unexpected bout of weather.

    Four weeks after planting, when the first blossoms begin to grow, side-dress plants with compost or a tablespoon of all-purpose organic fertilizer in a narrow band along each plant.

    To make the most efficient use of your garden space, many gardeners train cucumbers to climb up a trellis or garden netting. This saves precious garden space and also keeps the fruit from touching the soil and introducing soil-borne pathogens.

    Harvest

    Harvest is 50 to 70 days from planting. Since cucumbers are part of the squash family, they love to be picked! In fact, the more you pick cucumbers, you encourage them to produce and will prolong the growing season. A cucumber is normally considered ripe when it is bright medium to dark green and firm. When you are ready to pick the fruit, use scissors to cut them from the vine. The vines are delicate and can be damaged if the fruit is pulled off.

    Once picked, the cucumbers are ready to eat or can be placed in the refrigerator for up to a week.

    Troubleshooting Cucumbers

    Not enough water – If subjected to stress, cucumbers can become bitter. To minimize this, provide cucumber plants with adequate moisture. On average, cucumbers need 1-2 inches of water per week. Soaker hoses near cucumbers can ensure they are getting ample amounts of water. Mulching can also reduce stress and ensure there is moisture in the soil.

    Too much heat – This is a tough one, especially during summertime. Cucumber blossoms can drop off the plant if they are subjected to too much heat. Providing filtered afternoon sun to growing cucumbers will help them during the hottest parts of the day. Growing taller plants like sunflowers or having a bean tower to shade the cucumbers could be a big help. As well, shade cloth is another option.

    Nutrient Imbalance – Sometimes when there are not enough nutrients in the soil, cucumbers will turn from green to yellow. A yellow cucumber can also be the result of a virus or too much water.

    Striped cucumber beetle – If you are noticing your cucumber plants beginning to wilt, it could be as a result of the striped cucumber beetle. When this specific beetle begins eating the tender leaves, there are bacteria present in their mouth and they transfer this to the plant causing the leaves to wilt. Placing sticky traps near the cucumber plant will trap the striped cucumber beetle. As well, planting nasturtiums and adding wood ashes near the plants are effective against cucumber beetles.

     

     

    This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

    Everything You Need to Know To Grow a Big Crop of Cucumbers

    Nothing beats the summer heat like a fresh cucumber from the garden. These sun-loving vegetables are great for first-time gardeners and easy to grow.

    Pickling cucumbers, like Boston Picklers are prolific when they get going and are perfect for canning, but slicing cucumbers are best for salads. Did you know that cucumbers have electrolytes and are high in potassium? So they’re a wonderfully refreshing snack to help you beat the Summer heat!

    Here are some cucumber growing facts:

    • For one person, plant two to three plants in the garden.
    • On average, one cucumber plant produces two to three pounds of fresh cucumbers.
    • For square foot gardeners, all you need are two plants per square foot.
    • Did you know you can grow cucumbers inside for year-round cucumbers? Planting in a greenhouse or area of the home where cross-pollination cannot take place is best.

    Growing Tips for Lots of Cucumbers

    There are two methods you can use to grow cucumbers:

    Starting cucumbers indoors

    Cucumbers can be started indoors in peat pots or small flats and transplanted in a few weeks to the garden. The best time to start seeds is three to four weeks before the last frost. Plant 1 seed per pot in moist soil and place in a sunny window. Seeds should emerge within a few days. Give cucumbers plenty of sun and lots moisture until 3-4 true leaves grow. Begin hardening off cucumber plants by setting them outside for a few hours each day until they are used to extended hours of sunlight.

    When young plants are ready to be moved to the garden, wait to plant in the ground until soil temperatures reach 70 degrees F and take extra care to protect young cucumbers from frost.

    Directly sow seeds in the garden

    Cucumbers prefer well-drained, warm, fertile soil. Two weeks after the last frost in your area, plant your cucumber seeds about 1 inch apart, and about 1/2″ deep. You can either make a hole in the dirt and drop the seeds into it, or you place the seeds on top of the soil and gently press them in. If the soil is moist and warm, the seedlings will pop out of the ground in a matter of days. Ensure that young plants are protected from any unexpected weather. Row covers or hot caps (or plastic milk cartons with the caps removed) will help keep cucumbers safe if there is an unexpected bout of weather.

    Four weeks after planting, when the first blossoms begin to grow, side-dress plants with compost or a tablespoon of all-purpose organic fertilizer in a narrow band along each plant.

    To make the most efficient use of your garden space, many gardeners train cucumbers to climb up a trellis or garden netting. This saves precious garden space and also keeps the fruit from touching the soil and introducing soil-borne pathogens.

    Harvest

    Harvest is 50 to 70 days from planting. Since cucumbers are part of the squash family, they love to be picked! In fact, the more you pick cucumbers, you encourage them to produce and will prolong the growing season. A cucumber is normally considered ripe when it is bright medium to dark green and firm. When you are ready to pick the fruit, use scissors to cut them from the vine. The vines are delicate and can be damaged if the fruit is pulled off.

    Once picked, the cucumbers are ready to eat or can be placed in the refrigerator for up to a week.

    Troubleshooting Cucumbers

    Not enough water – If subjected to stress, cucumbers can become bitter. To minimize this, provide cucumber plants with adequate moisture. On average, cucumbers need 1-2 inches of water per week. Soaker hoses near cucumbers can ensure they are getting ample amounts of water. Mulching can also reduce stress and ensure there is moisture in the soil.

    Too much heat – This is a tough one, especially during summertime. Cucumber blossoms can drop off the plant if they are subjected to too much heat. Providing filtered afternoon sun to growing cucumbers will help them during the hottest parts of the day. Growing taller plants like sunflowers or having a bean tower to shade the cucumbers could be a big help. As well, shade cloth is another option.

    Nutrient Imbalance – Sometimes when there are not enough nutrients in the soil, cucumbers will turn from green to yellow. A yellow cucumber can also be the result of a virus or too much water.

    Striped cucumber beetle – If you are noticing your cucumber plants beginning to wilt, it could be as a result of the striped cucumber beetle. When this specific beetle begins eating the tender leaves, there are bacteria present in their mouth and they transfer this to the plant causing the leaves to wilt. Placing sticky traps near the cucumber plant will trap the striped cucumber beetle. As well, planting nasturtiums and adding wood ashes near the plants are effective against cucumber beetles.

     

     

    This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

    Use Honey To Heal Summertime Cuts and Scraps

    Click here to view the original post.

    Honey is one of nature’s most miraculous dressings for burns, ulcers, and even open wounds. The good news is that you can use honey to heal. The best news is that

    use honey to heal summertime cuts and scrapes

    Honey can be used to heal many summertime injuries.

    honey is very easy to use.

    Now that the weather in 2018 has finally warmed up, more of us are outside working in our gardens, farms and around the house. Along with all the new activity usually comes cuts, burns and even severe wounds

    This time of year doctors usually see a rise in outdoor injuries because folks aren’t ready to get back at outdoors work after spending a long winter inside with
    For cuts, scrapes and minor punctures, honey is a no-brianer. This means having a jar in your medicine kit.

    For deeper wounds and abscesses, clean up the injury site thoroughly. I always use tea tree oil for this. Then use honey to heal by filling the would cavity. Next, use a dressing pad to keep out dirt and other infections as well as to keep the honey at the wound site.

    Changing the dressing once daily is usually all that’s required. If the wound generates a significant amount of drainage, then more frequent changes may be necessary. Rule of thumb: Change the dressing once every five days until the drainage stops.

    I love honey because it’s inexpensive and readily available. The gauze dressing pads will cost you more than the honey. Some of the best and least expensive dressing pads are panty liners and sanitary napkins. Many manufacturers now have an adhesive backing, which makes them even more convenient.

    Finally, Don’t purchase over-processed (almost always overheated and over filtered) honey found in your grocery store. A much better option would be to use raw, unheated honey from a local farmer or health food store. Always shop “local” if you can. There’s usually a beekeeper in every community.

    The post Use Honey To Heal Summertime Cuts and Scraps appeared first on Off The Grid News.

    Use Honey To Heal Summertime Cuts and Scraps

    Honey is one of nature’s most miraculous dressings for burns, ulcers, and even open wounds. The good news is that you can use honey to heal. The best news is that

    use honey to heal summertime cuts and scrapes

    Honey can be used to heal many summertime injuries.

    honey is very easy to use.

    Now that the weather in 2018 has finally warmed up, more of us are outside working in our gardens, farms and around the house. Along with all the new activity usually comes cuts, burns and even severe wounds

    This time of year doctors usually see a rise in outdoor injuries because folks aren’t ready to get back at outdoors work after spending a long winter inside with
    For cuts, scrapes and minor punctures, honey is a no-brianer. This means having a jar in your medicine kit.

    For deeper wounds and abscesses, clean up the injury site thoroughly. I always use tea tree oil for this. Then use honey to heal by filling the would cavity. Next, use a dressing pad to keep out dirt and other infections as well as to keep the honey at the wound site.

    Changing the dressing once daily is usually all that’s required. If the wound generates a significant amount of drainage, then more frequent changes may be necessary. Rule of thumb: Change the dressing once every five days until the drainage stops.

    I love honey because it’s inexpensive and readily available. The gauze dressing pads will cost you more than the honey. Some of the best and least expensive dressing pads are panty liners and sanitary napkins. Many manufacturers now have an adhesive backing, which makes them even more convenient.

    Finally, Don’t purchase over-processed (almost always overheated and over filtered) honey found in your grocery store. A much better option would be to use raw, unheated honey from a local farmer or health food store. Always shop “local” if you can. There’s usually a beekeeper in every community.

    The post Use Honey To Heal Summertime Cuts and Scraps appeared first on Off The Grid News.

    What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2018-05-05)

    Click here to view the original post.

      This weekly post is an open-forum, though preferably focusing on what we all did this week for our prepping & preparedness. Comment and voice your thoughts, opinions, accomplishments, concerns, or questions for others on any general topic of preparedness. This weekly open-forum is for any off-topic conversation during the week. Keep up to date with recent comments from ALL articles.   ( Support Modern Survival Blog ) Important: To help assure that we stay on-the-air: 1. If you’re running an ad blocker, add ModernSurvivalBlog.com to your whitelist. Revenue from our ads help bring you this free premium content. 2.

    Original source: What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2018-05-05)

    What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2018-05-05)

      This weekly post is an open-forum, though preferably focusing on what we all did this week for our prepping & preparedness. Comment and voice your thoughts, opinions, accomplishments, concerns, or questions for others on any general topic of preparedness. This weekly open-forum is for any off-topic conversation during the week. Keep up to date with recent comments from ALL articles.   ( Support Modern Survival Blog ) Important: To help assure that we stay on-the-air: 1. If you’re running an ad blocker, add ModernSurvivalBlog.com to your whitelist. Revenue from our ads help bring you this free premium content. 2.

    Original source: What did you do for your preparedness this week? (2018-05-05)

    Budget Friendly Survival Kit

    Click here to view the original post.

    A popular new trend in the prepper community–which I really like–is using gadget pouches and tool rolls to make survival kits and bug out bags. It makes perfect sense because, rather than digging through a bag and struggling to find what you’re looking for, you can just unroll the pouch or roll and immediately see […]

    The post Budget Friendly Survival Kit appeared first on Urban Survival Site.

    Combating Cyber Warfare

    Click here to view the original post.

    Combating Cyber Warfare
    Micheal Kline “Reality Check” Audio player below!

    Are you afraid of being hacked by a nation state bent on Cyber Warfare? Have you ever been the victim of a hack attack, Ransomware, or identity theft? Join me on the next Reality Check as we discuss Cyber security.

    This week we will be talking about some common sense things you can do to stay safe online like keeping a reliable anti-virus up-to-date, keeping your OS updated, not clicking on links in emails, changing your online passwords on a regular basis, using complex passwords or passphrases, making regular backups of your data, and putting a freeze on your credit reports.

    Continue reading Combating Cyber Warfare at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

    Combating Cyber Warfare

    Combating Cyber Warfare
    Micheal Kline “Reality Check” Audio player below!

    Are you afraid of being hacked by a nation state bent on Cyber Warfare? Have you ever been the victim of a hack attack, Ransomware, or identity theft? Join me on the next Reality Check as we discuss Cyber security.

    This week we will be talking about some common sense things you can do to stay safe online like keeping a reliable anti-virus up-to-date, keeping your OS updated, not clicking on links in emails, changing your online passwords on a regular basis, using complex passwords or passphrases, making regular backups of your data, and putting a freeze on your credit reports.

    Continue reading Combating Cyber Warfare at Prepper Broadcasting Network.