Preparing to go backpacking looking for travel buddies

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Hi, Im mike 29 years old currently a student at university of phoenix I live in southern california, I have never felt that I fit in in the city it is not for me. I have worked hard my whole life only to see others prosper and take advantage of my kind hearted nature, no biggie. point is I am planning to leave here after I finish my current course and take off with only what items I put in my sack and a winning attitude.  My plan: Simple, I plan to backpack across the country maybe not all of it maybe all of it I am undecided, during which time I plan to possibly do odd jobs or sell items for extra cash when needed. I plan to document my experience and share it with the world, My goal is to prove that you do not need a ton of money to survive or live comfortably, in the end I plan to save money, buy land and build an off grid community for people who are looking to get away and start new like me. I welcome and encourage any and all who are interested in foregoing this adventure with me to do so.

If you are interested you may contact me by email at Free2BM388@gmail.com for more information.

You do not have to be super experienced or experienced at all, a great team is comprised of parts that work together like a well oiled machine. 

     Thank you all and good day!!

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Filling in the garden.

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I have about 120 days of growing season before the frost date of October 10th, so I’m sowing seed of plants and herbs in the new beds.  This next week I want to add some herbs, onions, chives along with some root veggies in the ‘cole’  crop bed. So far I have added brussel sprout starts, but it looks like some of my celery died. The lettuce looks okay after watering though I may need to adjust the cloth to protect the plants from the afternoon sun.

This year’s garden is not about production, though I want to have fresh veggies. My focus is making an easy to maintain garden for the future.  I will be adding a user friendly sit down ledge around all of the raised bed.  The new fence is not ‘Tucker the peke’ proof as  he is going under the fence.  At least Tucker has not dug up any of the new plants! Heck, I may just surround the garden area with 2 layers of cinder blocks to keep the little dog from digging until I can build a proper fence.

Repairing Mom’s little chicken house: I added a little WD-40 to the bolts that are rusted that need to be removed.  The manufacture of this little chicken house was poor not because materials though they went cheap.  It would have been simple to paint all sides of the wood and seal it against weather and insects.  Why use 2 inch long bolt and wing nut in wood framing is less than an 1/2-3/4  inch thick?

While I  doubt the manufacturer thought about anyone taking a pattern or learning how to repair or learning how to use a spray paint gun.  That is my ‘project’ for this little chicken house.  I will learn how to make the house rigid,  try and repair flaking wood,  fix some bad stuff and give Mom a great little chicken house.  I get to practice on something that is basically considered a throw away project.

The front lawn is weed whacked and 1/2 is mowed. I can finish up the rest this weekend and if things work out I’ll get the alley way weeds cut down and the cheat grass bagged.

Over all a good day of work and I’m not ‘toast’.   If i’m physically up to it  this weekend I’ll add some onions and herbs to the garden beds, finish up cutting the grass and then attack the alley way weeds.  At worst I think I can get at least one of those jobs finished.

Free Form Friday- Travel, Get One Gun Right and Ammo

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Travel- I think travel is a good thing. It broadens the mind and gives perspective. Americans travel very little compared to other affluent countries. In part because we travel more within our country because it is awesome and huge but also because we seem to be a xenophobic bunch and just stay here. I think that is probably not a good thing for our country.

If you pay some attention to the news, apply common sense about where you go and take basic stuff with you I do not think we need to forgo travel in order to be prepared. If you don’t want to travel or travel anymore, that is fine. What I am saying is that if you want to travel assuming you don’t have really stupid ideas like backpacking in Syria/ Afghanistan then you can go on the trips you want without excessive worry.

I have a post on travel related preparations in mind.

It is important to get things at least relatively squared away for one gun before running out and getting another. The reason is that once you get the new one the focus will shift away from the other one; which will make it even less likely that you get it sorted out in a timely manner. It is important and I suck at doing it. Not saying you need to have every accessory in the world a hundred mags and 10,000 rounds of ammo but getting the gun operational with basic necessary accessories sights if applicable, sling, holster and some sort of initial amount of mags n ammo is prudent. I am trying to get better.

This was brought to light recently in a conversation with a buddy. He isn’t a full on survivalist but has some of those tendencies. In the same conversation (we were talking shooting) he mentioned needing to finish a 1/4 built AR and also that he had like 100 rds of 5.56 for the AR he has and a couple mags worth of ammo for his Glock. I tried to get him to focus on putting back at least a bit more ammo before attacking the project.

That brings us to ammo levels. The folks at American Partisan did a post on that. It was good.

Begin tangent
If you looked at preparedness and the not exactly militia but “III” crowd the circles are definitely concentric. I am solidly on the preparedness side. I am ambivalent about the “III” thing for a few reasons not worth going into. There are some decent folks there but its not my scene. In any case when the folks in the Ven diagram overlap between preparedness and “III” want to talk preparedness stuff I am more than happy to participate.
End tangent

That got me to thinking about combat loads as well as amounts of mags and ammo I consider adequate. It made me go back and rethink the numbers I have been using. I will write about this soon. You may or may not care what Ryan thinks is adequate but showing the process of my thinking may bring value.

 

Prism Ceramic Science 315w CMH Kit Review

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The post Prism Ceramic Science 315w CMH Kit Review is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Today, we’re taking a look at a complete lighting kit from my friends over at GrowersHouse. I’ve talked about ceramic metal halide lights in-depth before, but realize that they might be a bit expensive for most growers to get started with. On top of that, the form factor of the bulbs isn’t friendly for those … Read more

The post Prism Ceramic Science 315w CMH Kit Review is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Prism Ceramic Science 315w Light Kit Review

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The post Prism Ceramic Science 315w Light Kit Review is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

Today, we’re taking a look at a complete lighting kit from my friends over at GrowersHouse. I’ve talked about ceramic metal halide lights in-depth before, but realize that they might be a bit expensive for most growers to get started with. On top of that, the form factor of the bulbs isn’t friendly for those … Read more

The post Prism Ceramic Science 315w Light Kit Review is by Kevin and appeared first on Epic Gardening, the best urban gardening, hydroponic gardening, and aquaponic gardening blog.

More Power Grid Issues

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When we need it the most – early mornings and evenings in summer and winter, our solar resources are useless and the nature of wind resources frequently means that many wind assets are idle.”

Mr. Howell said Tomago had been forced to switch off all of its potlines at one point or another during the week.

A lack of reserve power within the National Electricity Market on Tuesday evening required an urgent 300-megawatt power reduction. On Thursday evening, the same-sized reduction was needed again and the two remaining potlines were switched off for an hour each.

Read More

 

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Donald Trump: No White House invitation for Cavs’ LeBron James, Warriors’ Steph Curry or teams

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President Donald Trump told reporters Friday morning that he will not invite the Cleveland Cavaliers or Golden State Warriors to visit the White House following the conclusion of this year’s NBA Finals.

Cavaliers forward LeBron James and Warriors guard Stephen Curry said their teams had no interest in a prospective White House visit.

“I didn’t invite LeBron James, and I didn’t invite Steph Curry. We’re not going to invite either team,” Trump told reporters before departing for Canada, where he will participate in the G7 Summit.

Read More

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Hawaii volcano’s toll nears 600 homes destroyed by lava; no end in sight

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The number of homes and structures destroyed by lava on Hawaii’s Big Island has jumped to nearly 600 — making the Kilauea eruption the most catastrophic event in modern state history, Hawaii County Mayor Harry Kim said Thursday.

Kim, who lost his own home to the devastating magma march that began in May, has been pushing for more funding to help thousands of displaced residents.

That help came Thursday after Hawaii Gov. David Ige signed a memorandum of understanding that freed up $12 million in immediate disaster relief to the island. The money covers overtime pay for police, fire, public works and civil defense personnel. It also provides funds for equipment needed for evacuations and rebuilding.

Read More

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Get Better, Faster, by Failing at Three Gun Competitions

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For preppers, guns can be just another thing on a checklist. Not everyone is a dedicated firearms owner or someone who practices at the range on a regular basis. There is also the reality that time and money to invest in guns can be in short supply for many people. When it comes to prepping …

Continue reading

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What Big Data Companies Don’t Want You To Know About Internet User Agreements

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user agreements

Most of us are careless when it comes to signing and accepting internet user agreements.

Have you ever signed or accepted one of the many user agreements for online shopping, financial services, or social media? If so, then you may have already given up some important privacy rights without realizing it.

Heres why:

Almost all user agreements we sign daily give big companies the unlimited power to violate our rights, Medium writer Woodrow Hartzog revealed.

“User agreements are a legal and ethical trap, and they betray the trust of users from the very start,” Hartzog wrote. Sadly, almost everyone has to sign agreements like this to do almost everything these days. In fact, even those who try to live an off-the-grid lifestyle are in a bind. They often find themselves signing the agreements simply to shop online or get a smartphone. The gadgets and services that make it easier for many of us to live off-grid often require user agreements.

How User Agreements Require You To Sign Away Your Rights

Ironically, user agreements started as a means of protecting individual privacy back in the 1990s. The hope was that the agreements would make consumers more aware of companies’ policies and offer a degree of protection. The problem is that almost nobody reads these privacy agreements. Many of them are, in fact, deliberately written to confuse and bore you into complacency.  User agreements, for the most part, have created loopholes. These loopholes have allowed Big Tech to legally sell your data, track you, and violate your privacy. “To this day, these agreements largely exist to legally protect companies and not necessarily to ‘fully inform’ users in an intelligible way,” Hartzog wrote. The companies use the information collected to build massive databases, the contents of which can be sold for big money.

More Valuable Than Gold?

Such consumer data is so valuable that German entrepreneur Dr. Christian Lange has labeled it the “Oil of the 21st Century.”  Lange believes that consumer data might be more valuable than oil or gold, which gives businesses like Facebook a big incentive to trample your rights.
Big Data knows that most of us will not read the user agreements, which are long and have “gotcha clauses,” in which you sign away your privacy.

Back in 2016, researchers at York University created a fake user agreement that asked subjects to give up their first born child to join a fictional social network called “Namedrop.” Around 71% of the users signed the agreement without reading it, Ars Technica reported. Note: The signers were supposedly parents with children. Interestingly, these parents were taking a communications class at the university at the time. (That should make you smile)
Researchers convinced people to sign their kids away by making it long and hard to read. Furthermore, the “gotcha clause” was buried deep in the agreement. Some experts believe it would take the average person 25 days to actually read the contract they signed in a few minutes.

Protecting Your Rights From User Agreements

Always reading the fine print is still one of the best ways to protect your rights in today’s world. Limiting the information you post on social media or give to big companies is also a great idea. You can also add protection by utilizing sites that comply with the General Data Protection Regulations. The GDPR is a European Union law that restricts what big business can do with your data.

Even though the GDPR is not legal here, U.S. companies will have to follow it to do business in Europe. Doing business with companies that adhere to the GDPR rules might give you more protection, but loopholes abound, so be cautious. Everybody that uses the internet and modern technology should understand that you have probably already signed away your rights in some sense. Getting those rights back is going to be one of the most significant challenges of the 21st Century. We should also attempt to stay one step ahead of the data miners.

You may also enjoy reading: Google’s New Policy Allows It To Track You Like Never Before (But Here’s How To Fix It)

Or download our free 40-page report: Surveillance Nation

To dig even deeper check out the book: Underground Privacy Secrets

Do you have any thoughts or tips about avoiding data mining and the loss of privacy? If so, leave your comments below.

The post What Big Data Companies Don’t Want You To Know About Internet User Agreements appeared first on Off The Grid News.

Preparing for High Probability Disasters

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Fernando,

Have not chatted with you in awhile so after viewing your volcano info thought I would say Hey. I live in the shadow of Mt. St. Helens and Mt. Rainier in WA state. Volcano country. Of course I am more concerned about earthquake here where we are told it is only a matter of time, not if, The Big One hits. It is constantly amazing to me to see the vast majority of the population continually reminded of the potential threat of natural disaster but they shrug their shoulders and look the other way. I’ve concluded that it is just too much for the average person to grasp the threat and include responsible preparation into their lives. Just too overwhelming to cope with the thought that “it could happen to me”. It is human nature I suppose. Some people will argue with a Stop sign. Other people don’t bother to recognize a Stop sign. Many folks just believe in the back of their mind, if anything terrible should happen, help will be on the way. Those are the ones. Those are the victims. There are always survivors and there are always victims. So many people by nature just seem to find comfort in allowing themselves to nestle down into the comfort zone of “it won’t happen to me”, and if it does, rescuers will save me. To those who believe that I say, good luck.

The first video clip is mind blowing. Trying to imagine the lava spewing hour after hour, 24/7 is something I have trouble comprehending.

Cheers,

Pete

.

Hello Pete, Thanks for sharing your experience.

Free PDF: Fuel Gas From Cow Dung

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Fuel Gas From Cow Dung was dedicated to the millions of villagers in the Himalayan kingdom of Nepal whose need for fuel as been the author’s sole reason for writing it. With that Dedication to third world energy resources, you know it is a CD3WD document. About the Author: “Rev. Saubolle is the pioneer of biogas in Nepal. His oil drum plant, built in 1960 at St. Xavier’s School in Godavari, twenty kilometers south-east of Kathmandu, was used for boiling tea, which “Father” offered to his guests. The biogas plant offered brilliant demonstration of fuel from waste long ‘before it

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Hawaii Volcano Update June 8 — After the Calm, Another Swarm, then another 5+

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After yesterdays “calm day”, the 2 to 3 range EQ started ramping up into a swarm, and then almost an
EQ every minute…..then early in the morning, another 5 plus.

This one was just 5.2, so it broke the trend of every increasing “big ones”.

After the big one, the EQ drops to about 1 per hour instead of 1 per minute.   Look at the time stamps on the subsequent EQ

USGS 0060818

 Here is a nifty livestream with a split view showing the Caldera (which is collapsing like a son a gun) and a down slope view showing amazing fountaining.

Guide to Wild Foods

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WHY I WROTE MY BOOKS:
Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants
cover-gwf-030314-GWF-mint, etc 021
[I’ll eventually share a synopsis of each of my books that are appropriate to this forum.]

[Nyerges’ “Guide to Wild Foods” book, originally published in 1978, was published in full color as of 2014. The book, now titled “Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants,” is available at bookstores, Amazon, and at www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com. It has been adopted for use as a college textbook in one college.]

My earliest interest in wild food began around 1967 as I began my awareness of the Native Americans who lived in Los Angeles County in the pre-Spanish era who gathered and hunted all their food. I wanted to learn how to do that too, because I thought I would be a good survival skill, and mostly because I thought it was one of the most essential things a person could do, anywhere, at any time.

I studied all I could from the local library, and by enrolling in botany classes in high school and then college. I made the effort to study with whomever I could, when the opportunities arose: Native Americans, Amish, gardeners, botanists, bums — whoever knew about plants and was willing to share their knowledge with me.

By 1974, I was asked to lead Wild Food Outings with the Los Angeles-based non-profit, WTI, whose focus was to educate in all aspects of survival. I fit in well, and not only led the walks (and continued to this day) but started work on a book about local wild foods. It took the next four years of typing and researching and asking questions and compiling notes, but finally my stacks of seemingly-random notes were taking shape into a book.

My notes consisted of various piles of paperwork that I stacked around my bedroom, and which I finally began to order when I started a typesetting job at the Altadena Chronicle. The editor, Sue Redman, allowed me to write a column each week which I called “The Emergency Plant Survival Guide,” which was eventually assembled into a photocopied 8 ½ x 11 format. In many ways, I wrote the book for myself, as a way to assemble my own diverse notes and experiences about using plants for food, and other uses.

By then, I’d met and began studying with botanist Dr. Leonid Enari, who really opened my eyes to the vast botanical world “out there.” Dr. Enari – who I call the greatest botanist that no one knows — was instrumental in shaping that very crude first edition of what we then called “A Southern California’s Guide to Wild Foods.”

The second edition, completely revised, came out within another two years or so, and then soon another revised edition with more plants being added each time.

At the time, there was no other book like this one which appealed to the common useful plants in the Southern California area. There were a few academic books, though they didn’t appeal to the person who wanted to actually try these plants. And there was no internet then, so all my research was done in libraries or with first-person interviews, or spending all day to get somewhere just so I could learn one new fact about one plant.

The fourth edition was released in 1995, and in many ways this was my favorite version since all the plants drawings were painstakingly done in my own hand. But today, everyone wants color photos.

Finally, in the spring of 2014, the book was released in full color, which is perhaps the ultimate format we’d dreamed about in the mid-1970s when the idea for this book was formulated.

One of my greatest surprises came one morning while listening to the old American Indian hour on Pasadena City College Radio. Dorothy Poole, aka Chaparral Granny, was talking about the uses of certain local wild plants. As I listened, it sounded vaguely familiar. I quickly pulled out my copy of “Guide to Wild Foods” and opened to the plant she was talking about. Imagine my surprise to see that she was reading directly from my book! I felt honored that she felt my compilation and personal commentary was worthy of sharing on the American Indian hour.

The book helps the beginner understand the basic botanical terminology, and quickly shows the reader how to best utilize many of the common wild plants for food, medicine, soap, etc.

Many of the plants listed in the book are not native, and are considered invasive weeds. They are the plants that gardeners love to pull up and toss in the trash, or worse, to spray Roundup on them so they don’t come back.

It turns out that some of the wild foods are more nutritious than much of what we find in the supermarket. And they taste good too, if you simply take the time to learn how to prepare them.

In “Guide to Wild Foods,” you learn that the brown pod from the carob trees planted all over Southern California are edible, and are an excellent source of calcium and B vitamins.

You also learn that dandelion is the richest source of beta carotene (not carrots), and that purslane is the richest plant source of Omega 3 fatty acids, and that the common lambs quarter is like nature’s mineral tablet.

The book includes many of the Native American uses of plants, such as the yucca plant which was a valuble soap and fibre source, as well as three types of food. And you learn about many of the natural cures to poison oak, including the seemingly unusual treatment that I’ve done for the past 30 years.

Now titled “Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants,” it is available at Amazon, at bookstores, and at www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com.

“Tunnel 16” — a Pasadena-based science fiction novel

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WHY I WROTE MY BOOKS

“Tunnel 16” [part one of the Tunnel series]

By Christopher Nyerges

[Nyerges is the author of many, including “Tunnel 16,” “Sinkhole 102,” “Enter the Forest,” “Extreme Simplicity,” and others.  He has also been teaching ethnobotany for many years, in the field and classroom.  Information about his books and classes is available from  www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com. 

I’ve always wanted to try writing a novel.  I’ve even tried a few times, but I either didn’t have the patience to take it all the way to the end, or I didn’t have the imagination for a cogent story.

Then one night I had a dream.  I was visiting a friend of mine up at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) complex in the foothills of Altadena.  Something was happening, and we were being chased by some unseen threatening entities.  We ran through what seemed to be underground parking structures, and after a while, the tunnels opened up into a green wilderness area where there were grassy plains and lots of trees.  In the dream, I knew I could run there and be safe. As I exited the JPL tunnel, I looked up and saw the number “16” embossed on the cement wall.  I don’t recall what happened next in the dream.

Later that day, I called my friend who works at JPL and asked, “Is there a tunnel 16 at your work site?”  “Hmmm?” my friend responded. “I don’t think so.”

Eventually, I was taken on a tour of JPL, and got to look at the Mars yard, and the entrances to various corridors and tunnels, but nothing like I saw in my dream.  Regardless, little by little, I created a young character, Rick, and told the tale of how Rick accidentally discovered the hidden and secretive tunnels of Altadena.

I used my knowledge of the physical terrain of Pasadena and Altadena to tell the story, so most of the locations actually exist.  Rick falls into the tunnel and the youth-focused science fiction story begins.

I attempted to incorporate nearly every myth and mystery of Pasadena that I’d ever heard into the novel.  In the tunnel, Rick encounters the holographic image of Jack Parsons in a side cave,  and Parsons gives Rick instructions for helping to resolve a civil war among an invisible race who live in the tunnel system.

Jack Parsons figures large as part of local lore  — he was one of the early developers of JPL, who had a dark side.  As a follower of Aleister Crowley, Parsons was known to hold satanic rituals in his South Orange Grove home. Additionally, Parson’s most famous roommate was one L.Ron Hubbard, who ran away with Parson’s girlfriend, and eventually founded Scientology. 

Other local lore includes the Angeles Forest as the so-called “forest of disappearing children,” and the shaman’s cave found by Dorothy Poole in Descanso Gardens. 

Rick begins to interact with a JPL security worker, Frank Landry, partly based on a real person, and Landry tries to unravel the mystery of the tunnel before having to report it to his superiors. 

Actual names and places are used throughout the book, which local residents will recognize.   Even famous skeptic Michael Shermer appears in this book, and also appears in the  “Sinkhole 102” sequel.

I enjoyed writing the book, and I was partly inspired by the fast-moving Hardy Boys novels, which I always enjoyed.

“Tunnel 16” is currently available from Amazon’s Kindle, for far less than you’d leave for a tip at a restaurant.  Downloads and hard copies will be available from www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com.

Survival Medicine Hour: Backcountry Safety, Doxycycline, Lyme Disease

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Survival Medicine Hour: Backcountry Safety, Doxycycline, Lyme Disease

SURVIVAL MEDICINE HOUR PODCAST

School’s out and a great way to teach your family survival basics is by taking them camping. The skills needed for successful camping are akin to those required for the activities of daily survival. Once learned, these lessons last a lifetime. There’s no greater gift that you can give young people than the ability to be self-reliant.

Camping trips create bonds and memories that will last a lifetime.  A poorly planned campout, however, can become memorable in a way you don’t want, especially if someone gets injured. Luckily, a few preparations and an evaluation of your party’s limitations will help you enjoy a terrific outing with the people you care about, and maybe impart some skills that would serve them well in dark times.

Plus, identifying a common summer infection, Lyme disease, that can have long-term effects. Treatment, prevention, and more, plus a discussion of a popular broad-spectrum antibiotic that treats Lyme and many other diseases, Doxycycline. Learn indications, side effects, dosing, and much more.

Plus, a discussion of an exaggerated form of a common pregnancy complaint: nausea and vomiting. When it’s excessive, it’s called hyperemesis and can cause dehydration, weight loss, and in austere settings, can become life-threatening.

All this and much more on the latest Survival Medicine Hour with Joe Alton MD and Amy Alton ARNP!

To listen in, click below:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/survivalmedicine/2018/06/08/survival-medicine-hour-backcountry-safety-doxycycline-lyme

Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

Joe and Amy Alton

Learn more about all of the above and 150 other medical topics with a copy of the award-winning Third Edition of the Survival Medicine Handbook, available at Amazon or at https://store.doomandbloom.net!

“Foraging Wild Edible Plants of North America”

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WHY I WROTE MY BOOKS

“Foraging Wild Edible Plants of North America”

WHY I WROTE MY BOOKS
“Foraging Wild Edible Plants of North America”
By Christopher Nyerges
[Nyerges is the author of many foraging books, including “Foraging Wild Edible Plants of North America,” “Guide to Wild Foods,” and others.  He has also been teaching ethnobotany for many years, in the field and classroom.  Information about his books and classes is available from  www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com. 
After the release of my first book (“Guide to Wild Foods”) in 1978, I was contacted by Stackpole Press in Pennsylvania who wanted to know if I could write a cookbook for them, based upon “Guide to Wild Foods.”  Of course, I said yes. 
So I took the plants from my book that are most common over most of North America, and began compiling all my recipes, as well as testing new ones.  In addition, I added various stories about cooking on the trail, and the types of gear and condiments you should always carry if you want a good meal.  Then I spent considerable time trying to come up with catchy names for the various recipes.  The result a year later was “Wild Greens and Salads.”  The book sold a few thousand copies a year and was never re-printed after the first edition.

Nearly 30 years later, I’d started writing foraging books for the Falcon Guides.  They were aware of my previous cook book, and wondered if I could revise it with full color photos and lots of new information.  Of course, I said yes.
I worked for another year to update the text, to delete some plants and to add new ones.  Also, I once again spent considerable time coming up with catchy names to the recipes, usually recalling the first time I tried the recipe.  This is somewhat ironic too, coming from a guy who hardly uses recipes, and generally just follows the basics of cooking that was taught to me by mother.  For those who wonder if there is actually any food value to plants found in the wild, there is a chart at the end of the book detailed the nutritional analysis of many of the wild foods in the book, based upon the USDA’s “Analysis of Foods.”  You’ll be amazed that wild foods are generally more nutritious than much of what you buy at the supermarket.
This revised book is called “Foraging Edible Wild Plants of North America,” focusing primarily on leafy greens for salads, soups, and other dishes.  (I could eventually do a sequel to this, about all the wild nuts and berries that are found widely in North America, not just in a given locale.)
I was really happy with the result, and the way the color photos turned out.  It’s 211 pages full of wild recipes, and various ways to use wild foods, their nutritional value, and the ways to process the plants, with full color photos of every plant. 
The books has lots of interesting recipes.  Those of you who have come to my wild food classes know the ways I prepared wild foods, so many of the recipes in this book will seem familiar.
Some of the recipes’ names incorporate some memory of when I first came up with that recipe: Chardon Crepes (from when I lived in Chardon, Ohio), Big Bend Breakfast (a cattail dish my brother and I cooked up in Texas), the David Ashley Special (a salad of wild greens devised by David, and I wonder if David even remembers this?), Crisptado Fantastico (my unique chickweed tostada), Chicory Hicory Dock (everyone’s favorite), Point Reyes Sunset (a curly dock and clam soup that we first made at Point Reyes Seashore), Altadena Meadows Casserole (a nettle dish that I’d make when I lived in the Meadows), Hahamongna Swamp Salad (that’s self-explanatory, right?), and Tongva Memories (a watercress soup).
EARTH BREAD
Perhaps my favorite recipes are the Lamb’s Quarter recipes, because I use that plant nearly every day, both the leaf and seed. It’s a relative of the now-popular quinoa. 
Lamb’s quarter can be made into salads, soups, stews, and even bread when you use the seed.  You might like my Earth Bread made from the seeds. From the reviews of those who have tasted it, some like it, some do not.
According to the book, “I’ve served this Earth Bread to many foragers and have had mixed responses. A few people did not like it and said it tasted like dirt. There have also been ecstatic responses from people who found the bread ‘virile,’ ‘deliciously wholesome and amazing,’ and ‘primitive.’”  You’ll have to try it for yourself and see what you think. 
Here is the recipe:
1 cup lamb’s quarter seed
1 cup acorn flour
3 tsp. Baking powder
3 Tablespoons honey
1 egg
1 cup raw milk
3 tablespoons oil
You blend everything and bake it until done. You can also water this down and use the batter for pancakes.
This book also has an introductory section which includes photos of Dude McLean cooking a broth in a cut-out yucca bowl, and Pascal Baudar making a wild mustard, and Gary Gonzales showing a miner’s lettuce leaf. 
The cheapest way to get a copy is through Amazon. The retail is $22.95, and you can also get an autographed copy at  www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com. 

By Christopher Nyerges

[Nyerges is the author of many foraging books, including “Foraging Wild Edible Plants of North America,” “Guide to Wild Foods,” and others.  He has also been teaching ethnobotany for many years, in the field and classroom.  Information about his books and classes is available from  www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com. 

After the release of my first book (“Guide to Wild Foods”) in 1978, I was contacted by Stackpole Press in Pennsylvania who wanted to know if I could write a cookbook for them, based upon “Guide to Wild Foods.”  Of course, I said yes. 

So I took the plants from my book that are most common over most of North America, and began compiling all my recipes, as well as testing new ones.  In addition, I added various stories about cooking on the trail, and the types of gear and condiments you should always carry if you want a good meal.  Then I spent considerable time trying to come up with catchy names for the various recipes.  The result a year later was “Wild Greens and Salads.”  The book sold a few thousand copies a year and was never re-printed after the first edition.

Nearly 30 years later, I’d started writing foraging books for the Falcon Guides.  They were aware of my previous cook book, and wondered if I could revise it with full color photos and lots of new information.  Of course, I said yes.

I worked for another year to update the text, to delete some plants and to add new ones.  Also, I once again spent considerable time coming up with catchy names to the recipes, usually recalling the first time I tried the recipe.  This is somewhat ironic too, coming from a guy who hardly uses recipes, and generally just follows the basics of cooking that was taught to me by mother.  For those who wonder if there is actually any food value to plants found in the wild, there is a chart at the end of the book detailed the nutritional analysis of many of the wild foods in the book, based upon the USDA’s “Analysis of Foods.”  You’ll be amazed that wild foods are generally more nutritious than much of what you buy at the supermarket.

This revised book is called “Foraging Edible Wild Plants of North America,” focusing primarily on leafy greens for salads, soups, and other dishes.  (I could eventually do a sequel to this, about all the wild nuts and berries that are found widely in North America, not just in a given locale.)

I was really happy with the result, and the way the color photos turned out.  It’s 211 pages full of wild recipes, and various ways to use wild foods, their nutritional value, and the ways to process the plants, with full color photos of every plant. 

The books has lots of interesting recipes.  Those of you who have come to my wild food classes know the ways I prepared wild foods, so many of the recipes in this book will seem familiar.

Some of the recipes’ names incorporate some memory of when I first came up with that recipe: Chardon Crepes (from when I lived in Chardon, Ohio), Big Bend Breakfast (a cattail dish my brother and I cooked up in Texas), the David Ashley Special (a salad of wild greens devised by David, and I wonder if David even remembers this?), Crisptado Fantastico (my unique chickweed tostada), Chicory Hicory Dock (everyone’s favorite), Point Reyes Sunset (a curly dock and clam soup that we first made at Point Reyes Seashore), Altadena Meadows Casserole (a nettle dish that I’d make when I lived in the Meadows), Hahamongna Swamp Salad (that’s self-explanatory, right?), and Tongva Memories (a watercress soup).

EARTH BREAD

Perhaps my favorite recipes are the Lamb’s Quarter recipes, because I use that plant nearly every day, both the leaf and seed. It’s a relative of the now-popular quinoa. 

Lamb’s quarter can be made into salads, soups, stews, and even bread when you use the seed.  You might like my Earth Bread made from the seeds. From the reviews of those who have tasted it, some like it, some do not.

According to the book, “I’ve served this Earth Bread to many foragers and have had mixed responses. A few people did not like it and said it tasted like dirt. There have also been ecstatic responses from people who found the bread ‘virile,’ ‘deliciously wholesome and amazing,’ and ‘primitive.’”  You’ll have to try it for yourself and see what you think. 

Here is the recipe:

1 cup lamb’s quarter seed

1 cup acorn flour

3 tsp. Baking powder

3 Tablespoons honey

1 egg

1 cup raw milk

3 tablespoons oil

You blend everything and bake it until done. You can also water this down and use the batter for pancakes.

This book also has an introductory section which includes photos of Dude McLean cooking a broth in a cut-out yucca bowl, and Pascal Baudar making a wild mustard, and Gary Gonzales showing a miner’s lettuce leaf. 

The cheapest way to get a copy is through Amazon. The retail is $22.95, and you can also get an autographed copy at  www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com. 

Attract Bees To Your Garden In These Eight Easy And Simple Ways

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attract bees

You can attract bees who will eagerly pollinate your plants and help create a beautiful and bountiful harvest.

If you have ever had trouble growing certain vegetables like cucumbers in your garden, it may not be the soil that is the problem. It is more than likely that you don’t have a good way to attract bees. Throw away the notion that bees are nasty, stinging critters. They are actually quite passive by nature and only sting in defense, when stepped on or threatened.

Bees, pollinating and good harvests all go hand-in-hand. One out of three bites of food depends on a pollinator (Creatures that move pollen from one plant to another, helping the plants create fruit or seeds. Bees are great pollinators.) Livestock also need pollinators for their food, as well as cotton and other fiber-producing plants. In total, 150 crops in the U.S. alone need pollinators. Those crops include apples, blueberries, melons, almonds, pears and citrus.

Bees tend to stay in an area if there is a constant source of food. You can make your garden a veritable buffet for these little friends. In turn, they will pollinate your vegetable plants.

How can we encourage bees to come to our gardens? Here are a few simple ideas to make our gardening season more productive and help bees at the same time.

1. Grow Diverse Plants – Plant a variety of plants with either successive or long-blooming cycles. This will not only help bees, but it will look good, too. You will want flowers blooming from spring to fall, so use plants of different heights, shapes, sizes and species. Although you want vegetables to grow, you also will need flowers to encourage more bees to come. Wide flowers like daisies, coneflowers and sunflowers are good ideas.

2. Avoid Pesticides – It is best to avoid all pesticides, even organic ones. They are still toxic to bees. Use non-toxic weed and bug controls such as manual removal. Do not use pesticides on open flowers or on bright sunny days when bees are around. The chemicals will sink into the ground and stick to plants. When bees land on the flowers, the chemicals will stick to them, too. If you need to spray, do so after dusk when pollinators are least active and the flowers have gone.

The Best Source For Non-GMO Heirloom Seeds Is Right Here!

3. Plant Color – Bees are most attracted to blue, yellow and purple blossoms. By planting flowers and vegetables that bloom in those colors, you can greatly increase the chances of bees visiting. You don’t have to plant flowers among your vegetables. You can plant a three foot by three foot area of flowers by, or around, your vegetable garden. This will get the attention of bees as well.

attract bees

You don’t need a hive, but some sort of shelter will encourage bees to stay.

4. Provide Shelter –You don’t need a hive, but some sort of shelter will encourage bees to stay. With the right materials, they will build themselves a home. Bumble bees dig little tunnels in dirt and stack them with pollen. Other types of bees use cracks in wood or branches. If you want bees to come, avoid covers or mulch, as it prevents bees from making a home. Try leaving a portion of the garden bed with no mulch, as the bees will go there to make homes and go through the vegetable garden for food. You can also let the yard become a little wild. Leave a small area unmowed, have a little bush pile and a bare patch of dirt.

5. Provide A Water Source – That’s right, bees need a drink of water once in a while. Provide them with a bird bath with stones for them to land on, or a small waterfall with rocks, a shallow pool, or a hose as a water source. Freshly watered potted plants (especially those potted plants using peat soil) tend to be a favorite drinking and resting spot for bees. Place the water near the garden.

6. Use Plants That Attract Bees – There are many plants that have both beautiful flowers and are tasty, too. The following plants will grow throughout the garden season: basil, thyme, watermelon, oregano, chives, pumpkins, mints, sage, berries, cucumbers, squash and tomatoes, among others.

7. Let Plants Flower – To encourage bees, leave the flowers on the plants. You can deadhead them so the bees can still get the nectar. When growing vegetables such as broccoli, you can harvest but still leave the plant whole. When you are done with it, let it flower for the bees.

8. Don’t Fear Weeds – Clovers, dandelions, milkweed, goldenrod and other flowering weeds are incredibly important to bees. By letting these weeds grow in or near your yard, you will be creating a safe place for bees right near your garden.

By planting even one patch of native wildflowers or flowering vegetables and herbs, you can attract bees who will eagerly pollinate your plants and help create a beautiful and bountiful harvest. Ultimately, you are building a safe haven for bees so they can help us create the wonderful and healthy vegetables we love.

You may also enjoy reading an additional Off The Grid News article: Honey Bees Dying? You Can Help By Starting Your Own Hive

Every Year Gardeners Make This Crazy Mistake. Read More Here.

What are other ways you attract bees to your garden? Share your tips in the section below:

 

The post Attract Bees To Your Garden In These Eight Easy And Simple Ways appeared first on Off The Grid News.

Wild Coffee Substitute- Foraging For Cleavers

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Can you imagine a life without coffee. Now we are talking about a serious apocalypse! If you have a family and children you know just how important it is to have that coffee break. Well, most coffees come from far far away. If we  see a fall in our society we will not be seeing …

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“Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants”

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WHY I WROTE MY BOOKS:

Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants

[Nyerges’ “Guide to Wild Foods” book, originally published in 1978, was published in full color as of 2014.  The book, now titled “Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants,” is available at bookstores, Amazon, and at www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com.  It has been adopted for use as a college textbook in one college.]

My earliest interest in wild food began around 1967 as I began my awareness of the the Native Americans who lived in Los Angeles County in the pre-Spanish era who gathered and hunted all their food.  I wanted to learn how to do that too, because I thought I would be a good survival skill, and mostly because I thought it was one of the most essential things a person could do, anywhere, at any time.

I studied all I could from the local library, and by enrolling in botany classes in high school and then college. I made the effort to study with whomever I could, when the opportunities arose: Native Americans, Amish, gardeners, botanists, bums — whoever knew about plants and was willing to share their knowledge with me.

By 1974, I was asked to lead Wild Food Outings with the Los Angeles-based non-profit, WTI, whose focus was to educate in all aspects of survival. I fit in well, and not only led the walks (and continued to this day) but started work on a book about local wild foods.  It took the next four years of typing and researching and asking questions and compiling notes, but finally my stacks of seemingly-random notes were taking shape into a book.

My notes consisted of various piles of paperwork that I stacked around my bedroom, and which I finally began to order when I started a typesetting job at the Altadena Chronicle.  The editor, Sue Redman, allowed me to write a column each week which I called “The Emergency Plant Survival Guide,” which was eventually assembled into a photocopied 8 ½ x 11 format.   In many ways, I wrote the book for myself, as a way to assemble my own diverse notes and experiences about using plants for food, and other uses.

By then, I’d met and began studying with botanist Dr. Leonid Enari, who really opened my eyes to the vast botanical world “out there.” Dr. Enari – who I call the greatest botanist that no one knows — was instrumental in shaping that very crude first edition of what we then called “A Southern California’s Guide to Wild Foods.”

The second edition, completely revised, came out within another two years or so, and then soon another revised edition with more plants being added each time.

At the time, there was no other book like this one which appealed to the common useful plants in the Southern California area.  There were a few academic books, though they didn’t appeal to the person who wanted to actually try these plants. And there was no internet then, so all my research was done in libraries or with first-person interviews, or spending all day to get somewhere just so I could learn one new fact about one plant.

The fourth edition was released in 1995, and in many ways this was my favorite version since all the plants drawings were painstakingly done in my own hand.  But today, everyone wants color photos. 

Finally, in the spring of 2014, the book was released in full color, which is perhaps the ultimate format we’d dreamed about in the mid-1970s when the idea for this book was formulated.

One of my greatest surprises came one morning while listening to the old American Indian hour on Pasadena City College Radio. Dorothy Poole, aka Chaparral Granny, was talking about the uses of certain local wild plants.  As I listened, it sounded vaguely familiar.  I quickly pulled out my copy of “Guide to Wild Foods” and opened to the plant she was talking about.  Imagine my surprise to see that she was reading directly from my book!  I felt honored that she felt my compilation and personal commentary was worthy of sharing on the American Indian hour.

The book helps the beginner understand the basic botanical terminology, and quickly shows the reader how to best utilize many of the common wild plants for food, medicine, soap, etc. 

Many of the plants listed in the book are not  native, and are considered invasive weeds. They are the plants that gardeners love to pull up and toss in the trash, or worse, to spray Roundup on them so they don’t come back.

It turns out that some of the wild foods are more nutritious than much of what we find in the supermarket. And they taste good too, if you simply take the time to learn how to prepare them.

In “Guide to Wild Foods,” you learn that the brown pod from the carob trees planted all over Southern California are edible, and are an excellent source of calcium and B vitamins.

You also learn that dandelion is the richest source of beta carotene (not carrots), and that purslane is the richest plant source of Omega 3 fatty acids, and that the common lambs quarter is like nature’s mineral tablet.

The book includes many of the Native American uses of plants, such as the yucca plant which was a valuble soap and fibre source, as well as three types of food. And you learn about many of the natural cures to poison oak, including the seemingly unusual treatment that I’ve done for the past 30 years.

Now titled “Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants,”  it is available at Amazon, at bookstores, and at www.SchoolofSelf-Reliance.com.

The Government WILL Take Your Supplies: Venezuela is Seizing Cattle and Inventory

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by J. D. Martinez D.

Something has been happening in Venezuela these last few days: the seizing of cattle, food, and staples from the production sites, by the so-called “authorities” … Read the rest

The post The Government WILL Take Your Supplies: Venezuela is Seizing Cattle and Inventory appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

What Do You Know About Hunting Blinds

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What Do You Know About Hunting Blinds
What Do You Know About Hunting Blinds

 

What Do You Know About Hunting Blinds?

Today I have a guest post for you on hunting blinds. I don’t know a lot about them but my guest will give us a solid starting platform. 

If you’re looking for one of the coolest activities you might even enjoy, then check out ground blind hunting. It’s pretty awesome and for more than one reason. For starters, you’ll be at eye level with wildlife like deer.

Types Of Stands

Ground blind hunting is something that comes in many forms. You can build one from available natural vegetation, or you could use something more obvious that’s constructed using artificial materials.

 

Hunting from treestands is not uncommon across the Midwest and Southeast states. What’s not to like about it? The elevation of being up in a tree means you get better views and you have better views. Your shot angle will be different if you’re bowhunting, but then again, that’s par for the course according to allcampingstuff.com.

 

Box blinds can either be ground level or elevated, but in either case, they provide robust concealment. Add a few things like carpet or even noise-dampening foam on the window sills, and you can have a clink or clunk now and then without penalty.

 

To me, personally, ground blinds are a retro thing, harkening back to yesteryear when hunters did things like stump-sitting, long before the outdoors industry took over everything. You would put on your hunting clothes, get your gun, and then go sit on one stump for a while. You might even find a brush pile to cuddle up into for a day.

 

Ground blinds are what I love hunting from. Finding a great little hole to hide in meant whipping up a quick blind using clippers and assorted limbs set up against a tree. Portable blinds can be put up for better concealment. Each one works, although today’s portable blinds can be rather nice, given their space and their fast assembly using a hub-spoke model.

 

Tips For Ground Blinds

 

If you intend to hunt using a portable ground blind, I do have a few suggestions you can use to get the upper hand:

 

1) Brush Things In: Even when you’re enclosed, take some time to brush your blind in using the available natural vegetation around you. A good saw or even a pair of hand pruners can trim limbs that you can lay on top of the blind and around your sides. A lot of the current market models even have external loops you can use to attach vegetation.

 

2) Avoid Scents: Even when enclosed, have great scent-control products you can use inside your blind, as well as on your clothes and boots. Hose everything down with them if you’re not going to bother being enclosed.

 

3) It’s Not A Cloaking Device: Even though you’re sitting inside a pop-up ground blind and the sun has set, you’re not free to jump around, dance, or twerk. Some movement is okay, but stay calm and quiet. The behavior of a whitetail is rather keen and quick, so you can’t afford to take chances when setting things up. As you make your blind, clear out leaves, limbs, and anything and everything that might break, snag, snap, rustle, or otherwise make noise.

 

4) Hunt With The Appropriate Wind: Some wisdom from tree stands still applies to any area you enter intending to use a ground blind. You certainly need to know the direction of the wind. Either pick the best possible route of entry, or just hunt a different day. If your blind is an enclosed one, then you might be able to just get away with things.

 

5) Stay Comfortable: Hunting in a ground blind doesn’t need to mean personal suffering. Let the kids bring a game or even their iPhone. So a sleeping bag and snacks might also be essential if they’re with you. Comfortable chairs can mean a world of difference too.

 

6) Keep Your Options Open: One aspect of ambush hunting I personally love when on the ground is the power to move around fast should I need to make changes. What if the wind shifts? It’s time to move. Does the first ground blind have a snake in it? It’s definitely time to make a move. You might even get a text from a friend or relative who is taking his ATV across part of the land you’re on. As a result you’ll notice what direction the deer take off in as they hear the vehicle. Having options is always a good thing.

 

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Best Gun Builds for Preppers

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Best Gun Builds for Preppers Firearms are at the core of survival and prepping. Without some form of protection and a means to hunt food, you won’t make it in a survival situation. It’s that simple. For this simple reason alone, it’s easy to understand why preppers are so into guns and ammunition. This article […]

The post Best Gun Builds for Preppers appeared first on American Preppers Network.

Natural Diabetes Helpers That Optimize Metabolism And Pack On Muscle

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natural diabetes helpers

Even medical doctors are now advocating natural diabetes helpers

Just because you have been diagnosed with diabetes doesn’t mean that your life needs to be put on hold. Sure, there’s a bunch of expensive medications out there that you can take to help manage your diabetes, but there are also natural, less invasive ways to improve your condition.  Luckily, we are here to pull back the cover on natural diabetes helpers for your everyday life.

Switch Up Your Plate

If you’re fighting diabetes, namely Type 2, it’s most likely food that got you into this mess to begin with. Because of this, you might want to start eliminating these foods from your diets:

Refined Sugars – These rapidly spike blood glucose levels.

Cow’s Milk – We are the only mammals to not only drink milk past nursing but to drink another species’ milk. Casein in milk triggers inflammatory responses.

Alcohol – Alcohol increases blood sugar levels almost 50%.

Hydrogenated Oils – Like refined sugars, these oils have been treated and stripped of their nutritional value. In addition, in their wake lies much LDL cholesterol, which is the bad cholesterol behind diabetes.

Instead, you want to add natural diabetes helpers into your diet. That means you should incorporate these types of foods into your meals:

Healthy Fats – The truth of the matter is you need cholesterol. Healthy fats have high levels of HDL Cholesterol, which will balance out the LDL Cholesterol that leads to diabetes. A lot of these are oils. Just make sure the words “partially hydrogenated” and “refined” are nowhere on the bottle. Healthy fats include:

Fruit Oils like Avocado and Coconut
Grass-Fed Butter
Salmon
Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Foods Rich in Fiber – High fiber foods slow down glucose absorption. Therefore, your blood sugar won’t spike. Foods rich in fiber include:

natural diabetes helpers

Natural diabetes helpers can be very effective in metabolic control.

Whole or Sprouted Grains
Avocados
Seeds like Chia or Flax

Low Glycemic Foods – Foods with high glycemic indexes convert nutrients into sugar quicker than their lower glycemic counterparts. Try incorporating these natural diabetes helpers instead:

Organic, Grass-Fed, Lean Meat
Pasture-Raised Eggs
Berries
Wild-Caught Fish

Changing up the plate is the easiest way to invite more natural diabetes helpers into your daily routine.

Take Supplements

Even though food is the easiest and most effective of the natural diabetes helpers out there, sometimes what we consume on the plate is not enough. Taking supplements derived from natural ingredients is a great way to ward off diabetes. Some of the best supplements out there that act as natural diabetes helpers include:

Cinnamon – Lowers blood sugar while improving insulin sensitivity

Chromium Picolinate – Reduces cholesterol and triglyceride levels

Fish or Flax Oil – Chock full of Omegas and HDL Cholesterol

These are called supplements for a reason. You must take them in accordance with a diet outlined above to get the most out of these natural diabetes helpers.

Get Out And Exercise

The best natural diabetes helpers live within ourselves. Exercise has been shown over and over in studies to reduce chronic diseases such as diabetes. By getting up and going out, we can improve blood glucose control, preventing the onset of type 2 diabetes.

Also, exercise helps facilitate a healthy metabolism. This is done through burning fat while simultaneously packing on lean muscle. If running and lifting weights isn’t your thing, give yoga or spin class a try. Finding what you like best is the easiest way to introduce exercise into your daily routine.

You may also enjoy reading an additional Off The Grid News article: 7 Off-The-Grid ‘Superfruits’ That Fight Cancer And Diabetes

For a great book on dealing with diabetes in a crisis situation, read Off-The-Grid Diabetes.

Do you have any off-the-grid suggestions for fighting diabetes? Let us know in the comments below.

The post Natural Diabetes Helpers That Optimize Metabolism And Pack On Muscle appeared first on Off The Grid News.

The Single Mom Survival Series Part 2: Fortification

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The Single Mom Survival Series Part 2: Fortification

The Single Mom Survival Series Part 2: Fortification
Dane… “The Gunmetal Armory” Audio player provided!

On this outing of the Gunmetal Armory… we dive back into Single Mom Survival and prepping. Something many moms think about is how to protect their children… in every day life, and in a worst case scenario. Any sort of SHTF situation would present problems very few single mothers have prepared for or even come close to handling… but we are gonna help you with that.

Continue reading The Single Mom Survival Series Part 2: Fortification at Prepper Broadcasting Network.

Vegetable Garden Yields To Expect On Average Per 100′ Row

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How much will I get from my vegetable garden? If my garden rows are ‘x’ feet long (see chart below) how much yield should I expect? If you’re trying to figure out how much yield that you might get from your vegetable garden, I found a list from LSU AgCenter. I found the garden yield list while searching for how many ears of corn I might expect in my garden rows. I needed to figure that out first so I could estimate how many pints (or quarts) of home canning that may result.   Expected yields from a good vegetable

Original source: Vegetable Garden Yields To Expect On Average Per 100′ Row

Have You Considered Spare Parts for Your Preps?

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In our throw away world the idea of spare parts is almost laughable. Whether you know it or not you can call almost any appliance company and order parts. You can probably even order spare parts online! No one has spare parts for their appliances. We have been lulled into the dream of eternal prosperity …

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The Weapon of Next-to-Last Resort

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Written by Wild Bill on The Prepper Journal.

As Preppers we plan for the worst while hoping for the best, like all rational human beings. And as such I am a big fan of having redundant safety systems, something driven home during the many years I spent working on space systems like the Titan II and IV heavy lift systems, as well as the Atlas and Delta space lift vehicles, and all aspects of their launch control systems.  So I always have a backup and I know, the choices for a back-up gun are endless as there are so many short barreled autos available in impressive calibers, but here is a thought:
  • This is my go-to gun if I am ever very up close and personal, and may have lost my primary weapon (empty, taken from me, jammed). This is specifically for when I can tell by the smell how long it has been since he showered, I can see how long since he brushed his teeth by the food still in his gums and I have to focus on the fact that he is now even less concerned with his personal grooming than he is with making me dead. But it is what I might not be able to see that drives my decision. He may have my head in a bear hug and I can’t see the stroller behind him or the person rushing to my aid who is just a few feet away, neither of which do I want to shoot.

So I want something that never misfires, doesn’t get jammed because I can’t clear the ejection port or slide from his body or the ground or my body, and I want to put as many rounds into him as I can to MAKE HIM STOP! Hence my choice of a small caliber wheel gun.

I know I will get the comment that the cylinder can be restricted by the bodies pressing against it. Maybe, I haven’t though of a safe way to test this theory. I also know how far a slide has to travel to eject a spent round and chamber a fresh one, again, assuming no body parts or the ground are going to foul its operation.

So I have my little Taurus DX 9-shot in 22 long rifle with a 1.5″ barrel. Clearly some people are not a fan due to rim fire vs center fire , and here is a good case for that – Say No to a 9-shot 22 lr. But not good enough for me as this is indeed my gun of last resort, and with my luck my only shot might be right at my other hand wrapped behind this guys head, grabbing his man-bun or his pony-tail or mullet if I am that far south, and I so don’t like shooting myself. I have tried to avoid doing that since I did it clearing my Daisy Red Ryder BB gun when I was 9 years old. It hurt, it was the palm of my left hand, and it hurt less than all the times I caught my fingers in the lever, but still.

  

So, in a simple test I shot 8 rounds at target panel 1 above in rapid fire from 15′, 8 rounds at target panel 6, again in rapid fire from 10′, and 8 rounds in rapid fire at target panel 5 at 5′. The double action performed well, no misfires and if you look at the picture at the start of the article of the Blazer ammo box you can clearly see that it had indeed spent too much time in my stash, near the bottom. The intended purpose of this gun is really to fire point-blank or after you have inserted the barrel into one of his orifices, any one, as this is no time to be choosy, or squeamish.

And, a side benefit of this weapon is it is a great “first” gun to teach people shooting. Small, light, easy to operate, not LOUD, doesn’t kick like a mule. A way to build some familiarity and comfort before moving onto other calibers. And 22 lr ammunition is again readily available (yet another reason to celebrate the deleting of all things Obama) and comparatively inexpensive.

Of course, ALWAYS remember to have an empty chamber under a resting hammer in any wheel gun. As for the doubters among you who scoff that a 22 LR isn’t “lethal enough” I present the case of Bella Twin who accomplished her kill with 22 longs, not long rifles.

Why yes, I do carry a knife, a Bastinelli, as the LAST weapon of resort, doesn’t everyone?

BTW, that Daisy Red Rider STILL shoots straight – you can tell by the number of pigeons and doves that end up in my recycle bin because they still don’t get the rule that defecating on my pool deck is a capital offense, even with the signs I posted. While I believe they may be recyclable I know for sure that they are biodegradable.  Be safe out there, and ready.

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Importance of an IFAK

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What may seem like a pretty self explanatory and simple idea may really blow you away. The reason it is important to understand the IFAK or individual first aid kit, is because you can find a variety of these on the market. You have to understand the contents of a good kit in order to …

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Vietnam Has a Plan to Win a War Against China. (And China Could Use It Against America)

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Military tactics can often be a part of a preparedness plan that fits itself into the collapse of an urban or suburban environment. When you are in the western hemisphere you are going to be under the stark realization that you are crushed by America. The American military is just so dominant that it is …

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Surviving One Year in Hell: Interview With Selco of SHTF School

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There are so many voices in the survival world. There are at least 20 sites that you should visit each and every day! That is truly something fantastic when you think about it. Each of these sites may offer a great article. Now, there is something else out there, too. What you will find is …

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How to Avoid Being Targeted by Looters During a Period of Civil Unrest

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This post was gladly contributed by Danny Major from Alpha Survivalist. There isn’t much any of us can do to stop a natural disaster or doomsday type scenario happening in our

The post How to Avoid Being Targeted by Looters During a Period of Civil Unrest appeared first on Ask a Prepper.

From Dinner to Detox: 15+ Ways to Get Healthy With Cleavers

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This article on cleavers is one in a series on growing a weed garden, and how to identify and use the plants commonly found there. Check out the rest of the series here.

Plants are great, right? But you don’t always have time to go out and harvest them. Life gets busy. That’s why, today, I am bringing you a plant that is so easy to harvest, it picks itself.

Cleavers 1

Cleavers (Galium aparine), also known as goosegrass, clivers, clingers, and a whole host of other names, is an annual weed, growing about 1 to 2 feet (30 to 60 centimeters) tall. It has square stems, with 6 to 8 small, lance-shaped leaves arranged in a whorl1)Whorl: A leaf arrangement of three or more leaves around a single point. at the nodes.2) Node: A point along a plant’s stem at which one or more leaves or branches can form. Certain plants can also grow roots at nodes.

Cleavers 2

Cleavers produce tiny white flowers with four petals each. These turn into tiny, round, green, dry, bristly, 2-lobed fruit.

The entire plant is covered in tiny, curved prickles. They don’t hurt to touch, though they do feel very rough when you run your hand over them. Some stories name cleavers as the inspiration for Velcro. The tactile sensations are very similar.

Cleavers 3

Most of the common names for cleavers come from its prickly nature . . . except goosegrass. That’s just from watching the birds eat it.

You’ll find this plant growing in rich, moist soil; in thickets, the woods, or waste spaces; and probably in your yard if you don’t mow often, like me. It likes to form clusters, if given half a chance, and will recline on whatever vegetation is around it.

Cleavers 4

This little guy didn’t come up in my weed garden, but he’s reaching over to drop his seeds into it for next year’s crop. That’s so neighborly.

Cleavers’ combination of weak stems and clinginess make it a marvelous self-harvesting plant. You walk by and brush up against it. Then it grabs hold of your pant leg and hitches a ride to drop its seeds off somewhere down the line. It’s not a bad reproductive strategy, given that you can find cleavers all over North America, Europe, and many of the other temperate regions of the world, including Australia. Cleavers can be found in Greenland, in all of the southern provinces of Canada, and in every U.S. state except Hawaii. (Chin up, Hawaii. You have pineapples.)

Cleavers has such a wide growing range that telling you their growing season becomes tricky. April to September would not be an unreasonable generalization. But like anything else, it depends. Down south, you’ll get them popping up and fruiting a lot sooner. Here in my Arkansas yard, they’re definitely through with the flowering stage and have set their seeds. Give it another month and most of them will be gone with the heat. In cooler climates, you might have them all through the summer.

Edible Uses for Cleavers

Cleavers can be used to make a caffeine-free coffee substitute. It’s supposed to taste just like coffee. They’re in the same family, so I guess that makes sense. Slow roast the seeds in your oven or on the stovetop until dark brown. They’re small, so watch that they don’t burn. Then, send them through your coffee grinder and prepare the grounds as you would regular coffee.

I’m not a fan, but I’m not a big coffee drinker to begin with. Give it a try, and then come back here to tell me what you think.

Other foragers will tell you how great the young shoots are when you cook them. Boil them for 10 to 15 minutes, then add them to omelets. Boil, then chill and add to salads. Enjoy the young tips raw, or boil and serve them with butter, etc.

I’m going to be honest with you: I’m not in with the majority here. I just don’t care for cleavers, raw or cooked. But I’ll tell you what I do enjoy. The juice! If you don’t have a juicer, just fill up your blender. Add a little water to help it get started, and then strain out the pulp when you’re done. Jelly straining bags work great. Or just use a clean sock. I won’t tell.

The juice doesn’t store well, so you’ll want to drink it right away. The taste is mild, green, and refreshing. Add a splash of lemon and apple juice to taste, and now you really have something special. The flavors mingle together and really complement one another. It’s a perfect drink for cooling down and reinvigorating yourself after a hard day of yard work.

Eat only the young shoots or growing tips. Ideally, you’d gather them before they flower. Older plants accumulate silica and are just too tough to eat. They’re still okay for juice and cleavers coffee, though.

Medicinal Properties of Cleavers

Cleavers are a general nutritive herb, and can be used safely for prolonged periods of time to support growth, renewal, and overall health.3)Hoffmann, David. Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2003.4)Gladstar, Rosemary. Rosemary Gladstars Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health. Pownal, VT: Storey, 2009. The aerial5)Aerial: The aboveground parts of a plant. parts are used medicinally.

One of the more common uses of this herb is as a gentle diuretic. It helps to flush out and sooth irritations of the urinary tract and kidneys.6)Foster, Steven, James A. Duke, and Steven Foster. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs of Eastern and Central North America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2000.7)Gladstar, Rosemary. Rosemary Gladstars Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health. Pownal, VT: Storey, 2009. Cleavers tea is often recommended for dissolving kidney stones and for other urinary issues.8)Chevallier, Andrew. Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine. London: DK/Penguin Random House, 2016.9)Elpel, Thomas J. Botany in a Day: Thomas J. Elpels Herbal Field Guide to Plant Families. Pony, MT: HOPS Press, 2004.

Cleavers are cooling herbs, useful for bringing down fevers and for helping skin conditions related to heat and dryness.10)Foster, Steven, James A. Duke, and Steven Foster. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs of Eastern and Central North America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2000.11)Hoffmann, David. Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2003.12)Gladstar, Rosemary. Rosemary Gladstar’s Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health. Pownal, VT: Storey, 2009. They are also strongly anti-inflammatory, which likely contributes to these successful uses.13)Hoffmann, David. Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2003.

They are often taken for diseases such as eczema, psoriasis, and seborrhea.14)Chevallier, Andrew. Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine. London: DK/Penguin Random House, 2016. Again, tea is a popular choice. Because this herb is gentle and safe, I would drink several glasses a day.

One of cleavers’ most impressive functions is as a liver protector. Most other liver herbs will support normal liver function or cleanse the liver, but cleavers has the ability to protect the liver from harm and to actually help the liver heal.15)Elpel, Thomas J. Botany in a Day: Thomas J. Elpels Herbal Field Guide to Plant Families. Pony, MT: HOPS Press, 2004. Herbs that do this are relatively few and far between, so it’s nice to make a mental note when you find one. (Milk thistle would be another example.)

Another equally impressive function of cleavers is as a lymph mover. It helps keep everything moving, clear swollen lymph glands, strengthen the immune system, and generally improve a wide range of lymphatic issues.16)Chevallier, Andrew. Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine. London: DK/Penguin Random House, 2016.17)Elpel, Thomas J. Botany in a Day: Thomas J. Elpels Herbal Field Guide to Plant Families. Pony, MT: HOPS Press, 2004.18)Deane. “Goosegrass, Cleavers, Bedstraw.” Eat The Weeds and Other Things, Too. December 17, 2017. Accessed May 13, 2018. http://www.eattheweeds.com/galium-aparine-goosegrass-on-the-loose-2/.19)Gladstar, Rosemary. Rosemary Gladstar’s Medicinal Herbs: A Beginners Guide. North Adams, MA: Storey Pub., 2012.20)Hoffmann, David. Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2003. It’s an excellent tonic for the whole lymphatic system.21)Hoffmann, David. Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2003.

In this respect, cleavers is much like pokeweed. But if you read my blog on that topic, you’ll remember that, while pokeweed is a powerful medicine, it doesn’t go out of its way to be user friendly. In fact, it’s quite dangerous. Cleavers offers a much safer alternative for this function, without sacrificing potency.

Read More: “Pokeweed: The Weed, the Myth, the Legend”

Cleavers’ detoxifying properties also give it a place in holistic cancer strategies.22)Foster, Steven, James A. Duke, and Steven Foster. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs of Eastern and Central North America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2000.23)Hoffmann, David. Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2003. This is especially true of the juice.24)Chevallier, Andrew. Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine. London: DK/Penguin Random House, 2016.

Older plants are a source of silica. Silica is a compound that aids the body in innumerable ways, many of which we may not yet understand.25)Martin, K. R. “The Chemistry of Silica and Its Potential Health Benefits.” Advances in Pediatrics. Accessed May 14, 2018. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17435951/.

In Alternatives to Dentists, Doug Simons talks about the importance of silica for tooth health. His plant of choice, however, is a specific species of horsetail (Equisetum hyemale). If you’d like to learn more about Doug’s tried-and-true method of healing teeth and keeping them healthy, click here.

Amounts and Methods

Common methods of application are tea, powder, tincture, and juice. Fresh juice is generally considered to be the most potent, though you could also make an argument for the tincture. The juice can be frozen in ice cube trays, as mentioned above, and saved for later in the year. (Incidentally, this happens to be a nice dosing size.)

Younger plants are more potent for most medicinal applications. Once they start to flower or form their fruit, their energy goes into reproduction, and they become less potent.

However, if you’re looking for silica, everything is backwards. Older plants have more silica than younger ones, so don’t harvest those tender young shoots. Wait until they’re too tough to eat. A lot of that toughness is the silica.

The preferred methods are backwards, too. Fresh juice is okay, but if you strain out the pulp, you’re losing a lot of the silica-rich body of the plant. Dried plant powder is best because it retains the full silica content. It can be made into tea, or stirred into liquid and swallowed whole.

The following amounts and frequencies are fairly general. Consult an herbalist if you’d like to tailor a protocol to suit your particular needs.

Tincture of Fresh Plant

1:2 ration in 25% alcohol. Use 1–2 dropperfuls, up to 4x daily.

Fresh Plant Juice

Drink 1–2 Tbsp. (or the equivalent of one ice cube), as needed.

Infusion

Use 2–3 tsp. of dried herb. Pour boiling water over it and steep for 10–15 minutes. Drink 3 times per day, or as needed.

Powder (For Silica)

Stir 1–2 tsp. of powder into water. Drink it, powder and all, once or twice a day.

Cleavers has no reported drug interactions.26)Hoffmann, David. Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2003. However, as a diuretic it could theoretically amplify the effects of diuretic drugs. Also, cases of contact dermatitis from touching the sap have occasionally been reported.27)Foster, Steven, James A. Duke, and Steven Foster. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs of Eastern and Central North America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2000.

What are your experiences with using cleavers as food and/or medicine? Do you have any tips beyond what I included in this article? Leave me a note in the comments below!

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Psst! Our Lawyer Wants You to Read This Big, Bad Medical Disclaimer –> The contents of this article, made available via The Grow Network (TGN), are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice; the Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should seek immediate medical attention. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information provided by TGN. Reliance on any information provided by this article is solely at your own risk. And, of course, never eat a wild plant without first checking with a local expert.

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References   [ + ]

1. Whorl: A leaf arrangement of three or more leaves around a single point.
2. Node: A point along a plant’s stem at which one or more leaves or branches can form. Certain plants can also grow roots at nodes.
3, 11, 13, 20, 21, 23, 26. Hoffmann, David. Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2003.
4, 7. Gladstar, Rosemary. Rosemary Gladstars Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health. Pownal, VT: Storey, 2009.
5. Aerial: The aboveground parts of a plant.
6, 10, 22, 27. Foster, Steven, James A. Duke, and Steven Foster. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs of Eastern and Central North America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2000.
8, 14, 16, 24. Chevallier, Andrew. Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine. London: DK/Penguin Random House, 2016.
9, 15, 17. Elpel, Thomas J. Botany in a Day: Thomas J. Elpels Herbal Field Guide to Plant Families. Pony, MT: HOPS Press, 2004.
12. Gladstar, Rosemary. Rosemary Gladstar’s Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health. Pownal, VT: Storey, 2009.
18. Deane. “Goosegrass, Cleavers, Bedstraw.” Eat The Weeds and Other Things, Too. December 17, 2017. Accessed May 13, 2018. http://www.eattheweeds.com/galium-aparine-goosegrass-on-the-loose-2/.
19. Gladstar, Rosemary. Rosemary Gladstar’s Medicinal Herbs: A Beginners Guide. North Adams, MA: Storey Pub., 2012.
25. Martin, K. R. “The Chemistry of Silica and Its Potential Health Benefits.” Advances in Pediatrics. Accessed May 14, 2018. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17435951/.

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Waste Disposal and Latrine Building Off The Grid

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Off-grid living, well that’s the considered luxurious life for us split-shift preppers, and for a good reason too! We don’t even need to begin to go into the great details here, they are absolute givens this day in age. In our darkest closets and crevices of our psyche, a few of us may even semi-hope … Read more…

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